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I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 5 December 2013

4pm

Waiheke Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke Island

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Paul Walden

 

Deputy Chairperson

Shirin Brown

 

Members

Becs Ballard

 

 

John Meeuwsen

 

 

Beatle Treadwell

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2013

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6210

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     The Esplande Survey - Lisa Henley                                                                   5

9.2     Waiheke Community Art Gallery Inc - Alex Stone, Linda Chalmers and Caroline Forsyth                                                                                                                  5

9.3     The Friends of the Hauraki Gulf group - Research towards a possible northern side marine reserve                                                                                                      6

9.4     Waiheke Island Community Planning Group Inc - Christopher Wragg         6

9.5     Feedback on Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan (HGMSP) process and Inner Islands' lack of representation - Ping Lee-Wragg                                                           6

9.6     Waiheke Community Shed Inc - Waiheke Community Shed representative 6

9.7     The Unitary Plan - Bernard Rhodes                                                                   6

9.8     Special Consultative Procedure for the time and season rule and access rules for dogs on Waiheke - Barbara Wilkinson                                                              6

9.9     Preserving wetlands, waterways and sites of ecological significance - Jacqueline Joseph and Flynn Washington from the Forest and Bird                               6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

            11.1   There is a Confidential notice of Motion                                                          7

12        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       9

13        Auckland Transport Report - December 2013                                                         11

14        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards -
For the quarter - 1 July to 30 September 2013                                                        
21

15        Waiheke Community Art Gallery Annual Report and Funding Agreement          59

16        Waiheke Community Funding Round Two 2013/14                                              145

17        Waiheke Local Board dog access review                                                               153

18        Marine Spatial Plan update                                                                                       157

19        Waiheke Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2013/2014                                                                                                                                     171

20        Rangihoua Wetland Restoration - Baseline Monitoring Results                         189

21        Infrastructure and Environmental Services Update Report                                 193

22        Parks, Sports & Recreation Quarterly Update to the Waiheke Local Board for Jul-September 2013                                                                                                         217

23        Waiheke Golf Club lease boundaries                                                                      223

24        Waiheke Local Board Local Board Plan Engagement                                          299

25        Draft Local Board Agreement

This report was not available at the time of printing this agenda and will be distributed under separate cover.

 

26        Local board members Portfolio Allocation, Urban Design Champion and Appointments to External Organisations and Community Networks                                               305

27        Adoption of meeting schedule                                                                                 321

28        Urgent Decision Process for the Waiheke Local Board                                       327

29        Establishment of Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption Committee                     329

30        Central Facility Partnerships Committee                                                                333

31        Central Joint Funding Committee                                                                           343

32        Cemeteries and Crematoria bylaw review                                                              355

33        List of resource consents                                                                                         359

34        Chairperson's Report - November 2013                                                                 365

35        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         367

36        Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings                                      373

37        For Information: Reports referred to the Waiheke Local Board                          385  

38        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

39        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               389

C1       Notice of Motion – Hearing Committee                                                                   389

 

 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

 

That the Waiheke Local Board confirms the minutes of its inaugural meeting, held on Saturday, 2 November 2013, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

 

9.1       The Esplande Survey - Lisa Henley

          Lisa Henley will be in attendance to address the Board on the Esplanade Survey. 

 

 

9.2       Waiheke Community Art Gallery Inc - Alex Stone, Linda Chalmers and Caroline Forsyth

          Waiheke Community Art Gallery Director Linda Chalmers, Chair Alex Stone and Committee Member Caroline Forsyth, will be in attendance to address the Board in support of the operational grant to the Waiheke Community Art Gallery Inc.

 

 

 

 

9.3       The Friends of the Hauraki Gulf group - Research towards a possible northern side marine reserve

          The Friends of the Hauraki Gulf group, will be in attendance to present to the Board  research towards a possible northern side marine reserve.

 

 

 

 

 

9.4       Waiheke Island Community Planning Group Inc - Christopher Wragg

          Christopher Wragg from the Waiheke Island Community Planning Group Inc, will be in attendance to present to the Board  on:
(i) comments on the notified Unitary Plan & landscape protection
(ii) comments on the notified Unitary Plan & Matiatia catchment overlay.

 

 

 

 

9.5       Feedback on Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan (HGMSP) process and Inner Islands' lack of representation - Ping Lee-Wragg

        Ping Lee-Wragg, will be in attendance to present to the Board on feedback on Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan (HGMSP) process and Inner Islands' lack of representation.

 

 

 

9.6       Waiheke Community Shed Inc - Waiheke Community Shed representative

        A Waiheke Community Shed representative, will be in attendance to present to the Board on the Waiheke Community Shed.

 

 

 

9.7       The Unitary Plan - Bernard Rhodes

        Bernard Rhodes, will be in attendance to present to the Board on the Unitary Plan.

 

 

9.8       Special Consultative Procedure for the time and season rule and access rules for dogs on Waiheke - Barbara Wilkinson

        Barbara Wilkinson, will be in attendance to present to the Board on the Special Consultative Procedure for the time and season rule and access rules for dogs on Waiheke.

 

 

 

9.9       Preserving wetlands, waterways and sites of ecological significance - Jacqueline Joseph and Flynn Washington from the Forest and Bird

        Jacqueline Joseph and Flynn Washington from Forest and Bird, will be in attendance to present to the Board on preserving wetlands, waterways and sites of ecological significance.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

11.1     There was no notice of Motion

 

Please refer to item C1 of the agenda

 

 

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Councillor's Update

 

File No.: CP2013/26714

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That standing order 3.9.14 be amended to allow the local Governing Body     Councillor, Mike Lee, to have speaking rights.

b)       That the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee,     be           received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Auckland Transport Report - December 2013

 

File No.: CP2013/26455

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport activities in the local board area.

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Waiheke Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.       In particular, this report provides an update on;

·         Local Board Capital Fund

·         Man O’War Bay Road

·         Owhanake Car Parking site Update

·         Mobility Parking Space Surfdale

·         Regional Footpath Programme

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receives the report.

b)      Advises Auckland Transport of decision on sealing of Man O’War Bay Road.

c)      Advises Auckland Transport of decision on Mobility parking space in Surfdale.

 

 

 

Discussion

Local Board Capital Fund

 

4.       On the 2 August 2012, the Strategy and Finance Committee resolved that $10 million  per annum of Auckland Transport capital funding be allocated to Local Boards on the basis of the population of their respective board areas.

5.       The exception was Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards, whose allocation was determined to be one percent and two percent of the annual fund respectively, as allocating on a pure population basis, would have resulted in a negligible level of funding for these boards. 

6.       The funds can be used for any local transport capital works project as long as it is technically deliverable, meets transport safety criteria, does not compromise the transport network and is not part of an asset renewal programme.

7.       The Local Board can bundle capital works projects, by carrying budget over to later years, or by bring budget forward from future years provided;

A)           It can be managed by Auckland Transport within its annual budget

B)           It is within the same electoral term

 

8.       Waiheke’s board allocation is $200,000.00 per annum.

 

Man O’War Bay Road, Sealing

 

9.       The Previous Local Board requested a costing, to seal Man O’War Bay Road, extension.

10.     The costing identified that significant geotechnical preparation work would need to be undertaken before any sealing could take place.

11.     Therefore the estimated cost for sealing was $815,554 (based on 1km length of road by 6m wide) this equates to approximately $136/m2.

12.     Discussions were held around the available Local Board Capital Board fund.

13.     At that time the Board had $200,000.00 available to them.

14.     $200,000.00 based on $136/m2 would cover approximately 245m of road. Attachment A.

15.     The Board decided to wait for the up-coming elections of the Local Board and for this subject to be discussed once a new Board was elected.

 

Owhanake Car Parking Site Update

 

16.         As previously reported the temporary over flow car parking site at Owhanake is currently owned by Watercare.

17.         Auckland Transport and Watercare have been in discussions regarding the proposed leasing of the site on a long term basis.

18.         Auckland Transport and Watercare have since agreed on terms and conditions and a lease is to be signed this month.

19.         Once signed Auckland Transport will then consider improvements required to maximise the full potential of this site as a permanent parking area and will liaise with the Board on this .

20.         Any improvements made will be based on available budgets. 

 

Mobility Parking Space Surfdale

 

21.         Auckland Transport has received a request for a new mobility parking space at Surfdale, due to a perceived lack of access for mobility card holders to the dairy and hairdressers.

22.         Currently there are angle parks on Miami Avenue, near the dairy, bar and eatery, these parks are P15, P60 and motorcycle parking.   

23.         It is noted that there is also off street parking on the corner of Hamilton Road, which is managed by Auckland Transport.

24.         If the Board were of the view that a mobility car-park was necessary, the preferred location would be inside the off street car-park area.

Regional Footpath Programme

 

25.     After careful consideration Auckland Transport, Community Transport management team have approved the final 2013/14 new footpath construction programme. 

26.     The 2013/14 period saw a reduction in the regional budget available for new footpath construction compared to 2012/13 and as a result it was not possible to proceed with all those scheme for which design and investigation has been undertaken. Such schemes will automatically be considered for inclusion in the 14/15 programme and will be reassessed and prioritised against other existing requests and new requests that have been received. Consideration will also be given to progressing some of these deferred schemes later in the 13/14 financial year, should underspends in other programmes allow for new funding to become available.

27.     Waiheke’s are as follows;

Approved

·    Tui Street – from Nikau Rd to Rata St 100 meters in length

·    Moa Ave – from Bus stop to Matai Rd 100 meters in length

Not approved

·    Seaview Road – from Brown Rd to Seventh Ave (100m)

·    Goodwin Ave - from No.30 to Hekerua Rd (300m)

Regional Transport-related Information

Media

28.     Bike park trial at train stations and ferry terminal

 

29.     New bike parking facilities have opened at two train stations and a ferry terminal.

30.     Auckland Transport is trialing enclosed, covered bike parking at Papakura and Papatoetoe train stations and Birkenhead ferry terminal.

31.     The parks at the train stations hold 20 bikes while the one at the Birkenhead ferry terminal can store 30 bikes. All three parks offer a choice of standing racks and hanging bike parking.

32.     Auckland Transport’s Manager of Community Transport, Matthew Rednall, says “We want to encourage people to leave their car at home and get on their bike to connect with the train or the ferry. It’s a chance to get fit and takes another vehicle off the road.”

33.     The bike parks are covered by CCTV cameras and, to add to security, access is by a proximity card which is issued after registering on-line.

34.     The parks at the rail stations also have bike repair stands for small jobs like fixing punctures.

35.     Cycle Action Auckland Chair, Barbara Cuthbert, says “Bike parking has moved into a new age with these superb facilities - they even have a bike pump as part of the installation.  Secure, undercover bike parking will allow more of us to cycle to the train or ferry, and have peace of mind out bike will be ready and waiting at the end of the day.”

36.     Access to the bike parks is on a six-monthly basis, you will be contacted before your registration runs out in time to renew or cancel it.

37.     For more information and to register go to:

http://www.aucklandtransport.govt.nz/moving-around/biking-cycleways/cycling-and-public-transport/Pages/default.aspx

Bike-park 1

Consideration

Local Board Views

38.     The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes. 

Implementation Issues

39.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritization, funding and consultation. 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Man O'War Bay Road Map

17

b

Auckland Transport Issues register

19

     

Signatories

Authors

Ivan Trethowen – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Team Leader

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards -
For the quarter - 1 July to 30 September 2013

 

File No.: CP2013/27064

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform Boards about progress on activities undertaken by AT in the three months July-September 2013, and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months October-December 2013.

2.       Attachments include

·      A – AT activities, broken down by Local Board

·      B – Decisions of the Transport Co-ordinating Committee, by Board

·      C – Report against local board advocacy issues (replaces the previous reports against the Local             Board Plan and Local Board Agreement)

·      D – Report on the status of the Board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receive the Auckland Transport Quarterly Report.

 

 

Main activities during the period under review

 

Capital Programming

 

3.       The current approved forecast for the 2013/14 Capital Programme is $887M. It is made up of Core Business Capital Projects at $471M, Renewals at $217M, Local Board Initiatives at $12M and CRL/EMU/SMART at $187M

 

During the period July to September the organization was able to deliver/achieve 13% ($115M) of the approved programme. And from the period October to December the projected expenditure is at $218M or 25% of the total programme. It is anticipated that the organization will be able to improve the delivery of the capital programme during the regular construction period (October to May).

 

Seal extension validation and prioritisation analysis to determine the 10 year programme is at the final stage with new traffic counts received, and all high priority road asset data checked externally. This will determine which road will be committed to over the summer construction period.

 

Infrastructure Development

 

Road Development

 

4.       Taharoto/Wairau Stages 6 and 8 – 1939 bridge replacement completed, new utility ducting 95% complete, cable installation ongoing, retaining wall 27-33 Wairau Rd completed, new cantilever footpath on remaining bridge complete, footpath and kerbing 60% complete, pavement construction 50% complete.

 

5.       Tiverton Wolverton Route upgrade - management of construction phase of project. With Wolverton St construction at 95% completion, pavement reconstruction is being progressed on Tiverton Rd. Planned for 60% completion on Tiverton Rd by 31 December. Kerb and Channel and footpath renewal target is 85% completion for full length of Tiverton Rd

 

6.       Pukekohe Town Centre - Design work has been completed for the 2013-2014 programme of works. (West Street; Queen to Tobin and Tobin Street; Edinburgh to Seddon).  Tender documentation will be released in October. The programme is to commence construction of these projects in January 2014, (approximate value $1.3m over two financial years).

 

7.       King-Queen-Constable Intersections – Design is complete and tender document released for public tender. The programme is to commence construction of these projects in January 2014, (approximate value $1.3m).

 

8.       Flat Bush School Road Stage 4 Murphy’s Road Intersection Upgrade – relocation of power cables is ongoing with completion expected in early December 2013; this will be followed by the installation of pipeline along Murphy’s Road by Watercare.

 

In addition to the works already in progress, further works are to be carried out during the period from October to December 2013.  The major projects include:

 

9.       Tiverton Wolverton Route upgrade – complete all works on Wolverton Rd and complete 60% of pavement renewal works on Tiverton Rd. Complete 50% of works on New Windsor Rd including retaining wall package. Complete all works on Blockhouse Bay Rd at intersection.Overall project completion in March 2014.

 

10.     Khartoum Place Upgrade – this is an Auckland Council contract managed by Auckland Transport – tender due to go out in October 2013

 

 

11.     Taharoto Wairau Upgrade Stages 6 and 8 – complete installation of utilities, all widening works, new pavement, surfacing, signs, signals and road markings.  Likely completion date has moved to late November.

 

12.     Evaluate and award both the Pukekohe Town Centre and King-Queen-Constable Intersections as early as possible to provide the successful contractor as much lead time as possible to organise the works prior to 6 January 2014 expected commencement date.

 

 

Road Design

 

13.     Hibiscus Coast Busway Station:  Auckland Council has received a claim from a third party for a judicial review with regard to the granting of the resource consent for Stage 2 on a non-notified basis.  The construction of Stage 2 has been put on hold until the matter is resolved.

 

14.     Albany Highway Upgrade:  NZTA has brought forward the SH1-SH18 Connection project in its programme and has requested further analysis of the impact of this on the Albany Highway Upgrade project.  Construction is now programmed to start in January 2014.

 

15.     Upper Weiti Bridge: The feasibility study is complete.  Three options are recommended to go forward to scheme assessment: Curley Avenue to East Coast Road link road; signalisation of Silverdale Street; and signalisation of Wainui Road.

 

16.     Taharoto/Wairau Upgrade: The construction of Stages 6 & 8 is well underway.  Negotiations are proceeding with Atlas Concrete with regard to the encroachment onto the road reserve.

 

17.     Upper Harbour Drive Walking and Cycling:  The final scheme assessment report has been received and the road safety audit has been completed.  The preferred option of on road cycle lanes on both sides and a footpath on the northern side will be taken forward to detail design.

 

18.     Warkworth SH1 Intersections: NZTA’s construction contract for the Hudson Road intersection is well underway.

 

19.     Warkworth Western Collector:  16 of the 17 submissions on the Notice of Requirement were in support of the project and Auckland Council has confirmed that no hearing will be required.

 

20.     Gills to Oteha Valley Link:  The Notice of Requirement has been served on Auckland Council.  The notification period commenced on 17 October 2013.

 

21.     SH17/The Avenue Lucas Bridge Upgrade:  The design tender has been withdrawn due to new information coming to light about the structure of the existing Lucas Creek Bridge.  Further investigation is required to confirm that the widening of the bridge is still viable before the design contract can be re-tendered.

 

22.     Onewa Road Westbound Transit Lane:  The design has been amended to address feedback received during the public consultation process.  Construction funding has been brought forward to 2013/14. 

                                                 

23.     Albany Highway South Upgrade: Internal traffic modelling review of original NSCC assumptions and feasibility has shown that the design provides capacity beyond what is reasonably required for future growth.   Decision over full redesign is on hold however until NZTA modelling into the SH1/SH18 connection is complete; as this has potential traffic implications for the project due to the removal of access to Albany from SH18. NZTA decision is expected before December 2013.

 

24.     Te Atatu Road Corridor Improvements: Continuation of both land take and consents works in the second quarter of 2013/14.  Out of 111 properties, 74% of land acquisitions have been settled, with a further 1% verbally-agreed or signed (approaching settlement). 

 

25.     Lincoln Road: The funding application for NZTA’s subsidy is at the final stage.   The consultation with the directly affected properties owners will commence by the end of October. The public consultation with the wider community and the designation process is planned to start early 2014.

 

26.     Glen Eden Park N Ride: The preferred option has been agreed amongst various stakeholders and this has been communicated to the Waitakere Ranges Local Board. Consultation with the Glen Eden Business Association is completed, and public consultation with the affected parties is underway. The detailed design is anticipated to be completed before Christmas this year.

 

27.     Brigham Creek Road (SH16-SH18): The scoping investigation has started and expected to be completed in February 2014.  The outputs of this scoping investigation will be used to set the scope and required outputs for the feasibility phase which will be subject to a separate exercise later in this financial year.

 

28.     Te Atatu Ferry Terminal: The feasibility study to investigate the physical possibility of establishing a ferry terminal and associated facilities at Te Atatu Peninsula has been completed.  The study has concluded that it appears physically feasible to construct a ferry terminal and associated facilities on the foreshore of Te Atatu Peninsula on the downstream side of the Whau River Bridge.  Further investigation is underway into the operational aspects of the ferry terminal in order to build a business case. 

 

29.     Te Atatu Bus Interchange: The investigation and evaluation of location options for the Te Atatu bus interchange has reached a hold point and is waiting for NZTA to release the final design for the SH16/Te Atatu Road intersection upgrade.   The investigation has identified 11 potential locations and will be evaluating all options against a set of criteria that are based upon Auckland Transport’s strategic objectives and the feedback received from local residents to date.  NZTA are expected to release the final design for the SH16/Te Atatu Road intersection upgrade in late October. 

 

30.     Tamaki Drive/Ngapipi Intersection: The tender for the detailed design has been published and closes on 25 October 2013. Public engagement commences in late November; feedback from this process will be integrated into the detailed design as appropriate.

 

31.     Federal Street Upgrade: Construction of the upgrade has started and is on track to be completed in May 2014.

 

32.     Mill Road: The scheme assessment for the northern section is undergoing legal review.  A documentation review is under way for the southern section to support preparation of the investigation tender.

 

33.     Half Moon Bay: The investigation phase of this project will be tendered by September 2013.  Auckland Transport is continuing to develop the NZTA funding application.

 

 

Key Agency Initiatives

 

34.     AMETI: Footpath, kerb and channel construction has begun on Ellerslie Panmure Highway between Forge Way and Mt Wellington Highway. Work continues on construction of the local road with landscaping and planting underway and finishing works on top of the 220m long covered box adjacent to the Panmure station.  Inside the box fire protection, with the installation of electrical and mechanical components being installed.The first fix of services for the station building is complete and internal linings and glazing are being installed. Canopies, Lift shafts and escalators are substantially complete,with large areas of architectural finish now being unveiled. The plan is to commission the new building on 19 January 2014.

 

35.     Work has continued on construction of the northern portion of the AMETI Link Road which will extend from Morrin Road to Mt Wellington Highway. Archeological issues have been resolved and documented in this area with construction of the retaining wall and bulk fill for the level of the link road progressing well. However a portion of the new road north of Mountain Road Bridge has been sealed. Construction of the southern portion is advancing with the main storm water line substantially complete. Road sealing has begun on the AMETI link road south between Ellerslie Panmure highway and William Harvey Place. A temporary footbridge between William Harvey Place and Ireland Road has been installed and is being well patronised. Work on Ireland Road is progressing well with approximately 50m of the 200m diameter culvert already tunneled. Work has been delayed in the southern area due to archaeological discoveries and delays in NCI Building Consent. Considerable progress has been made on storm water construction on the southern portion, including the new outfall to Van dames Lagoon. The access track into Van Dammes Lagoon is being constructed. Watercare works and NCI accommodation works are yet to commence.

 

36.     The investigation and design of the busway extending from Panmure to Pakuranga continues.  The design of the busway between Panmure and the Panmure Bridge is complete and the Scheme Assessment Report for the busway between Panmure Bridge and Botany is being finalised.  The Request for Tender of the planning services required for consenting of the Panmure to Pakuranga section of busway and Reeves Road Flyover has been issued. The project is also preparing tender documentation for specimen design of the Reeves Road flyover and final design of the Pakuranga Road section of the busway.

 

37.     The final design of the bus interchange development at Sylvia Park is near complete. Consent documentation has been prepared. An environment court hearing regarding the compulsory acquisition of a property at 430 Mt Wellington Highway has been deferred to November. This acquisition is required to enable consenting and construction to advance.

 

38.     East-West Link (MMEWS): The project team has scheduled options workshops with AT, NZTA and Auckland Council staff to further investigate, develop, assess and agree on programme options. These workshops will incorporate land use planning, social/environmental impacts and other opportunities associated with this project.  AT and NZTA plans to further update local boards on the project within the next few months. An approved preferred programme option will be taken forward for full public consultation in early 2014. The feedback from the public consultation will be incorporated into the draft programme business case which will be presented to the AT and NZTA Boards for approval. This is planned for mid-2014. Any preferred programme of work is likely to include a mix of various elements of the options above, not just one of them.

 

39.     Dominion Road: The design contract was awarded to Beca on 14 August 2013.  Initial design work will be completed late this year with the plan for stakeholder final review to occur before finalizing the design.  The project team is confident that final design work will be completed by April 2014 with a start on construction in August 2014.

 

40.     NorSGA: Construction is continuing on Rua Rd south however wet weather and limited site access is likely to result in the Rua/Fred Taylor intersection not being constructed before the shutdown for the Xmas Moratorium. The resource consent application for the Don Buck Rd extension has been notified and a hearing is scheduled for 15 November to address issues with an adjoining land owner who has not given his approval as an affected party. The Northside Drive East Notice of Requirement has been notified and submissions close 1 November. (A date is yet to be confirmed for the hearing). Resource consent has been lodged for the Fred Taylor/Garelja intersection and it is anticipated that land acquisitions and affected party approvals will be obtained by mid November. (Construction is planned to commence late January 2014). DVAC approval has been obtained to progress the Hobsonville Road project based on the revised design which incorporates transit lanes through Hobsonville Village. The existing Notice of Requirement documentation for Hobsonville Rd is to be updated to incorporate the effects of adopting the revised design.

 

41.     Harbour Edge Development (HED): A master delivery plan for the harbour edge projects is being developed in conjunction with the City Rail Link project, based on earliest delivery of projects with minimum disruption to the city Centre. Four new PT Interchanges for the city centre are being investigated to enable the roll-out of the 2016 PT Network. An early focus is on site locations, layouts and operational efficiencies for Downtown, Wynyard Quarter and the Learning Quarter, as well as the connecting corridors. Concept design options for the Quay St Seawall seismic upgrade are underway, which will inform options for both the Quay St Upgrade and the Ferry Basin Redevelopment master-plan. Early improvements to Quay St start this month and a programme of events on the harbor edge is being developed with ATEED and Waterfront Auckland over summer. A HED Manawhenua Forum meets quarterly to discuss portfolio issues and seek input from interested iwi on the issues and opportunities in this space. Tenders have been called for the design of roading infrastructure in Wynyard Quarter, with construction targeted to start in 2014/15. Waterfront Auckland starts work on the Westhaven Promenade in October. Options to provide a coastal walkway from Westhaven to St Heliers are being investigated.

 

 

PT Development

 

42.     Papakura Station: The project is now complete including the cycle storage area. The temporary park and ride adjacent to the bus interchange is under review and towards assessment as a permanent parking area.

 

43.     Mount Albert Station: Stage 2 of the project is to develop the link bridge connection into New North Rd and to upgrade the existing underpass. Confirmation of budget is in progress with expectation that the works will be completed by mid-2014.

 

44.     Half Moon Bay Ferry Terminal and Precinct Plan: The Master Planning report and Concept plan were reviewed by the AT Board and will be presented to the local stakeholder forum in late 2013/early 2014. Over the next 3 months the staging of the overall plan will be reworked to ensure the most important issues are prioritised, taking account of the overarching focus on the achievement of efficient and effective public transport outcomes. Parking remains key to unlocking the HMB marina and a number of parking demand measures are being planned or in progress over the next 3 months.  Reclamation and land use strategies are will be reviewed further over the next 3 months.

 

45.     Manukau Rail Station: The Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) works have now restarted with a new main contractor Hawkins Infrastructure. As a result the completion date for the station and the tertiary building is now targeted for May 2014 Good progress is being made with building water tightness.  Full construction recommenced in September 2013.  The new ticketing gates will be installed during March 2014.  Detailed design for the bus interchange is still making good progress towards completion in 1st half of 2015. Construction tender has now been awarded for the North Davies Ave linear park works. The agreed construction completion date for these works is by the end of February 2014.

 

46.     Parnell Station: The final enabling works on the Domain pathways and signaling were substantially completed in September 2013. Over the recent wet period the new soil nail retaining area has been subject to detailed scrutiny that has resulted in the need for some further retaining works and some pathway repair works. This work will be completed over the labour weekend. The Auckland Transport board approved the detailed design funding for the station in September 2013 and over the next months the programme for delivery will be refined towards an anticipated completion date late in 2015. Planning is underway for the access ways, connections to the Domain and Carlaw park development and up to the University precinct. The NZTA are working on plans for better connectivity across Stanley St.

 

47.     Newmarket Rail (formerly Sarawia St) Level Crossing: Public consultation has been finalised including a more detailed analysis of an underpass to Sarawia St. The feedback on all options has been evaluated and a preferred option was recommended to the AT board in September 2013. The AT board requested further information and analysis before any final decision. Over the next month the requested further analysis will be provided to the AT board with an expected final decision by the end of October 2013. Commencement of the detailed design is scheduled for December through to March 2014 during which time there will be further community engagement. Construction works are anticipated to be from April 2014 through to March 2015.

 

Strategy and Planning

 

48.     Auckland Integrated Transport Programme (ITPv2) and its key components

Work is underway on delivering the next version of the ITP which is due by the middle of 2014.  Work are also continuing on the development/updating of the key components of the ITP including:

·    Regional Rapid Transit Review (RTN) review – further analysis required in view of the RDS update

·    Rail Development Strategy (RDS) update – in progress

·    Rail Level Crossings Study – joint review with KiwiRail in progress

·    Park and Ride and Parking Strategy – review and update of legacy strategies in progress

·    Regional Passenger Transport Plan – formally adopted by the AT Board on 23rd September 2013.  Consultation of the new network for the other areas in Auckland will be undertaken in 2014-15.  Implementation of the new network will commence in early 2015.

 

49.     Regulatory planning

Strategy and Planning continues to lead and co-ordinate AT’s responses to proposed plan changes and Notices of Requirements (NoRs) to ensure that land use and transport are integrated and that proposed land use changes enable AT to deliver its capital works programme.  During the first quarter, there are 33 applications including 3 new applications that are in progress.  5 applications were completed this quarter.

AT also continued working closely with the Auckland Council on the review of the draft Unitary Plan.  AT has been assisting the council on matters such as cycle parking, Integrated Transport Assessments, parking, loading and access provisions.  AT has also been working with the Auckland Utility Operators Group on trees in road corridor provisions.

Over the next quarter, AT will be reviewing the Proposed Unitary Plan as notified on 30 September 2013.

 

50.     Corridor management plans (CMPs)

The 10 priority arterial CMPs in the 2012/13 year are now nearing completion:

·    Great North Road-Rata St-Ash St corridor - draft plan reviewed

·    Albany Highway-Greville Rd-Tawa Dr corridor – draft plan reviewed

·    Takapuna North (East Coast Road Stage 2) – draft plan reviewed

·    East Tamaki Road-Springs Rd-Harris Rd corridor – draft plan completed

·    City East West Transport Study – draft plan completed and initial recommended projects are under concept design

·    Tamaki Drive-Ngapipi Rd-Kohimarama Rd-Kepa Rd corridor – draft plan under review

·    Ellerslie-Panmure Highway – draft plan under review

·    Balmoral Road-St Lukes Road corridor – draft plan under review

·    Great South Road Stage 2 – scope of the CMP was extended to include Shirley Road and those sections of Coronation and Rangitoto Road that are currently bus routes. 

·    Pakuranga Road – in progress

The 2013/14 CMP programme was finalised, three of which are currently at scoping stage:

·    Great North Road (between Ash Street and Karangahape Road) – scoping completed

·    New North Road (Blockhouse Bay Road to Mt Eden Road) – scoping underway

·    Manukau Road (Broadway to Royal Oak roundabout) – scoping underway

 

51.     Transport modelling

Work is continuing on the update/development of transport models including:

·    Local area traffic modelling – Takapuna town centre, Ponsonby Road, proposed Convention Centre

·    CRL transport model in parallel with the APT3 update

·    Updating the Auckland Passenger Transport (APT3) model

 

52.     Asset Management Plan 2015-2018

The development of the next Asset Management Plan 2015-2018 is continuing.  The plan will give effect to the ITPv2 and will support forward investment decisions.

 

53.     Seismic Screening Programme

Work is continuing on the screening of all transport assets for earthquake susceptibility. 

 

54.     Asset Condition Surveys

The asset condition surveys for higher risk transport assets is continuing and is on schedule for completion by the end of December 2013.  Minor safety and other issues are prioritised and addressed through the maintenance teams. More extensive defects are included in the long term forward renewal works programme and, where feasible, coordinated with the capital new works programme.

There were no major safety issues requiring immediate action or restrictions on access have been identified.

 

Community Transport

 

55.     School Transport Programme and Road Safety Education

 

·    The number of schools signed onto the TravelWise Programme has now reached 343.

·    Key activities that were undertaken with the schools included, safety at the school gate parking enforcement, speed enforcement campaigns undertaken with the NZ Police, cycle training, scooter training, school leadership programme for intermediate and high school students and school curriculum transport related activities targeted at road safety and school travel options.

·   Walking School Buses now number 354 in the region with a continued programme of recruitment and recognition for the volunteers who accompany the buses. 

·    Demand for cycle training is still strong from schools and greater partnerships with the NZ Police, Sports Trusts and Bike NZ have been developed to deliver cycle training and cycle safety. 

·    The following regional road safety education campaigns are being developed for the coming eight months: 

 

1.   The Sober Driver campaign – with a focus on the Christmas

2.   Pedestrian safety campaign – pay attention or pay the price

3.   Motorcycle safety and training campaign

4.   Back to school speed campaign focused on targeting drivers speed around schools

5.   Distractions campaign

 

 

56.     Travel Planning and Cycle and Walking

 

·   Commute travel planning packages and personal journey plans being delivered across the region targeting business, communities, business associations and tertiary institutions.

·    The spring “Cycling’s the go” safety and promotional campaign is being delivered over the coming months targeting, cycle training, safety, guided rides and maintenance programmes.

·    The development of the Auckland Cycle network continues with priority being placed on working with the NZTA on Grafton Gully, working with Local Board Greenway proposals, Beach Road, Great South Road, Puhinui Road and the New Zealand Cycle Trail network expansion programme of the Airport to City & Waiheke routes.

 

 

Road Corridor Access

 

57.     Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB) Rollout

Good progress has been made in closing out the Year 1 (2011/12) and Year 2 (2012/13) cabinet areas with 163 cabinet areas now completed and moved into warranty.  The linking of the Year 3 CAR approvals to the completion of the Year 1 and 2 work has had the desired effect and focused the contractor on completing this work.  The next milestone is the completion of 230 cabinet areas by 31 October 2013.

There are now 31 Year 3 cabinet areas which have completed the civil and hauling phases and are undergoing final quality assurance checks by VisionStream and Chorus before being handed over to Auckland Transport for sign-off.  There are currently 86 cabinet areas under construction with a further 28 cabinet areas awaiting build commencement. 

 

58.     Hunua 4 Watermain

The construction of Watercare’s Hunua 4 bulk water watermain is continuing westwards on Puhunui Road. 

The final reinstatement of the Great South Road/Puhunui Road intersection has been satisfactorily completed and the general issues around the construction methodology and reinstatement have been resolved.

The crossing of the Puhinui Road/Lambie Drive intersection was carried out over the weekend of 11/13 October 2013.  This work was undertaken in much the same manner as that at the Great South Road/Puhunui Road intersection and required the closure of Lambie Drive over the weekend.   There were no significant problems experienced and the intersection was fully reopened before the morning peak period on Monday.

 

59.     Waterview Tunnel Boring Machine

There are a further 8 components of the Waterview Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) which are expected to arrive at the Port of Auckland in October 2013 which will require transport to the Waterview Tunnel site.

We are working with the Well Connected Alliance and the transport contractor regarding the movement of 22,000 reinforced concrete segments from East Tamaki to the Waterview Tunnel site.  These precast segments will be used to line the new tunnel and weigh 10 tonnes each.  Approval is being sought to move 3 segments on each vehicle which will require a High Productivity Motor Vehicle (HPMV) permit as the gross weight will exceed 44 tonnes.  The movement of these precast segments will require in excess of 7,000 laden trips over the next 2 years.  Most of the travel will be on SH20.

 

 

 

 

Road Corridor Maintenance

 

60.     West

 

·    The new contract for west area road maintenance which include the wider scope of the Henderson – Massey, Waitakere and the Whau local board areas started in July and levels of service and contractor resources scaled up to allow for the larger size & scope of  works included in this contract.

 

·    Extensive reconstruction works in pavement and footpath assets have been programmed and are well underway across the region. Initial focus has been in the Whau ward to balance out the levels of service and standard of asset condition. Major pavement works are currently underway in Margan Ave, Kinross St and Birdwood Rd. Four other sites are programmed to be rehabilitated this construction season dependent on final design criteria vs. available budget.

 

·    A large programme ($7M+) of resurfacing is also underway throughout the central – west region. This schedule of activities includes approx. 15.6km of Asphaltic Concrete surfacing and 63km of various Chip Sealing (resealing) sites. This programme continues on from the previous 3 years, in the RCM undertaking to raise the standard of road surface condition in the western area.

 

·    Very wet and poor weather conditions encountered in August & September caused multiple slip sites in the Waitakere ward which needed major design and investment in retaining structures. These sites are also well underway, that’s to a quick response from the contractor. The hardest hit area of the storms was Titirangi Road & Titirangi Beach Roads where 5 separate minor under slips required treatment over the last 2 months. Fortunately the torrential cyclone season has passed and two major slip sites within the Waitakere Ranges (Candia Rd & Laingholm drv.) are nearing completion with another two awaiting final detailed design & funding approvals.

 

61.     Streetlights

 

·    Completed the section of Tamaki Drive (Okahu section) with new poles and luminaires in accordance with the Tamaki Drive approved upgrade report. There are only 25 poles and lights to complete the upgrade between Ngapipi Road and The Strand.

·    St George Street Papatoetoe is currently being upgraded with new poles and lights.  The former decorative type lights will become gas look alike lights for decorative purpose only.

·    Bowen Street in the CBD has been upgraded to provide increased safety for pedestrians walking into the city especially from the university at night.

·    Installation of new lights and poles supporting the Vector undergrounding programme removing overhead lines.  Areas where undergrounding has taken place are Epsom, and Penrose.

 

62.     South

·    Approval has been given to proceed with the second section of the East Street road reconstruction project in Pukekohe.  This project is being undertaken by John Filmore Contractors as a separate contract to the RCM South contracts and work is programmed to start in January 2014.

 

63.     Central

·    Foot path upgrades in Raumati road, and Poto Street are in the final stages. Foot path work has also commenced at the Remuera road end of Orakie road.

·    Preparation for major road works on Orakei road (Shore to Ngapipi roads) is in progress, with construction scheduled to commence early Jan 2014. This project is in conjunction with the Auckland Council Shore road Boardwalk project and in consultation with the local Iwi.

·    RCM Central Contract has completed several Footpath and Kerb & Channel Upgrades in the Arch Hill area over the last few months. These upgrades have significantly enhanced the streetscapes of this area within the Waitemata ward.

·    A major road rehabilitation upgrade of Hukanui Crs was undertaken over the October Schools holidays which will eliminate on-going maintenance activities on this busy residential road. Our contractor modified their construction programme to ensure that parents and teachers from the school had access into Marist School first week back following the break.

 

64.     North

 

·    During the period of 24-25th September 2013 the North Shore, Hibiscus Coast and greater Auckland area were subjected to a severe weather system that brought high winds and heavy rainfall.  High winds toppled a significant number of trees and the heavy rainfall caused flooding and minor slips. Contractors worked hard to ensure that all sites were made safe with only minimal disruption to traffic flows.

 

·    Area wide pavement treatment activities have been completed on Argent Lane, Station Road, Nobilo Road and Wintour Road. Other works completed I September includes Makarau Road Slip reinstatement and Kaipara Flats Walkway and Footbridge

 

 

Road Corridor Operations

 

65.     One Network Road Classification project

AT is a Road Controlling Authority member of the One Network Road Classification project with NZTA. This is a national initiative which is a recommendation of the Ministerial Road Maintenance Task Force, which aims to develop a national road classification which will support better asset management across the country.

Benefits are:

Planning, investment, maintenance and operational decisions relating to each road will reflect its function as part of the broader network

Over time road users can expect to have a similar experience across the country, on roads with the same classification

An integrated classification system will also make collaboration easier, leading to a more efficient roading network and improved value for money.

Progress to date includes:

·    A draft One Network Road Classification (ONRC) framework has been developed

·    Roadshows introducing the draft ONRC to all Road Controlling Authorities in NZ have been completed and feedback sought

·    The next step is to collate all feedback and update the ONRC Framework;

 

66.     Route optimisation Investigation and analysis.

Route optimisation was completed on 30% of the arterial road network for the second year of the programme (2012-2013) with 100km of routes being optimised.

This year, 2013/14, our primary focus will be in the Central area of Auckland with a focus on the inner city. This will align our network operations to accommodate recent changes to the Public Transport services and land use changes that have occurred in the Central City.

The Central City has been divided into five key zones and each zone has an assigned technical lead. Approximately 103 intersections in the central area will be reviewed and optimised. Work has commenced on Stage 1 reports to establish the existing conditions, known planning and possible improvements. Internal workshops have been held to understand the programme and the likely effect of Changes to Bus services, The Central East West Transport study and Foreshore development

 

Work is in progress on 16 identified routes in the Central City

 

67.     Physical Works Programme (other routes across the region):

·    6 projects are at the scheme design stage

·    5 projects are at the detailed design stage

·    1 project is under construction

 

 

Road Safety

 

68.     Version 1. of Urban KiwiRAP risk mapping software has been developed and all Auckland routes, intersections, and vulnerable user groups have been mapped and prioritised.

The software methodology will be further revised in Oct/Nov, and is due for launch in December 2013.

 

69.     An Urban Motorcycle Route demonstration project brief has been developed for West Auckland and the project is expected to commence in November.

 

70.     The high risk rural roads SERR (Self Explaining Rural Roads) project working group has confirmed parameters for option development. Investigation is expected to commence early in the New Year.

 

71.     The Red light camera policy has been agreed with NZ Police and now working on technology applications. AT has completed a site selection report on 22 of the highest red-light running crash risk intersections.

 

 

Parking and Enforcement

 

72.     Waitemata

Freemans Bay – A questionnaire survey on parking issues in residential streets was completed in August. 87% of residents felt that crowded parking was a problem in Freemans Bay.

St Marys Bay – A questionnaire survey on the trial parking zone was completed in August. 65% of residents supported the trial parking zone in St Marys Bay.

Eden Terrace – Pay and display on-street parking was introduced into several streets in Eden Terrace in July. Parking in the paid area costs $1.00 per hour. There is no time limit. Paid parking operates from 9am – 5pm, Monday to Friday. The Eden Terrace Business Association is very happy with the parking management system and has even received positive comments from some businesses. No formal surveys have been carried out but there has been an observed improvement in availability.   

K Road Car Park – AT exited the K Road Car Park on 13 August ending 40 years of council tenure.  The car park was sold by the previous landlord to Tournament Parking.

Parnell – The Parking Design Team completed the review of on-street parking in Parnell in August. This included several minor parking restriction changes and removing a lot of signage on Parnell Road.

 

73.     Waiheke

Matiatia – AT gave notice of termination to all car park leaseholders during September.  These 145 leased car parks are often vacant and underutilised, giving rise to complaints from casual users wishing to find a park.  Seventy of the currently leased car parks are being converted to pay and display parking, to satisfy the growing demand for casual parking.  The remaining 75 will be available for lease at commercial rates.  Expressions of interest from current leaseholders are being sought for these car parks.

 

74.     Orakei

Remuera – Time restrictions were removed in August in Remuera town centre along Remuera Road.  AT will be using demand responsive pricing to manage the parking.

 

75.     Howick

Howick – Parking occupancy surveys has been completed in August and business questionnaire surveys are being collected currently.

Halfmoon Bay Car Park – Changes have been approved by the Local Board and a report is currently being prepared for approval at Traffic Control Committee. The changes include a 14 hour time restriction and priority for car pool users.  Implementation expected in November.

 

76.     Franklin

Pukekohe – Strategy and Planning commenced a Comprehensive Parking Management Plan to coordinate with the Area Plan. The parking report is expected to be completed early next year.

 

77.     Takapuna – Devonport

Killarney Street Car Park – The owner of this car park, Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA), decided to put the car park services up for tender in July.  AT did not submit a tender.  A contract was awarded by RFA to Wilson parking.  AT has exited the car park.

 

78.     Hibiscus and Bays

Orewa – A P120 town centre parking zone was implemented in August.

 

79.     Manurewa – Papakura

Papakura – AT has agreed to seek a temporary consent for the continuation (eighteen months) of the temporary Park and Ride site.  This action will enable a further review when more information is known about the possible electrification of the railway to Pukekohe.

 

 

Public Transport

 

80.     During the third quarter of 2013, the Public Transport Department focused on analysing feedback on the new on the new network in South Auckland. Planning for implementation of the PTOM contracting model continued.

81.     Rail patronage is showing signs of renewed growth after a period of relative stability while rail service reliability has shown pleasing improvements over the last few months.

 

82.     The final quarter of 2013 sees changes to the proposed South Auckland new network bus services in response to public feedback finalised and communicated to customers. This will be followed by preparing the South Auckland bus network for a competitive tendering process.

 

83.     The implementation of Auckland Integrated Fare System (AIFS) on buses was briefly paused while an intermittent technical issue was resolved but has now resumed with implementation on North Star services on 13 October 2013. It is envisaged that the roll-out on remaining NZ Bus services will be completed by the end of 2013.

 

84.     A new train timetable is to be implemented on 29 October 2013 doubling Western Line weekend train frequencies during the day from hourly to half-hourly and extending Sunday train service to Swanson. In addition, weekend Southern Line train services will start earlier and a number of adjustments made to other services, primarily to improve reliability.

 

85.     An ongoing programme of bus timetable adjustments, in partnership with our service providers, continues so that published timetables more closely reflect actual bus running times. This is leading to a significant improvement in bus service reliability. 

 

86.     Consultation began on Green Bay / Titirangi route changes began on 21 October 2013 to improve the frequency on key routes and simplify the bus network as an interim improvement step towards the future new bus network.

 

87.     The closure of most Northwestern Motorway bus lanes for up to 2-3 years for the Waterview Connection project has delayed many bus services by 6-8 minutes in the afternoon peak. AT has reviewed bus timetables; changed some bus routes and added more express bus service to help address the delays to service. Meanwhile, the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) opened a bus/transit lane on the westbound approach to the Great North Road interchange on 20 October 2013 to significantly reduce bus delays.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Schedule of activities undertaken for the first quarter (2013/14) ending 30 September 2013 and forward works programme for the second quarter (2013/14) ending 31 December 2013

37

b

Traffic Control Committee Decisions July-September 2013

51

c

Local Board Advocacy Report

53

d

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

57

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Community Art Gallery Annual Report and Funding Agreement

 

File No.: CP2013/25918

 

  

 

Purpose

1.   The purpose of the report is to present the Waiheke Community Art Gallery annual report for 2012/2013 and to seek approval from the Waiheke Local Board for the attached funding agreement between Auckland Council and Waiheke Community Art Gallery. The agreement is for the 2013/2014 financial year.

Executive Summary

2.   The Waiheke Community Art Gallery is a community arts and culture organisation located in the Waiheke Local Board area. The Gallery is due to receive funding for delivery of arts and culture services in the 2013/2014 financial year.

3.   The Waiheke Community Art Gallery received a $10,000 grant from the Waiheke Local Board in 2012/2013. An annual report for 2012/2013 has been received as required by the associated funding agreement.

 

4.   The results of the Waiheke Community Art Gallery against the objectives specified in the funding agreement show that the key performance indicators have been met and exceeded.

5.   This report also presents the proposed 2013/2014 funding agreement between Auckland Council and Waiheke Community Art Gallery for approval by the Waiheke Local Board. This agreement proposes a payment of $10,250 to be paid in one lump sum to contribute to operational management of the gallery.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receives the Waiheke Community Art Gallery 2012/13 annual report.

b)      approves the operational funding agreement of $10,250 for Waiheke Community Art Gallery to assist the organisation to achieve its objective of providing art exhibitions, programmes and opportunities that inform and reflect the cultural diversity of the local Waiheke community.

 

 

Discussion

6.   The Waiheke Community Art Gallery is a community arts and culture organisation located in the Waiheke Local Board area. The gallery is due to receive funding for delivery of arts and culture services in the 2013/2014 financial year.

 

7.   The operational funding from the Waiheke Local Board provides cornerstone support to the Waiheke Community Art Gallery for the provision of community arts and culture services. The organisation leverages this funding to secure additional external funds from charitable and corporate funders and from other revenue sources.

 

8.   The Waiheke Community Art Gallery received a $10,000 grant from the Waiheke Local Board in 2012/2013. An annual report for 2012/2013 has been received as required by the associated funding agreement (See Attachment B). The results of the Waiheke Community Art Gallery against the objectives specified in the funding agreement show that the key performance indicators have been met and exceeded.

9.   The proposed 2013/2014 funding agreement between Auckland Council and Waiheke Community Art Gallery is attached for approval by the Waiheke Local Board (see Attachment A). This agreement proposes a payment of $10,250 to be paid in one lump sum to contribute to operational management of the gallery.

 

10. The proposal responds to the priorities in the Auckland Plan and the Waiheke Local Board Plan, and aligns with the local board’s operational budget for the Waiheke Community Art Gallery.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

11. This is the first opportunity to present this information to the Waiheke Local Board.

Maori Impact Statement

12. The arts and culture funding agreements are not specifically linked to council’s strategic priorities for Maori. However, in accordance with its funding agreement the gallery has engaged with Maori organisations and will report on their provision of programmes that meet Maori outcomes.

Implementation Issues

13. Once the funding agreement is confirmed, the Waiheke Community Art Gallery will be required to report monthly to council staff from the Arts and Culture (Central) team. The local board will receive regular updates based on these monthly reports and formal reporting quarterly and annually.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Funding Agreement Waiheke Community Art Gallery 2013-2014

61

b

Attachment B Annual Report July 2012 - July 2014

73

     

Signatories

Authors

Renee Tanner – Arts and Culture Advisor (Central)

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Community Funding Round Two 2013/14

 

File No.: CP2013/26634

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications for round two of Waiheke Local Board Community Funding to the Waiheke Local Board for their consideration.

Executive Summary

2.       For the 2013/2014 financial year the Waiheke Local Board set a total discretionary community grants budget of $46,377.36.

3.       Under the first round of Community Grants the board approved a total of $11,348.46, leaving a balance of $35,028.90 for the remaining three funding rounds.

4.       Ten applications were received in this second round, requesting a combined total of $28,409.45.

5.       This report provides a recommendation summary, an analysis of the applications received in comparison to round one and an overview of the application process.

Recommendation

a)      That the Waiheke Local Board considers the advisor recommendations and agrees to fund, part-fund or decline the Local Board Community Funding applications in this round as follows:

Organisation name

Funds required for

Amount requested

Amount recommended

1st Waiheke Sea Scouts

Safety Life Vests

$1,614.70

$1,000.00

BYO BAG Waiheke Island

Plastic Free Friday and awareness campaign

$4,691.00

$2,000.00

Living Without Violence - Waiheke Network Inc

Upgrade to technology

$3,440.00

$3,440.00

Matiatia and Oneroa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Gutter Cleaning

$592.25

 

Mothers Helpers

Ostend (Community) Market Stand

$1,194.00

$500.00

Ocean Aware

Rangitoto Film - More than meets the eye

$500.00

$500.00

The Waiheke Winegrowers Association Incorporated

Waiheke Vintage Festival

$6,566.50

$2,500.00

Waiheke Community Art Gallery

Waiheke Community Art Gallery Art Map distribution costs

$2,735.00

$2,000.00

Waiheke Community Art Gallery

World War 1Commemorative  Exhibition

$2,076.00

 

Waiheke Island Golf Club Inc

Summer greens intern

$5,000.00

 

Total:

$28,409.45

$11,940.00

 

Discussion

6.       In March 2013, the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) resolved to continue the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year, noting that there would be no proposed changes to the decision-making budget structures already in place for the 2013/2014 financial year (RDO/2013/32).

7.       Through the Local Board Community Grants Fund, the Waiheke Local Board aims to build social capital within the local community. The local board does this by supporting projects that provide a community benefit, are equitable and inclusive and result in an ongoing gain to the local area.

8.       When reviewing applications, the local board should be guided by the following criteria (these are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to help the local board when considering the merits of each proposal):

-     The proposal’s benefit to the local area

-     The applicant group’s role in the local area

-     The proposal’s alignment with the board’s priorities, such as

Young people

Maori

The environment

Culture and arts

Social cohesion

Recreation and sport

Heritage

-     Whether the group applies to receive the proceeds of gaming machines.

9.       This fund is allocated at the local board’s discretion. In accordance with its fiduciary duties, the local board is to act honestly, avoid conflicts of interest and act in what the local board believes to be the best interests of the community.

10.     Round two of the Waiheke Local Board Community Funding closed on 1 November 2013. The fund was advertised through local community networks and on the Auckland Council website.  Officer recommendations on the applications received are included as

attachment A.

 

Budget

11.     Of the original $46,377.36 budget, $35,028.90 is available for the remainder of 2013/2014 ($11,348.46 was allocated in Round One). 

12.     Ten applications were received this round, requesting a combined total of $28,409.45 in Local Board Community Funding. Officer recommendations total $11,940.00 for this round.

13.     Figure A below shows how much was requested in each of rounds one and two, against how much was approved (or in the case of round two, recommended).

 

14.     For round one the local board funded 31.7 per cent of the total amount requested by community groups.  For Round Two, the advisor recommends that 42 per cent of the total applied for be funded.

Application analysis

New applicants

15.     In round one, one of the nine applicants considered was new to community funding. Three out of the ten applications in Round Two are new.

Types of projects

16.     Figure A below shows a comparison of costs applied for in rounds one and two.

17.     Across the rounds, promotional material (such as event flyers and newspaper advertisements) and personnel costs (e.g. photographers, facilitators) represent a large portion of costs applied for (20/45 items, or 44.4 per cent).  Equipment hire is also a common request, for items such as lighting equipment for events.

Application Process

18.     In July 2013, an online application process was launched.  All applications for community funding are now submitted online. As part of this project, staff have begun to refine and standardise reporting to local boards.

19.     Once the local board have made their final funding decisions, all applicants are notified in writing of the outcome of their application. Applicants provide an accountability report back to the council once their project has been completed.

20.     The Community Funding Programme has recently introduced an online accountability process which will make the funding process more efficient and in the future enable clearer reporting on each applicant’s funding history.

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.     This is the first opportunity for the Waiheke Local Board to consider this information.

Maori Impact Statement

22.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori. Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.

General

23.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

24.     The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Officer recommendations on applications

149

     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Zimmerman - Community Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board dog access review

 

File No.: CP2013/27025

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to decide on the scope of review of local dog access rules in the Waiheke Local Board area.

Executive Summary

2.      The board indicated at workshops in August 2013 that it sought to review certain local dog access rules contained in the policy and bylaw on dogs by summer 2014.

3.      The primary objective for local boards in making decisions on dog access is to ensure public safety and comfort and to ensure that the needs of dogs and their owners are met.

4.      The governing body has established a standard process to assist local boards. The governing body will fund aspects of the standard process, including basic research and engagement and public notification. Local boards will fund any additional research and engagement, alternative forms of public notification, and signage.

5.      The process timeline starts in September of one year and ends in October of the following year. The local board will need to adopt a proposal by April 2014, and to hold hearings, deliberations and make decisions on submissions by August 2014.

6.      Dog access issues for the Waiheke Local Board area relate to beaches, Onetangi Sports Park, and clarifying rules related to dog exercise areas, safe swimming areas or lanes, “picnic” and “fitness apparatus” areas, significant ecological areas, perimeter track outside of golf course, and round Waiheke Walk.

7.      Depending on the scope of the review, options for research and engagement between December 2013 and April 2014 range from external engagement to internal council review.

 

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board resolves:

a)      to review local dog access rules in the Waiheke Local Board area as follows:

i)       review time and season beach rules on Waiheke and Rakino Islands, and foreshore rule on Rotoroa Island. The review on Waiheke Island is to focus on the 29 bays between Piemelon and Rocky Bay, Man O War Bay, Orapui Bay, Awaawaroa Bay, and Te Matuku Bay.

ii)      review exemption to sports surface prohibition on Onetangi Sports Park.

iii)     clarify rules by identifying:

·        which dog exercise areas meet the new criteria or are more appropriately referred to as under control off-leash areas

·        any safe swimming areas or lanes

·        “picnic” and “fitness apparatus” areas

·        significant ecological areas.

iv)     review perimeter track outside of golf course and round Waiheke Walk (only if not already under control on-leash).

b)      that the Chair of the Waiheke Local Board be authorised to make decisions on the scope of research and engagement to be undertaken between December 2013 and April 2014.

 

 

Discussion

8.      The board indicated at workshops in August 2013 that it sought to review certain local dog access rules contained in the policy and bylaw on dogs by summer 2014.

9.      The primary objective for local boards in making decisions on dog access is to ensure public safety and comfort and to ensure that the needs of dogs and their owners are met.

10.    The governing body has established a standard process to assist local boards. The governing body will fund aspects of the standard process, including basic research and engagement and public notification. Local boards will fund any additional research and engagement, alternative forms of public notification, and signage.

11.    The process timeline starts in September of one year and ends in October of the following year. The local board will need to adopt a proposal by April 2014, and to hold hearings, deliberations and make decisions on submissions by August 2014.

12.    The following dog access issues were identified during the governing body review of the policy and bylaw on dogs in 2011-2012:

·     review beach dog access rules. Options include:

Option 1: review time and season beach rules on Waiheke and Rakino Islands, and foreshore rule on Rotoroa Island. The review on Waiheke Island would focus on the 29 bays between Piemelon and Rocky Bay currently subject to time and season dog access rules, and Man O War Bay, Orapui Bay, Awaawaroa Bay, and Te Matuku Bay.

Option 2: review coastal dog access rules on all 18 islands in the Waiheke local board area.

The board in August 2013 indicated a preference for Option 1 and the inclusion of those matters listed below in any review. Staff are seeking confirmation of this approach.

·     review exemption to sports surface prohibition on Onetangi Sports Park.

·     clarify rules by identifying:

which dog exercise areas meet the new criteria or are more appropriately referred to as under control off-leash areas

any safe swimming areas or lanes

“picnic” and “fitness apparatus” areas

significant ecological areas.

·     review perimeter track outside of golf course and round Waiheke Walk (only if not already under control on-leash).

13.    Depending on the scope of the review, options for research and engagement between December 2013 and April 2014 range from external engagement to internal council review.

Consideration

Local Board Views

14.     The views of other local boards have not been sought.

Maori Impact Statement

15.    The views of 23 iwi in relation to dog access was sought as part of two hui held on 22 and 23 October 2013. The hui covered five bylaw topics - signs, trading in public places, navigation safety and lifejackets, animal management and dog access, outdoor fires.

16.    Feedback related to the ability of iwi to determine dog access on Marae, a focus on control, responsible dog ownership, and ensuring the protection of sensitive ecological areas.

Implementation Issues

17.    Issues related to implementation relate to the local board costs for additional research, engagement, and public notification initiatives; and the cost of any signage.

18.    The costs of implementation are expected to be obtained from existing budgets. The cost of signage will become clearer as the review progresses.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Paul Wilson - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Marine Spatial Plan update

 

File No.: CP2013/26673

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing the board with information from Council’s Coastal Management team and Research Investigations and Monitoring team regarding the status of the Marine Spatial Plan (Seachange) including probable timeframe and Local Board involvement, and any existing research regarding marine monitoring programmes, in response to a resolution of the Waiheke Local Board dated 18 July 2013.

Executive Summary

2.       At its meeting held 20 June 2013, the Waiheke Local Board resolved as follows:

“37.        Northern coast marine reserve proposal - Waiheke Island

   That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)   Receives the proposal from the Friends of the Hauraki Gulf group for a Waiheke Island northern coast marine reserve, outlining proposed next steps and indications of costs required.

b)   Notes that $2,000 SLIPs opex has been allocated to the Attitudinal Survey under Item 17, Waiheke Local Board  SLIPs 2012/1013, on this agenda, in order to respond in a timely manner, to the ATEED contribution of $2,000, allocated on condition that this sum be matched by the Board or another organisation.

c)   Refers the proposal from the Friends of the Hauraki Gulf group to SLIPs officers for consideration in the 2013/2014 year from this or another budget, as appropriate.”

3.       On 18 July 2013, the Waiheke Local Board resolved as follows:

“18n)      Agrees that any further funding of the proposed Marine Reserve, Waiheke northern side be considered once the results of the Attitudinal Study have been received by the Board and the Board has received an officers report regarding DOC processes regarding the establishment of Marine Reserves, any existing research regarding desirable areas in the Hauraki Gulf under the Waiheke Local Board’s jurisdiction and information on the probable timeline for results of Marine Spatial Planning for the Gulf which would presumably include areas for Marine Reserves and any other appropriate information for the Board to make a sound decision.”

4.       In response to the above resolution, officers from Council’s Coastal Management team and Research Investigations and Monitoring team provide the attached memorandum regarding the status of the Marine Spatial Plan (Seachange) including probable timeframe and Local Board involvement, and any existing research regarding marine monitoring programmes.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receive the information from Council’s Coastal Management and Research Investigations and Monitoring team regarding the status of the Marine Spatial Plan (Seachange) and any research regarding marine monitoring programmes.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Update on status of the Marine Spatial Plan

159

     

Signatories

Authors

Janine Geddes - Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2013/2014

 

File No.: CP2013/26134

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Waiheke Local Board 2013/2014 Small Local Improvement Project (SLIP) programme and recommends projects for approval and commencement.

Executive Summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board had $449,000 SLIPs capital expenditure and $349,000 SLIPs operational expenditure to allocate in the 2012/2013 financial year. Both of these budgets have been 100% allocated. The Waiheke Island Local Board has projects carried forward from the 2012/2013 financial year. Information regarding these projects is shown in the Waiheke SLIPs programme attachment.

3.       The Waiheke Island Local Board has $441,263 SLIPs capital expenditure and $310,029 SLIPs operational funding available to allocate in the 2013/2014 financial year.

4.       To date the Waiheke Island Local Board has allocated $314,830 or 73% of their capital expenditure budget and $212,150 or 70% of their operational expenditure budget.

5.       Approval of the recommendations in this report will allocate $427,770 Capex or 97% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and $233,450 or 75% of the available operational expenditure leaving $13,492 capital expenditure and $76,579 operational expenditure for scoping prioritisation and project approval by the Local Board.

6.       Further SLIPs funding reports for 2013/2014 financial year will be put to the board for project approval and implementation.

7.       All 2013/2014 projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year; to enable commencement and completion between prior to 30th June 2014. 

8.       Most projects will need six months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year. Projects that have budget allocated to them with less then six months remaining within the current financial year, will be at risk of not being completed by 2013/2014 financial year end. As a result the project completion, as per the agreed delivery programme, may be deferred across into the following 2014/2015 financial year for completion.


 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)       Delegate authority to the spokesperson to provide guidance and advice to the SLIPs team regarding their allocated proposals and delegates authority to the spokesperson and chair of the board, to be exercised together, to make additional funding decisions where a variation to a project scope is needed due to unforeseen circumstances.

b)       Receives the Waiheke Island SLIPs report and the December 2013 programme update.

c)       Considers whether scoping for the public toilet on Belgium Street is to be progressed at this stage.

d)       Approves the following SLIPs projects for implementation during the 2013/2014 financial year and confirms the Project Spokespersons for each project:

No

Project description

Capex/ Opex

Budget value

Local board Spokesperson/s

1.

Little Oneroa Concept Plan

Opex

$5,200

TBC

2.

Valley of Tranquillity Concept Plan

Opex

$4,000

TBC

3.

Onetangi Sports Park / Rangihoua Orientation Signage x 3

Capex

$13,750

TBC

 

e)       Note that SLIPs projects with the status “On hold” are currently being reviewed by Local Board members, who will provide direction and guidance to the SLIPs portfolio leader on the following SLIPs projects:

No

Project description

Capex/ Opex

Budget value

1.

Future Interpretative Sign research – to identify appropriate locations and content

Scoping resolution

 

2.

Removal of inorganic rubbish on the beach and around the old Oyster Boat Shed, Anzac Bay and manufacture and installation of a sign

Scoping resolution

 

3.

Scope WWI commemorations

Scoping resolution

 

4.

White House garage upgrade works

Capex

$25,000

5.

Robust Oneroa Street Pole Banners

Capex

$8,500

6.

Ballysaggart Track from Hill Road to Crescent Road East Extension

Capex

$4,104

Discussion

9.       The Waiheke Local Board had $449,000 SLIPs capital expenditure and $349,000 SLIPs operational expenditure to allocate in the 2012/2013 financial year. Both of these budgets have been 100% allocated. The Waiheke Island Local Board has projects carried forward from the 2012/2013 financial year. Information regarding these projects is shown in the Waiheke SLIPs programme attachment.

10.     The Waiheke Island Local Board has approximately $441,263 SLIPs capital funding and $310,029 SLIPs operational funding available to allocate in the 2013/2014 financial year.

          Recommendations for the allocation of SLIPs 2013/2014 opex and capex budgets are being sought in this report. The detail regarding these proposals is attached to this report as the, “SLIPs Project Summary for Waiheke Local Board December meeting 2013”.

11.     Approval of the recommendations in this report will allocate $427,770 Capex or 97% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and $233,450 or 75% of the available operational expenditure leaving $13,492 capital expenditure and $76,579 operational expenditure for scoping prioritisation and project approval by the Local Board.

12.     Further SLIPs funding reports for 2013/2014 financial year will be put to the board for project approval and implementation.

13.     All 2013/2014 projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year; to enable commencement and completion between prior to 30th June 2014. 

14.     Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) funding is for projects that deliver a local community benefit. SLIPs funding provides an opportunity for the community to engage with their elected representatives and see the outcome of their funding decisions in a relatively short timeframe. The main criteria are that the proposal must provide a benefit to the local community. SLIPs can also be approved of in the form of a grant, up to the value of 100%.

SLIPs provide the Local Board with an opportunity to fund and provide solutions to their local communities, which are not covered by day-to-day council business.  Historically SLIPs projects have received a lot of coverage from the local media. Examples of previous SLIPs projects include Anti-Graffiti murals, traffic calming devices, additional seating in parks, rubbish bins and playgrounds, basketball and volleyball courts, skate parks, toilets, new pathways etc.

Onetangi Sports Park Orientation Signage:

 

15.     The board’s attention is drawn to the scoping of the Onetangi Sports Park – Rangihoua signage (refer Attachment A).  These signs have been priced using the standard Auckland Council local and sports parks plinth design and not utilising the Around Waiheke Walkway interpretative sign template as requested by the previous board.

 

The reasons for this are:

 

·    The Onetangi Sports Park – Rangihoua is not planned to be part of the Around Waiheke Walkway

·    Most of the existing signage within Onetangi Sports Park – Rangihoua uses the standard Auckland Council local and sports park design

·    The Around Waiheke Walkway signage template would require further development (design, material, mounting/installation specifications) before it can be applied

·    The Auckland Council local and sports park plinth can be supplied and installed without delay

Consideration

Local Board Views

16.     This report canvasses the views of the Waiheke Local Board.

17.     The recommendations contained within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority.

Maori Impact Statement

18.     Parks and open spaces contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate consultation will follow.

General

19.     Communities are impacted by SLIPs projects. They provide an opportunity for staff and elected representatives to engage with the communities on their specific needs.   SLIPs staff will liaise directly with all residents and stakeholders impacted by any SLIPs or Discretionary funded projects to be delivered.

20.     Funding for the proposed projects within this report would be obtained from the Waiheke Local Board’s Small Local Improvement Project budget allocation. After allocating budget to all the projects listed in this report and elsewhere, the Waiheke Local Board will still have SLIPs capital and operational funding remaining unallocated. Further reporting as part of the monthly work programme reporting will be used to determine what other projects the board may wish to fund.

21.     SLIPs need to comply with all relevant legislation, including the Resource Management Act 1991, the Local Government Act and all Auckland Council policies.

 

Implementation Issues

22.     All 2013/2014 projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year; to enable commencement and completion between prior to 30th June 2014. 

23.     Most projects will need six months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year. Projects that have budget allocated to them with less then six months remaining within the current financial year, will be at risk of not being completed by 2013/2014 financial year end. As a result the project completion, as per the agreed delivery programme, may be deferred across into the following 2014/2015 financial year for completion.

24.     Longer term projects will result in SLIPs capital funding being carried forward to the 2014/2015 financial year and these projects not being delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year.

25.     Budgets for projects funded from 2013/2014 SLIPs operational expenditure must be fully expended within the 2013/2014 financial year.

26.     The ability to spend/deliver outcomes is dependent on the availability of experienced staff or consultant project management resource.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Project Summary for Waiheke Local Board December 2013

177

b

Waiheke Programme December 2013

183

    

Signatories

Authors

Susan Thomas - SLIPs Project Portfolio Leader

Oliver  Kunzendorff  - Team Leaser SLIPs

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Rangihoua Wetland Restoration - Baseline Monitoring Results

 

File No.: CP2013/25633

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present to the Waiheke Local Board (the Board) the results of baseline monitoring of pest animals and freshwater fish and macroinvertebrates at Rangihoua as part of the implementation of the Rangihoua wetland restoration plan.

Executive Summary

2.       Baseline monitoring of pest animals and freshwater fish and macroinvertebrates was undertaken to ensure the outcomes of restoration efforts at Rangihoua Wetland can be measured over the five years of the project. A set of baseline data has now been established through the undertaking of initial pest animal, freshwater and weed surveys at Rangihoua wetland.

3.       A summary memo outlining the results of the monitoring work was tabled at the Board’s September 2013 meeting. The Board subsequently requested that the results be noted in a formal report to the Board. This report actions that request.

 

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receives the Rangihoua Wetland Restoration – Baseline Monitoring Results report.

b)      Notes that ongoing monitoring of pest animals should be undertaken annually as part of the implementation and monitoring of the Rangihoua wetland restoration.

c)      Notes that monitoring of freshwater and macro invertebrates should be undertaken every five years.

 

 

Discussion

Native freshwater fish and macro invertebrate baseline monitoring.

4.       The freshwater survey of the Rangihoua Wetland and associated streams was undertaken in May 2013. Three streams bisect the Council-owned land (Onetangi Sports Park and Waiheke Golf Course); all drain in a westerly direction into the Rangihoua Creek Estuary. A total of seven stream and wetland sites were investigated, with a focus on fish and macroinvertebrate communities.

5.       A freshwater survey of the two northern streams (golf course streams) was undertaken in 2006 as part of the Golf Course Development Plan.  The same monitoring sites used in the 2006 survey were used in the 2013 survey, with three additional sites added in 2013.

Results of 2012/2013 monitoring

6.       Only five of the seven sites provided suitable water depth to allow freshwater fauna monitoring to be undertaken. Fish communities as well as macroinvertebrates (snails, insect larvae etc) were surveyed. These fauna communities are established indicators of habitat quality and are easily sampled. The Macro Invertebrate Community Index (MCI) and %EPT (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera groups) were recorded for each site.  These common measures of macroinvertebrate communities provide indicators of water quality, and habitat conditions.

7.       An MCI score of less than 80 indicates poor water quality and a score of greater than 119 indicates excellent water quality All five Rangihoua sites had MCI scores of less than 80.  Some macroinvertebrates are particularly sensitive to pollution, in particular invertebrates in the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera groups (mayflies, stoneflies and caddisflies), which forms a measurement called '%EPT'. Low %EPT indicates a river is under pollution stress, while high %EPT indicates good water quality. All Rangihoua sites recorded a 0%EPT which is an indication that all three streams have poor water quality and are suffering from pollution stress.

8.       Temperatures, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen in the streams were also measured. Information on aquatic vegetation, general habitat characteristics, such as substrate type, and stream depth was also collected and photographs were taken at each site.

9.       Water temperature and dissolved oxygen are important parameters to indicate if a stream can support life. If water temperatures increase beyond their usual ranges for too long, plants and animals in waterways can become stressed and die.

10.     Four of the five sites monitored at Rangihoua wetland had dissolved oxygen below acceptable levels and all sites had moderate to high water temperatures (between 17.2-19.8°C). As water temperatures in the 2013 survey were recorded in late autumn, it would be expected that summer water temperature would be much higher and would reach temperatures beyond the tolerance levels of most native freshwater fish species. These poor results are also reflected in the diversity of the fish communities recorded. Native eels and exotic Gambusia fish were found at most sites. Both these fish species are tolerant of high water temperatures and poor water quality. There was an obvious lack of fish diversity at the sites and none of the more sensitive native fish species were recorded.

11.     Fish communities at five sites were monitored using a combination of minnow traps, fyke nets and electric fishing. All fish captured were identified, their size estimated and counted before being returned to their habitats. Freshwater fish database forms were completed for each site. Four of the five sites had fish recorded. Shortfin and Longfin eels were the only native fish species recorded, with adult and juveniles observed. Two sites had the exotic fish Gambusia record in high numbers. This species is highly invasive and tolerates poor quality water conditions.

12.     The absence of fish from the section of stream (Site 5) between the wetland and online pond is likely a factor of the shallow instream water depth and intermittent nature of this section of the watercourse. The pond outlet to the online irrigation pond (Site 1) is forming a barrier to fish and retrofit of an engineered fish passage is required (this is a condition of consent for the golf course).

13.     The 2013 survey and results of the 2006 survey confirm that the ponded and wetland habitats provide the most substantial habitats for aquatic biota, and therefore require protection and restoration. The Rangihoua Wetland Restoration Plan and Waiheke Golf Course Wetland Restoration Plan will support the protection and restoration of these wetland habitats.

14.     Future riparian planting of these areas will enhance streamside shading and trailing cover, to help reduce instream water temperatures and minimise algal blooms and excessive algal growth, and improve instream habitats for native fish.

15.     Restoration of the wetlands and streams wil, over time, increase shade to instream habitat, reduce water temperatures and increase dissolved oxygen to create more hospitable environment for native aquatic fauna. Continued monitoring every five years will enable these changes to be measured.

16.     Use and management of nutrients, such as fertiliser and herbicides, into the wetlands and water ways should be addressed by surrounding landusers, to limit and reduce the impact of pollutants on stream and wetland habitats. This issue will be addressed in the proposed wetland restoration workshops with neighbouring landowners.

 

 

 

Pest animal baseline monitoring.

17.     Baseline monitoring for rodents and stoats was undertaken in June 2013. It is necessary to undertake baseline pest animal monitoring at the start of the Rangihoua Wetland restoration project, to gauge pest animal levels and pest species present.

18.     Contractors setup a network of monitoring tunnels. Monitoring locations were determined using GIS analysis. Due to the linear shape of the wetland edge only three animal pest control monitoring lines could be fitted into the site. Each line consisted of ten Black Trakka tunnels spaced at approximately 50m apart.

19.     For rodent monitoring, tracking ink cards were placed in the tunnels on the 6th June 2013 and baited with peanut butter. These were removed after one night.  For mustelids, tracking ink cards were placed in the tunnels on 7 June 2013 and removed after three nights. Frozen pilchards were used as the lure.

Results of 2012/2013 baseline monitoring

20.     Rodent monitoring results show that that there is a reasonable population of rats and mice around the wetland edge. 11 out of 30 cards were tracked by rats and 13 out of 30 cards were tracked by mice. There is currently no rodent control happening in the immediate vicinity of the wetland and there is sufficient food and habitat available for rodents to thrive.

21.     Mustelid monitoring showed that one tracking tunnel was visited by a stoat. In addition, a high proportion of the stoat tracking tunnels were visited by rodents and one smudged mark of probably a cat was recorded. The local community has reported several sightings of stoats along the causeway crossing the Rangihoua estuary. The food that is left out for feral chickens at the Onetangi Sports Park entrance is attracting large numbers of rats and encouraging stoats into the area. Therefore, bait stations and traps near this location may need checking more frequently. This site has a very high edge effect, which will result in constant reinvasion of animal pests from surrounding areas.

22.     As a result of the above finding, Local Parks staff are currently implementing the recommended pest control programme setup.  Contractors have installed a network of bait stations and traps around the edge of the Rangihoua Wetland, in order that regular animal pest control visits can be undertaken. The programme will target rodents and stoats and start in September 2013 which is inline with the start of bird breeding season.

23.     Local Parks staff have recruited local volunteers to assist with the animal pest control programme. Volunteers are needed to raise awareness about the project, record sightings of animal pests, carrying out bait station and trap maintenance, undertake animal pest monitoring and get involved in wildlife surveying (e.g. birds) in future. Volunteers have a valuable role to play in ensuring the success and long-term continuity of this project, as well as establish community ownership.  A volunteer training workshop was held at the end of September.

Consideration

Local Board Views

24.     A summary memo outlining the results of the baseline monitoring work was tabled at the Board’s September 2013 meeting (resolution WHK/2013/292). Due to the high priority accorded wetland restoration by the Board, the Board requested at that time that a formal report on the baseline monitoring work be included on the Board’s next agenda. This report actions that request.

25.     The Board endorsed the restoration plan for the Rangihoua wetland at its April 2013 meeting and noted that ongoing funding for restoration works requires funding from the Board’s wetland restoration and small local improvement projects (SLIPS) budget lines (resolution number WHK/2013/99).  Funding for the implementation of the year two physical works programme was agreed at the Board’s July 2013 meeting, including a total of $4000 for ongoing pest control and monitoring (resolution numbers WHK/2013/218 and WHK/2013/222).

Maori Impact Statement

26.     No consultation with Maori was undertaken for the purposes of this report.  Consultation with iwi may be required as part of the implementation of any wetland restoration project.

General

27.     Ongoing monitoring can be assessed against the baseline data established through this initial monitoring to determine the success of the restoration work, changes in habitat quality can be recorded, and methodologies adjusted accordingly. This enables the ongoing support of the project to be justified to the local community, stakeholders and the Board.

28.     No external consultation was required for the purposes of this report.  Staff from the Biodiversity team liaise regularly with appropriate staff in Council’s Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) and Local Parks teams in delivering the restoration programme.

Implementation Issues

29.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report. Project implementation is managed by staff in Council’s SLIPs and Local Parks team with ongoing technical advice and support from Environmental Services.

30.     Regular reporting on the implementation of the Rangihoua wetland restoration project is through the quarterly report from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department, or as required.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Miranda Bennett – Senior Biodiversity Advisor 

Authorisers

Gael Ogilvie – Manager: Environmental Services Unit

John Dragicevich – Infrastructure and Environmental Services Manager

Judith Webster – Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Infrastructure and Environmental Services Update Report

 

File No.: CP2013/25641

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This quarterly update from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES) department covers the period from August to October 2013.  It reports on both regional and place based activities undertaken by the three I&ES units – Environmental Services, Stormwater and Solid Waste.

2.       This report also tracks the delivery and expenditure of environmental budget lines from the 2013/2014 Local Board Agreement (LBA), as assigned to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department.

Executive Summary

3.       The I&ES Department delivers on the Auckland Plan and Local Board Plans through the delivery of environmental programmes, regional stormwater and waste services, as well as the maintenance and enhancement of Auckland's natural environment.

4.       This report has been written to update the Board on the delivery of activities and work programmes by I&ES.  A number of these regional activities have a distinct local involvement and impact and are detailed in the attachments to this report.

5.       This report also includes some background information for newly elected board members, to familiarise them with the work programme and priorities of the department.

 

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receives the Infrastructure and Environmental Services update report.

b)      Endorses the design for the new signage to be installed on Rakino.

 

Discussion

6.       This report and attachments specifically details the activities delivered by the three units of I&ES within the Board area which support and contribute to the following Local Board Plan priorities and initiatives:

Priority

·     Protecting and Enhancing our Environment

·     Building a strong community identity

Projects / Initiatives

·     Enhanced weed management including increased service levels, development of an education programme and the continuation of cost-effective and environmentally safe practices.

·     Wetland restoration / creation / protection programme.

·     Local environmental programmes such as wetland restoration, community gardens and orchards, weed and pest control and waste minimisation.

·     Continuation of regional initiatives on bio-security on the Hauraki Gulf Islands.

·     Monitoring of water quality to ensure ecological integrity (recreational monitoring programme).

 

7.       In addition this report may detail activities which may not be specifically identified in the Local Board Plan but which will; impact on the local area.

8.       The following provides some background information for board members, to familiarise them with the work programmes and priorities delivered by the three units within the I and ES department.

Environmental Services Unit

9.       The Auckland Plan describes a transformational shift to ‘strongly commit to environmental action and green growth’.  It is the responsibility of the Environmental Services Unit (ESU) within I and ES to support that shift through the development, promotion and implementation of projects that support environment and sustainability outcomes.

10.     Improving freshwater quality is a key focus for ESU and is supported through the implementation of catchment-based restoration projects (such as the Sustainable Catchments Programme and Project Twin Streams), land management programmes, and community education initiatives such as Wai Care.

11.     The vision of the Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy is to ensure that Auckland’s biodiversity is flourishing and treasured. In supporting this vision, as well as that of the Auckland Plan, the biodiversity team provide technical advice to ecological restoration projects being delivered by either Council or private landowners. Biodiversity staff also provides technical input into the evaluation of resource consent applications and other statutory processes, such as the development of the draft unitary plan. 

12.     Biosecurity works alongside biodiversity to contribute to environmental outcomes. Biosecurity is responsible for the implementation of the Regional Pest Management Strategy through a number of programmes, and is also responsible for the regional coordination of national biosecurity management programmes, such as the local response to kauri dieback and kiwifruit vine disease (PSA).

13.     ESU also delivers a number of projects that support community development through engaging communities in environment and sustainability projects.  These projects include Wai Care, Enviroschools and Trees for Survival.  In addition, ESU is currently developing and trialling a number of household sustainability initiatives in various local board areas. 

Solid Waste Unit

14.     The Solid Waste Unit, within the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department, is responsible for the management of the region’s kerbside domestic refuse, recycling, hazardous waste, inorganics, illegal dumping and litter collection. It also manages some transfer stations, and develops and delivers waste minimisation programmes. It is made up of four main operational delivery groups; Waste Planning, Waste Minimisation, Waste Operations and Waste Infrastructure and Assets.

15.     The Waste Planning team is responsible for carrying out implementation planning for the delivery of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) and ensuring our waste operations and plans are consistent with regional waste bylaws and national level waste legislation. They advocate council views to central government on waste issues.

16.     The Waste Minimisation team is responsible for the development, management and delivery of waste minimisation behaviour change and education programmes to households, businesses, and schools. This includes programmes such as the Create Your Own Eden composting courses and WasteWise schools.

17.     The Waste Operations team is responsible for the management of the region’s kerbside domestic refuse, recycling and inorganic waste collection services, servicing and maintaining public litter bins and loose litter cleaning.

18.     The Waste Assets and Infrastructure team is responsible for providing infrastructure to ensure Auckland meets its obligations under the Waste Management Act for the safe and efficient recovery, recycling and disposal of waste across the region.

19.     These infrastructure requirements are managed in many ways. For example, through direct service supply contracts for delivery of waste to landfill, Build Operate Own and Transfer contracts for facilities to process recycling, and through council-owned assets and operations such as those at the Waitakere Transfer Station in Henderson and the Claris Landfill on Great Barrier Island. In addition, the team also procures and manages the stock of refuse and recycling bins and public litter bins. Finally, they work with suppliers to make provision for hazardous waste drop off, recovery and disposal.

Stormwater Unit

20.     Council’s Stormwater Unit is largely responsible for two of the activities outlined in the 2010 amendment of the Local Government Act 2002: Stormwater drainage, and flood protection and control, and is required to comply with the Resource Management Act and other legal requirements. The purpose of these activities is to minimise the nuisance of flooding, protect people and property from the adverse effects of extreme storm events and protect the environment and public health by reducing stormwater contaminant and sediment runoff that is discharged into natural waters.

21.     Council’s stormwater functions are guided by the draft Stormwater Unit Strategic Direction and the Stormwater Asset Management Plan 2012-2032.

22.     The Stormwater Asset Management Plan is updated every three years and its review is a key focus for the 2013/14 financial year. The Stormwater Asset Management Plan spans a 20-year period with focus on the ten year period covered in the council’s 10-year Long Term Plan (LTP).  The Stormwater Asset Management Plan addresses all major asset based activities.  A primary purpose of asset management planning is to ensure that present and future customer service requirements are met while managing assets in the most cost effective manner.

23.     The draft Stormwater Unit Strategic Direction was completed in 2013.  It is a non-statutory document aligned to the Auckland Plan that guides the operational matters of the council in relation to stormwater that informs and engenders support from internal and external parties involved in stormwater management.  The document ultimately will be incorporated into the updated Stormwater Unit Asset Management Plan 2015-2035.

Consideration

Local Board Views

24.     This is a report prepared specifically for the Local Board.

Maori Impact Statement

25.     While this report is for information only and does not require any decision making, it is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Implementation Issues

26.     The activities detailed in this report are within budget. Any decisions arising from discussions and planned changes to work programmes will have financial and resourcing implications which will need to be managed.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Environmental Services Unit update

197

b

Rakino Island signage

199

c

Stormwater Local Board Update Report

201

d

Solid Waste Update Report

207

e

Auckland Household Waste Prevention Study

213

     

Signatories

Authors

Lucy Hawcroft - Relationship Advisor

Varsha Belwalkar - Stormwater Liaison Advisor

Emma Joyce - Relationship Advisor

Mara Bebich - Senior Relationship & Engagement Advisor  

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Stormwater Local Board Update Report (Waiheke)

 

Relevant to Local Board priority: Protecting and enhancing our environment

 

Relevant to Local Board initiatives: Local environmental programmes such as wetland restoration, community gardens and orchards, weed and pest control and waste minimisation

 

Auckland Council’s Stormwater Unit is largely responsible for two of the activities outlined in the 2010 amendment of the Local Government Act 2002: Stormwater drainage, and flood protection and control, and is required to comply with the Resource Management Act and other legal requirements. The purpose of these activities is to minimise flooding, protect people and property from the adverse effects of extreme storm events and protect the environment and public health by reducing stormwater contaminant and sediment runoff that discharge into natural waterways.

The Stormwater Unit operates and maintains an extensive stormwater network comprising 6,000 km of pipe, 10,000 km of streams, 140,000 manholes, and 370 ponds and wetlands. Stormwater activities are generally of a regional activity with both local and regional impacts. This report provides the local board with its quarterly update on delivery of the stormwater work programme including any key highlights is structured to reflect the levels on which the regional stormwater programme is delivered:

-     Regional (e.g. annual plan, asset management plan)

-     Sub-regional (e.g. network consents)

-     Local (e.g. catchment plans and programmes)

-     Site specific (projects)

This report detail highlights on these stormwater programmes, including the Unitary Plan, technical guidelines, education initiatives, and network discharge consents.

Managing stormwater requires co-operation from a number of parties within and external to council (Figure 1)

Figure 1.  Contributors to stormwater outcomes.

 

 

 

 

Regional

Strategic Documents

Council’s stormwater functions are guided by the draft Stormwater Unit Strategic Direction and the Stormwater Asset Management Plan 2012-2032. The Stormwater Asset Management Plan is updated every three years and its review is a key focus for the 2013/14 financial year. The Stormwater Asset Management Plan spans a 20-year period with focus on the ten year period covered in the council’s 10-year Long Term Plan (LTP).  The Stormwater Asset Management Plan addresses all major asset based activities.  A primary purpose of asset management planning is to ensure that present and future customer service requirements are met while managing assets in the most cost effective manner.

 

The draft Stormwater Unit Strategic Direction was completed in 2013.  It is a non-statutory document aligned to the Auckland Plan that guides the operational matters of the council in relation to stormwater that informs and engenders support from internal and external parties involved in stormwater management.  The document ultimately will be incorporated into the updated Stormwater Unit Asset Management Plan 2015-2035.

 

Figure 2 encapsulates the direction and way that council manages stormwater and shows the commitment to the Auckland Plan vision to become the world’s most liveable city.

 

 

Figure 2.  Auckland Council Stormwater Objectives

 

Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP) was notified on Monday 30 September and is available on the Auckland Council website. The Stormwater Unit is working through how the provisions with immediate legal effect may impact the stormwater capital works consenting. The Unit is also working with the Special Housing Office, Resource Consents Department, and Unitary Plan teams to support implementation of stormwater management and flooding provisions in the PAUP.

Best Practice, Stormwater Education, and Technical Advice

The Council publishes stormwater and sediment best practice guidelines and construction practice notes, which are non-statutory documents.  Best practice guidelines are reviewed and updated at regular intervals to remain current.  A number of guidelines are under review and scheduled for update in the next three years as detailed below.

 

Table 1.  Stormwater and sediment best practice guidelines

Guideline or standard

Anticipated completion date

Stormwater Code of Practice

Completed (2013)

GD01 (TP10) Design guideline manual for stormwater treatment devices (ARC 2003)

2014

GD02 (TP108) Guideline for stormwater runoff modelling in the Auckland region (ARC 1999)

2014

GD 03 Proprietary Device Evaluation Protocol for Stormwater Quality Treatment Devices.

GD03/2012 published

GD04 (TP124) Low impact design manual for the Auckland region (ARC 2000)

 Nov 2013

GD05 (TP90) Erosion and sediment control guideline for land disturbing activities in the Auckland region (ARC 1999)

2014

Soakage design manual (ACC 2002)

 TR2013/040 published

On-site stormwater management manual (ACC 2003)

TR2013/040 published

GD06 (TP58) On-site wastewater management (ARC 2004)

2015

 

Stormwater Education and Community Programmes

 

Council manages a range of educational and community programmes that support stormwater and environmental outcomes. The focus of this team over the next year will be implementing the Regional Stormwater Education Implementation Plan. This plan lays out a three year plan with a regional focus to meet network discharge consent requirements and activities including:

·    Development and promotion of Water Sensitive Design demonstration sites,

·    Updated content for the Environmental Training for Industry education courses.

·    Delivery of new courses for the Environmental Training for Industry programme including Water Sensitive Design,

·    Delivery of stormwater education events including the annual Sediment Field Day and Auckland Council Stormwater Seminar,

·    Development of a pre-application advisory service to support update of Water Sensitive Design and stream restoration,

·    Educational outreach (e.g. Great Drain Game, low impact design competition with the University of Auckland),

·    A region wide attitudes, awareness and behaviors research survey,

·    Development of an integrated communications plan for stormwater initiatives and programmes

·    Development of a regional pollution prevention plan, and

·    Development of proactive education programmes focused on minimising sedimentation from small construction sites.

 

Sub-Regional

Operations

Currently Stormwater operations contracts to manage stormwater assets in the road corridor are managed by Auckland Council Stormwater Unit in the south, central and west of Auckland. The northern contract is currently still managed by Auckland Transport and will be handed over to Auckland Council in July 2014.

In the 2013/14 financial year, Stormwater Operations is focusing on:

 

 

·          effectively operating and maintaining the stormwater network,

·          responding to incidents and storm events,

·          working collaboratively with the maintenance contractors to improve customer services and responses,

·          the successful procurement of the new northern maintenance contract,

·          driving health and safety for our staff and stakeholders and implementation of a safety improvement programme,

·          securing knowledge of our critical assets and renewals,

·          prioritise and carry out works with efficiency and sound financial management to ensure value for money, and

·          undertaking minor stormwater pond rehabilitation and capital works renewals.

 

Network Discharge Consents

Network Discharge Consents based on Consolidated Receiving Environments (Figure 3) are currently being prepared for the Waitemata Harbour, Greater Tamaki, Hauraki Gulf Islands, and Manukau Harbour. The Waitemata Harbour Network Discharge Consent will be the first of its kind. Consultation on the Greater Tamaki Consolidated Receiving Environment has commenced and consultation on the Hauraki Gulf Island and Manukau Harbour Consolidated Receiving Environment are scheduled for later in this financial year.

 

CRE Catchments 2

Figure 3. Stormwater Consolidated Receiving Environments

 

 

 

Local

Catchment Planning

In the 2012/13 financial year, catchment planning provided significant input into the preparation of the Unitary Plan including mapping flood areas, Stormwater Management Areas – Flow (SMAF), and into the location of mixed and terraced housing zones. 

 

The Catchment Planning Group was also involved in the Rural Urban Boundary investigations and undertaking cost estimates to service growth and inputting into the Housing Accord.

 

A focus for the Council in 2013/14 is to provide input into initiatives to enable growth delivery in priority areas including Housing Accord zones. Input consists of:

 

·      preparing base information related to catchment planning to enable quick responses to development related initiatives, and

·      taking part in strategic initiatives such as Rural Urban Boundary-investigations, area planning, submission process to the Unitary Plan and precinct plans.

 

Site specific

Stormwater Physical Works Programme 2013/14

The Council’s 2013/14 stormwater capital works programme consists of 159 physical works projects as reported by local board area in the previous local board quarterly report. An update on the status and progress of physical works projects within your local board area will be provided in the next update report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Solid Waste Local Board Update Report (Waiheke)

 

Relevant to Local Board priority: Protecting and enhancing our environment

 

Relevant to Local Board initiatives:

·   Improved waste management and more island-based sustainable solutions, such as recycling bins in village and key destinations

·   Local environmental programmes such as wetland restoration, community gardens and orchards, weed and pest control and waste minimisation

 

 

Overview

 

This update describes the activities of the Solid Waste unit with regards to regional programmes and local achievements over the update period, August to October 2013. Some background information about the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) is also provided for newly elected board members.

 

 

The Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

 

A major priority for the Solid Waste unit over the next four years will be to implement the Auckland WMMP. This plan was approved by the governing body in June 2012, after extensive consultation with the public, key stakeholders and local boards. Its vision is that:

 

“To become the most liveable city in the world, Auckland will aim for the long-term, aspirational goal of ‘Zero Waste’ by 2040, turning its waste into resources.”

 

To help achieve this goal, the plan also sets some bold targets. These are:

·    to reduce the amount of domestic kerbside waste sent to landfill by 30% by 2018, from 160 kg to 110 kg per capita per year.

·    to reduce council’s own in-house waste by 30% per capita by 2018

·    to reduce total council and private sector influenced waste to landfill by 30% by 2027.

 

To achieve this final goal, council will have to work closely with the commercial sector as council only directly influences approximately 17% of the waste stream.

 

To achieve these targets, the WMMP identifies a series of key actions. Some of the main activities that are highlighted in the WMMP for the Hauraki Gulf Islands, include:

·    User pays rubbish collection. A “pay as you throw” collection will be introduced to Waiheke, along with the rest of the Auckland region, after July 2015. The typical bin size used for this collection will be 120 litres, although residents will have a choice of using either a smaller or larger bin (ranging in size from 60 to 240 litres) or bags. Although the rest of the Auckland region will shift over to a purely user pays rubbish system, due to the higher cost of providing waste services to the Hauraki Gulf Islands, the charges for rubbish collection on Waiheke will also be partially subsidised through rates at a level still to be decided.

·    On island solutions: Develop on-island solutions to maximise reuse and recycling and help keep resources, such as organic material, out of the waste stream.

·    Community engagement and education: Engage communities who will be most impacted on by the shift towards a user pays rubbish collection in developing innovative, local solutions to help minimise waste. Waiheke (along with the other Hauraki Gulf Islands) has been identified as a priority area for this work.

 

Development of a Resource Recovery Network


Another key project included in the WMMP that council is working on is the development of a Resource Recovery Network (RRN).

 

The RRN would consist of a network of facilities across the region that would provide a convenient place for local residents and businesses to drop off their used furniture, clothes, whiteware, hazardous waste and other materials. Planning for the RRN is still underway but it is envisaged it would include:

·     a small number of large Resource Recovery Parks focused predominantly on commercial waste or resources that would act as more substantial hubs of the network

·     a larger number of smaller Community Recycling Centres (CRCs) focused on serving local households and businesses

·     local Drop-off Depots for isolated areas or where there is limited space.

 

These facilities would be spread across the region and could be run by businesses, community or voluntary organisations, and iwi. They will enable large quantities of reusable and recyclable materials to be diverted from landfill and create local employment.

 

In the short-term, five council-owned sites have been identified as being priorities for redevelopment into resource recovery facilities from 2014. These are the:

1.    Waiuku Transfer Station

2.    Waitakere Refuse and Recycling Centre

3.    Central isthmus site (location to be identified)

4.    Devonport Transfer Station

5.    Helensville Resource Recovery Centre

 

Several local boards have also become involved in funding or supporting feasibility studies for Community Recycling Centres, and this is an area where other local boards may wish to have further involvement in future.

 

 

Update on Ongoing Solid Waste Activities

 

 

Waste Planning

 

This team is responsible for carrying out implementation planning for the delivery of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan (WMMP) and ensuring our waste operations and plans are consistent with regional waste bylaws and national level waste legislation. They advocate council views to central government on waste issues.

 

Regional activities and achievements

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund: The second round of the waste fund closed on 31 October 2013. This round has a total value of $475,000. A list of applications to the fund will be sent to board members in November, and they will be asked to give feedback and local input on applications from their area.

 

Waste collection controls: These controls regulate issues such as the times that waste can be collected and the levels of contamination allowed in refuse and recycling containers. After consultation with local boards in July and August, the controls were approved by the Regional Development and Operations Committee in September. They became operational on 1 November.

TV TakeBack programme: This programme enables Aucklanders to recycle their old analogue televisions at various drop off points around the region for just $2 at council subsidised sites. It is being delivered by Ministry for the Environment, with some council support. A memo was sent to all local board members with more information about the scheme, before it opened on 23 October. A full list of all the available sites for residents to use and the cost of each is available at www.tvtakeback.govt.nz. The main site available on Waiheke is the Waiheke Transfer Station. Sites will remain open until roughly 70,000 televisions have been recycled across the region.

 

 

Waste Minimisation

 

This team is responsible for the development, management and delivery of waste minimisation behaviour change and education programmes to households, businesses, and schools. This includes programmes such as Create Your Own Eden and WasteWise schools.

 

Regional activities and achievements

 

Auckland Household Waste Prevention Survey: This was the first regionally representative survey of Aucklanders’ attitudes and behaviours towards waste carried out by council. Analysing and publishing the results of this survey has been a major focus for the team over the update period. A summary of survey results is provided in a separate attachment.

 

Supporting events to minimise their waste: Council is working with the Auckland Community Zero Waste Alliance (ACZWA) to support 15-20 events around the region to reduce their waste. The first event which was chosen for support was the Waitakere Festival, which was held in Henderson in late October. This had an excellent result with a diversion of 95% of all event waste from landfill. Officers are still working to confirm which events, if any, will be supported in the board area. Board members will be informed as soon as an event is chosen.

 

Text Box:  
Composting for Community tutors celebrate the first year of the programme.
Composting for Communities: This programme focuses on large households with high volumes of food waste in the Asian and Pacific communities. In the first 18 months of the programme, eight tutors from the Tongan, Cook Islands, Niuean, Chinese and Samoan communities have delivered 22 courses in composting and bokashi.

 

The results of this new programme were recently assessed. The assessment found that the 426 households involved diverted 181 tonnes of rubbish from landfill per annum, an average of 8.2kg per household per week. The average family involved in the programme went from putting out two and a half bags of rubbish a week to just one. Particularly significant progress has been made in working with the Tongan community and residents of Otara.

Local activities and achievements

 

Community engagement and development: Council continues to engage with Waiheke local groups, community leaders and networks on how to build on the innovation and expertise that exists on the island to develop island-based solutions to waste management. Several Waiheke residents have attended council skill-sharing sessions with other “waste champions” from around the region during the update period. These workshops are helping to build a community-led network to catalyse initiatives across the region. Officers also met with the Sustainable Business Network and the educator at the Waiheke Transfer Station to discuss strategies to compost food waste from cafes and restaurants across the island.

 

Food waste pilot scheme: Council has contracted the Waiheke Resources Trust to work with 220 households in the Blackpool area to support them in reducing their food waste going to landfill. 42 families have already been recruited to take part in the project and have received a “Kai Conscious Waiheke” tool kit to help them reduce their waste. Based on these families’ feedback the kit will be refined before it is distributed to all households in Blackpool in February. Interested residents were invited to a Sunday Roast dinner in November to help develop an action plan for how to engage Blackpool residents in this project. It is envisioned these residents will act as community champions to engage the whole community in the project. Once completed in June 2014, learnings from this project will contribute to the development of a regional programme on 'love food hate waste'.

 

Create Your Own Eden composting courses: This programme offers free three hour workshops to Aucklanders on how to minimise their organic waste through composting, bokashi and worm farms. During the update period, a workshop was held on the island in August with 10 participants.

 

Visits to the learning centre at Waiheke Transfer Station: During the update period, two school groups from the Waiheke Childcare Centre and Waiheke Playgroup, with 59 participants in total, visited the learning centre for an educational tour. One adult group (the BYO Bag Group) with 8 members also visited the station.

 

 

Waste Operations

 

The operations team is responsible for the management of the region’s kerbside domestic refuse, recycling and inorganic waste services, servicing and maintaining public litter bins and loose litter cleaning.

 

Regional activities and achievements

 

Recycling education trials: From June to August, council conducted a 12 week trial in targeted areas of the North Shore and West Auckland to educate residents about how to recycle correctly. This trial involved a visual inspection of residents’ recycling bins, with stickers being attached to bins where residents were recycling incorrectly and an educational letter left in their mail box. In some cases, highly contaminated recycling bins were not collected for a fortnight (one collection cycle). The final results of the trial are still being analysed but initial results indicate that for the duration of the trial a reduction of up to 50% in the percentage of contamination found in recycling bins was achieved in the targeted areas.

 

Customer service: One of the main ways that council has to measure customer satisfaction is to analyse how many requests we receive from the public relating to issues such as late collections, missed bins or loose litter. As shown in Figure One below, from August to October 2013 council received 10,851 Requests for Service (RFS) relating to waste operations. This is slightly lower than the same period in 2012 when 11,213 RFS were received. This shows that the various new waste contracts that were introduced around the region from July 2013 onwards are progressing well.

 

 

Figure One: Requests for service relating to waste issues received in 2012-13

 

Local activities and achievements

 

Educational notices to residents: As part of Transpacific Industries’ encouragement strategy the waste educator at the Waiheke Island Transfer Station has continued sending out letters to households flagging issues where they have not been disposing of recycling or rubbish correctly. In the update period from August to October 2013, 130 letters were sent. Overall, there is a clear downwards trend in the number of letters sent since the strategy began in 2010. This suggests it has helped households to improve their rubbish disposal practices.

 

 

Waste Assets and Infrastructure

 

This team is responsible for providing the infrastructure to ensure that Auckland meets its obligations under the Waste Minimisation Act for the safe and efficient recovery, recycling or final end disposal of waste from residents and ratepayers. They manage various waste assets around the region either directly or indirectly through contractors, including the Waiheke Island Transfer Station.

 

Regional activities

 

Better management of our litter bins: Council is working to develop an Asset Management Database for our litter bins around the region. This will ensure that litter bins which are in poor condition or reaching the end of their lives are replaced as required. The database will also combine all legacy bin records into one central system to ensure operational efficiencies.

 

Local activities and achievements

 

Tonnages through Transfer Station:  The Waiheke Island Transfer Station processes all the rubbish and recycling received from households and businesses on the island. From July to September 2013, the transfer station received and processed 1,081 tonnes of rubbish and 460 tonnes of recycling. This is an overall recycling rate of 30%, which is very similar to that observed in the 2012/13 financial year.


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Parks, Sports & Recreation Quarterly Update to the Waiheke Local Board for Jul-September 2013

 

File No.: CP2013/26219

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Parks, Sports & Recreation (PSR) activities for the July to September 2013 quarter. 

Executive Summary

2.       The Parks, Sports & Recreation (PSR) September 2013 quarterly report to the Local Board seeks to update Local Board members on the activities carried out by the PSR units – Local & Sports Parks (LSP), Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery (RFSD), and Asset Development & Business Support (ADBS) – for the July-September quarter.  The information included is a summary of key departmental indicators within the local board area. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receives the Parks, Sports & Recreation Quarterly Update to the Waiheke Local Board for the July to September 2013 Period report. 

 

 

Discussion

3.       The Parks department (PSR) have been presenting Local Board quarterly reports since the January to March 2011 quarter.  PSR have reviewed the content and format of the report with the intention of making it both concise and more meaningful to the board.  The A3 report format presents a summary of key indicators and comments on progress.  It provides a snapshot of historical performance over the quarter. 

Consideration

Local Board Views

4.       Local Board feedback on the report will assist to enhance its future effectiveness. 

Maori Impact Statement

5.       Iwi will be advised of any projects that may have significance to them and will be consulted with accordingly. 

General

6.         All applicable comments are included in the documents attached. 

Implementation Issues

7.         There are no implementation issues. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Quarterly Report

219

b

Capex Project Summary: Waiheke

221

     

Signatories

Authors

Naila D'Souza - Programme Coordinator

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Golf Club lease boundaries

 

File No.: CP2013/26482

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To report the precise boundaries of the Waiheke Golf Club’s lease at Onetangi Sports Park/Rangihoua to the Waiheke Local Board as per item 25, resolution number WHK2013/32, of the Board dated 21 February 2013.

Executive Summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board appointed a Hearings Panel chaired by an independent commissioner, Gerry Rowan, to hear the submissions and make recommendations on the issuing of leases over Onetangi Sports Park.

3.       The recommendations of the panel were reported to the Waiheke Local Board in the Onetangi Sports Park - Rangihoua hearing decision report.  The local board resolved:

c)     Notes that the Hearings Panel’s approval of a lease to the Waiheke Golf Club excludes the following:

i)         A minimum public access strip of 10 metres around the Coastal Marine Area, or as otherwise agreed to retain established tees and greens within the lease; and

ii)        A public walking access strip of 5 metres around the eastern and southern boundaries of the Park; and

iii)       Also the three significant watercourses within the general location of the golf course, identified in the District Plan as conservation areas;

iv)       and that the precise boundaries of the lease, and the division of responsibility in complying with the conditions of the resource consents are still to be determined, on the ground, by the Panel, with the support of Council officers competent in biodiversity and leasing matters, and in discussion with representatives of the Club.

e)              requests that the results of the process in (c) above to determine the precise boundaries of the leases to be reported to back to the Board.

4.       The precise boundaries of the Golf Club lease were determined by the Hearings Panel members on site with the assistance of relevant staff and representatives of Waiheke Golf Club.

5.       The precise boundaries of the Historical Society Lease were determined by the Hearings Panel members on site with the assistance of relevant staff. Some wetland areas were excluded from the lease so that they could be managed by council.

6.       The precise boundaries of the Riding Club lease were determined by the Hearings Panel members based on the previous lease and were unchanged.

Attachment A shows the precise boundaries of the Golf Club lease.

Attachment B shows the precise boundaries of the Riding Club and Historical Society leases.

7.       Attached for the board’s information is the Waiheke Golf Club lease, signed by Auckland Council and the Waiheke Golf Club, and awaiting consent from the Minister of Conservation.

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receives this report.

 

 

Discussion

 

8.       The precise boundaries of the lease were determined at two site meetings in April and May 2013.  These meetings were attended by members of the Hearings Panel, including board members Storer, Holmes and McKenzie, commissioner Gerry Rowan, staff from Property Group, Community Leasing, Board Services, Parks and Biodiversity and by representatives of the Waiheke Golf Club.

9.       The precise boundaries of the 10 metre public access strip were determined at the site meetings.  A strip of around 10 metres wide which would safely accommodate walkers, cyclists and horse riders without unnecessarily inconveniencing golfers was agreed. The location of the strip was marked with metal boundary markers and GPS measurements taken at each of these points.  The GPS measurements were used to produce the attached map.  The public access strip is shown on the attached map by the yellow line around the edge of the golf course from the Historic Society on Onetangi Road to the entrance to the golf course next to the tennis courts.

10.     The precise boundaries of the 5 metre public walking access strip were determined at the site meetings. A strip of around 5 metres wide around the perimeter of the reserve was agreed. The route crosses a wetland in the south eastern corner of the reserve.  Within this section a boardwalk will be necessary to enable access. The location of the strip was marked with metal boundary markers and GPS measurements taken at each of these points.  The GPS measurements were used to produce Attachment A Waiheke golf course lease boundaries. The public walking access strip is shown on the attached map by the orange line from Onetangi Road around the edge of the reserve to the point where it enters Onetangi Sports Park and meets the bridal path to Trig Hill.

11.     The precise boundaries of the three significant watercourses were determined at the site meetings. An appropriate margin of 5 metres to 20 metres wide along both sides of each watercourse was excluded from the lease to provide a functioning buffer to enable ecosystem services such as sediment control, nutrient filtration, shade and shelter for the watercourse and provision of habitat for Flora and Fauna.

Consideration

Local Board Views

12.     Four local board members were part of the working party. Three members attended the site meetings to determine the exact boundaries of the lease.

Maori Impact Statement

13.     The contribution of parks outcomes is of significant importance to tangata whenua, their well being, values, culture and traditions. Sites of significance to tangata whenua are an important part of their heritage, established through whakapapa. Whilst tangata whenua made a submission on the leasing proposals through the hearing, they were not involved in the setting of the precise boundaries of the golf club lease.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke golf course lease boundaries.

227

b

Map showing boundaries of Riding Club and Historical Society leases.

229

c

Waiheke Golf Club Incorporated Lease

231

     

Signatories

Authors

Gary Wilton - Parks Adviser Hauraki Gulf Islands

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 



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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board Local Board Plan Engagement

 

File No.: CP2013/26956

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present an outline of the local board plan engagement and to request the board delegates representatives to work with the Waiheke Local Board Engagement Advisor to refine the plan and content for consultation.

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October 2014. The local board plans describe the local communities’ aspirations, and their preferences and priorities for the next three years, and beyond.

3.       Waiheke Local Board has workshopped an overall approach to community engagement and identified some key focus areas for engagement. These areas will be refined over time.

4.       Engagement for the Local Board Plan will commence in February 2014 with some informal engagement activities with the community and stakeholders in the board’s area.  A second round of more formal engagement on the draft Local Board Plan will be conducted separately and in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP). Community and stakeholder engagement on the Local Board Plan will be conducted at the same time as the SCP required for the Local Board Agreement.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         Receives the Waiheke Local Board Local Board Plan Engagement report.

b)         Approves in principle the Community Engagement and Communications Plans for the Waiheke Local Board Plan;

c)         Delegates board representatives to work with the Waiheke Local Board Engagement Advisor to refine the engagement and communications plan for implementation in February 2014.

 

 

Discussion

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October 2014. The local board plan describes the local communities’ aspirations, and their preferences and priorities for the next three years, and beyond. 

6.       The role and purpose of the Waiheke Local Board is to: enable democratic local decision-making and action; promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of the community, now and for the future; ensure local people have a voice on local issues and to provide a direct link between the community and the Council; make decisions that are in the best interests of the community as a whole; monitor the facilities and services provided by the Council; act as a sounding board for Council on community and regional matters.

7.       Increasing community and stakeholder engagement is a key focus for the Waiheke Local Board this term. Through a series of workshops with officers, the board has identified a desire to operate inclusively, seeking local views and expertise to advise their priorities, activities and decision-making. The board’s first major piece of engagement will be to seek community input into developing the Draft Waiheke Local Board Plan.

8.       As per the timeline below, consultation and engagement for the local board plan occurs in two stages; firstly, informally with the community and key stakeholders to help refine the draft local board plan’s content and direction, and secondly through a formal Special Consultative Procedure (SCP).  Informal consultation and engagement will occur throughout February 2014 and is proposed to include a range of public and stakeholder meetings as well as written surveys – paper and online. 

9.       Results from this initial consultation will be collated into a Draft Local Board Plan which will be presented to the board at their June 2014 meeting for approval to be released for formal consultation.  Formal consultation via an SCP will occur from July to September 2014.  A final draft will be presented to the board’s October meeting for adoption.  Informal community and stakeholder engagement on the Waiheke Local Board Plan will be conducted at the same time as the SCP required for the Waiheke Local Board Agreement.

Waiheke Local Board Plan: Community Engagement and Communications

10.     Waiheke local board have indicated their priorities for the next three years will largely reflect the previous local board plan’s priorities.  Accordingly, community and stakeholder feedback will be sought to further refine the revised plan’s direction, emphasis and key initiatives, and to identify potential new or emerging initiatives.

Community engagement objectives

11.     To ensure the local board plan reflects the community’s views, consultation and engagement for developing the draft local board plan will focus on two key areas:

·   The draft local board plan priorities and key initiatives

·   Community views on the future direction for the Waiheke local board area

Waiheke local board’s methods of engagement and targeted stakeholders

12.     The Waiheke local board will use a variety of methods of engagement as appropriate for specific stakeholder groups. The method for engagement will be tailored to the particular group to be engaged with and the types of information sought. Engagement will be simple, flexible and effective.

13.     The Waiheke local board has indicated a desire to include a broad range of views and input from across the community.  Local board plan engagement will be developed to be consistent with this approach.

14.     To provide community and stakeholders with context for the local board plan, it is suggested that the board host an event at the local board office to launch (the launch) in February 2014 the engagement plan.

15.     A proposed engagement plan is outlined in the table below.  It is recommend that the Board delegates representatives to work with the Engagement Advisor to refine and finalise the plan.

 

 

Engagement

Purpose/explanation

Date

Broad community engagement

 

 

Waiheke Local Board engagement plan launch

To launch the local board plan engagement process and invite community and stakeholder participation.  The launch is an opportunity to introduce the high level approach to the local board plan and provide context for the board’s approach, priorities and key initiatives.

 

One meeting

(potential date to be confirmed)

1 February

Public meetings/drop in events

A multiple topic event promoted to the community

One event

(potential dates to be confirmed)

Either,

5th February or

5th March

 

Market Stall at Saturday Market and/or Listening post

(e.g. Oneroa and at Rocky Bay Hall.)

An opportunity for one-on-one contact and discussions with members of the public.  Paper survey forms available.

Dates to be confirmed February/March

Online engagement

‘Have Your Say’ – council survey system. 

Waiheke Local Board page and Facebook containing information on engagement and link to online survey.

 

Throughout engagement period

Receiving written input

 

Stakeholders may choose to write their input to the local board.

Tools available:

-     Have Your Say

-     Hardcopy survey form

-     Via email

-     Via post

-    

Received throughout period

Information stands with drop boxes

At the libraries and community centres

Received throughout period

Targeted engagement with stakeholders

 

 

Mana whenua and mataawaka engagement

Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is being arranged with the assistance of the Maori Strategy and Relations department.

 

To be confirmed - February

Children and young people

Workshop with young people.

To be confirmed

February

WICOSS

Workshop/meeting with social service providers and NGO’s.

 

To be confirmed

February

Business owners

Meeting with business owners in the Waiheke local board area.

 

To be confirmed

February

Strategic partners

The local board will engage with other organisations and agencies working in the area in order to develop a local board plan that is integrated. Strategic partners include the Waterfront Development Agency, Ministry of Social Development and neighbouring local boards. Engagement may occur through meetings or email communication.

 

February/March

 

Communications

16.     The following table outlines a proposed plan for communications regarding the plan and engagement:

Key message

Channel

Timing

Local board plan background, priorities and engagement schedule

Waiheke print media

Waiheke Radio

Facebook

January/February

Next steps for Draft local board plan

Waiheke print media

Waiheke Radio

Facebook

March

Draft local board plan consultation schedule and process

Waiheke print media

Waiheke Radio

Facebook

July

Launch of adopted local board plan

Waiheke print media

Waiheke Radio

Facebook

October

Consideration

Local Board Views

17.     This report seeks the local board’s approval in principle for the draft local board plan engagement and communications plans.

18.     Board representatives are requested to work with the board’s Engagement Advisor to further develop and refine the engagement and communications plans for implementation.

19.     The decisions in this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

 

Maori Impact Statement

20.     Views and participation from Mana Whenua and Mataawaka will actively be sought throughout the formal and informal consultation and engagement processes.

General

21.     Consultation with local community and stakeholders is a statutory requirement for the development of the Local Board Agreement and Local Board Plan.

Implementation Issues

22.     Resourcing the numerous engagement events will need to be carefully assessed to ensure the availability of board members and council officers.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Ian  Leader - Engagement Advisor - Waiheke/Waitemata

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Local board members Portfolio Allocation, Urban Design Champion and Appointments to Outside Organisations and Community Networks

 

File No.: CP2013/27278

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt a portfolio allocation for board members and to appoint board members as representatives to outside organisations and community networks within the local board area and to Local Government New Zealand.

Executive Summary

Portfolios

2.       Portfolios are established by local boards to oversee local board work programmes and consider issues relating to key council activities.

3.       It is recommended that the local board allocates each portfolio area to two members, and nominates a lead and an alternate.

4.       Attachment A has been developed through workshops with the board and sets out suggested portfolio allocations.

Outside organisation and community network appointments

5.       Elected members participate on management, governance or networking groups in outside organisations for a number of reasons. This report provides details of the organisations and outlines and networks relevant to the local board. It includes appointments delegated to local boards by the governing body (Resolution GB/2013/126).

6.       The beginning of the new electoral term generates the need for new appointments. It is recommended that the board appoint one representative, and one alternate representative for each organisation and community network listed in the recommendations.

7.       In addition to the allocation of portfolio roles, Attachment A also sets out suggested representatives for external organisations and community networks.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Nominates members as lead and alternate for each portfolio area:

Local Board Portfolio

Portfolio holders

Lead

Alternate

Arts and Culture

 

 

Community

 

 

Public Open Space, Environment and Sports and Recreation

 

 

Economic Development and Tourism

 

 

Transport

 

 

Planning and Regulatory

 

 

Matiatia

 

 

 

b)      Appoints member X, and member Y as an alternate, to provide input into notification decisions for resource consent applications that trigger local board input.

c)      Appoints member x as the board’s representative as an urban design champion and member xx as the alternate representative.

d)      Allocates board members to outside organisations and community networks, as listed below:

Organisation/Community network

Primary

Alternate

Hauraki Gulf Forum

 

 

Waiheke Recreation Centre Trust

 

 

 

 

 

Community networks

 

 

Waiheke Island Council of Social Services

 

 

Piritahi Marae

 

 

Waiheke Health Trust

 

 

Waiheke Island Civil Defence Emergency Management Sub Committee

 

 

Community Police

 

 

Youth

 

 

Educational Establishments

 

 

 

 

 

Local Government New Zealand

Primary

Alternate

Local Government New Zealand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion

Portfolios

8.       In the previous electoral term, portfolio areas varied across the local boards.  In that term, officers proposed that local boards consider portfolio areas which reflected the committee and forum structure adopted by the governing body and the key areas the board had a decision-making/input role. The interest and background of local board members also influenced the establishment of some portfolios.

9.       Three years on, local boards have their local board plans with their own priorities; and the organisation has aligned itself to meet the needs of local boards.  Rather than reflecting the governing body’s committee and forum structure as a framework for portfolios, it makes sense to align portfolios to the delegation protocols adopted last year, which guide the organisation in working with and supporting local boards.

10.     A portfolio approach will assist board members in having a strategic overview of programmes and activities rather than feeling they are dealing with issues in an ad-hoc manner.  It also provides for a consistent approach that is familiar to staff working to these delegations and will assist with the running of the portfolio (e.g. regular portfolio briefings/workshops with staff from one activity). 

11.     Attachment A sets out the proposed portfolio areas developed through workshops with the board.  These proposed areas are: 

·    Arts, culture and events

·    Community

·    Public Open Space, Environment and Sports and Recreation

·    Economic development and Tourism

·    Transport

·     Planning and Regulatory

·     Matiatia.

 

12.     Within the portfolio areas outlined above, specific board members have indicated particular areas of interest.  These are set out in Attachment A but are not the subject of separate resolutions.

13.     As the Waiheke Local Board is an almost completely new board, the proposed approach to the portfolio structure will be reviewed in April 2014 to ensure it is operating effectively.

Portfolio holder role

14.     A useful starting point for board members is to consider their role as portfolio holder as that of a “sounding board” on behalf of the board.  Staff from departments across the organisation will need to regularly talk to board members for a number of reasons. This may be to provide a progress up-date to the board on projects and work programmes agreed with the board, to test the level of interest a board has on a particular issue so the department can consider how best to progress matters, or to advise on any issues that may be arising from a project/activity. 

15.     Portfolio holders are the key board member contacts for departmental staff and in that way assist staff to progress the work programme.  Board members are not required to give advice to staff on the operational details of projects or activities.  The important consideration for members is that they are appointed to be the local board representative on a particular area – they represent the views of the board (not their own views) to give direction/steer to staff.  If a portfolio holder doesn’t know what the board view is on a particular issue, they will need to discuss the issue with the Chair to see if general advice can be given, if not, it may be necessary to refer that issue to a workshop of the full board for discussion.

16.     Portfolio holders should have a lead and an alternate to help share the workload.

 

Communication

 

17.     Feedback from the previous term indicates that communication from portfolio holders back to other board members was an area that could be improved.  Portfolio holders have a responsibility to provide a feedback loop to other board members – this includes updating on how issues are progressing (or not), putting issues on the radar for all members, bringing issues to the table if guidance is needed from other board members.  Local board advisors can provide assistance and advice about how to progress these types of issues.

18.     Communication needs to be regular (for example, monthly) and can be done in a range of ways – scheduled slots on workshop agendas can be an effective way to keep everyone informed about the key things that are happening in the portfolio.

19.     The work on portfolio areas will often eventuate in formal reports from officers to the whole board requesting a decision or providing an update – so it is important for portfolio holders to have provided regular and clear communication on the portfolio area so that all board members are briefed and there are no surprises.

 

Decision-making

 

20.     Decision-making is carried out at formal board business meetings.  However in some cases – generally quite limited – decision-making has been delegated to the portfolio holder – for example when it is a straight forward issue and a decision may be needed quickly such as landowner consents.  Any delegation of decision-making to portfolio-holders would need to be made through a formal business meeting. If a portfolio-holder has delegated decision-making and is asked to consider a significant/complex decision it is advisable to refer to the wider group of board members.

 

Urban Design Champion

21.     Auckland Council has set up local board champions to contribute to the drive toward creating the world’s most livable city. Each of the 21 local boards is asked to appoint a member as the board’s urban design champion or advocate. The governing body will also appoint an urban design champion.

 

Notification decisions on resource consent applications

 

22.     In the previous electoral term, the governing body considered the role of local boards in regulatory matters, and resolved, amongst other things, that local boards be given the opportunity, within statutory timeframes, to provide their views on whether or not certain applications should be notified.

23.     The council’s Resource Consents department worked with local boards to establish a process for local board input: a portfolio holder or spokesperson provides comments within three working days on applications that the board requested and that trigger local board input. Those comments are then included in the planners' report on the application.

24.     By enabling local boards to have input into notification decision, the local voice can be heard at an early stage in the resource consent process.

25.     Local boards that wish to have input into notification decisions on applications that trigger local board input, should appoint a lead and alternate for this role. These appointees could be the regulatory, bylaws and compliance portfolio holder, if any.

 

External Organisations

26.     A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of elected members in their affairs. Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation. Board members may provide updates of their activities with their allocated organisations at local board meetings.

27.     The reasons for participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·      a trust deed of an organisation providing for the council to appoint a trustee

·      an organisation of interest to the council simply inviting representation at its meetings

·      associations entered into by the council which provide for representation - such as Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ)

·      organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·      a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee)

·      a resource consent requiring the formation of a representative committee.

28.     At the commencement of each triennium, committees and local boards recommend appointments to outside organisations as appropriate and the governing body reviews and either makes the appointments it sees fit and delegates the remaining appointments to local boards. At the end of each triennium, appointments to outside organisations must be reviewed by the appropriate officers as to current relevance, and a recommendation made to the appointing body as to whether or not representation should be continued.

29.     It is recommended that the board appoint one representative, and one alternate representative for each organisation and community network listed in the recommendations.

30.     In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of:

·      historical relationships

·      relevance and interest

·      time commitment.

31.     In addition, the governing body has delegated some appointments to local boards (Resolution GB/2013/126).    The governing body has confirmed the previous delegation to the Waiheke Local Board to appoint one representative to the Hauraki Gulf Forum.

Local Government New Zealand

32.     Membership of Local Government New Zealand Zone One (i.e. Auckland and Northland) Committee includes a representative from each of the 21 local boards.

33.     Each local board needs to consider selecting their representative, as well as an alternate.  Meetings take place four times a year and the venue for meetings is shared across the entire Zone One area. 

34.     Further information on LGNZ is available in Attachment B.

Consideration

Local Board Views

35.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on the allocation of portfolio roles and representatives to outside organisations and community networks.

36.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Amendment Act 2013 provides for local boards to delegate to committees, sub-committees, members of the local board or Auckland Council officers, any of its responsibilities, duties and powers, with some specific exceptions.

37.     The decisions in this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

Maori Impact Statement

38.     This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers appointments of local board members to outside organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

General

39.     Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members.  Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

40.     Elected representatives may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests.

41.     Elected representatives are encouraged to disclose memberships to external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Implementation Issues

42.     The network of design champions is supported by the Built Environment Unit of the Chief Planning Office department, led by Tim Watts, Manager Built Environment. The network is expected to be active for the second term of council from February 2013.

43.     The venues for Local Government NZ Zone One meetings are shared across the entire Zone One area and some travel costs may be incurred by local boards as a result of the appointments.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Allocation of Responsibilities

311

b

Attachment B Local Government New Zealand

319

     

Signatories

Authors

Harriet Kennedy - Local Board Advisor Waiheke

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Adoption of meeting schedule

 

File No.: CP2013/26707

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the adoption of the meeting schedule for the 2013-2016 term.

Executive Summary

2.       A draft local board meeting schedule has been developed for the 2013/2016 electoral term; it is attached to this report. It is recommended that the local board adopts this schedule.

3.       The specific times and dates for the hearings process, part of the special consultative process outlined in the Local Government Act 2002, for local board agreements and local board plans are yet to be finalised. Local board meeting schedules may therefore be updated and provision made for these hearings, once the details are confirmed.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         Adopts its meeting schedule for the 2013/2016 electoral term as follows, all beginning at 4pm:

Thursday, 30th January 2014

Thursday, 13th  February 2014

Thursday, 27th February 2014

Thursday, 13th March 2014

Thursday, 27th March 2014

Thursday, 10th  April 2014

Thursday, 24th April 2014

Thursday, 8th May 2014

Thursday, 22nd May 2014

Thursday, 12th  June 2014

Thursday, 26th June 2014

Thursday, 10th July 2014

Thursday, 24th July 2014

Thursday, 14th August 2014

Thursday, 28th August 2014

Thursday, 11th September 2014

Thursday, 25th September 2014

Thursday, 9th October 2014

Thursday, 23rd October 2014

Thursday, 13th  November 2014

Thursday, 27th November 2014

Thursday, 18th December 2014


 

Thursday, 29th January 2015

Thursday, 12th February 2015

Thursday, 26th February 2015

Thursday, 12th March 2015

Thursday, 26th March 2015

Thursday, 9th April 2015

Thursday, 23rd April 2015

Thursday, 7th May 2015

Thursday, 28th May 2015

Thursday, 11th June 2015

Thursday, 25th June 2015

Thursday, 9th July 2015

Thursday, 23rd July 2015

Thursday, 13th August 2015

Thursday, 27th August 2015

Thursday, 10th September 2015

Thursday, 24th September 2015

Thursday, 8th October 2015

Thursday, 22nd October 2015

Thursday 12th November 2015

Thursday 26th November 2015

Thursday, 17th December 2015

 

Thursday, 28th January 2016

Thursday, 11th February 2016

Thursday, 25th February 2016

Thursday, 10th March 2016

Thursday, 24th March 2016

Thursday, 14th April 2016

Thursday, 28th April 2016

Thursday, 12th May 2016

Thursday, 26th May 2016

Thursday, 9th June 2016

Thursday, 23rd June 2016

Thursday, 14th July 2016

Thursday, 28th July 2016

Thursday, 11th August 2016

Thursday, 25th August 2016

Thursday, 8th September 2016

Thursday, 22nd September 2016

 

b)       Notes that dates and times for hearings and deliberations for local board agreements and local board plans are yet to be finalised.

 

Discussion

4.       Clause (5)(d), Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires a local board to adopt a schedule of business meetings at its first meeting in the electoral term.

5.       Adopting a meeting schedule allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures local board members have clarity about their commitments. It also gives an indication to the public of when meetings are to be held and meets the requirement of clause 19, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

6.       The majority of the meetings will be held in the Local Board meeting room, Waiheke Local Board office, 10 Belgium Street, Ostend, Waiheke Island.  However, due to building improvements at the local board office scheduled for 2014, some meetings will be held in the Oneroa Bowling Club, 2 Marama Avenue, Surfdale, Waiheke Island.

7.       Each local board develops a Local Board Agreement annually and a Local Board Plan every three years. Both documents are subject to public consultation, with Local Board Plans being subject to a special consultative procedure process. The local board will hold hearings to give submitters the opportunity to express their views verbally.

8.       The specific times and dates for the hearings process for the local board plan and agreements are yet to be finalised.  Local board meeting schedules may therefore need to be updated and provision made for hearings, once details are confirmed.

9.       In addition to local board meetings, local boards will hold workshops that are closed to the public. The proceedings of every workshop are recorded and considered at the next business meeting of the local board in accordance with current local board standing order provisions.

Consideration

Local Board Views

10.     This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

11.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.

General

12.     Clauses 19(4), 19(5) and 19(6), Schedule 7, of the Local Government Act 2002 states that:

“(4) A local authority must hold meetings at the times and places that it appoints.

(5) Unless clause 22 (extraordinary meeting) applies, the chief executive must give notice in writing to each member of the time and place of a meeting -

(a) not less than 14 days before the meeting; or

(b) if the local authority has adopted a schedule of meetings, not less than 14 days before the first meeting on the schedule.”

(6) If a local authority adopts a schedule of meetings, -

(a) the schedule –

(i) may cover any future period that the local authority considers appropriate; and

(ii) may be amended; and

(b) notification of the schedule or of any amendment to that schedule constitutes a notification of every meeting on the schedule or amendment.”

13.     Similarly, the statutory requirement pursuant to clauses 46, 46(A) and 47 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 mentions that:

·          meetings of a local authority are publicly notified

·          agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting

·          local board meetings are open to the public.

Implementation Issues

14.     Meetings of the local boards are supported by Auckland Council’s Local Board Services Department.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft meeting schedule

325

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Urgent Decision Process for the Waiheke Local Board

File No.: CP2013/26042

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the board’s agreement for a process for urgent decisions of the Waiheke Local Board on matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum.

 

Executive Summary

2.       This report details a process for urgent decisions of the local board on matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board

a)      Adopts the urgent decision process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum.

b)      Delegates authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair or any person acting in these roles to make an urgent decision on behalf of the local board.

c)      Requests that all urgent decisions be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

 

Background

3.       An extraordinary meeting is called when an urgent decision is required on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled ordinary meeting of the local board.  At times, such as during the Christmas and New Year period, it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum.

 

4.       An alternative to calling for an extraordinary meeting is to delegate the authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make the decision on behalf of the local board.

 

5.       Urgent decisions are different from emergency decisions, which are only made if there is a risk to public health and safety.

 

Decision Making

6.       It is recommended that the local board delegate the power to the Chair and Deputy Chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the board.

 

7.       Any request for an urgent decision of the local board must be processed through the Local Board Services department, and the Local Board Relationship Manager must endorse the request for an urgent decision before commencing the process. 

 

8.       All requests for an urgent decision will be supported by a report stating the nature of the issue, reason for urgency and what decisions or resolutions are required.  These reports will comply with the standard approval process. 

 

9.       A number of factors are considered before approval to use the urgent decision process is given such as:

 

·    The timing of the next scheduled meeting.

·    Confirmation that the local board has the delegation to make the decision.

·    Consideration of the rationale for urgency.

·    The significance of the decision and whether the urgent decision process is appropriate.

 

10.     Any decision made by delegation will be reported as an information item to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

11.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Amendment Act 2013 provides for local boards to delegate to committees, sub-committees members of the local board or Auckland Council officers, any of its responsibilities, duties and power, with some specific exceptions.

Consideration

Local Board Views

12.       This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

13.       There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.

Implementation Issues

14.     The Local Board Relationship Managers can provide advice as to what might constitute an urgent decision.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Establishment of Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption Committee

 

File No.: CP2013/26044

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To establish the Waiheke Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee to assess and consider applications in relation to the Special Exemption under S6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987, and to appoint a maximum of four local board members to the committee.

 

Executive Summary

2.       Under S6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987, territorial authorities may grant exemptions from the requirements in the Act for particular pools if satisfied that it “would not significantly increase danger to young children”.

3.       The decision-making responsibility for swimming pool fences exemptions has been delegated to local boards. To administer this delegation in the 2010 – 2013 political term, local boards formed committees to assess and consider swimming pool fencing exemption applications.

4.       In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, all committees have been automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections. 

5.       Officers recommend that the local board:

·        Establishes a committee to assess and consider applications in relation to the Special Exemption under S6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

·        Appoints a maximum of four local board members to the Waiheke Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Establishes the Waiheke Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee to assess and consider swimming pool fencing exemption applications.

b)      Appoints the following four members to the Waiheke Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee: member X, member Y, member Z and member ZZ.

 

Discussion

6.       The purpose of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 (the Act) is to promote the safety of young children by requiring the fencing of certain swimming pools.  The Act places an obligation on territorial authorities to ensure that pool owners comply with the Act, both at the time when the pool is built, and subsequently by occasional inspections of pools to ensure ongoing compliance.

7.       Under S6 of the Act, territorial authorities may grant exemptions from the requirements in the Act for particular pools.  Territorial authorities can also impose special conditions on a property and a pool.  A territorial authority can only grant an exemption, or impose a special condition, if, after having regard to the characteristics of the pool and the property, it is satisfied that it “would not significantly increase danger to young children”.  No exemption is required for a new pool fence, or an alteration to an existing fence, if the new or altered fence is at least as safe as one built in accordance with the standard in the schedule of the Act.

8.       The governing body has delegated decision-making responsibility for swimming pool fences exemptions to local boards (resolution GB/2011/163). This decision is documented in the following report: “Auckland Council Long Term Plan 2012-20122.  Volume three: Financial information, policies and fees.  Chapter one: Allocation of decision-making responsibility for non-regulatory activities.  Part one: Source of decision-making responsibilities”.

9.       To administer this delegation, the previous local boards considered two options, as detailed in the table below. 

Option one: Creation of swimming pool fencing exemption subcommittee
(recommended
option)

Description

A subcommittee is created to assess and consider swimming pool fencing exemption applications

Benefits

·           enables decision-making to be undertaken in a timely manner as and when applications are received

·           the application and hearing can be the appropriate consideration away from a congested business meeting agenda

·           provides flexibility to organise a meeting as some applications will require a site visit

Costs / risks

·           additional workload for local board members

·           not all local board members will sit on the subcommittee

·           can be difficult to organise a meeting time with members on an ad-hoc basis

Option two: Application considered at local board business meeting

Description

Local board assess and consider swimming pool fencing exemption applications at their business meetings

Benefits

·           consistent and streamlined approach that is considered at the next local board business meeting

·           no additional workload for local board members

Costs / risks

·           item may not be given due consideration amongst congested local board business meeting

·           site visits

 

10.     After consideration, the previous local boards opted for option one and established committees to assess and consider swimming pool fencing exemption applications. Under this option, the committee is called together when a suitable number of applications are to be heard. A particular time is set aside to hear the applications, giving each applicant sufficient time to present their case. Some applications for exemption require a site visit; the committee meeting may be adjourned for that purpose, and reconvened following the site visit.

11.     In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, all committees have been automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections. 

12.     Officers recommend that in the 2013 – 2016 political, local boards re-establish committees to assess and consider applications in relation to the Special Exemption under S6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987.

13.     It is also recommended that the boards each appoint a maximum of four local board members to their local board swimming pool fencing exemptions committees.

Consideration

Local Board Views

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

15.     This report does not specifically impact on Māori population or iwi.

General

16.     The local board’s decision on this matter does not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Implementation Issues

17.     Costs associated with the formation of the Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee will be met within internal operating budgets.

18.     The decision of a local board following an exemption hearing is open to challenge by a judicial review process. Members appointed to the Local Board Swimming Pool Fencing Exemptions Committee will be briefed by Legal Services and Building Control officers regarding the requirements of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987, the Building Act and the appropriate considerations to take into account when determining an application by a hearings process.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Central Facility Partnerships Committee

 

File No.: CP2013/26045

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks:

·      agreement to continue the Central Facility Partnerships Committee for the 2013/2014 year in the absence of a regional policy

·    agreement on the term of reference

·    nomination of a board’s representative and alternate representative to the Committee.

 

Executive Summary

2.       The Central Facility Partnerships Committee was a joint committee established by the seven central local boards. It had decision-making responsibility to allocate the legacy Facility Partnerships funding in support of capital development projects that will assist Auckland Council to meet its identified strategic outcomes.

3.       In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, the committee has been automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections. 

4.       The Central Facility Partnerships Committee needs to be operational for the 2013/ 14 to administer legacy Facility Partnerships funding. This report seeks the board’s approval to re-establish the Central Facility Partnerships Committee for the 2013/ 2014 as a joint committee of the local boards, approval of the Terms of Reference and appointment of a member and an alternate to the Committee.

5.       The Committee will consider applications to the 2013/2014 Facility Partnerships fund at a workshop on 27 November 2013, and hold a meeting in 11 December 2013 to ratify the decisions.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Agrees to re-establish the Central Facility Partnerships Committee with the Albert-Eden, Great Barrier, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke, and Waitemata Local Boards, to collectively administer the Facility Partnerships fund.

b)      Endorses the Terms of Reference and Guidelines for the Central Facility Partnerships Committee, which will be adopted by the Committee at its first meeting:

i.        The Central Facility Partnerships Committee has a member from each of the following Local Boards: Albert-Eden, Great Barrier, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke, Waitemata.

ii.       The Central Facility Partnerships Committee has the authority to make funding decisions in 2013/2014 in relation to the Facility Partnerships Guidelines.

iii.      The Central Facility Partnerships Committee will appoint and may remove its own chairperson and deputy chairperson.

iv.      The Central Facility Partnerships Committee will meet as required. It is envisaged there will be two procedural meetings and no less than one funding decision meeting in each financial year.

c)      Appoints Board Member x, and Board Member X as alternate, to the Central Facility Partnerships Committee with appropriate delegated authority to bind the board on decisions relating to the Central Facility Partnerships Fund made by the Committee.

d)      Notes that the first meeting of the Central Facility Partnerships Committee will be held on 11 December 2013.

 

.

 

Discussion

 

6.       The legacy Facility Partnerships fund invites organisations to submit partnership proposals for capital development projects that will assist Auckland Council to meet its identified strategic outcomes.

7.       Where a proposal fits identified strategic priorities and other criteria, council may contribute to the capital cost of the project. The level of financial assistance is informed by the level of benefit to, and access, the public will have to the facility once the project is completed.

8.       Organisations participating in Facility Partnerships benefit from funding, as it enables them to leverage grants from other donors, and through technical assistance and support. Funding from council allows organisations (many of which are not-for-profit voluntary groups) to meet their objectives sooner and in some cases, develop a better facility than may otherwise have been possible.

9.       Facility Partnerships benefit the council by delivering quality, community accessible facilities, without council providing all the development funding. Facility partnerships are not limited to sport and recreation facilities, and can be provided for other general or specific community purposes (for example a community hub or arts facility).

10.     The wider Auckland community benefit from Facility Partnerships by having access to a greater number of quality, community facilities.

11.     Auckland Council inherited several different approaches for managing Facility Partnerships. A new, integrated policy is being developed and is expected to be completed for the 2014/2015 year.

12.     In the absence of an integrated regional policy, and to enable facility partnership funding to be allocated, the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) resolved on 24 May 2012 and again on 14 March 2013 that an interim approach be implemented for 2013/14.

13.     RDOC also resolved that the interim approach would be implemented by devolving the legacy Facility Partnerships funding to “local board sub-regional funding committees.”

14.     The seven central local boards consequently established a joint committee of local boards that deals specifically with central Facility Partnerships.  Each of the seven central local boards appointed a representative to the Central Facility Partnerships Committee to ensure that the Facility Partnerships fund can be implemented in a timely manner.

15.     The Central Facility Partnerships Committee has a different focus to the Central Joint Funding Committee, with the latter having a focus on community and heritage funding. In contrast, facility partnership is a capital development fund that establishes partnerships between council and external organisations.

16.     In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, the committee has been automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections.

17.     It is recommended that the board agrees to re-instate the Central Facility Partnerships Committee to administer the Facility Partnerships funding. This report also asks the seven central local boards to appoint a representative and an alternate to the Committee, with the appropriate delegated authority to bind the local boards on decisions relating to the legacy Facility Partnerships policy made by the Committee, and to agree the attached terms of reference (unchanged from last term).

Consideration

Local Board Views

18.     This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

19.     Facility partnerships is a general programme of interest that is accessible to a wide range of groups, including Māori. No particular implications for the Māori community or Māori stakeholders have been identified from this report.

Implementation Issues

20.     The Committee will hold its first workshop in late November early December 2013.  The purpose of the workshop is to discuss and seek additional information on the partnership applications.

21.     A first meeting is scheduled in December 2013 to consider procedural matters including but not limited to electing a Chair and Deputy Chair; adopting the Central Facility Partnerships Committee Terms of Reference (attached) and considering funding applications received (Stage 1).

22.     After the Central Facility Partnerships Committee has decided which projects to support, the local board where the project is based will be actively engaged with the project. The local board’s role may include setting expectations for community access to the facility.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference

337

b

Facility Partnership Guidelines

339

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Terms of Reference 2013-2014

 

Central Facility Partnerships Committee

 

 

Membership

The Central Facility Partnerships Committee has a member from each of the following Local Boards:

·    Albert-Eden

·    Great Barrier

·    Maungakiekie-Tamaki

·    Orakei

·    Puketapapa

·    Waiheke

·    Waitemata

 

Decision Making

The Central Facility Partnerships Committee has the authority to make funding decisions in 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 in relation to the Central Facility Partnership Fund.

 

Chairperson

The Central Facility Partnerships Committee will appoint and may remove its own chairperson and deputy chairperson.

 

Meetings

The Central Facility Partnerships Committee will meet as required. It is envisaged there will be two procedural meetings and no fewer than one funding decision meeting in each financial year.

 

Workshops

Decision meetings will be preceded by a workshop. The purpose of the workshops is to discuss and seek additional information on the applications.

 

Standing Orders of Local Boards

The Standing Orders of Local Boards as set by the Auckland Transition Agency on 27 October 2010 will apply to this Joint Committee.

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Central Facility Partnership Guidelines

 

Background

 

The Facility Partnership fund is a grant scheme available to organisations to assist with facility development projects.  Auckland council has inherited several different approaches for managing and providing community facility partnerships from the former Auckland, North Shore, Manukau and Waitakere City councils.  A new regional policy is being developed to consolidate these inherited approaches and create a consistent, integrated approach.  This policy is not yet completed.

 

In the absence of an integrated regional policy, and to enable facility partnership funding to be allocated, the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) resolved on 24 May 2012 that an interim approach be implemented for 2012/2013.  In February 2013 the Regional Development and Operations Committee resolved that the interim community funding arrangements in place be continued for 2013/2014.

 

 

Introduction

 

These guidelines have been developed to assist local boards and /or funding committees in making decisions regarding the allocation of facility partnership funding.  The guidelines are based on legacy council policies with some operational improvements.

 

The guidelines are also intended to provide community groups wishing to apply to the Facility Partnership Fund with an overview of:

·      eligibility criteria

·      the application process

 

 

Fund scope

 

The purpose of facility partnerships is to support not-for-profit community groups develop community accessible facilities that deliver on council outcomes.

 

The provision of council funding assists organisations to leverage additional grants from other donors and develop a better facility than may otherwise have been possible.

 

Where a proposal fits with the council’s identified strategic priorities and other relevant criteria, the council may contribute, by way of a grant, to the capital cost of the project.  The level of council assistance is informed significantly by the level of benefit and access the wider public will have to the completed facility.

 

Facility Partnership projects benefit the council by supporting it to meet strategic outcomes through the provision of quality, publicly accessible facilities without the council having to provide all the funding. 

 

 

Principles

 

The Facility Partnerships Fund is underpinned by a number of principles.  Projects should demonstrate the following:

 

·      partnership approach

·      evidence based demand

·      maximum community use of facilities

·      increase participation

·      easy accessibility by the wider community

·      partner organisations have the capability to deliver the project and community outcomes

·      project viability (funding plan, feasibility, business plan)

·      multiuse projects

·      improved levels of service

·      facility sustainability.

 

 

Eligibility criteria

 

To be eligible for facility partnership funding, projects must:

·      be applied for by legal entities that have not-for-profit status (e.g. be registered as an incorporated society or charitable trust), or are a school or educational institution

·      be for a facility development

·      be in the Central area or if in a neighbouring area be of proven regional significance with high use by Central area residents

·      be a partnership project with multiple funders, including self-funding from the applicant

·      have a total project value of over $50,000 (GST exclusive)

·      align with and have support from regional/national bodies (as applicable/where relevant) and

·      the project could also be a feasibility study for a facility.

 

Not eligible

·      proposals from individuals, commercial and/or profit orientated organisations

·      projects that are primarily health, education, welfare facilities or places of worship

·      retrospective applications/projects that have already started

·      debt funding

·      on-going operational cost

·      maintenance/asset renewal

·      design, architectural or technical reports as part of a feasibility study.

 

 

Prioritisation

 

In addition to alignment with the Principles the following criteria should be used to prioritise projects:

·       the extent to which the proposal will increase community participation

·       the degree to which the proposal caters for council’s priority targeted communities and activities

·       whether existing facilities meet local and regional needs whether the proposed facility will meet proven local and regional and needs

·       potential partners and their involvement in the project

·       allocation of the potential partners own resources, including a financial contribution and the level of access the partner has to other sources of funding/resources

·       the financial sustainability of the new facility to ensure that the ongoing operational costs of the facility can be met without council assistance

·       who is likely to benefit from the facility

·       the status of any resource and/or building consent applications already lodged 

·       a track record that shows an ability to undertake and complete the proposal and operate the facility as put forward

·       capacity building of the community (grows skills within the community)

·       the amount of community support for, and involvement in, the project

·       acceptable community access to the facility

·       positive spin-offs for the community, with minimal negative effects

·       potential for funding from other providers

·       the overall cost of the project is credible and funding is achievable

·       the proposed start and finish dates for the project and whether they span more than one financial year

·       how advanced the project planning is

·       how advanced the funding plans are

·       whether the proposal covers prospects and timing for funding from other agencies

·       the appropriateness of the scale of the proposed project including the amount of funding sought from council

·       the willingness of the potential partner to develop and engage in a shared vision for the facility.

 

 

Parameters and minimum requirements for facility partnerships

 

·       Successful applicants will be required to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding and/or Facility Partnership Agreement.

·       The Memorandum of Understanding and/or Facility Partnership Agreement will clearly state the intentions of each party, shared objectives and the outcomes each party wishes to achieve.

·       Council’s contribution to the facility is to be acknowledged on publicity material and signs commensurate with the level of council’s funding.

·       The facility must be promoted for community use.

·       Affordable hire charges should be comparable to, and sometimes approved by council.

·       Regular reports are to be provided to council on community use, hire fees, promotions, income and expenditure of the facility.

·       If requested, council access to the facility for customer surveys or community research is to be provided.

·       If requested, the facility is to be made available as a welfare centre in the event of an emergency.

·       Evidence must be provided of an agreed minimum level of funding raised by the organisation.

·       The funding mix will be discussed and agreed by both parties.  Council needs to know as soon as possible if there are any proposed changes to this mix.

·       The start and finish dates of the project need to be within the timeframes agreed to at the time of executing the Memorandum of Understanding and/or Facility Partnership Agreement.

·       If funds are not uplifted by the agreed dates, approved funding may lapse at council’s discretion.

·       Appropriate business processes for tendering and all aspects of work associated with developing the facility are to be used.

·       That “NZS 3910:2003 Conditions of Contract for Building and Civil Engineering Construction”, or a variation thereof, will be the basis of any construction contract, given the conditions of contract contained therein are well known and widely accepted by contractors as industry standard

·       Facilities are to be insured to full replacement value.

·       Council will monitor the terms of the agreement in line with good management practices.

·       Council will have input into the sale/lease of the facility’s naming rights.

·       Council will recover some of its financial contribution if the use of the facility changes significantly within the terms of agreement or agreed timeframe.

·       Council takes no liability for ongoing operational or maintenance funding, nor responsibility for long-term asset replacement.  It may, at its discretion, agree to contribute to operational funding based on a maximum level of council assistance.  The future operational model will be agreed prior to construction commencing.

·       No council funding will be released until all funding is in place for the project to be completed.

·       Payment will be in instalments based on work completed.

 

 

In addition, the term of community access will be commensurate with the grant approved as per the table below:

grants for

$25,000 - $100,000

·    The partners will negotiate and agree to a minimum level of community access of at least 5 years

grants for

$100,001 - $250,000

·    The partners will negotiate and agree to a minimum level of community access of at least 10 years

grants for

$250,001 - $750,000

·    The partners will negotiate and agree to a minimum level of community access of at least 15 year

grants for

$750,001+

·    The partners will negotiate and agree to a minimum level of community access of at least 20 years

 

 

Process

 

There will be one funding round per financial year consisting of a two stage approach.

 

Stage 1 Expressions of Interest

·              groups submit a high-level proposal (expression of interest)

·              proposals are screened to ensure they meet the guidelines, align with the council’s strategic needs and that they will benefit the community

·              proposals are summarised and presented in a workshop and to the Central Facility Partnership Committee

·              some proposals will be declined at this point, while others will progress to stage 2

·              officers will work with groups identified by the Committee to develop a full proposal

·              no funding decisions are required at this stage

·              unsuccessful proposals can be re-submitted for consideration in subsequent years.

 

Stage 2 Further assessment and funding decisions

·      council officers will work with the successful organisations to gather further   information in respect of the proposal

·      selected proposals are assessed against criteria

·              full proposals are discussed in a workshop and formally considered by the Committee who will make a funding decision

 

If a proposal is unlikely to be progressed through the Facility Partnership Fund, a clear signal should be provided to the project proponents including whether a project may be of interest to council in subsequent years.  This allows those projects to be progressed independent of council and/or revised where possible and re-presented at a later stage.

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Central Joint Funding Committee

 

File No.: CP2013/26046

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the local board’s agreement:

·      to re-instate the Central Joint Funding Committee to oversee the relevant legacy community funding schemes

·      on the Terms of Reference for the Central Joint Funding Committee

·      to nominate a member and an alternate on the Central Joint Funding Committee.

Executive Summary

2.       The Central Joint Funding Committee was a joint committee established by the seven central local boards with decision-making responsibility for the allocation of grants through the legacy community funding schemes.

3.       In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, the committee was automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections. 

4.       The Central Joint Funding Committee needs to be operational for the 2013/2014 financial year to administer legacy community funding budgets. This report seeks the board’s approval to re-instate the Central Joint Funding Committee for the rest of the 2013/2014 financial year, approval of the Terms of Reference and appointment of a member to the Committee.

5.       The establishment of the committee is an interim approach until a region-wide community funding policy is finalised. Financial analysis is currently underway to inform options and a supporting budget structure for the new funding policy. Formal consultation on the draft policy will be undertaken with local boards in 2014. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Agrees to re-instate the Central Joint Funding Committee for 2013/ 2014 to administer the legacy funds as per the Terms of Reference

b)      Endorses the draft Terms of Reference for the Central Joint Funding Committee

c)      Appoints member XX to the Central Joint Funding Committee for 2013/ 2014 with appropriate delegated authority to bind the board on decisions relating to the legacy community funding schemes made by the Committee

d)      Notes that a region-wide Community Funding Policy is being developed and will in time replace the current interim funding arrangements. Officers will engage with the board in the coming months.

 

 

Discussion

6.       The Central Joint Funding Committee was a joint committee established by the seven central local boards - Albert-Eden, Great Barrier, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke and Waitemata Local Boards. It had decision-making responsibility to allocate grants from the legacy community funding schemes.

7.       Local boards continue to have full decision-making authority over their individual Local Boards Discretionary Grants schemes. These schemes were established as part of the interim funding programme, using budgets inherited from legacy community board funding schemes.

8.       At its March 2013 meeting, the Regional Development and Operations Committee resolved to continue the Community Assistance Programme for 2013/2014 within unchanged structural and budgetary parameters, while the region-wide Community Funding Policy is in development.

9.       This means that, as per previous years, legacy community funding budgets are allocated to sub-regional joint funding committees of local boards, and that the Central Joint Funding Committee needs to be operational for the 2013/2014 financial year.

10.     The previous local board agreed to the continuation of the Central Joint Funding Committee for 2013/2014, approved amended terms of reference and appointed a member and an alternate to the Committee. Attachment A presents the rationale behind this decision, as well as the details of the funds to be allocated.

11.     In accordance with Clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, the committee was automatically dissolved following the 2013 Local Government elections. 

12.     Officers recommend that the board re-instates the Central Joint Funding Committee for the rest of the 2013/2014 financial year, approves the Terms of Reference and appoints a member to the Committee.

13.     Each of the legacy councils had a different approach to investing in their communities, and community grant funding is only one of several mechanisms for making this investment. In April 2013, the Regional Development and Operations Committee requested  comprehensive financial analysis of all community development-related spending, including but not limited to the legacy community funding budgets that local boards are administering through the interim programme (Resolution number RDO/2013/55). The Regional Development and Operations Committee required this work to be completed prior to development of the second iteration of a new Community Funding Policy.

14.     The financial analysis is currently underway, and will be reported to the relevant committee early in 2014. It is anticipated that the findings will provide a clearer picture of current budget distribution and show the variation in inherited community investment models in place around the region. This will provide a valuable basis for developing new policy options and outlining the appropriate budget structures to underpin them. However, any changes to current budget distribution will be proposed as part of the Local Board Funding Policy (not the Community Funding Policy) for implementation as part of the Long Term Plan (from 2015).

15.     Officers will be formally engaging with local boards around further development of the region-wide Community Funding Policy in the coming months.

Consideration

Local Board Views

16.     The legacy funding schemes are a key way for local boards to support their communities.

Māori Impact Statement

17.     The legacy community funding schemes are of general interest to communities and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Māori. No particular implications for the Māori community or Māori stakeholders have been identified as arising from this report.

General

18.     The recommendations contained in this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

Implementation Issues

19.     The Central Joint Funding Committee resolved in September 2013 to distribute the 2013/2014 legacy community funding schemes for the purposes of administering the funding, as follows:

Fund

Allocation

Auckland City Natural Heritage Fund $50,000

$40,000 for Great Barrier Island Local Board

$10,000 for Waiheke Island Local Board

For Hauraki Gulf Island projects only and noting that the funding split is based on historical allocation

Auckland City Cultural Heritage Fund $50,000

Five isthmus local boards to administer jointly

 

Community Group Accommodation Support Fund $676,900

$5000 to Great Barrier Island Local Board

$20,000 to Waiheke Island Local Board

Remainder ($651,900) administered jointly by the five isthmus local boards

Community Group Assistance Fund $435,150

$15,000 to Waiheke Island Local Board

Remainder ($420,150) administered jointly by the five isthmus local boards

20.     The Central Joint Funding Committee also resolved that there would be two rounds only for the legacy community funding schemes (Community Group Assistance Fund, Community Group Accommodation Support, Auckland City Cultural Heritage, and Auckland City Natural Heritage):

I.          Round one opened in June 2013 and closed on 15 July 2013 for decisions in September 2013

II.         Round two will open in November 2013 and close on 13 December 2013 (CGAF only) and 28 March 2014 (ACCHF) for decisions in May 2014.

21.     The Central Joint Funding Committee will hold a workshop  and a meeting (dates to be confirmed to consider procedural matters including but not limited to:

i)          electing a Chair and Deputy Chair

ii)         adopting the Terms of Reference (attached)

iii)         considering the applications received.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Agenda report to the local boards May / June 2013

347

b

Draft terms of reference

353

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Cemeteries and Crematoria bylaw review

 

File No.: CP2013/27024

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To request the Waiheke Local Board to provide feedback on the Cemeteries and Crematoria bylaw review.

Executive Summary

2.       A copy of the Memo to local board chairs informing them of the review of the legacy bylaws relating to council owned and operated cemeteries and crematoria is attached.

3.       Feedback is due by the end of January 2014.

 

 

Recommendation/s

 

That the Waiheke Local Board delegates authority to the Chair and or Elected member to be named, to provide feedback on the Cemeteries and Crematoria bylaw review by end of January 2014.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo to Local Boards

357

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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List of resource consents

 

File No.: CP2013/26717

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Attaching a list of resource consents lodged during September to November 2013 related to Waiheke Island.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Waiheke Local Board receives the list of resource consents lodged during September to November 2013.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Resource Consents for September to November 2013

361

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Chairperson's Report - November 2013

 

File No.: CP2013/26722

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues he has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Waiheke Local Board receives the Chairman’s verbal report.

 

Paul Walden,

Chairman,

Waiheke Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Board Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2013/26718

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

 

a)      That the Waiheke Local Board receives the Waiheke Local Board members’ written and verbal reports.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chair report - Shirin Brown

369

b

Board member report - John Meeuwsen

371

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


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05 December 2013

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05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings

 

File No.: CP2013/26715

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Attached are copies of the Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings taken for the meetings held on the 8th, 12th, 14th, 15th and 21st November 2013.

 

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Waiheke Local Board receives the Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings for the meetings held on 8th, 12th, 14th, 15th and 21st November 2013.

b)     

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings 8 November 2013

375

b

Workshop proceedings 12 November 2013

377

c

Workshop proceedings 14 November 2013

379

d

Workshop proceedings 15 November 2013

381

e

Workshop proceedings 21 November 2013

383

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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For Information: Reports referred to the Waiheke Local Board

 

File No.: CP2013/26725

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of Governing Body information-only reports and resolutions for circulation to the Waiheke Local Board.  Because no board decisions are required for these items, the full reports are not included on the agenda.  However, limited copies of the reports and attachments will be made available at the local board office, and full reports will be published online under this item.

2.       The following reports have been referred from Governing Body committee meetings or forums for the information of the Waiheke Local Board:

 

No.

Report Title

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Forum

10.

Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

19 September 2013

Regional Development and Operations Committee

 

3.       The following resolutions of interest to the Waiheke Local Board were received:

 

No.

Report Title

Referred by

Date initially received

20.

Early Childhood Education Centre facilities on parks and reserves

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board

11 September 2013

 

7.

Transport

16 September 2013

Disability Strategic Advisory Group

9.

Bridging the Digital Divide – Don McKenzie

16 September 2013

Disability Strategic Advisory Group

 

Copies of the reports can be located at the following link:

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/AboutCouncil/meetings_agendas/Pages/home.aspx

 


Early Childhood Education Centre facilities on parks and reserves

 

 

Resolution number MO/2013/495

 

MOVED by Member CM Elliott, seconded Member CF O'Brien:

That the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board:

 

a)       Requests an analysis of Early Childhood Education (ECE) facilities demand in the local board areas comprising The Southern Initiative

 

b)     Urges the governing body to develop a strategic approach to the provision of ECEs as a matter of urgency and include this on their work programme.

 

c)      Seeks identification of those open spaces which are currently suitably zoned and classified to support the establishment of ECEs.

 

d)      Seeks identification of those open spaces which are suitably classified and will be appropriately zoned in the Unitary Plan to support the establishment of ECEs.

 

e)      Requests that this report and its resolutions be forwarded to other local boards for their information.

CARRIED

Transport

 

Resolution number DSAB/2013/31

MOVED by  HH Hickey, seconded  DH Hughes:  

That the Disability Strategic Advisory Group:

a)      receive the verbal discussion on transport issues in the Auckland region

b)      receive Ezekiel Robson’s verbal feedback on his presentation to the Transport committee regarding a total mobility scheme.

c)      note the recommendations from the Transport Committee.

d)      forward the Transport Committee’s recommendation 5.6 d) of their meeting held on 4 September 2013 to all Local Boards.
“5.6 (d) requests Auckland Transport report to the new Council on the accessibility of public transport including a review on the Total Mobility Scheme.”

CARRIED 

Bridging the Digital Divide – Don McKenzie

 

Resolution number DSAB/2013/32

MOVED by  DM McKenzie, seconded  HH Hickey:  

That the Disability Strategic Advisory Group:

a)         receive the memorandum ‘Bridging the Digital Divide’ and forward it to the Chair of the Social and Community Development forum, Councillor Dr Cathy Casey and the Manager, Auckland Libraries and Information, Allison Dobbie.

b)        invite Auckland Libraries to meet with them to discuss access issues for the print impaired, and to demonstrate the access barriers to reading already bridged by Auckland Libraries.

c)         forward Member Don McKenzie’s report to all Local Boards

CARRIED

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Receives the Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan report referred to the Waiheke Local Board for information from the Governing Body committee meeting.

 

b)         Receives the resolutions of interest referred to the Waiheke Local Board from:

i)          the Mangere-Otahuhu Local board on Early Childhood Education Centres facilities on parks and reserves

ii)         the Disability Strategic Advisory Group on Transport

iii)         the Disability Strategic Advisory Group on bridging the Digital Divide

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bridging the Digital Divide - Don McKenzie

386

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

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Waiheke Local Board

05 December 2013

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      agree to exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Notice of Motion - Hearing Committee

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.In particular, the report refers to matters currently before the Environment Court.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.