I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 April 2014

4.30pm

Local Board Chambers
Papakura Service Centre
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Bill McEntee

 

Deputy Chairperson

Michael Turner

 

Members

Stuart Britnell

 

 

Brent Catchpole

 

 

Graham Purdy

 

 

Katrina Winn

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Trish Wayper

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

9 April 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 295 1331

Email: Patricia.Wayper@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Councillors' Update                                                                                                       7

13        Auckland Transport Update - March 2014                                                                  9

14        Community Safety Funding – Papakura Local Board                                             29

15        Fees and Charges for the Hire of Community Venues, Centres and Arts Facilities - Papakura Local Board Agreement                                                                            31

16        Approval of New Community Lease at 30 Wairoa Road, Papakura                      37

17        Papakura Local Board Smoke-free Public Places Implementation                       43

18        Local Economic Development July to December 2013: Papakura Local Board  49

19        Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan and Commerce and Industry programme                                                                                                                   57

20        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2013                                                                                                             95

21        Local Board Feedback on the Local Boards Funding Policy Review                 125

22        Financial Planning for Extreme Weather Events                                                   137

23        Papakura Local Board Input into the Council-Controlled Organisations Current State Assessment                                                                                                                145

24        Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 Submissions Analysis and Responses to Information Requests                                                                                                                     189

25        Local Board Decisions for 2014/2015 Annual Plan                                                197

26        Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Conference and Annual General Meeting (AGM) 2014                                                                                                                             211

27        Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term        219

28        Reports Requested - Pending - Issues                                                                   223

29        Papakura Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                231  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 19 March 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

b)         confirm the ordinary minutes of the Annual Plan Hearing – Papakura Panel, held on Wednesday, 19 March 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Safer Papakura Trust – Jan Robinson

9.2       Michelle Kingham – Hawkins Theatre – Fees and Charges

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Councillors' Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07129

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity is provided for Councillors’ Calum Penrose and Sir John Walker to update the Board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Councillors’ update be received.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Trish Wayper - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/07110

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Papakura Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to AT activities or the transport sector; and AT media releases for the information of the Board and community.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

i.              receives this report.

ii.             no longer wishes to proceed with construction of streetlight improvements in Goodwin Drive and Takariki Street and accepts it’s liability for any costs incurred to date on this project.

iii.            supports Auckland Transports proposal to raise the parking restriction time limit on Great South Road to P60

 

Discussion

Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

 

3.       The Papakura Local Board is allocated $306,184 per annum from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. These funds can be used annually or rolled together to use the full three years’ of funding i.e. $918,552 for larger projects.

 

4.       In the 2013/14 financial year the Board left $271,621 uncommitted. When this is added to the 2014/15 and 2015/16 allocations the Papakura Local Board has a total pool of approximately $883,989 available in this electoral term to be utilised on transport projects. In addition the current Papakura Local Board may spend some or all of the 2016/17 allocation, being an additional $306,184.

 

5.       The Board is encouraged to identify new projects as a matter of urgency. I attach a report providing the board with information on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund Programme, in particular the need to urgently identify new project proposals that will enable the total budget to be spent by the end of June 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2: Papakura Local Board Transport Fund Project Update:

 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

132

Streetlight improvements in Goodwin Drive

and Takariki Street.

 

The work involves the compete upgrading of the streetlighting in the full length of both Tatariki St and Goodwin Drive.

 

The original request from the Local Board was to only upgrade the lighting in the vicinity of the park at the intersection of the two roads. The AT streetlighting team were not comfortable with this approach as the lighting levels in both streets would vary significantly from the upgraded areas to the remaining areas which could have safety implications for all road users.  Accordingly the design that has been carried out involves the upgrading of the full length of both roads.  The standard to be used is the same as that recently completed in Smiths Ave and Redcrest Ave. 

 

Twenty three new streetlight poles will be installed and five existing poles will be relocated to new positions.  All of the old lights will be removed and twenty eight new LED lanterns will be installed.  The current ripple-control streetlight power supply cable will become redundant and each of the new lights will be connected directly to the 24/7 power supply. 

 

The Firm Estimate of Cost (FEC) for this work is $154,000.

 

 

The Board passed a resolution on the Wednesday 19 March approving the construction of the streetlight improvements in Goodwin Drive and Takariki Street at a firm estimate cost of $154,000.

After careful consideration the Board has decided not to proceed with the streetlight improvements utilising money from the Local Board Capital fund. 

 

 

Walters Road, Papakura - Update:

 

6.       The detailed design is completed and will soon go to public consultation.  It is expected the work will start mid to late May, with a construction period of four to five weeks.

 

Parking Study in Papakura

 

7.       Papakura Town Centre Management and a number of local businesses have requested Auckland Transport review the existing P30 restriction along Great South Road, Papakura.

8.       Auckland Transport has agreed to consult the wider business community regarding P60 time restriction being more appropriate for the Papakura Town Centre.

9.       A proposal is being developed with consultation expected to begin by the early May 2014.

 

Elliot Street, Papakura – Update:

 

10.     Work on the Southern side of Elliot Street has commenced. Progress to date includes the removal of existing kerbing, catchpits, timber rails, regrading and installation of some of the new kerbing. The second phase includes the re-grading of the kerbline (including the central island), replacement of the timber posts and rails, reshaping of the carriageway and sealing with a two coat chipseal. It is estimated this work will be completed by the end of May subject to weather.

11.     The Northern side of Elliot Street is the responsibility of Auckland Council Storm Water team. This will involve filling the depressed area with depressed area with Asphaltic Concrete, followed by chip seal. No update from Auckland Council was available at the time of submitting this report.

 

Board Consultations

40km/h School Speed Zone for Alfriston School

 

12.     The Board was supportive of this proposal. However, asked if the engineers could respond with the impact of this on the Mill Road corridor. This is being followed up.

 

Electronic School Zone in the vicinity of Conifer Grove School

 

13.     The Board was supportive of this proposal.

General Information Items

April Local Board workshops – pre-engagement on Transport Long Term Plan (TLTP)

 

·        Auckland Transport has scheduled workshops for Councillors and Local Board members, in the second and third weeks of April 2014.

·        The workshops aim to gain early feedback to inform advice and options for Transport as input to Auckland Council’s 2015-25 Long Term Plan (LTP) and by extension, the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). 

·        Auckland Transport hopes that the workshops will also be useful to Local Boards in developing the Transport Advocacy component of their Local Board Plans.

·        At this early stage, the priority is to understand community preferences and to look for opportunities to improve the alignment of Auckland Transport and Local Board priorities.

·        The importance of participating in the workshops is that local boards will be able to help shape the options that eventually make it into the draft RLTP, before the draft is written.

·        The workshops will be designed to be interactive, with a focus on listening.  Auckland Transport is particularly interested in elected members’ views on the strategic direction for Transport, the prioritisation process Auckland Transport uses to select projects, and the overall levels of expenditure on Local Roads, Public Transport and Walking and Cycling.

14.     Formal consultation on the Transport component of Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan, and on Auckland Transport’s Regional Land Transport Programme, will take place in January and February 2015.

15.     The workshop the Papakura Local Board has been invited to is on Monday 14 April at 2pm in the Manukau Council Chamber.

 

Media Reports:

 

16.     CRL route moves to the next phase

17.     Five independent commissioners, who heard Auckland Transport’s planning application for the City Rail Link (CRL), have unanimously recommended that Notices of Requirement (NoR) for the land be approved, subject to certain conditions. The commissioners accepted the CRL would result in significant overall benefits to the people and economy of Auckland.

18.     The recommendation adds another layer of certainly to everyone involved including international developers who have indicated their intention to invest in major projects along the CRL route.

19.     The commissioners were satisfied that alternative sites, routes and construction methodologies for the project had been adequately considered.

20.     The recommendation and related conditions will now be considered by AT.  AT has 30 working days to confirm, amend or withdraw the notices.

 

Relief for North Shore bus commuters

21.     The westbound bus lane on Fanshawe Street is to be upgraded following a suggestion from the Campaign for Better Transport and Generation Zero.

22.     Auckland Transport has agreed there are benefits for customers in doing westbound bus lane improvements on Fanshawe Street (between Albert Street and Halsey Street) as soon as practicable. 

23.     More than 8,000 people travel on 173 buses from the city to the North Shore each weekday between 4pm and 6pm.

24.     There are some planning regulatory processes to consider as well as public consultation, however it is anticipated the upgrade can be in place within three months.

25.     Auckland Transport, together with the City Centre Integration Group are currently developing plans that will provide significant benefits for public transport in the Fanshawe corridor from Beaumont Street to the downtown area, however, it will be some time before these will be in place. 

 

AT Completes AT HOP Rollout

26.     Auckland Transport has completed the rollout of AT HOP, its reusable pre-pay smart card for travel on trains, ferries and buses.

27.     There are currently more than 250,000 AT HOP cards being regularly used by customers around the region.

28.     AT HOP allows customers to use one travel card on different modes of transport and public transport operators.

29.     The card was first introduced on the region’s rail network in October 2012 and has been progressively rolled out since then.

30.     This concludes the successful introduction of integrated ticketing into Auckland.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund - Overview of Total Programme for the Current Local Boards

15

bView

Papakura Local Board Transport Capital Fund - Financial Update

21

cView

Examples of Transport Capital Fund Projects

23

     

Signatories

Authors

Felicity Merrington – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South), Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Report Name: Local Board Transport Capital Fund – Overview of Total Programme for the Current Local Boards

 

File No.: <<leave blank – Infocouncil will insert this when the report is saved in Trim>>

 

 

Purpose

 

1.    The purpose of this report is advise all twenty-one Local Boards of the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund Programme, in particular the need to urgently identify new project proposals that will enable the total budget that needs to be spent in the electoral term of the current Local Boards to be spent by the end of June 2016.

 

 


Recommendation/s

 

a)   That the report be received.

b)   That all Local Boards urgently identify new project proposals for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme by 31 August 2014 so that subsequent initial assessment, detailed design including consultation and statutory approvals, and construction can be completed by 30 June 2016.

 

Discussion

Background

 

2.    The total annual budget for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is $10M. This was assigned to the twenty-one Local Boards based on population, except for the Waiheke and Great Barrier Local Boards who received nominated sums.

 

3.    The programme commenced in September 2012 following resolution of the use of the fund by the Auckland Council Strategy and Planning Committee in August 2012.

 

Budget Considerations

 

4.    One of the requirements of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is that the budgets must be spent within the same electoral term. Budgets can be moved from year to year within the electoral term, subject to Auckland Transport having the ability to manage the cash flow, but carry forwards to subsequent political terms are not allowed.

 

5.    The total amount spent on Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects in the 2012-13 financial year was $1.3M. This was due to the late start of the programme in that year so Auckland Council was asked to relax the “no carry forward” rule in this inaugural year of the programme. This one-off carry forward of the unspent balance of $8.7M was subsequently approved.

 

6.    Therefore the total budget that must be spent on Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects in the current political term is as follows:

·           The carry forward from 2012-13 = $8.7M

·           The 2013-14 Budget = $10M

·           The 2014-15 Budget = $10M

·           The 2015-16 Budget = $10M

This is a total of $38.7M

 

7.    In order to fully spend this amount by 30 June 2016 the following spending profile will be required.

·   2013-14 Forecast =   $8.6M (actual current forecast)

·   2014-15 Forecast = $10.1M (latest forecast)

·   2015-16 Forecast = $20.0M (latest forecast)

 

8.    The 2013-14 figure is the currently expected end of year result for 2013-14. The end of the 2013-14 financial year is the end of the second year of the four year Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme that needs to be completed by 30 June 2016, and only $9.9M of the $40M will be spent. i.e. only 25% spent in half the available time.

 

9.    Conversely, the required spend in the last two years (2014-15 and 2015-16) is $30.1M, being a threefold increase in the spend compared to the first two years. At the current rate of spending this $30.1M target will not be achieved.

 

10.  In addition, the current Local Boards are allowed to spend some or all of the 2016-17 Local Board Transport Capital Fund budget as their elected term finishes three months into this financial year on approximately 30 Sept 2016. This means there is an additional $10M available that could also be spent.

 

Value of Projects

 

11.  Of the 228 proposals submitted to date 64 are not proceeding (not meeting criteria, funded elsewhere, deferred to future years, or not chosen by Local Boards). The total value of the remaining 164 projects that range from being in the initial assessment phase to having the construction fully complete is $14.9M.

 

12.  Assuming that all of these projects are completed they represent only 37% of the total Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme that needs to be delivered in the current electoral term.

 

13.  Conversely an additional $25.1M worth of projects need to be identified in order to deliver the programme by 30 June 2016.

 

 

Forward Planning to Ensure Programme Delivery

 

14.  Additional project proposals need to be identified urgently by ALL Local Boards in order for the programme to be delivered on time.

 

15.  As the spending of the budget is heavily weighted towards the 2015-16 financial year and to a lesser extent the 2014-15 financial year, the issue of Auckland Transport being able to manage the work in those years and the contracting industry being able to carry out the large volume of work become factors in the overall delivery of the programme.

 

16.  Accordingly construction approval will be required for all projects in the programme by 30 May 2015 at the latest so that the last of the physical works construction of the works (in fact half of the whole programme) can be spread out over the entire 2015-16 financial year. Many of these approvals will be required much earlier in order to deliver $10M of work in the 2014-15 year.

 

17.  In order to achieve the 30 May 2015 construction approval date, detailed design approval will need to be provided for all projects no later than 30 November 2014 in order to allow six months for detailed design including consultation and statutory approvals to be completed so that construction approval can be provided on time.  As with the construction approvals, much of this detailed design has to happen much sooner in order to deliver the 2014-15 programme.

 

18.  Accordingly the identification of new projects by ALL Local Boards to the total value of at least $25.1M needs to happen by 31 August 2014 at the latest in order for them to be assessed and project scopes and rough orders of cost provided back to the Local Boards for their consideration for detailed design approval.  Ideally more projects need to be identified in case some don’t meet the necessary criteria.

 

19.  As the four year programme budgets for each Local Board can be considered as a single budget there is opportunity for Local Boards to consider larger projects that can be funded over more than one year, or that are funded jointly between more than one Local Board. A fewer number of larger projects will be easier to manage and will make delivery of the programme much easier.

 

20.  If the above programme timing is not met Auckland Transport cannot guarantee that the Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme will be able to be fully delivered in the current electoral term.

 

 

Project Management Process

 

21.  The time required for managing the various stages of a project can vary significantly depending on the nature and size of the project.

 

22.  Initial assessments of project proposals including the development of Rough Orders of Cost can be relatively quick in the case of simple projects such as new footpaths or the installation of new bus shelters where the work is straight forward and is carried out on a regular basis under other Auckland Transport work streams. In these cases typical costs are known and a turn-around of a few weeks can be achieved.

 

23.  However other one-off projects that may have safety implications that require the gathering of data (site specific surveys, and information such as traffic counts) to determine whether or not the project meets traffic warrants, standards or regulatory requirements, or projects that require initial community input can take up to three months to assess.

 

24.  Detailed design and the development of Firm Estimates of Cost can also vary significantly in terms of the overall time required. Some simple projects require very little design and can take a matter of a few weeks.

 

25.  Other more complex projects require time to gather detailed site information, to carry out consultation with stakeholders, to carry out design including inputs from specialists, to apply for resource consents, and to obtain regulatory approvals such as traffic resolutions or speed limit changes. These projects can take more than six months to design.

 

26.  Construction timeframes can vary significantly depending on the size of the project. Lead time to supply specialist materials for construction, often from overseas, can delay projects. Timing of works to avoid the wetter winter months can also impact on when tenders are let. Delaying of weather sensitive works to construct them at the right time of the year can impact on the overall timing of project delivery.

 

27.  In addition, spreading out the delivery of the construction of works over the whole year can provide a more even workload to the contractors which can result in more favourable overall costs to AT and the Local Boards.

 

28.  All of the above highlights that the timing of the various stages of projects can vary significantly. Straight forward projects can be delivered in a single year; whereas it is not possible to deliver more complex projects within a single year. Many of the Local Board projects fall into this second category.

 

 

Auckland Transport Programme Management Process

 

29.  A review of the internal Auckland Transport processes has highlighted a number of improvements that will be made in order to assist with the delivery of this programme of work.

 

30.  Timing of responses back to the Local Boards on initial assessments and on the completion of detailed designs will be monitored more closely to ensure there is no slippage in these approval processes.

 

31.  Rough Orders of Cost and Firm Estimates of Cost will be provided in ranges of price rather than a single dollar figure because of the uncertainty of providing exact figures in the early stages of projects. Rough Orders of Cost carried out at the start of the project can vary by up to 30%, whereas Firm Estimates of Cost carried out in the detailed design phase can vary by 15%.

 

32.  There are examples where previous estimates that have been provided have been too low and additional approvals have been required from the Local Boards. This has caused problems with the Local Board expectation of project costs. More care will be taken in future to provide accurate estimates.

 

33.  It should be remembered that these figures are still estimates and the true cost of the work will only be known when the construction is complete. The reason for this is that there are many factors that can affect the final cost of a project compared to the Firm Estimate of Cost. Three of these are the tendered price from the contractor, unforeseen ground conditions, and relocation/protection of underground services. Every endeavour will be made to keep project costs within the approved budgets.

 

 

Consequences of not Delivering the full Programme

 

34.  Auckland Transport CAPEX underspend including from within the Local Board Transport Capital Fund remains under sustained scrutiny by Auckland Council.

 

35.  Auckland Transport is accountable for the current underspend on this significant budget allocation, and reports every quarter to Auckland Council on the accuracy of its CAPEX spend forecasts.

 

36.  It is important that this fund is fully spent each year to ensure that neither its amount nor its process are put at risk when consistently reporting underspends to Council.

Summary of the Budgets and Project Values by Local Board

 

Local Board

Total Budget 2012-13 to 2015-16

(four years)

Total Value of all Approved Projects and Proposals Being Assessed

Value of New Projects Still to be Identified

Albert Eden

$2,659,732

$1,302,567

$1,357,165

Devonport Takapuna

$1,540,120

$1,104,960

$435,160

Franklin

$1,739,864

$946,555

$793,309

Great Barrier

$400,000

$278,476

$121,524

Henderson Massey

$2,993,512

$1,012,988

$1,980,524

Hibiscus and Bays

$2,399,540

$763,330

$1,636,210

Howick

$3,487,612

$1,147,000

$2,340,612

Kaipatiki

$2,318,064

$1,244,711

$1,073,353

Mangere Otahuhu

$2,071,016

$609,364

$1,461,652

Manurewa

$2,373,256

$472,116

$1,901,140

Maungakiekie Tamaki

$1,979,028

$800,000

$1,179,028

Orakei

$2,199,796

$852,633

$1,347,163

Otara Papatoetoe

$2,197,168

$1,098,584

$1,098,584

Papakura

$1,224,736

$904,747

$319,989

Puketapapa

$1,526,468

$373,000

$1,143,468

Rodney

$1,477,044

$733,000

$744,044

Upper Harbour

$1,348,264

$674,132

$674,132

Waiheke

$800,000

$211,943

$588,057

Waitakere Ranges

$1,324,608

$140,000

$1,184,608

Waitemata

$1,879,156

$192,470

$1,686,686

Whau

$2,071,016

$0

$2,071,016

TOTALS

$40,000,000

$14,862,576

$25,137,424

 

37.  It should be noted that the possible spend of the 2016-17 budget is not included in the above figures.

 

Suggestions of Projects to be funded from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund

 

38.  Attached is the Pick List of the types of projects that could be funded from the LBTCF programme that has previously been circulated to Local Boards for their information. This list will assist Local Boards to identify potential projects in their areas.

 

Consideration

 

Local Board Views

This report is for the Local Board’s action.

 

Maori Impact Statement

No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

 

General

The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

 

Implementation

There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are two attachments.

Projects that could be considered by Local Boards.

Financial Updates for the individual Local Boards.

 

Signatories

 

Author

Phil Donnelly, Team Leader East, Road Design and Development, Capital Development Division, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Andrew Scoggins, Group Manager Road Design and Development, Capital Development Division, Auckland Transport

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 





 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Community Safety Funding – Papakura Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/05394

 

  

 

Purpose

1.    The purpose of this report is to seek approval for the renewal of current funding agreements with Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrols Incorporated, Papakura Marae Maori Wardens and Safer Papakura Trust.

Executive Summary

2.    Three funding agreements that are specific to Papakura are due to expire on 30 June 2014:

 

·     Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrols Incorporated

·     Papakura Marae Maori Wardens

·     Safer Papakura Trust.

 

3.    Local board direction is requested with regards to renewal of these funding agreements. The first two agreements are currently funded via the regional safe environments advisory  budget. Safer Papakura Trust is funded directly by Papakura Local Board.

 

4.    The current agreements expire on 30 June 2014 and a further one year extension will maintain service continuity.

 

Recommendations

That Papakura Local Board:

i.          Approve the renewal of the funding agreement with Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrols Incorporated for a further year to the value of $20,000.

ii.          Approve the renewal of the funding agreement with Papakura Marae Maori Wardens for a further year to the value of $20,000.

iii.         Approve the renewal of the funding agreement with Safer Papakura Trust for a further year to the value of $120,897.

 

Discussion

5.  In March 2014, council staff reviewed all regional and local community contracts and funding agreements due to expire on 30 June 2014. Three of these funding agreements were specific to Papakura. The current values (for the 2013-2014 period) are:

 

·      Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrols Incorporated - $20,000 per annum (with no GST);

·      Papakura Marae Maori Wardens - $20,000 per annum (with no GST);

·      Safer Papakura Trust - $117,000 (with no GST).

 

6. Funding for the Safer Papakura Trust agreement sits as a discreet funding line within the local board budget. Previously GST was paid on this contract. However, following tax advice, council’s new funding processes no longer attract GST. The funding is consumer price indexed (CPI) and accordingly increased each year. For the 2014-2015 period, it has risen from $117,000 to $120,897. 

 

7.   Funding for Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrol Incorporated and the Papakura Marae Maori Wardens has been met from within the regional, safe community advisory budget and is an example of a regional programme tailored locally.

 

8.   The Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrols Incorporated, Papakura Marae Maori Wardens and Safer Papakura Trust are all meeting their contractual requirements.

Consideration

Local Board Views

9.    The local board has previously supported all three groups with funding and also expressed its support for local crimewatch and safety patrols.

 

Maori Impact Statement

10. It is noted that the current funding agreement in place for the Papakura Marae Maori Wardens supports the activities of the Maori Wardens in the community. Maori Wardens are seen as a by Maori for Maori response to community safety issues. It is also noted that Maori are generally over-represented as both victims and perpetrators in crime statistics.

 

General

11. This report does not trigger council’s significance policy.

Implementation

12. There are no significant implementation issues foreseen as a result of the decisions in this report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Mark Evans - Team Leader Safety South

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Fees and Charges for the Hire of Community Venues, Centres and Arts Facilities - Papakura Local Board Agreement

 

File No.: CP2014/06067

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Local boards are required to set fees for the hire of local council-managed community venues, centres and arts facilities. The fee schedule will be presented as part of the 2014/2015 Papakura Local Board Agreement.

2.       This report seeks to inform the Papakura Local Board of administrative changes to the fees and charges framework.

3.       It also seeks the Papakura Local Board’s confirmation of the priority activity types which will be eligible for a maximum discount (i.e. lowest fees per hour).

Executive Summary

1.   Local boards have the allocation of setting hire fees for local facilities, to support delivery of services, projects, events and activities for the wider community’s benefit.

2.   A project has been under way to develop a more consistent pricing structure for hire of council-managed community venues, centres and houses and arts facilities. Excluded from scope are facilities managed by committees or third parties, and bookable spaces in parks, sport and recreation facilities, or in libraries.

3.   Local boards have been engaged in this project through a series of workshops, providing feedback to inform a new fee structure for the hire of local community facilities, with the following purpose:

“To ensure people can access safe and affordable spaces to pursue their interests.”

 

4.   The project has resulted in three main changes:

a.   administrative changes to standardise terminology and charge fees on an hourly basis

b.   the Papakura Local Board can now select activity types to receive discounts to reflect your local board Plan priorities.

c.   proposed adjustments to the hire fees, to improve consistency across the portfolio of facilities within each local board area, and in similar facilities in adjoining boards.

 

5.   The fees and charges schedule will be presented for adoption as part of the 2014/2015 Papakura Local Board Agreement.

 

Recommendations

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Confirms the activity types eligible for priority discounts for hire of local council-run facilities as per attachment A

b)      Notes the administrative changes to facilitate implementation.

 

 

Discussion

Background

6.   Local boards are allocated the setting of fees and discounts for hire of their local council-run community arts venues, halls, centres and houses.  This supports delivery of services, projects, events and activities for the wider community’s benefit.

7.   Historical variations in hire fees, terminology and procedures across the Auckland region led local boards in 2012 to request improvements to the customer experience for hirers of local community facilities, and to improve the transparency and quality of information and advice to guide local boards when you set and vary hire fees.

Local Board Engagement

8.   At workshops during 2013 and 2014, local boards with facilities in scope had a number of opportunities to engage with the project team and to express their preferred approaches to the hire of local facilities.  This report has been informed by the feedback received, and has led to a new hire fee framework and fee structure for the 2014-15 year.

9.   Operational considerations have meant that not all views expressed can be incorporated during 2014-15.  If you wish to consider more substantial changes to hire fees and charges in future years to ensure alignment across your portfolio, the Long Term Plan process offers an opportunity to consult local communities.

Changes to the Hire Fees and Charges Framework

10. The resulting new hire fee framework takes into account the size, condition and quality of each bookable space, levels of staffing, amenities available, and current patterns of utilisation of the spaces. Some adjustments have been proposed to fees for comparable facilities within each local board area or in adjoining boards.

11. The proposed fee schedule will be presented as part of the 2014/2015 Papakura Local Board Agreement.  While the proposed fee schedules are based on modelling within existing budget parameters, variances may arise due to changing demand and utilisation of facilities.  The proposed changes are intended to be budget neutral for each local board, and in most instances, are considered minor in comparison with value for money.

Proposed Administrative Changes

12. In 2014 at a further series of workshops, local boards were informed of operational changes, including standardised fee-naming, and principles for applying discounts:

i)    all bookings are treated on a first-come first-served basis

ii)   discounts are given for regular bookings and for off-peak times

iii)   all hire fees will be charged on a per hour basis, using six simple naming conventions, as in Table 1.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Fee Naming Conventions

Naming Convention

Fee Comparisons

Standard

Full rate, no discounts

Standard Off Peak

Full rate, less a discount for time of day or week

Regular

Discount off standard rate for 10 or more bookings per year

Regular Off Peak

Discount off standard rate for 10 or more bookings per year, and a further discount for time of day / week

Local Board Priority Activities

Maximum discount off standard rate

Local Board Priority Off Peak

Maximum discount off standard rate, and a further discount for time of day / week

Consideration of Papakura Local Board Priorities

13. In line with 2014/2015 Papakura Local Board Agreement priorities, the local board is now asked to confirm their Local Board Priority Activities, i.e. those activity types the local board wishes to be eligible for a maximum discount.

Consideration

Local Board Views

4.       This report reflects the engagement with the local boards

Maori Impact Statement

5.       This will affect or benefit Māori communities in the same way it would any other community user in the local board area.  No specific need for consultation with Māori was identified for the purposes of this report.

General

6.       This report does not trigger the significance policy.

Implementation Issues

7.       The new fee framework will be implemented from 1 July 2014.  No particular implementation issues are anticipated.  It is expected that the clarity and simplicity of the approach will enable more effective promotion of the facilities in the future.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Appendix A: Principles for bookings, fees and discounts for Papakura Local Board

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Kat Tierney - Team Leader – Community Facilities, South

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Appendix A: Principles for bookings, fees and discounts for Papakura Local Board

 

1.   Bookings are made on a first-come first-served basis, and charged at standard rates. 

 

2.   In order to meet demand for use of the facilities, a discount is applied at off peak hours.

 

3.   Regular users (10 or more bookings per year) will be charged at a discounted rate. 

 

4.   Bookings for activities which achieve community outcomes and benefits that the Local Board has prioritised or directly support priority outcomes and transformational shifts of the Auckland Plan, may be eligible for an additional discount, if certain criteria are met.

 

5.   For Papakura Local Board, the priority activities for maximum discounts are those activities contributing to community outcomes, such as those offered by not-for-profit and community groups. Standard fees will apply to commercial or one-off private use.

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Approval of New Community Lease at 30 Wairoa Road, Papakura

 

File No.: CP2014/07076

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to seek the approval of the Papakura Local Board to grant a new community lease at 30 Old Wairoa Road, Papakura to the Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated.

Executive Summary

2.       The Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated (the club) has been occupying this site since 1977, the latest community lease expired on 30 June 1996.

3.       The club practices lapidary, being the art of cutting, polishing and engraving precious stones.

4.       The club owns the building and under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 a group which owns its building has an automatic right to re-apply at the end of their occupancy terms without public notification.

5.       This report recommends the approval of a new community lease, under the terms and conditions of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, for 10 years commencing 16 April 2014 with one 10 year right of renewal at the current site.

6.       A community outcomes plan has been negotiated with the group and will be an attachment to the lease subject to local board approval (Attachment A).

 

Recommendations

That the Papakura Local Board grants the approve of a new community lease to the Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated at 30 Old Wairoa Road, Papakura subject to the following terms and conditions:

i.          Term – 10 years commencing 16 April 2014 with one ten year right of renewal.

ii.          Rent - $1.00 per annum if requested.

iii.         The Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved and attached to the lease document.

iv.        All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Discussion

7.       The club was incorporated on 16 October 1972. The club was leased the current site at 30 Old Wairoa Road, Papakura by the Papakura District Council in 1977. The membership of the Papakura Lapidary Club then raised funds to erect a building for their purposes. The club owns its own building. (Attachment B - Aerial View)

8.       The land at 30 Wairoa Road, Papakura is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council and is not subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

9.       The purpose of the club is to provide a forum for those interested in Lapidary (cutting and polishing stones), geology, rock hunting and related hobbies.  They currently undertake field trips to find fossils, stones and minerals for lapidary purposes and are currently increasing capacity of display facilities to showcase their membership’s works and highlight the art of Lapidary in support of the tuition in Lapidary the club provides.

10.     The club interacts with hundreds of people throughout the year by providing workshop opportunities with schools, presenting at community fairs and providing tuition of lapidary, jewellery making, carving and related interests. The club has also participated in providing activities at children’s programmes and library coffee mornings.

11.     In the future the club aims to upgrade the workshop and redesign the premises that may include the addition of custom lighting to improve exposure of displays and the general setting to encourage higher visibility for the clubs work and purpose.  The club also aims to gain a higher profile for its work by being open to the public on a more regular basis as well as being available to host schools visits. 

12.     The club has a membership of 60 people, 23 of these members are under 18 years of age. It is hoped that introducing youth to Lapidary may encourage them to consider pursuing careers in geology or as jewellers.

13.     The club has allowed the Neighbourhood Watch group to use this facility free of charge for evening meetings which supports the principle of shared utilisation of space.

Consideration

Local Board Views

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to the local, recreation, sports and community facilities.

15.     The purpose of the Papakura Lapidary Club supports Local Board priorities by providing education and activities for youth and adults that promote the region’s natural heritage.

Maori Impact Statement

16.     There are no significant changes or impacts for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.  The groups have ties with local Maori through their activities and Maori benefit as users of the clubs.

General

17.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

18.     Council staff has sought input from relevant council departments.

Implementation Issues

19.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

39

bView

Aerial Photograph - Papakura Lapidary Club

41

     

Signatories

Authors

Kim  Isaac - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

Name and Location of Land/Facility

30 Old Wairoa Road,

 

Papakura

Name of the Community it serves

The wider community of Papakura and surrounding District

Local Board Area

Papakura

Name of Community Group

Papakura Lapidary Club Incorporated

Postal Address

PO Box 23235

 

Papakura

Contact person

Geoffrey James Rankin

Name of Community Lease Advisor

Kim Isaac

 

Auckland Plan (AP) and Local Board Priorities (LB)

Performance Measure

Target

Achievements

AP 1: Creating a strong, inclusive and equitable society that provides opportunity for all Aucklanders

Put children and young people first

 

LB 1.  Our Youth, Our Future

Provide indoor and outdoor space for youth to meet, participate and perform the Arts.

 

Increasing the number of members under the age of 25 by 50% over 5 years.

 

 

Providing educational workshops within the community to increase interest and opportunities for participation of youth that is also a stepping stone to a career pathway.

 

 

Marked increase of 20% per annum in this age group

 

 

2 x school visits per annum

 

Partnership with local schools programme

 

 

 

 

Annual review with CLA and Group to identify

AP 5: Promote individual and community wellbeing through participation and excellence in recreation and sport.

Provide opportunities for all Aucklanders to participate in recreation and sport.

 

LB 5: Quality Sports, Recreational and Cultural Facilities

Papakura will have high-quality sporting and recreation facilities that will encourage local communities to participate and attract national and international events.

 

 

Increasing profile of group by hosting community and open days.

 

 

2 x community/open days per annum

 

Annual review with CLA and Group to identify

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Smoke-free Public Places Implementation

 

File No.: CP2014/05362

 

  

 

Purpose

This report is to provide the Papakura Local Board (‘the Board’) with recommendations on the implementation of the Auckland Council Smoke-free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) in its local board area. 

Executive Summary

The Policy sets out a regional position on smoke-free public places and events. The exact detail of the implementation will be a matter for local board discretion, as local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities.

Local Boards can:

·        choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·        determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·        decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·        determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

To assist local boards progress the implementation of the Policy, staff have made recommendations pertaining to the extent of smoke-free public places, signage requirements, promotion activities and other matters.

In terms of signage for smoke-free public places, staff do not recommend smoke-free signage in all areas affected by the Policy. Instead, placing additional smoke-free signs in certain ‘high priority sites’ will bear greater benefits in promoting smoke-free public places.

In March 2014, a workshop with the Papakura Local Board was held to confirm high priority sites for the immediate installation of additional smoke-free signage. At this workshop, seven high priority sites were confirmed. Staff recommend additional budget be allocated for smoke-free signs in these sites. The cost of additional signage is estimated at $3,936-$4,500. These values might vary depending on signage printing, size and installation. At this workshop, the Board had also signaled interest in making the Papakura town centre smoke-free. Staff can investigate options and provide a report at a later date.

In order to promote the smoke-free status of these sites, staff recommend that the Board publicises smoke-free public places in their local board area as the Board deems appropriate.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      allocate budget for printing and installation of additional smoke-free signs in seven high priority sites which include:

i)        Massey Park and Pool site

ii)       Central Park site 

iii)      Prince Edward Park site

iv)      McLennan Park site

v)      Papakura Recreation Centre site

vi)      Papakura Service Centre and Village Green site

vii)     Papakura Library and Museum site

b)      requests officers to investigate options to implement Smoke-free Policy in Papakura town centre 

c)      promotes the smoke-free status of smoke-free public places in Papakura as the Board deems appropriate

 

Discussion

Background

The Auckland Council Smoke Free Policy 2013 sets out council’s position on smoke-free public places, events, tobacco control advocacy and workplace smoking cessation.

As local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities, the implementation of the Policy at a local level is a matter for local board discretion.

 

Local boards can: 

·        choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·        determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·        decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·        determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

 

According to the 2013 census, Papakura Local Board (‘the Board) area has the second highest smoking rate in the region at 21.2 percent (12.9 percent for the region). This is higher than the smoking rate for the Southern Initiative area (20.5 percent)

 

The Auckland Plan and the Policy has a goal of a three percent smoking rate in the Southern Initiative area by 2025. In order to reach this target, approximately 18.2 percent or (6,278 persons) in Papakura will need to quit smoking by 2025. 

 

Policy Implementation

Smoke-free Public Places

Smoke-free in public places aims to discourage the community from smoking in certain public outdoor areas to de-normalise smoking behaviour.  As the Policy is non-regulatory, compliance is voluntary and relies on the public being well informed about these smoke-free areas. As such smoke-free signs need to communicate the smoke-free status of a space.

 

However, the cost of installing smoke-free signage in all public places identified in the Policy outweighs its benefit. Therefore, staff recommend placing smoke-free signs in certain areas where the smoke-free message will have the greatest impact.

 

In order to identify these sites, staff developed a criteria based on the objectives and principles of the Policy. The criteria focused on:

·        areas that are frequented by children and youth

·        council-owned facilities

·        areas that are well used and popular within their community

·        sites where several smoke-free public places are clustered in close proximity.

 

Based on scores against the criteria, sites were then divided into four categories. Smoke-free signage implementation varies according to the categories. Sites that are scored highly are ‘Category A sites’ or high priority sites, where there is an opportunity for a higher level of smoke-free signage installation. Table one summarises these categories and smoke-free signage installation.

 

Table 1             Site Priority and Level of Signage Installation

Category

Level of smoke-free signage installation

A

High priority sites

·      additional smoke-free signs +

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades occurs

B

Medium priority sites

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades

C

Low priority sites

·      smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they are replaced or upgraded

D

No priority sites

·      no smoke-free signage installation

 

High Priority Smoke-free Sites

Staff had prepared recommendations on the high priority (Category A) and medium priority (Category B) sites within the Papakura local board area. In March 2014 a workshop with the Board was held to gather feedback and confirm these high priority sites.  Table two outlines the high priority smoke-free sites in the Papakura local board area.

 

Table 2            High Priority Smoke-free Sites for Papakura Local Board Area

Site Name

Rationale

Signage and cost

Massey Park and Pool

·      Prominent sports and recreation area used by diverse groups

·      Large number of young athletes use this space for events

·      Sports clubs and schools use the area for events

·      Community events are often held here

·      6- 7 wall mounted signs

·      est. cost $ 797- 861

 

Central Park

·      High profile and well used park

·      Site contains a well-used destination playground

·      Used by several athletics and rugby clubs

·      Several community events use the stage in the park 

·      3-5  wall mounted signs

·      est. cost $ 569-615

 

Prince Edward Park

·      Predominantly used by league and softball clubs with large numbers of youth members

·      5-7 wall mounted signs

·      est. cost $797-861

McLennan Park

·      High profile sports facility located here

·      Sports clubs with high youth participation use the park

·      4-6 wall mounted signs

·      est. cost $683-738

Papakura Recreation Centre

·      Site contains a recreation centre and sports field area

·      Attracts diverse groups of users

·      1-3 wall mounted signs

·      $342-369

Papakura Service Centre and Village Green

·      Destination playground and park near Papakura Local Board office and Service Centre

·      Diversity of groups move through the area

·      3-4 wall mounted signs

·      $455-492

Papakura Library and Museum

·      High profile area and the library has diverse groups using the space

·      located in the town centre space

·      Library has issues with smokers congregating outside the premises at present

·      2-3 wall mounted signs

·      $342-$369

NB: these cost estimates are based on (300x150mm and 300x400mm) sizes from one supplier (Panda Visuals)

Smoke-free Signage Installation in Other Areas

Sites that have scored moderately against the criteria, or ‘medium priority’ (Category B) sites will have temporary smoke-free sticker logo attached onto existing signs (in accordance with the council’s signage manual). As signs are replaced and upgraded, the signs will incorporate the permanent smoke-free logo.

 

For the Papakura local board area, the medium priority sites are:

1.               Kerri Downs Park

2.               Drury Library and Hall

3.               Ray Small Park and Hawkins Theatre

4.               Takanini Reserve

5.               Drury Sports Complex

 

‘Low priority’ (Category C) sites will have the smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they are  for upgrades or replacement. ‘No priority’ (Category D) sites are areas that do not currently have any signage installed.

 

Smoke-free Public Places Promotion

As the Policy is non-regulatory, raising public awareness around the danger of smoking and the council’s position on achieving a smoke-free Auckland is important.

 

To assist the Board in the promotion of the Policy staff suggest the following for consideration:

·    an article in the local paper or magazine near World Smoke-free Day (31 May 2014)

·    a launch event at one of the high priority sites on World Smoke-free Day (31 May 2014)

·    raise awareness through social media (i.e. local board Facebook page or a website).

Consideration

Local Board Views

Staff consulted with the Board throughout the development of the Policy in 2012-2013.

 

In March 2014, staff attended a workshop with the Board to confirm the high and medium priority sites for the implementation of the Policy. The Board was also provided with an indicative cost of introducing additional signage in the identified high priority sites. 

 

At the workshop, the Board had made the following comments: 

·    would like to include the town centre in Phase one of the Policy as a high priority site

·    would prefer wall mounted signage as opposed to stand alone signs

·    signaled interest in a ‘launch’ event to publicise the smoke-free public places in their area

·  the Board is interested in the number of young smokers (under 25 years of age) in the Papakura local board area; in order to emphasise the importance of smoke-free measures in community.

 

Maori Impact Statement

The New Zealand Tobacco Use Survey (2009) found that the smoking rate amongst Maori (44 percent) is significantly higher than that of the non-Maori population (18 percent).

Through the development of the Policy, many stakeholders highlighted the disparity between Maori and non-Maori smoking rates within the region as a cause for disproportionate health outcomes for Maori.

The Policy aims to address Maori smoking rates through:

·   the creation of smoke-free public places

·   smoke-free signs to contain awareness based messages in Maori

·   focus on the Southern Initiative smoke-free work stream

 

General

Not applicable

Implementation Issues

There will be additional costs to the local board relating to the printing and installation of smoke-free signage in the high priority sites identified in the report.

 

Staff recommend wall-mounted smoke-free signage as these are hard wearing, have a longer life span and minimises signage pollution.

 

The approximate cost of additional smoke-free signs in the seven identified sites (Table two) in Phase one is between $3,936 and $4,500. The exact costs will vary depending on:

 

·                the exact number of smoke-free signs required on each site

·                if there are many smoke-free messages (e.g. mass printing of one message is more cost effective)

·                the positioning and installation of the smoke-free signs

 

These estimated costs are one off costs. Any ongoing costs will be covered within signage maintenance and renewal budgets.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur - Policy Analyst

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Local Economic Development July to December 2013: Papakura Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/05379

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update for the Papakura Local Board on local economic development activities delivered by the Economic Development Department for the period July to December 2013.

Executive Summary

2.       The 2013/2014 local economic development work programme in the Papakura Local Board area includes:

·        Preparation of an economic development overview presenting a range of indicators on the Papakura economy, issues and opportunities

·        A Local Economic Development (ED) Action Plan aimed at building the economic capacity of Papakura

·        A programme for Māori economic development

·        Initiation of an Integrated Business Precinct Plan for the Industrial South

·        Economic analysis and planning as part of the Southern Initiative

·        The Business Improvement District (BID) Partnership programme in Papakura

·        Support for the roll out of ultrafast broadband and the sustainable and targeted provision of public WiFi.

3.       The proposed work programme for 2014/2015 builds on current activities.

 

Recommendations

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Receives the six-monthly update on local economic development activities from July to December 2013.

b)      Approves the indicative 2014/2015 local economic development work programme as:

i.        Economic analysis and planning to support local initiatives.

ii.       Delivery of priority actions identified in the Local Economic Development Action Plan.

iii.      Implementation of the Māori economic development programme.

iv.      Finalising the Integrated Business Precinct Plan for the Industrial South.

v.       Support for Business Improvement District Partnership programme in Papakura.

vi.      Support for the roll out of ultrafast broadband and the sustainable and targeted provision of public WiFi.

c)      Nominates a Local Board Member to the working group for the Integrated Business Precinct Plan for the Industrial South.

d)      Nominates Local Board Member(s) to attend the Business Improvement District Policy (2011) review workshops and represent the view of the Local Board.

 

Discussion

4.       The Economic Development Department champions Auckland’s Economic Development Strategy (EDS), which aims to develop an economy that delivers opportunity and prosperity for all Aucklanders and New Zealand.  The department works with ATEED, business, Government and community stakeholders to lead local economic development, regional economic strategy and policy advice, economic analysis and advocacy, digital policy and international relations on behalf of Auckland Council.

5.       This report focuses on local economic development activities in the Papakura Local Board area.  An overview of the regional economic work programme undertaken by the Economic Development Department and ATEED to implement the EDS is provided to the Economic Development Committee, and is made available for information to Local Boards.  

6.       Under the guidance of global city development expert Greg Clark, and with the assistance of representatives from business, the wider Auckland Council and Government, critical priorities for Auckland’s future economic performance have been identified.  These are to:

·        Establish a new Auckland Leadership Team

·        Raise youth employability.  At the local level this means:

increasing the number of opportunities for young people to gain work experience

·        Build, retain and attract talent. At the local level this means:

encouraging our businesses to invest in skills

thoroughly understanding Auckland’s skills shortages

·        Build the Auckland business proposition for a business-friendly city

·        Boost the investment rate into Auckland’s economy and infrastructure

·        Motivate greater investment in products, services and markets. At the local level this means:

promoting the benefits of innovation and entrepreneurship

creating and connecting spaces for innovation and entrepreneurship

·        Increase Auckland’s visibility internationally

·        Optimise Auckland’s platforms for growth: housing, transport and availability of employment land. At the local level this means:

developing and adopting a new implementation model to achieve growth in key locations – CBD and metropolitan centres

leveraging the fibre network to its full potential

·        Support improved performance of Māori businesses.  At the local level this means:

working to support Māori businesses to grow.

7.      We are planning a workshop with Local Board economic development portfolio holders, ATEED and the Economic Development Committee on making local economic development in Auckland more strategic, focused and united.  Further information will be provided through the Local Board Advisors.

 

Economic Development Overview

8.       An economic development (ED) overview has been prepared for the Papakura Local Board area.  The overview outlines the current economic picture in Papakura, recent trends, and identifies particular strengths or points of difference the local board area has in comparison to the region wide picture. It is primarily a data driven view drawing on the statistics available covering a range of indicators including demographics, incomes and housing, education and skills, employment and occupation, sectoral strengths, business growth and development trends.

9.       The overview has been distributed to Local Board members, Council departments and BIDs.   It has been used as a key input to developing the ED Action Plan for Papakura. The information can also inform the Local Board Plan currently under development.

10.     In 2012, GDP[1] in Papakura was $1.6 billion, which was 2.0 per cent of the Auckland regional GDP. Manufacturing is the dominant industry in Papakura and combined with a growing service sector the local economy is relatively highly diversified.

Papakura’s industrial mix by GDP (2012)

Source: Infometrics

11.     Stand out facts about Papakura from the ED overview include:

·        Papakura’s economy is one of the most diversified in Auckland.  It has a strong manufacturing base which accounts for 30 per cent of economic activity.

·        Qualification levels and household income are lower than the Auckland average.

·        There are strong anchor companies with an export focus.  Fifty-nine percent of jobs are in larger firms that employ over 20 employees.

·        Food and beverage, construction and engineering, and niche manufacturing are the strongest sectors in Papakura that compete internationally. There are a significant number of firms in Papakura supplying the construction industry and they are well placed to benefit from the pick up in building activity.

·        Papakura’s economic growth from 2002-12 was above the Auckland region.

 

12.     Employment in Papakura increased by an average of 1.3 per cent pa in the ten years from 2002-12, below the Auckland rate of 1.9 per cent and above the 1.4 per cent in New Zealand.  During this period Papakura job numbers increased the most in construction (+470), education and training (+320), retail (+340), and public administration and safety (+290) sectors and declined in manufacturing and transport, postal and warehousing, and agricultural sectors. 

13.     The current Papakura Local Board Plan seeks a revitalised local economy, with increased investment, leading to more employment, new services and a boost to the local economy. The ED overview recognises these priorities and includes the following initial assessment of the strengths, challenges and opportunities within the local economy.

 

 

 

 

An assessment of Papakura’s economic potential

Strengths

Challenges

Growth potential

·      Papakura has long term potential for growth as a metropolitan centre

 

Lifestyle

·      Papakura offers a wide range of lifestyle choices

 

Strategic location

·      business locations are close to the motorway and part of Auckland’s industrial south

·      the manufacturing sector has wider regional, national and international links 

·      excellent public transport connections to the CBD

·      national and international linkages

 

Large anchor firms

·      base of large employers of long standing 

Building the skills base

·      qualification levels are below the Auckland average

·      high number of lower skilled jobs

 

Developing as a destination

·      as a metropolitan centre Papakura will need to widen its catchment and appeal for retail and business services and further develop its leisure and evening economy

·      competition from other centres

 

Infrastructure

·      infrastructure constraint for freight movements

Opportunities

Business friendly

·   leveraging the BID partnership programme

·   town centre marketing, business retention attraction of business investors and development demand

·   skills development and growth from the digital economy

·   define levers of growth through the Integrated Southern Business Precinct Plan 

Innovation and exports

·   increase the export potential of firms in Papakura

·   define pathways for firms in Papakura to innovation programmes that assist commercialisation and business growth

Skills

·   improving access to training opportunities 

·   transitioning youth from education to the workforce

·   the momentum of the Southern Initiative driving better education, training and employment outcomes

Vibrant and creative city

·   further developing the leisure and evening economy in Papakura

 

Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan

14.     A local economic development action plan is a platform for the Local Board and other parties to advocate or catalyse activities for local economic development.  The process to develop the draft action plan involved engaging with a range of players on how to build the economic capacity within Papakura.  It reflects that local actions are crucial to achieving the regional aim to develop an economy that delivers opportunity and prosperity for all Aucklanders.

15.     The preparation of a draft ED Action Plan for Papakura has been completed and was reported to the Local Board on 19 March 2014.   The Board deferred the Action Plan in March in order to consider it at a future meeting.

16.     Māori economic development

17.     At a regional level, the Economic Development department is working across Council with the Independent Māori Statutory Board, Te Puni Kokiri and mana whenua to ensure an integrated approach to Māori economic development and entrepreneurship opportunities. 

18.     Using funding provided by the Local Board, a programme for Māori economic development has been scoped and approved by the Local Board.  The Board has allocated $47,176 to start the programme in the current financial year (2013/2014).

 

Integrated Southern Business Precinct Plan

19.    The integrated business precinct plan (IBPP) will provide a coordinated framework for Local Boards to develop projects and programmes to enhance the economic performance of the industrial precincts in their respective areas. Key components of the plan include the development of a spatial concept map and a series of high-level actions that will address the issues and opportunities identified within the relevant precinct areas.

20.    The development of the IBPP will contribute to the economic development workstream of the Southern Initiative specifically in engaging with economic stakeholders to develop actions in regard to youth transition from education to employment, business growth and development and opportunities for actions between employers, education providers and government.

21.    A working group has been established to ensure that Local Boards are able to input into the development of the IBPP. This report asks the Papakura Local Board to nominate a member to sit on the working group.  The role of members of the working group is to:

·        Steer the strategic direction of the IBPP

·        Ensure that the plan responds to the priorities for the Local Board Areas as defined in the Local Board Plans

·        Act as the representative for the relevant Local Board

·        Provide comments on the draft plan prior to consultation and prior to finalisation of the plan

·        Provide feedback on the draft IBPP prior to formally seeking approval from Local Boards and the Economic Development Committee.

22.    In order to inform the development of the IBPP an initial consultation exercise has been undertaken. This has involved workshops with business associations and a series of telephone and face to face interviews with business owners within the zoned industrial areas. We are now in the process of completing an analysis of the zoned industrial areas with a view to developing draft actions that will be presented to the working group.

BID Partnership Programme

23.     The BID Partnership Programme approach is a public-private partnership between business associations that have a commitment to develop and promote their local business environment and Auckland Council.  In work to date since Auckland Council was established there has been a focus on sharing best practice and developing consistent governance, processes and practices across the region’s 46 BIDs.

24.     Each BID has signed a Partnering Agreement with Auckland Council.  These agreements define the relationship between Auckland Council and individual business associations operating as BIDs.  Several have also signed a discretionary Memorandum of Understanding with their Local Board. The MOU is an opportunity to agree mutual goals and objectives and to support each other’s programme of work where applicable. 

25.     BID Partnership Advisors hold monthly networking meetings for BID managers and interested business associations that focus on professional development and sharing information and best practice. Topics covered from July to December 2013 include:

·        Auckland Transport (importance of good parking in our centres)

·        AGM checklist and meeting procedures

·        ATEED local events

·        WiFi how to make the most of Apps

·        Overseas conferencesreport back and learnings from BID attendees

·        Signs and alcohol bylaws

·        Social enterprises

·        Using Marketview results for business attraction

·        Media awareness

·        Your Website how to review it and improve it

·        Using information from Local ED Overviews and opportunities to engage with Local ED Action Plans  

 

26.     A refresh of the Auckland Region Business Improvement District Policy (BID Policy 2011) will be undertaken in 2014. The proposed BID Policy will go before the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for final approval in November 2014.

27.     The process to review the BID Policy will involve consultation with both business associations and Local Board representatives. Separate workshops will initially be held for the two stakeholder groups, followed by a combined workshop with both the business associations and Local Board representatives. Local Board representative(s) are sought for involvement in the review process.

28.     Any suggestions made at these workshops to amend the existing BID Policy (2011) will be brought before the Local Board for its consideration and feedback.

29.     There is much activity happening with the establishment of new BID areas (including State Highway 16 and Devonport, who will be balloting in March 2014). Several other locations are actively working with the BID team on preparatory work towards establishment. Existing BIDs undertaking expansion ballots prior to June 2014 include Otahuhu and Manukau Central.

30.     Twenty-seven existing BIDs have chosen to increase their amount of target rate for the 2014/2015 financial year. Every one of these proposed increases has followed the process of advising all members and receiving approval of the proposed new amount from members at Annual General Meetings.

Papakura BID

31.     Progressive Papakura Incorporated (PPI) held their AGM in October 2013. There was no increase in the BID targeted rate for 2014/2015. A presentation on their activities, budget and plans for the following year will be made to the Local Board in 2014.

32.     PPI has confirmed a consultant for their Strategic Plan update. The review will be an opportunity to capture progress and achievements against the current strategies and address opportunities and issues. 

33.     Six CCTV cameras have been installed within the town centre with prospects of more in the near future.  Safety continues to be a high priority for PPI, with the town centre manager continually advocating to police for support for foot patrol in and around the town centre.

Takanini Business Association

34.     There has been no further contact from Retail Holdings Ltd since council officers provided briefing information on business association set up and Auckland’s BID Partnership Programme. 

 

Ultrafast Broadband

35.     The third year of the rollout of Ultrafast broadband (UFB) ends on 30 June 2014.  The rollout is a third of the way through the nine year programme. So far over 60,000 premises region wide can connect to UFB with just over 11 per cent of these premises connected. This is in line with the rate of uptake predicted at the start of the UFB rollout. 

36.     Chorus intends to provide updates to Local Boards on the progress of the rollout in each area and Council officers will work with Local Board Services to arrange times in the appropriate Local Board Workshops as the updates become available.

 

 

 

Public WiFi

37.     Public WiFi is available in all 56 libraries and in 23 public open spaces around Auckland.  In January 2014 the Libraries WiFi service was used 173,000 times by 110,000 people totalling 7.7 million minutes of free Wi-Fi usage.  The public open space service has been experiencing network stability issues and this has limited usage.  These issues are now resolved and we expect to see usage grow in line with Libraries usage.  The public open space service was used 49,631 times by 44,419 people totalling 893,494 minutes of free WiFi usage.

 

Work programme 2014/2015

38.     The proposed 2014/2015 local economic development work programme in the Papakura Local Board area is set out below.

OPEX Project description

Economic analysis and planning e.g. for the Southern Initiative.

Delivery and monitoring of activities in the Papakura local economic development action plan.

Māori economic development.

Finalising the Integrated Business Precinct Plan for the Industrial South.

Business Improvement District (BID) Partnership programme in Papakura.

Support for the roll out of ultrafast broadband and the sustainable and targeted provision of public WiFi.

Consideration

Local Board Views

39.     This report informs the Papakura Local Board on progress implementing the agreed local economic development work programme.  Feedback from the Board is welcome and will shape ongoing activities.  

Maori Impact Statement

40.     Matters relating to Māori wellbeing are addressed as part of specific projects and are reported in the relevant Board and committee reports.

General

41.     Not applicable

Implementation Issues

42.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Trudi Fava - Strategic Planner

Authorisers

Janet Schofield - Business Area Planning Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan and Commerce and Industry programme

 

File No.: CP2014/05950

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek the adoption of the Papakura Local Economic Development (ED) Action Plan and approval of the Papakura Industry and Commerce, 2013/14 work programme.

Executive Summary

2.       The Papakura local economic development programme for 2013/14 consists of three key initiatives: Development and implementation of a local ED action plan for Papakura; Papakura Industry and Commerce projects and the scoping of a Kaitiaki Māori Economic Development programme (outlined in a separate report).  Each of the three initiatives have been allocated $49,068 in FY2013/14.

3.       The Local ED Action Plan has been developed following consultation with a wide range of key stakeholders. Stakeholders have identified a number of challenges and opportunities within the Papakura economy and these have helped shape the actions within the Plan.  Iwi have been engaged as part of the development of the Papakura Māori ED Programme and this work has been used to inform the Local ED Action Plan.

4.       Ten potential industry and commerce projects have now been scoped.  Actions relating to these projects have been incorporated into the draft Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

5.       The proposed Industry and Commerce FY2013/14 work programme includes three projects: Papakura Business Survey, Phase 1; Papakura commercial property market study and Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce.

6.       The Board is now being asked to adopt the Papakura Local ED Action Plan and approve the Papakura Industry and Commerce, 2013/14 work programme. It is proposed that the 2013/14 programme be funded from the remaining budgets from the development of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan and industry and commerce projects, which is $69,000.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Adopts the Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan (Appendix A)

b)      Approves the Papakura Industry and Commerce FY2013/14 work programme (see attachments),

c)      Approves the allocation of the remaining budget assigned to the Local ED Action Plan and Papakura Industry and Commerce Projects, of $69,000 to implement the following projects:

i)        Action 1.6 – Papakura Business Survey, Phase 1

ii)       Action 1.10 – Support safety and security in the Papakura Local Board area

iii)      Action 1.12 – Papakura commercial property market study

iv)      Action 1.13 – Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce

v)      Action 4.2 – Vocational training and education expo (joint project with CDAC and TSI)

 

Discussion

Papakura Local Economic Development – 2013/14

7.       The Papakura Local Economic Development programme 2013/14 consists of the three key initiatives, as follows:

·    Development and implementation of a local economic development action plan for     Papakura  – $49,068 allocated in 2013/14

·    Papakura Industry and Commerce projects - $49,068 allocated in 2013/14

·    Kaitiaki Māori Economic Development - $49,068 allocated in 2013/14.

Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan

8.       The development and implementation of a local ED action plan for Papakura was approved by the Local Board at its meeting on 21 August 2013 (resolution number PPK/2013/227).  A budget of $49,068 was allocated to undertake this work.  A further $49,068 was also allocated at that meeting to assist Kaitiaki Maori Economic Development and that this work be used to inform the Local ED Action Plan.  The Papakura Māori ED programme was approved by the Local Board at its 19 March business meeting.

9.       The Local Board cannot deliver the Papakura Local ED Action Plan alone.  The Plan will provide a framework that guides local actions in Papakura for the next three to five years.  It provides a mechanism for the local board to engage with individuals and organisations delivering economic development initiatives and also the Papakura business community.  The plan contains a set of priority actions for inclusion in future local board agreements and the next long term plan.  The plan will form the basis of the annual local economic development work programme and will be reviewed annually to agree priorities for the forthcoming financial year.

10.     The Papakura Local ED Action Plan supports the Auckland Plan, Auckland’s Economic Development Strategy (EDS) and Papakura Local Board Plan.  It is structured into sections that align with the five priorities and cross cutting themes of the Auckland Economic Development Strategy:

·        grow a business friendly and well-functioning city

·        develop an innovation hub of the Asia-Pacific rim

·        be internationally connected and export driven

·        enhance investment in people to grow skills and a local workforce

·           develop a creative, vibrant international city.

11.     Consultation has been undertaken with the following key stakeholders: NZ Police Papakura, Safer Papakura Trust, ATEED, COMET, Auckland Transport, Auckland Council organisation (Economic Development, Community Development Arts and Culture (CDAC), Southern Initiative office, Research and Consultation Team, Local Board Services, Planning south, City Transformation, Southern Resource Consenting Team), Progressive Papakura , Colliers, CBRE, Studio D4, Synergy Design (Papakura Business Community), Ministry of Education, NZ Bloodstock, MIT and Papakura High School.

12.     Iwi have been engaged as part of the development of the Papakura Māori ED Programme which has been incorporated into the draft Local ED Action Plan.

13.     Action 4.2 in the plan refers to a trade/vocational training and education expo in Papakura. This is part of the CDAC work programme that has been agreed by the Board.  The project is seeking joint funding from The Southern Initiative (TSI) and Economic Development. It supports economic development in Papakura by linking young people to either training or employment. It provides employers with a platform to showcase work and career opportunities.

Papakura Industry and Commerce projects

14.     The Papakura Local Board Annual Agreement included a sum of $49,068 towards the development and implementation of industry and commerce projects. Eleven potential industry and commerce projects have now been scoped.  Actions relating to these projects have been incorporated into the draft Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

15.     The Papakura Industry and Commerce 2013/14 work programme, has been discussed with the Local Board.  The 2013/14 work programme includes the following projects identified in the Local ED Action Plan :

·        Action 1.6 – Papakura Business Survey, Phase 1

·        Action 1.12 – Papakura commercial property market study

·        Action 1.13 – Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce.

16.     In order to implement the programme as soon as possible it is proposed that the 2013/14 programme be funded from the remaining budgets from the development of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan and Industry and Commerce projects, which is a total of $69,000.

Town Centre Safety and Security

17.     In addition to the above projects, town centre safety has been identified as a key priority for the Local Board. In order to assist in addressing safety issues in the town centre identified as action 1.10 in the Local ED Action Plan, it is recommended that the Local Board agree to allocate $23,000 out of the $69,000 available to this action.  Subject to agreement with the Progressive Papakura Business Improvement District, this should be a grant to Progressive Papakura as a contribution to fund a contract with a security company, to increase the resources available to address safety issues in the town centre.

Consideration

Local Board Views

18.     The Papakura Local Board has been kept up to date with the development of the Local ED Action Plan and Industry and Commerce projects.  A previous draft of these was presented to a Local Board workshop on 12 February 2014.

Maori Impact Statement

19.     Iwi have been engaged as part of the development of the Papakura Māori ED Programme.  Activities highlighted in the Hui and Māori business meetings held in late 2013/early 2014 have been incorporated into the Papakura Local ED Action Plan and industry and commerce initiatives.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan

61

bView

Papakura business survey proposed scope

87

cView

Papakura commercial property market study proposed scope

89

dView

Papakura town centre collaborative taskforce proposed scope

91

eView

Papakura training and education expo proposed scope

93

      Signatories

Authors

John Norman - Strategic Planner Local Economic Development

Authorisers

Janet Schofield - Business Area Planning Manager

Harvey Brookes - Manager Economic Development

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan – V0.8

 

Creating economic growth and prosperity for Papakura and Auckland

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Contents

Chair’s message  3

Setting the scene for growth  3

Economic Advantages and industry strengths  3

Challenges  4

Options for Action  4

Objectives and plan development process  5

Plan Development Process  5

Strategic context 5

Key strategic drivers  6

Strategic Initiatives Underway  6

Sub-regional context – Economic development at Auckland’s southern urban edge  8

Plan Delivery – A partnership approach  9

Priority New projects – 2013/14 (Year 1) to 2015/16 (Year 3) 9

Year 1 projects  10

Indicative year 2 projects  10

Indicative year 3 projects  11

Yearly review, monitoring and work programme  11

ATEED   12

Appendix 1 - Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan – 2013/14 – 2015/16 – V0.8  13

Glossary/Key  22

 

 

 

 

 

Chair’s message

To be finalised

Setting the scene for growth

Economic Advantages and industry strengths

Papakura has a diversified economic base, with a growth rate of 7.3% in 2012, producing a GDP of $1.58 billion.  This was an acceleration of higher than average growth rate for the last ten years of 3.8% compared with an Auckland average of 3.0 per cent.

Papakura has strategic advantages that position the area for future growth.  These include:

·      Excellent transport links, including three motorway intersections and two rail stations (Papakura is Auckland’s third busiest)

·      Significant employment precincts within Papakura and adjoining local board areas, such as Ardmore Airport (Franklin).  Further expansion potential for Takanini north

·      Attractive to investment by large New Zealand and multi-national corporations, the latest being a $60 million investment from Gen-I/Revera, with development partner Retail Holdings Ltd (data centre - now under construction at Takanini north, Popes Road)

·      Major housing sites underway and planned, attracting new residents and increasing local spending power

·      Significant land proposed for future urban use (Unitary Pan).  Development of this land is likely to have the biggest impact on the Papakura economy over the next 30 years, including increased construction and infrastructure employment.  This includes northern parts of the Franklin Local Board area and the Drury South industrial zone, which alone is forecast to employ 7,000

·      Metropolitan centre zoning proposed (Auckland Plan and Unitary Plan) for Papakura Town Centre, with its potential for long-term transformation into the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge

·      Investment underway to improve the education, skills and career outcomes for Papakura’s young people, including initiatives such as Youth Guarantee, Youth Connections, activities linked to the Southern Initiative and investment in infrastructure, including the $40 million investment in Papakura High School redevelopment

·      Highest proportion in Auckland of people of Māori ethnicity (28%) and a Māori business community becoming increasingly significant

·      Excellent sporting, arts and cultural facilities and close to regional parks along the Clevedon Coast, making it a great place to live.

Papakura has strengths in a number of sectors that are export orientated and have the potential to grow further:

·      Food and beverage manufacturing – Papakura is home to a number of large food and beverage manufacturers located mainly in Takanini and Hunua Road industrial precincts.  Key anchor companies include Fonterra Brands, Griffins, Independent Liquor, Zeagold Foods and Ottogi New Zealand.  Takanini is also home to animal feed producers NRM and Tegel

 

·      Construction, engineering and specialised manufacturing – A major strength in Papakura and sectors that will benefit greatly as the economy grows and demand for construction and engineering products increases.  Key companies are located in the four main industrial precincts of Takanini north, central, Hunua Road and Drury.  Key companies include Teale (sheet metal products),   Seel Engineering (hydraulic systems), Monier (HQ for building product manufacturer), Stresscrete (pre-cast concentre), Humes (concrete pipelines) and Wilco Precast.

Papakura is also home to New Zealand Bloodstock facilities in Karaka.  New Zealand Bloodstock is NZ’s premier thoroughbred sales centre and is increasingly popular for international buyers and thoroughbred exports.  This centre is important to equine related export businesses (breading, international specialised freight and other ancillary services) across Auckland.  New Zealand Bloodstock was recently chosen as the launch venue for the new national Equine Industry Association.

Papakura has a number of business networks, formal and informal.  It has a Business Improvement District for Papakura Town Centre (Progressive Papakura), which undertakes activities for companies based in the town centre and is funded by a target rate.  Informal networks include a successful and popular business breakfast series run by ATEED; breakfast club/industry referral network BNI runs two chapters in Papakura (BNI Business Growth and BNI Counties) and Papakura Business Community is a Facebook virtual networking/informational dissemination group of over 300 members, with some networking meetings taking place on an informal basis.

Challenges

Papakura has great underlying economic strengths that will ensure that it economic growth continues but there are also some challenges around workforce, people and income:

·      Papakura’s unemployment is significantly higher than the Auckland average, particularly in the 15-24 age group where nearly a quarter are unemployed

·      Median income ($55,773) is lower than the Auckland Average ($63,387)

·      Self-employment or business income (17%) is lower than the Auckland average (25%)

·      Higher proportion received government benefits (35%) compared to Auckland (27%)

·      NCEA Level 2 (foundation skills required for employment) rates for 18 year olds are lower in Papakura (73.8%) than the Auckland average (81.1%), with young Māori and Pasifika learners achieving 51% and 64.4% respectively

·      Larger proportion of low-skilled jobs in Papakura (44%) compared with Auckland (40%) and a smaller proportion of highly-skilled jobs (31% compared with 37%).

Papakura town centre has short and long-term challenges, if it’s to live up to its zoning as the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge.  The town centre has suffered in recent years due to significant investment in competing centres, most notably in nearby Takanini but also Manukau CBD, Sylvia Park, Botany and Pukekohe.  This has had serious consequences for the vitality and viability of Papakura town centre, as a retail destination.  The result has seen businesses relocate, close, increased vacancy rates, falling rents and security and safety issues.  Security and safety issues are being tackled by a visible Police presence, Safer Papakura and Papakura Community Crimewatch patrols.  The fear of crime remains and there is still some work to be done to ensure that the town centre has a family-friendly environment.

An initial assessment of property economics suggests that significant redevelopment projects in the town centre are unlikely in the short to medium term.  The focus in the short-term should, therefore, on supporting and encouraging refurbishment and renovation of the existing built environment and at the same time repositioning the centre to reflect current market conditions.  Efforts to welcome and support future redevelopment projects should be put in place, so that any redevelopment that does occur, acts as a catalyst for others to follow.

Options for Action

The Plan needs to include actions that address barriers to growth as well as seize opportunities.

Papakura has the potential to play its part in meeting regional economic growth, export and productivity targets.  For this to happen there needs to be:

·      an increased collaboration across public and private sectors, business associations and industry groups

·      a focus on increasing exports, capability and productivity performance of Papakura’s businesses. 

·      a focus on ensuring that business precincts continue to attract and retain property and business investment and that there is sufficient land for future local business expansion, as well as inward investment into the area

·      a cross-council, cross agency collaborative effort to ensure that Papakura Town Centre is able to fulfil its metropolitan centre status in the Auckland Plan and Draft Unitary Plan

•     a focus on Papakura’s workforce and in particular young people, as they pathway from secondary to tertiary education and work.  There has already been achievements in this area and more to come

•     local Māori economic leadership and cooperation, to leverage employment and entrepreneurship opportunities

•     a focus on actions that maximise the economic benefits from the development of future urban land identified in the draft Unitary Plan.

Objectives and plan development process

The objectives of this plan are to:

 

·      create a framework to guide local economic development actions for Papakura Local Board area for 3-5 and up to 10 years

·      facilitate effective engagement between deliverers of economic development initiatives and Papakura Local Board

·      provide a key mechanism for Papakura Local Board to communicate with the Papakura business community and residents, around the area’s economic development, future prosperity and wealth creation

·      provide a set of priority economic development actions and initiatives for inclusion in the next Papakura Local Board Plan, future Local Board Agreements and Council’s next Long Term Plan.

Plan Development Process

The plan development process has included:

Franklin Local Economic Development Action Plan

 
Strategic context

The Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan has been developed to complement and support Auckland Council’s key strategic documents and they include:

•       Auckland Plan

•       Auckland’s Economic Development Strategy (EDS)

•       Papakura Local Board Plan.

The plan also has regards to and takes direction from, other national, regional and local plans and strategies, such as government’s Business Growth Agenda, ATEED’s plans (Visitor Strategy, Major Events Strategy and Business Growth and Competitiveness Framework – BG&C) and legacy strategies and plans, such as Papakura District Council Economic Development Strategy 2007.  The 2007 Strategy provides useful background for scoping and implementation of actions within the plan.

The plan incorporates strategic initiatives underway in Papakura including:

•       Papakura Māori ED Programme, including activities highlighted in the Hui and Māori business meetings held in late 2013/early 2014

•       Integrated Business Precinct Plan, which includes Papakura

•       The Southern Initiative, which includes Papakura.

Key strategic drivers

Auckland Plan

 

EDS

Papakura Local Board Plan

Other Plans

·      Mayor’s Vision: the world’s most liveable city

 

·      Moving to a quality compact city

 

·      RUB – southern urban expansion

 

·      100% of school leavers with NCEA L2 by 2020, post-secondary school qualification by 2030

 

·      Outlines EDS priorities

 

·      Outlines priorities as part of the Southern Initiative

 

·      Identifies Papakura Town Centre as a metropolitan centre

·      grow a business friendly and well-functioning city

 

·      develop an innovation hub of the Asia-Pacific rim

 

·      be internationally connected and export driven

 

·      enhance investment in people to grow skills and a local workforce

 

·      develop a creative, vibrant international city

 

·      cross-cutting themes (various)

 

Auckland seeks on an annual basis:

 

·      6 per cent increase in exports

 

·      5 per cent rise in GDP

 

·      2 per cent productivity growth 

 

·      Revitalising our local economy

 

·      An increase in investment, leading to more local employment, new services and a boost to the local economy

 

 

 

Proposed projects/initiatives:

 

·      Local ED programme

 

·      Attract more commerce and industry

 

·      Forum for business capability courses and delivery of business management for small businesses

 

·      Maori ED programme

 

·      Information facility at Papakura station

 

Government business growth agenda (BGA):

 

·      Ratio of exports to GDP to 40% by 2025 from 30% today, including Increasing value from tourism and growth of primary and manufactured exports

 

·      Build capital markets

 

·      Building innovation

 

ATEED’s strategies

 

·      Visitor strategy – increase value of visitor economy from $3.3 billion in 2010 to $6 billion in 2021

 

·      Major Events Strategy – sets a strategic framework – to develop Auckland as a global events destination

 

·      BG&C Framework – implementation of EDS to meet business growth targets

 

Strategic Initiatives Underway

·                      Papakura Māori ED Programme:

·                       

·                      Integrated Business Precinct Plan:

·                       

·                      The Southern Initiative:

·                       

·                      Include actions to address issues and opportunities highlighted at a Hui and Māori business meetings held in late 2013/early 2014, including:

·                       

·      Business capability support and information available – what’s already available and gaps

·                       

·      Funding and seed capital availability

·                       

·      Learning from other Māori businesses – including mentoring and Māori business showcasing

·                       

·      Iwi post-settlement capability support.

·                       

·                      The Industrial South Integrated Business Precinct Plan will:

·                       

·      Describe the strategic economic context for the industrial south area

·                       

·      Set out an analysis of current and future economic trends and linkages for the area as a whole and significant trends in each of the local board areas covered within the plan

·                       

·      Set a vision for the main industrial precincts in South Auckland. This vision will set out the desired outcomes for the industrial precincts.

·                       

·      Provide a co-ordinated framework for Local Boards to develop projects and programmes to enhance the economic performance of the industrial precincts in their respective areas.

·                       

·      Components of the plan include the development of a spatial concept map and a series of high-level actions that will address the issues and opportunities identified within the relevant precinct areas.

·                       

·                      A 30 year project that aims to transform the four local board areas of Māngere-Otāhuhu, Otara Paptoetoe, Manurewa and Papakura.

·                       

·                      Seven priority Southern Initiative priorities/work streams outlined in the Auckland Plan are:

·                       

1.             Support strong family attachment and early intervention for children before school

2.             A clear pathway and support for further education, training or employment for all young people leaving school

3.             An outstanding international gateway and destination area

4.             Economic development and jobs for young people

5.             Increased services and increased use of public transport

6.             Housing development in Mangere and Manurewa

7.             Sport and Recreation, art and culture.

·                       

·                      Health and safety is embedded in all seven work streams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sub-regional context – Economic development at Auckland’s southern urban edge

Although the Papakura Local ED Action Plan creates a framework to guide local economic development actions for Papakura Local Board area, it’s important to remember that economic development operates across local board and municipal boundaries.  It is, therefore, important to consider the Plan within a sub-regional context for south Auckland and Auckland’s southern edge.  The sub-regional context is one of substantial future urban expansion, employment generation and investment opportunities, ethnic diversity and a clear mandate to tackle underlying issues of deprivation, youth unemployment and skills and education under-achievement.  The diagram below captures Papakura’s economic development within a sub-regional context:

Plan Delivery – A partnership approach

The Papakura Local Economic Development Plan creates a framework to guide local economic development actions for Papakura Local Board Area.  Its aim is to facilitate effective engagement between deliverers of economic development initiatives and the Papakura Local Board.  The Papakura Local Board has to work in partnership to enable effective implementation and will work with the following partners:

 

 

Priority New projects – 2013/14 (Year 1) to 2015/16 (Year 3)

A number of projects outlined in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan are underway and are being implemented and funded.  Outlined below are new projects that have been scoped and are deliverable in years 1, 2 and 3.  Year 1 projects form part of the local economic development work programme for 2013/14 (subject to Local Board approval).  Projects shown for year 2 (2014/15) and year 3 (2015/16) are indicative only and require discussion/approval as part of yearly planning workshops (see below).

These projects could start with investment from Papakura Local Board (and partners).  This will ensure that there is increased momentum on delivery early in the Plan period.  The projects are to be implemented sequentially and are linked.

 

 

Year 1 projects

Papakura Local Board will focus its efforts on delivery of the following new projects within 2013/14 (year 1) and will form part of the local economic development work programme for this year:

·      1.6 Undertake a survey of businesses operating in Papakura to understand:

The issues and business growth opportunities related to operating in Papakura, for example business land availability, skills and local workforce issues

Identify Māori owned/operated businesses in Papakura and any specific issues and growth opportunities they face

Current use of internet and broadband technology, awareness of UFB rollout and the benefits UFB/internet technologies may bring to their business (linked to action 1.8)

 

·      1.12 Commission a commercial property market study to indicate market demand, trends and prospects for future commercial property investment within the Papakura Local Board area

The focus for the study will be Papakura’s key employment precincts, including Papakura Town Centre.  The study will assist with the development of an investor pack for Papakura (Action 1.16), as it will identify significant available commercial development sites and buildings to accommodate expansion or new business investments.  This information will be used to assist ATEED’s business attraction activities

·      1.13 Establish a Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce, involving key public and private sector partners, to develop short and long term actions to:

Enable transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge

Ensure the vitality and viability of Papakura Town Centre

Identify actions to inform the development of Papakura Local Board Plan, Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan and Progressive Papakura’s strategic plan.

Indicative year 2 projects

Papakura Local Board will focus its efforts on delivery of the following new projects within 2014/15 (year 2) – subject to discussion/approval at yearly planning workshop:

·      1.13 (above) – continued funding from 2013/14

 

·      1.4 Establish a wider business forum (public/private partnership) and sub-groups to ensure that there is coordination, collaboration and networking amongst key ED Action Plan delivery partners.  This will be a proactive facilitated forum that could include:

Twice-yearly Action Plan progress meetings or electronic reporting

Stakeholder conversations and networking with business services sector (in between meetings/reporting)

Formation of industry-led sub-groups (where relevant/required) to discuss industry specific (e.g. construction or engineering or manufacturing) or location specific (key business precincts) specific issues and opportunities informed by surveys (see Action 1.6)

 

·      1.6 Phase 2 business survey - using focused interviews to provide more in depth information on Papakura’s key manufacturing and export generating businesses (linked to action 2.2)

 

·      1.14 Establish relationships with current and future landlords/property investors:

Develop a mapped database of commercial property owners

Establish a commercial property landlord forum:

§  Focussed on key employment precincts

§  Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura)

§  To provide a platform for dissemination of information between landlords, Auckland Council organisation, Papakura Local Board and Progressive Papakura

Establish relationships with future landlords/property investors (linked to action 1.16)

 

·      1.16 Develop an investor pack and investor champion service for the Papakura Local Board area.  The focus will be on Papakura’s key employment precincts and Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura).  The investor champion service will pull together existing services to ensure a seamless and fast service to significant investors or occupiers

 

·      2.2 Provide additional part-time/contract ATEED resource to:

Undertake additional and targeted business capability assessments and assistance to companies seeking to develop and grow

Assist qualifying companies to access funding through NZTE capability vouchers and other services provided by NZTE (e.g. Better by Design)

Provide additional Research & Development advice to local companies that meet the criteria for Callaghan funding

 

The additional resources could also be full-time in conjunction with adjoining Local Boards

 

·      4.2 Develop and implement a vocational training and education expo in Papakura, to connect Papakura’s young people to trade training and apprenticeships opportunities.  Post-expo follow up provided by Youth Connections Papakura and ensure young people can take up Māori and Pasifika trades training provision that will be scaled up in 2014.

Indicative year 3 projects

Papakura Local Board will focus its efforts on delivery of the following new projects within 2015/16 (year 3) – subject to discussion/approval at yearly planning workshop:

·      1.4, 2.2, and 1.14 (above) – continued funding from 2014/15

 

·      1.8 Leverage the deployment of Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB).  Building on the survey findings outlined in 1.6:

Undertake awareness and education programmes with Papakura based businesses based on survey results

Ensure Papakura businesses are represented and linked into a future regional community (map based) web information portal

Advocate to ensure that key community and business hubs are connected to and making the most of UFB

Consider working with other local boards to establish best-practice and reduce project costs/increase efficiencies.

 

·      1.15 Undertake a Business Expansion and Retention (BEAR) programme for Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura).  BEAR is an internationally recognised facilitated programme of local business community based economic development.

Yearly review, monitoring and work programme

This action plan forms the implementation and work programme for the Local Board to deliver on its economic development objectives. Each year Auckland Council’s Local Economic Development team will hold a planning workshop with the Papakura Local Board. At the workshop there will be a review of the Action Plan.  Completed actions will be removed and new actions added.  The action plan will then be finalised as the local economic development work programme for that financial year.

This process keeps the action plan current and relevant.  It also allows proposals for funding of local economic development projects for inclusion in the Local Board Agreement and Council’s Annual Plan, and/or the next iteration of the Long Term Plan. 

ATEED

ATEED’s existing activity and programme of work is broadly captured within the 2013/16 Statement of Intent (SOI), agreed with Auckland Council.

The SOI acknowledges that local boards are focused on a range of visitor and economic development related priorities and projects through Local Board Plans. The SOI states that where these priorities can be aligned with ATEED’s regional economic growth focus and vision to improve New Zealand’s economic prosperity by leading the successful transformation of Auckland’s economy, ATEED will commit to working with the Auckland Council Economic Development Group and Local Boards on the delivery of these priorities. ATEED acknowledges that Local Boards have responsibilities regarding funding and delivering local economic development and local events.

Actions have been developed to ensure that full range (or majority) of ATEED’s existing work programmes and SOI are fully reflected and recognised and these have been included in this Action Plan.  ATEED’s actions are positioned at the start of each section of the plan for ease of reference.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 1 - Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan – 2013/14 – 2015/16 – V0.8

Ref.

Actions and initiatives

 

Interested parties

Timescale

Status

Outcome

1.     Grow a business-friendly and well-functioning city

1.1

Identify and list multi-national corporations (MNC’s) for inclusion in ATEED’s regional aftercare programme.

ATEED (BA&I), AC (MPT), Papakura LB

Ongoing

Underway

The regional aftercare programme assists in the retention and expansion of MNC’s with significant operations in Papakura.

1.2

Support and promote the delivery of ATEED’s programme of local business events and networking functions to businesses in the Papakura Local Board area.  This includes the Papakura and Franklin Business Breakfast.

 

ATEED (EG), PP

Ongoing

Underway

Businesses in Papakura are well connected and networking opens new business growth opportunities.

1.3

Support and promote the delivery of local business growth advice and assistance.

ATEED (EG)

Ongoing

Underway

Businesses in Papakura are connected to support available through ATEED

1.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Establish a wider business forum (public/private partnership) and sub-groups to ensure that there is coordination, collaboration and networking amongst key ED Action Plan delivery partners.  This will be a proactive facilitated forum that could include:

 

·      Twice-yearly Action Plan progress meetings or electronic reporting

·      Stakeholder conversations and networking with business services sector (in between meetings/reporting)

·      Formation of industry-led sub-groups (where relevant/required) to discuss industry specific (e.g. construction or engineering or manufacturing) or location specific (key business precincts) issues and opportunities, informed by surveys (see Action 1.6).

 

Papakura LB, AC (LED), ATEED (EG), business groups, business services sector

Years 2 – 3

and 4 -10

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

A collaborative proactive facilitated partnership is developed to ensure effective delivery of the objectives and actions of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan. 

 

The wider forum will meet when required/relevant.  Industry-led sub-groups to discuss specific issues, opportunities or activities.

1.5

Advocate for timely roll-out of the Papakura Area Plan or a land-use based action plan focussing primarily on Papakura Town Centre.

 

As part of the development of the Papakura Area Plan,  advocate for:

 

·      a sustainable supply of business land in Papakura and adjoining local board areas, to meet the needs of Papakura’s economy

·      continuing use and development of industrial and employment precincts in Papakura including:

 

Takanini north (manufacturing, construction and wholesaling)

Takanini central (manufacturing and retail)

Papakura metropolitan centre (retail, hospitality, business services and public administration)

Hunua Road (manufacturing and construction)

Drury (construction and manufacturing)

Karaka (international thoroughbred horse sales and export)

Papakura LB, AC (Plan south), AC (RESP)

Year 2 - 3

Not started

Area plan or land-use based action plan activity is brought forward.

 

Business expansion opportunities are considered alongside allocation of green field residential land.  Existing industrial and employment precincts operate without any significant reverse sensitivity issues.  Further expansion of existing and ancillary activities are safeguarded.

 

 

1.6

Undertake a survey of businesses operating in Papakura to understand:

 

·      The issues and business growth opportunities related to operating in Papakura, for example business land availability, skills and local workforce issues

·      Identify Māori owned/operated businesses in Papakura and any specific issues and growth opportunities they face

·      Current use of internet and broadband technology, awareness of UFB rollout and the benefits UFB/internet technologies may bring to their business (see action 1.8 below).

 

Consider undertaking a phase 2, using focused interviews, to provide more in depth information on Papakura’s key manufacturing and export generating businesses (linked to action 2.2).

 

AC (LED), AC (RDPI),

ATEED (OS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AC (LED),

ATEED (EG/OS)

Year 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 2

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

Papakura LB and Local ED Action Plan delivery partners are aware of the key issues faced by and business growth opportunities for businesses operating in Papakura.  This information will be used to inform future actions as part of the yearly review (Local Board workshop) of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

 

The potential phase 2 focused interviews provides detailed information to maximise future potential investment in additional business capability assessment/R&D support.

1.7

Develop and implement the Industrial South Integrated Business Precinct Plan, which includes key industrial precincts in south Auckland, including Takanini (north and central).

AC (LED)

Ongoing

Underway

The Plan will provide a series of high-level actions that will address the issues and opportunities identified within the industrial south business precincts, including Takanini north and central.

1.8

Leverage the deployment of Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB).  Building on the survey findings outlined in 1.6:

 

·      Undertake awareness and education programmes with Papakura based businesses based on survey results

·      Ensure Papakura businesses are represented and linked into a future regional community (map based) web information portal

·      Advocate to ensure that key community and business hubs are connected to and making the most of UFB

·      Consider working with other local boards to establish best-practice and reduce project costs/increase efficiencies.

 

Papakura LB, AC(RDPI)

Year 3 and 4 -10

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

More Papakura based businesses’ are connected to UFB and more businesses are using associated technologies to improve productivity and best practice is shared.

1.9

Support for Papakura Business Improvement District partnership programmes and activities in Papakura outlined in Progressive Papakura’s future strategic plan, which is now under development.

 

Papakura LB, PP, AC (LED)

Ongoing

Underway

Collaborative promotion and advocacy activities continue to enhance business vitality in Papakura’s BID area.  Progressive Papakura’s strategies and activities help develop Papakura into the thriving metropolitan centre serving Auckland’s southern edge.

1.10

Support safety and security initiatives in Papakura Local Board area including:

 

·      Safer Papakura’s safety patrol programme, to create a feeling of safety within Papakura Town Centre

·      Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrol, across the area

·      Other future initiatives developed by partners.

 

 

 

Papakura LB, Safer Papakura, CDAC (south), NZ Police (Papakura), Papakura Community Crimewatch Patrol

Ongoing

Underway

The programmes help to address the fear of crime and help to establish a family-friendly environment in key locations, such as Papakura Town Centre.  The Safer Papakura programme also provides opportunities to gain work experience, qualifications and future job opportunities.

1.11

Investigate the feasibility of local transport improvements that will assist local economic development including:

 

·      Changes to Papakura Town Centre on-street parking time limits

·      Improvements to way finder signage to and through Papakura Local Board area including:

Papakura Town Centre

Papakura’s key sporting, arts and cultural facilities (see Action 5.3)

Key visitor attractions in the adjoining Franklin Local Board area, including Clevedon and coast, Hunua and Ardmore Airport.

 

Papakura LB, AT, PP, Franklin LB, Franklin Tourism Group

Years 1 – 3

Not started

Changes to on-street parking times will allow increased flexibility for shoppers and visitors to Papakura Town Centre.

 

Improved way finder signage will make it easier to attract new and repeat visitors to Papakura, its key shopping, cultural, sporting and arts facilities and become a gateway to Clevedon, coast and Hunua visitor attractions.

1.12

Commission a commercial property market study to indicate market demand, trends and prospects for future commercial property investment within the Papakura Local Board area.

 

The focus for the study will be Papakura’s key employment precincts, including Papakura Town Centre.  The study will assist with the development of an investor pack for Papakura (Action 1.16), as it will identify significant available commercial development sites and buildings to accommodate expansion or new business investments.  This information will be used to assist ATEED’s business attraction activities. 

 

Papakura LB, AC(LED)

Year 1

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

The property study will enable informed choices to be made about Papakura’s need for future employment land and prospects for property investment in Papakura’s metropolitan centre.

 

The study will also provide practical information to assist in the promotion of Papakura for increased business investment.

1.13

Establish a Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce, involving key public and private sector partners, to develop short and long term actions to:

 

·      Enable Papakura Town Centre to transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge

·      Ensure the vitality and viability of the Town Centre

·      Identify opportunities for property development and investment

·      Identify actions to inform the development of Papakura Local Board Plan, Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan and Progressive Papakura’s strategic plan.

 

Papakura LB, PP, AC (LED), AC (Plan south), AT, CDAC(south) NZ Police (Papakura), Safer Papakura, Papakura Marae, Papakura Secondary Schools, Papakura Youth Council, AC (CTP), Property investors/

Professionals

 

Years 1 and 2

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

A collaborative partnership is formed to identify short and long term actions and activities to address issues within Papakura Town Centre to enable its transition to a the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge.

1.14

Establish relationships with current and future landlords/property investors:

 

·      Develop a mapped database of commercial property owners

·      Establish a commercial property landlord forum:

Focussed on key employment precincts

Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura). 

To provide a platform for dissemination of information between landlords, Auckland Council organisation, Papakura Local Board and Progressive Papakura

·      Establish relationships with future landlords/property investors (linked to action 1.16)

 

Papakura LB, AC (LED), PP, private sector landlords, landlord’s agents

Years 2 – 3

 

Years 4 - 10

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required.

A collaborative partnership between the public sector and the property development and investment industry will help to ensure alignment between investment in the built environment and Papakura Local Board’s aspirations for the area.  Proactive engagement attracts interest and investment from property investors and landlords new to Papakura.

1.15

Undertake a Business Expansion and Retention (BEAR) programme for Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura). 

BEAR is an internationally recognised facilitated programme of local business community based economic development.

 

Papakura LB, AC(LED), PP, Papakura town centre businesses

Year 3

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required

The BEAR programmes provides a structured approach to identifying and supporting the needs of Papakura Town Centre’s existing businesses. 

1.16

Develop an investor pack and investor champion service for the Papakura Local Board area. 

 

The focus will be on Papakura’s key employment precincts and Papakura Town Centre (working with Progressive Papakura).  The investor champion service will pull together existing services to ensure a seamless and fast service to significant investors or occupiers. 

Papakura LB, AC(LED), PP AC (consents), AC (MPT), NZ Police (Papakura), Safer Papakura, ATEED (BA&I) – for MNC investment only

Year 2

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required

Commercial property investors and occupiers have access to high quality information to make informed decisions about investing/locating within Papakura.  Regulatory and delivery agencies provide a coordinated and seamless service to significant property investors and occupiers.

1.17

Undertake the feasibility of establishing a business network or business association focussed on the key business precincts (Takanini North, Takanini Central, Hunua Road and Drury).

 

The project will draw on successes/learnings from action 1.2 (wider business forum).

 

Papakura LB, AC(LED)

Year 4

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required

The project will identify the feasibility and the willingness of businesses based within Papakura’s business precincts to collaborate on developing solutions to common locational issues and opportunities for business growth.

2.     Develop an innovation hub of the Asia-Pacific Rim - Supporting innovative firms to grow in Papakura

2.1

Deliver and promote the Regional Partner Programme (RPP) within Papakura Local Board area.

 

ATEED (EG)

Ongoing

Underway

Businesses in Papakura are connected to support available through the RPP Programme in partnership with NZTE and Callaghan Innovation.

2.2

Provide additional part-time/contract ATEED resource to:

 

·      Undertake additional and targeted business capability assessments and assistance to companies seeking to develop and grow

·      Assist qualifying companies to access funding through NZTE capability vouchers and other services provided by NZTE (e.g. Better by Design)

·      Provide additional Research & Development advice to local companies that meet the criteria for Callaghan funding. 

 

The additional resources could also be full-time in conjunction with adjoining Local Boards.

 

 

Papakura LB, ATEED(EG)

Year 2 -3

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required

Additional resource allows proactive targeting of Papakura’s key manufacturing and export generating businesses, to assist them to grow with the help of capability development, NZTE support, and research and development advice.

2.3

Promote the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) to Papakura secondary schools to encourage their participation in the YES programme 2014/15.

 

Papakura LB, ATEED(EG)

Ongoing

Underway

Entrepreneurship in Papakura is fostered at an early age through Papakura secondary school participation

2.4

Promote the business mentors programme locally to maximise the participation of local companies.

Chamber of Commerce,

Business Mentors NZ, ATEED (EG)

Ongoing

Underway

Businesses in Papakura have access to mentors to help them to overcome barriers to and seize opportunities for business growth.

2.5

Support the development of a needs analysis to establish the feasibility of setting up an “Innovation Station” within the Papakura Local Board area.

 

The Innovation station could provide or encourage business incubation, business training, co-working, networking, business meetings and mentoring.  The station will connect in existing business capability/incubator providers.  The station will also support specific needs of Māori owned/operated businesses in Papakura, as part of the Papakura Māori ED Programme (see Action 6.2).

AC (LED), CDAC(south) ATEED(EG)

MBIE, COMET Auckland

Year 1 - 5

Underway

The needs analysis will establish the potential user base, patronage, income streams, services required and link in existing service providers.

3.     Become internationally connected and export-driven

3.1

Support the continuation of international thoroughbred horse sales at New Zealand Bloodstock facilities in Karaka and international buyers visiting the city.  Recognise the importance this has to equine related export businesses (breading, international specialised freight and other ancillary services).

 

Papakura LB, New Zealand Bloodstock

 

Ongoing

Underway

Export of thoroughbred horses provides benefits to the Auckland economy.

4.     Enhance investment in people to grow skills and a local workforce – developing opportunities for Papakura’s young people

4.1

Support the introduction and continued development (Papakura High School) of Youth Guarantee, including Vocational Pathways and a local Youth Guarantee network in Papakura’s secondary schools and their tertiary interface.

 

Support collaborative programme delivery by educational providers, industry groups (national) and local industry in Papakura.  Connect with Auckland training and skills initiatives (see 4.2 to 4.5).

Ministry of Education, Papakura High School, other educational providers, Papakura pathway businesses, Ministry of Social Development Youth Service Providers

 

Ongoing

Underway

Provides Papakura’s young people with opportunities to gain contextualised qualifications and skills that are valued by employers and learning pathways that lead to further education and work.

4.2

Develop and implement a vocational training and education expo in Papakura, to connect Papakura’s young people to trade training and apprenticeships opportunities. 

 

Post-expo follow up provided by Youth Connections Papakura and ensure young people can take up Māori and Pasifika trades training provision that will be scaled up in 2014.

CDAC(south) AC(SI), training providers (MIT and AUT), Youth Connections Papakura

Year 2

Project scoped.  Project approval and budget required

Provides Papakura’s young people with real examples of trades-based further education and employment pathways.  Provides Auckland employers with skilled employers in labour-shortage professions.

 

Greater number of 18-35 year old Māori and Pasifika complete trades training that will support key growth sectors in the Local Board area.

4.3

Support skills, workforce and training initiatives and actions, as part of Auckland Council’s Southern Initiative project, including:

 

·      MIT/SI cadetship programme (now underway)

·      Supporting Papakura High School vocational pathway and employer relations programme

·      Support for pathways for further education, training and employment at other Papakura education providers

·      Enhancing Māori and Pasifika trades-training provision in response to the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment’s recent Request for Proposals.

 

AC (SI), COMET Auckland, MIT, Ministry of Education, SI based businesses, charitable groups (training and education)

Years 1–3 and 4-10

Underway

Collaborative planning and implementation of workforce and training initiatives starts a transformative change for employment opportunities for Papakura’s young people.

4.4

Support Papakura Youth Connections programme, working with local businesses, youth services and schools to create connections between young people and employers.

Papakura LB, CDAC(south)

Papakura Marae

Ongoing

Underway

Provide opportunities for all young people in Papakura to meet the goal that they are either working and earning, or learning and training.

4.5

Support for COMET Auckland’s collaborative activities for advancing education and skills development in Auckland and specific activity in Papakura, including:

 

·      Implementation of the Māori Education Plan and formation of the Tamaki Makarau Maori Education Forum

·      Development of a regional employability framework (with cross-sector partners) – to be scoped further with a possible trialling at Papakura High School/Marae

·      Trial employability passport process with Papakura High School and Papakura Marae.  The development of the employability framework needs to be completed prior to the shaping of this work and budget required

·      Host an ICT (communities/families go digital) symposium in south Auckland – to build digital inclusion, digital skills and opportunities for engagement in learning.

 

COMET Auckland and partners

Ongoing

Underway

Regional and Papakura based collaborative initiatives help to achieve the vision of accelerating prospects for Aucklandlers through education.

4.6

Support the development of the social enterprise facility feasibility study at a Papakura community centre (also referred to as “Hot House”).  This project to include access to business skills learning, computer skills as well as access to social, health and lifelong learning services. 

CDAC(south, Papakura Marae, AC(LED), COMET Auckland

Year 1

Underway

The feasibility study will establish the viability and need for this project.

5.     Develop a vibrant, creative international city – support the development of Papakura’s cultural, visitor and sporting assets

5.1

Provide advice on the development of local tourism marketing material.

 

ATEED (tourism), Papakura operators

 

Ongoing

Underway

Local tourism operators have access to regional and international best practice in developing marketing material and collateral. 

5.2

Profile local areas through a range of channels including aucklandnz.com official visitor guide and regional maps.

 

ATEED

(tourism)

Ongoing

Underway

Providing access to channels to market for the area’s tourism offer.

5.3

Support, promote and ensure optimum usage of Papakura’s cultural, arts, performing arts and competitive sporting assets, including:

 

·      Papakura Art Gallery

·      Papakura Museum

·      Facilities at Ray Small Road/Elliot Street, including Hawkins Theatre (theatre, youth theatre and cinema), and Papakura Theatre Company (off Broadway Theatre – managed by Bruce Pulman Park Trust)

·      Old Central School (artists centre)

·      Bruce Pulman Park and sporting venues

·      Massey Park sporting facilities

 

Consider undertaking an economic impact assessment on the value of Papakura’s hosting of national amateur sporting competitions, NZ international competitors and their coaches.

 

 

 

 

Papakura LB, CDAC(south) facility operators, Bruce Pulman Park Trust

 

Ongoing

Underway

Papakura’s cultural, arts, performing arts and competitive sporting facilities continue to enhance the area’s liveability and attract visitors from surrounding areas and wider New Zealand (amateur sporting competitions).

 

Usage of cultural, arts and sporting facilities is optimised.

 

The impact on the local Papakura economy in hosting of national amateur sporting competitions, NZ international competitors and their coaches is quantified.

6.     Cross-cutting EDS themes

Creating a sustainable eco-economy

6.1

Explore opportunities to undertake sustainable development demonstration projects and facilitation of sustainable economic practices, as part of Papakura’s development as a metropolitan centre.

Papakura LB, AC(LED), AC(Plan south), PP

Years 2-3 and 4-10

Further scoping and budget required

Opportunities are encouraged to provide a point of difference to the development of Papakura Town Centre as it transitions into a metropolitan centre, supported by best-practice in environmental sustainability.

Iwi/Maori Economic Powerhouse

6.2

Develop and implement a Papakura Māori ED Programme. Include actions to address issues and opportunities highlighted at a Hui and Iwi/ Māori business meetings in late 2013/early 2014, including:

 

·      Business capability support and information available – what’s already available and gaps

·      Funding and seed capital availability

·      Learning from other Māori businesses – including mentoring and Māori business showcasing

·      Ensuring that a “Māori lens” is used to develop other actions within the Papakura Local ED Action Plan

·      Iwi post-settlement capability support.

 

AC(LED), CDAC (south), Papakura Iwi, Papakura Marae, Papakura Māori businesses

Year 1 and 2-3

Underway

Development of a toolkit to assist the economic development of Papakura’s Māori based businesses, to ensure that they thrive and contribute to the economic prosperity of Papakura.

 

Glossary/Key

Abbreviation/term/colour

Description

 

Papakura Local ED Action Plan

Papakura Local Economic Development Action Plan (this plan)

AC (Plan south)

Auckland Council’s planning team south

AC (UPT)

Auckland Council’s Unitary Plan team

AC (LED)

Auckland Council’s Local Economic Development team, Economic Development Department

AC (CTP)

Auckland Council’s City Transformation Project team

AC (RESP)

Auckland Council’s Regional Economic Policy Implementation

AC (consents)

Auckland Council’s consents teams

AC (RDPI)

Auckland Council’s Regional Digital Policy Implementation team, Economic Development Dept.

AC (MPT)

Auckland Council’s Major Projects Team

AC (SI)

Auckland Council’s Southern Initiative team

CDAC (south)

Auckland Council’s Community Development Arts and Culture Department, south team

ATEED (south)

Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) southern business growth team, based in Highbrook

ATEED (BA&I)

ATEED’s Business Attraction and Investment team

ATEED (EG)

ATEED’s Economic Growth team

ATEED (Tourism)

ATEED’s tourism team

ATEED (OS)

ATEED’s Operational Strategy Team

AT

Auckland Transport

Business Mentors NZ

Business Mentors New Zealand (NZ) is the leading business mentoring service provider to the SME (small to medium-sized enterprise) sector in New Zealand.

PP

Progressive Papakura

MBIE

MBIE’s (Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment’s) purpose is to grow New Zealand for all by helping businesses to become more productive and internationally competitive, and by increasing opportunities for all New Zealanders to contribute to the economy.

COMET Auckland

Charitable Trust and Council Controlled Organisation set up to enhance Auckland’s skills and education.

ITO

Industry Training Organisation

Papakura LB

Papakura Local Board

MIT

Manukau Institute of Technology

PBC

Papakura Business Community – Online (Facebook) business community with approximately 300 members and with networking opportunities – privately operated initiative.

Safer Papakura

Safer Papakura Trust – provide safety patrol services in Papakura Town Centre and training and employment initiatives for those taking part in the programme.

Bruce Pulman Park Trust

Trust set up to provide world-class sporting facilities for Papakura’s residents, elite athletes, host national amateur sporting events.  The Trust also manages the Off Broadway Theatre (home of Papakura Theatre Company).

NZ Police (Papakura)

Initiatives and services provided by Papakura police station, Counties Manukau South main policing centre.

NZTE

New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) is New Zealand's international business development agency. NZTE’s role is to help New Zealand businesses grow bigger, better, faster in international markets.

Callaghan Innovation

Callaghan Innovation connect businesses with research organisations across the innovation system: offering the expertise and facilities they need; operating their own research and technology laboratories and specialist equipment; and managing more than $140 million a year in government funding and grants to support business innovation and capability building.

Youth Guarantee

This is a new approach to secondary education curriculum development and its linkages to tertiary provision.  It enables students to achieve qualifications and skills that are valued by employers; create a learning pathway that leads to further education and work and identify where the jobs are and plan how to get there.  This programme has been developed collaboratively by Ministry of Education, education providers, industry groups and individual businesses in local areas.  Papakura High School has adopted the Youth Guarantee scheme.

Youth Connections

Youth Connections' vision is to have all young people either working and earning, or learning and training. Its goal is to ensure that every young person has a plan and a direction to help them reach their potential.  It targets young people who are not involved in education, employment or training.  In Papakura this project is supported by Hugh Green Foundation, Papakura Local Board, project managed by Auckland Council organisation (CDAC) and delivered by Papakura Marae (2 year contract from 2013).

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

1.6 Papakura Business Survey

 

Background

The proposed business survey would provide the Papakura Local Board with a greater understanding of business needs in Papakura.  It would provide an evidence base for the development of other actions within the Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

 

The proposed business survey would seek information to assist with the understanding of:

 

·      The issues and business growth opportunities related to businesses operating in Papakura

·      Identify Māori owned/operated businesses in Papakura and any specific issues and growth opportunities they face (linked with Papakura MāoriED Programme identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 6.2)

·      Current use of internet and broadband technology, awareness of UFB rollout and the benefits UFB/internet technologies may bring to their business (see scope for Leverage and deployment of UFB identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 1.8).

This project includes an option to undertake a phase 2, using focused interviews, to provide more in depth information on Papakura’s key manufacturing and export generating businesses.  The potential phase 2 is linked to the Additional ATEED business capability assessment resource project, outlined in a separate scope (identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 2.2).

 

It is proposed that phase 1 of this project be undertaken early in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan period (year 1).  This is to ensure that there is relevant and bespoke data available that can be used to inform the implementation and development of actions. 

 

Phase 1 will exclude companies located with the Papakura Town Centre BID area.  This is to avoid duplication, as Progressive Papakura have recently undertaken a survey of companies located across the BID area, as part of the development of their Strategic Plan.

 

The implementation of this project will need to follow the procedures and processes of the Research, Consultation and Engagement team within the Auckland Council organisation.  Separate project documentation has been developed to comply with this process.

 

It is important that responses to the survey are kept confidential.  It is proposed that the survey results will be discussed with the Papakura Local Board as part of a confidential business meeting agenda.  The survey responses are likely to reveal commercially sensitive information regarding businesses operating in the Papakura Local Board area.

 

Objectives and deliverables

Project objectives

 

The key objectives of this project are to:

 

·      Establish the key issues faced by and business growth opportunities for businesses operating in Papakura area, including those that identify themselves as Māoriowned/operated

·      Provide useful data to guide the development of the Leverage of Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB) project identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 1.8

·      Ensure that current and future actions and initiatives outlined in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan reflect these findings

·      Maximise future potential investment in additional business capability assessment/R&D support (optional phase 2 focused interviews).

 

Deliverables

 

The project will include an initial survey of businesses operating in Papakura Local Board area (phase 1) and an optional more in-depth phase 2.  Phase 1 will mainly be conducted remotely (online, postal, telephone and face to face only when requested).  Phase 2 will be face to face only.  Deliverables include:

 

·      Development of a phase 1 questionnaire that addresses partner needs (including ATEED and Auckland Council organisation’s Regional Digital Policy Implementation Team), ensures optimum company participation and invites further follow-up for targeted companies (phase 2)

·      Establish a database of companies to be included in the Phase 1 survey.  Confirmation of target sectors for optional phase 2

·      Completed questionnaires and analysis of the results, including highlighting key issues and growth opportunities for businesses operating in Papakura

·      Optional phase 2:

Establish a database and develop questionnaire for a detailed face-to-face survey

Undertake phase 2 focused interviews with approximately 100 targeted companies - Papakura’s key manufacturing and export generating businesses

Analyse results working closely with ATEED.

Benefits and measures

 

The key benefits of the project include:

 

·      Compilation of bespoke data that provides Papakura Local Board with a greater understanding of business needs in Papakura. 

·      Provides delivery partners with details of the key issues faced by and business growth opportunities for businesses operating in Papakura,including those that identify themselves as Māori owned/operated

·      Analysis of the key issues and opportunities highlighted that inform the annual review of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan and the implementation and development of actions

·      Provide useful data to guide the development of the Leverage of Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB) project identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 1.8

·      Establishes communication and connection between Papakura Local Board, Local ED Action Plan delivery partners and businesses operating in the Papakura area

·      Phase 2 – provides in-depth information, leads and targets for the additional ATEED business capability assessment/R&D support.

 

A key success measure is whether or not the key issues and opportunities highlighted in the survey (phase 1) are able to inform future annual reviews and actions of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan.  The key success measure for phase 2 is an assessment of the value it plays in ensuring the success of the Additional ATEED business capability assessment resource project identified in the Papakura Local ED Action Plan as Action 2.2.

 

Budget details

Total estimated budget

Phase 1 - Cost 2013/14 (year 1 of Local ED Action Plan)

$ 15,000

Phase 2 - Cost 2014/15

$ 20,000

The proposed budget for this project is to cover the cost of contracting a professional business survey company to undertake the survey and complete the analysis.  Phase 2 budget is based on completion of approximately 100 face-to-face focused interviews.

 

Recommendations

It is recommended that the Papakura Local Board:

 

·      Approve the project scope

·      Approve Phase 1 of the project, as part of the Papakura Local ED Programme for 2013/14 and to undertake immediate implementation

·      Consider the approval of Phase 2 of the project, as part of the Papakura Local ED Programme for 2014/15, at a future year 2 Papakura local economic development workshop.

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

1.12 Papakura commercial property market study

 

Background

The proposed study will provide Papakura Local Board with:

 

·      A detailed analysis of the current position and hierarchy of Papakura Local Board area’s commercial property market, relative to other areas in an Auckland regional context, e.g. Franklin Local Board , Manurewa Local Board areas

·      An analysis of current commercial property market demand and trends in the Papakura Local Board area compared to the regional context and other similar areas. 

·      An analysis of potential  future commercial property investment within the Papakura LB area

·      An evidence base/benchmark to assist the development and implementation of actions within the Papakura Local ED Action Plan

·      Evidence to enable informed choices to be made about Papakura’s need for future employment land and prospects for property investment in Papakura’s metropolitan centre

·      Data and analysis to inform strategic planning being undertaken.

 

The information provided by the study will also assist with:

 

·      The development of an investor pack for Papakura (Action 1.16), as it will identify significant available commercial development sites and buildings to accommodate expansion or new business investments

·      ATEED’s business attraction activities.

·      The future development of the Papakura Area Plan (or sub-area plan)/Structure Plan development

 

The focus for the study will be Papakura’s key employment precincts, including Papakura Town Centre.

 

The project is scheduled to start in year 1 of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan, to help inform strategic plans being developed during 2014.  This includes Papakura Local Board Plan and Progressive Papakura’s Strategic Plan.

 

It is important that the study report is kept confidential.  It is proposed that the study report will be discussed with the Papakura Local Board as part of a confidential business meeting agenda.  The study report is likely to include commercially sensitive information, regarding the commercial property markets operating in the Papakura Local Board area.

Objectives and deliverables

Project objectives

 

The key objectives of this project are to provide:

 

·      Papakura Local Board with an evidence base to assist the development and implementation of actions within the Papakura Local ED Action Plan

·      Data and analysis about commercial property market trends, to inform strategic insights into how the market operates in Papakura

·      Insight into what commercial property market changes in Papakura are likely to occur and what are the influencing factors (economic and land use)

·      Information on opportunities to provide developer/investor confidence to invest in the Papakura commercial property market

·      Information to assist with ATEED’s business attraction activities.

Deliverables

 

The study will provide an analysis of commercial property market providing an evidence base that describes how the market operates in Papakura and Papakura’s role within the regional context.  Elements of the study include:

 

·      An analysis of the current Papakura commercial property market including a review of:

Commercial occupancy and vacancy levels

An analysis of Market rents and land price trends, compared with Auckland and benchmark centres e.g. Pukekohe

Land sales and commercial property take-up

The current position and hierarchy of Papakura’s commercial property market, relative to other areas in an Auckland regional context, including a comparison of key occupancy/vacancy levels.

·      An analysis of potential future commercial activity and the influencing factors including:

Floor space demand and estimated employment growth

Development pipeline – total pipeline floor space estimated

Identification of the level of development across different commercial sectors, such as retail, office and industrial

Structural economic and land-use changes influencing Papakura’s role in a regional property market context

The potential commercial property market response to Papakura Town Centre metropolitan status identified in the Auckland Plan and draft Unitary Plan.

·      Provision of data and analysis on Papakura’s current key employment precincts, such as Takanini north and central, Hunua Road and Drury, as well as Papakura Town Centre.  This includes data and analysis on current and future market potential

·      Recommendations on opportunities to provide developer/investor confidence to invest in the Papakura’s commercial property market

·      Identification of significant available commercial development sites and buildings to accommodate expansion or new business investments.  This information will be used to assist with the development of an investor pack for Papakura (Papakura Local ED Action Plan: Action 1.16), as it will identify significant available commercial development sites and buildings to accommodate expansion or new business investments.  It will also be used to assist with ATEED’s business attraction activities.

 

Benefits and measures

 

The commercial property study will:

 

·      Enable informed choices to be made about Papakura’s need for future employment land and prospects for property investment in Papakura’s metropolitan centre

·      Provide data and analysis to inform strategic planning being undertaken by Papakura Local Board and Progressive Papakura

·      Provide a useful input into the future development of the Papakura Area Plan (or sub-area plan)/Structure Plan development

·      Provide information to assist with ATEED’s business attraction activities.

 

Success measures for this project could be:

 

·      Whether or not the study met the expectations in consultants brief and scope of works.  This will be evaluated as part of project close

·      A review into how the study has helped to inform strategic plans been undertaken.  This will be evaluated as part of the monitoring of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

·      Provide a useful input into the future development of the Papakura Area Plan (or sub-area plan)/Structure Plan development.

 

Budget details

Total estimated budget

Phase 1 - Cost 2013/14 (year 1 of Local ED Action Plan)

$ 20,000

The proposed budget for this project is to cover the cost of appointing a professional property consultant to undertake the study and other project management costs. 

 

Recommendations

It is recommended that the Papakura Local Board:

 

·      Approve the project scope

·      Approve the project as part of the Papakura Local ED Programme for 2013/14 and to undertake immediate implementation.

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

1.13 Papakura Town Centre collaborative taskforce

 

Background

The collaborative taskforce would develop an initial set of actions to enable the start of Papakura Town Centre’s transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge and to:

 

·      Ensure the vitality and viability of Papakura Town Centre

·      Identify actions to inform the development of Papakura Local Board Plan, Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan and Progressive Papakura’s strategic plan.

 

The collaborative taskforce should include a balanced mix[2] of public and private sector organisations.  This will include a core group that are expected to attend each session and subject matter experts, who will attend sessions relevant to their area of expertise.  The taskforce will be assisted by an independent facilitator with local business knowledge and mana.

 

The core group should include:

 

·      A taskforce Chairperson –  an independent Papakura business person or a business person with knowledge of Papakura’s business environment

·      Progressive Papakura – committee members and Town Centre Manager

·      Town centre businesses/organisations representing different sectors, such as retail, not-for-profit, financial services and business and professional services

·      Existing property owners and investors

·      Representatives from Papakura Local Board

·      Papakura Marae.

 

Subject matter experts:

 

·      Auckland Council organisation – including Economic Development, City Planning and Community Development Arts and Culture Departments

·      Auckland Transport

·      Safer Papakura

·      NZ Police (Papakura – Counties Manukau south)

·      Papakura secondary schools

·      Potential property owners and investors

·      Papakura Youth Council.

 

The project is scheduled to start in year 1 (2013/14) of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan to help inform strategic plans being developed during 2014.  This includes Papakura Local Board Plan and Progressive Papakura’s Strategic Plan.  The project will continue in year 2 (2014/15).

 

Objectives and deliverables

Project objectives

 

The key objectives of this project are to:

 

·      Assist Papakura Town Centre’s transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge

·      Form a collaborative taskforce to take joint ownership and collective responsibility to address town centre issues and opportunities

·      Identify short and long term actions and activities to address town centre issues and opportunities

·      Assist Papakura Town Centre’s transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge.

·      Develop initiatives and actions to inform strategic planning being undertaken by Papakura Local Board and Progressive Papakura.

 

Deliverables

 

The project’s main deliverable will be the formation of a collaborative taskforce, coming together to collectively address town centre issues and opportunities.  The project will include at least 3 or 4 facilitated workshops bringing together key partners.  The taskforce workshop will:

·      Develop an initial set of actions to enable the start of Papakura Town Centre’s transition to the metropolitan centre for Auckland’s southern edge

·      Provide a platform for longer-term collaborative delivery of actions identified in strategic plans finalised during 2014

·      Provide a useful input into the future development of the Papakura Area Plan (or sub-area plan)/Structure Plan development.

 

Benefits and measures

 

The collaborative taskforce will:

 

·      Take joint ownership and collective responsibility to address town centre issues and opportunities

·      Develop initiatives and actions to inform strategic planning being undertaken by Papakura Local Board and Progressive Papakura

·      Provide a platform for longer-term collaborative delivery of actions identified in strategic plans.

 

Success measures for this project could be:

 

·      Whether or not a collaborative taskforce is formed – involving the buy-in of a sufficient number of key partners. This will be evaluated as part of project close

·      Whether or not actions and initiatives identified by the taskforce are adopted within either the Papakura Local Board Plan and/or Progressive Papakura’s Strategic.  This will be evaluated as part of the monitoring of the Papakura Local ED Action Plan.

 

Budget details

Total estimated budget

Cost 2013/14 (year 1 of Local ED Action Plan)

$3,000

Cost 2014/15 (year 2 of Local ED Action Plan)

$7,000

The proposed budget for this project is to cover the cost of appointing a taskforce facilitator and other project management costs.

 

Recommendations

It is recommended that the Papakura Local Board:

 

·      Approve the project scope

·      Approve the project as part of the Papakura Local ED Programme for 2013/14 and 2014/15 and to undertake immediate implementation.

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

 

4.2 vocational training and education expo

 

Background

This project will aim to link vocational training organisations, private training establishments (PTE’s) and the tertiary sector in a focused and collaborative approach with schools, marae, Iwi, youth services, churches and new migrant services. The event will kick start or boost Papakura’s youth with more opportunities in a process that not only provides opportunity but also supports them and their Whanau through bureaucratic barriers that often stifle participation.

Understanding the economics of trade training, enrolment, Ministry of Social Development, apprenticeships, subsidies requires navigation and the community partners in this initiative will help guide participants through.

The project is proposed as a joint project between Community Development Arts and Culture and The Southern Initiative office, with support from Papakura Local Board.

Post-expo follow up provided by Youth Connections Papakura and ensure young people can take up Māori and Pasifika trades training provision that will be scaled up in 2014.

 

Objectives and deliverables

Project objectives

 

Objectives of the project are to link the Auckland need for skilled vocationally based workforce (recent Chamber of Commerce survey suggests that over half of all companies in Auckland have issues in recruitment of skilled labour) with the need to address the issues in Papakura of:

·      youth unemployment

·      Higher than average proposition of residents with no formal skills (over a third in Papakura compared with over a quarter nationally)

·      equitable access to tertiary education is a barrier to Papakura youth participation in the tertiary sector and a considerable amount of research has examined the barriers to access and those most likely to be affected in the tertiary education system

 

Deliverables

 

Deliverables include:

 

·      Event focused opportunities for youth

·      A series of workshops, presentations for youth and whanau

·      One sector forum for community leaders and organisations

·      Iwi/Māori Papakura skills forum.

 

Benefits

 

·      Provides Papakura’s young people with real examples of vocational-based further education and employment pathways.

·      Provides Auckland employers with skilled employers in labour-shortage professions.

·      Greater number of 18-35 year old Māori and Pasifika complete trades training that will support key growth sectors in the Local Board area.

·      Increase youth participation in:

Vocational  training

Apprenticeships

Technical training

Engineering

Sciences

 

Budget details

Total estimated budget

Cost 2013/14(year 1 of Local ED Action Plan)

$ 7,000 (Local Board contribution  out a total budget of $15,000)

The proposed budget for this project is to cover the cost of venue hire, hosting, communication and marketing,  youth leaders support/travel/volunteer costs, entertainment and sound equipment hire.

Recommendations

It is recommended that the Papakura Local Board:

 

·      Approve the project scope

·      Approve the project as part of the Papakura Local ED Programme for 2013/14 and to undertake immediate implementation.

 

 

 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2013

 

File No.: CP2014/07121

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to update the Papakura Local Board of the activities of Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL) for the six months 1 July to 31 December 2013.

Executive Summary

2.       ACPL’s goal is to be recognised as a “centre of excellence” that brings commercial expertise and provides value for money to Auckland Council across a discrete property portfolio valued at approximately $1 billion.  ACPL provides commercial expertise in property management, the buying, selling of properties by and strategically developing council assets.   As a substantive CCO with a commercial focus ACPL provides crucial support to a council organisation that efficiently and effectively achieves social, economic, cultural and environmental outcomes for Auckland.

3.       In order to achieve our goal and meet the expectations of the Mayor and the council, ACPL will work towards seven key outcomes over the next three years. These are:

·    Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are fit for purpose and net returns optimised.

·    Place-shaping partnerships are effectively planned and managed to project completion and in accordance with Auckland Plan objectives.

·    ACPL identifies housing opportunities and collaborates with partners to deliver exemplar housing developments, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market.

·    Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net return. 

·    Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

·    Council and AT property disposals are undertaken in a commercially robust manner.

·    The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

4.       A summary of ACPL activities specific to the Papakura Local Board is outlined in the Discussion section of this report with supporting detail included in Attachments B, C, and D.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board accepts the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-monthly Update Report 1 July to 3 December 2013

 

 

Discussion

Principles for working together

5.       ACPL’s Local Board Engagement Plan (LBEP) states that a successful working relationship between local boards and ACPL is founded on the following high-level principles which will guide our engagement with the local boards:

a shared understanding of and mutual respect for the roles, responsibilities and decision-making authority of local boards, the governing body and ACPL; 

·      transparent and timely communication with no surprises;

·      understanding and acknowledgment of shared responsibilities between the parties;

·           a commitment to a timely response to and resolution of issues raised by local board members;

·           a commitment to early inclusion in the planning and decision making process where issues have a specific relevance to a Local Board;

·           a commitment to flexibility in terms of engagement, recognising differing levels of interest and local relevance across the Auckland region.

 

6.       ACPL’s commitment to the local boards is outlined in detail in our LBEP, which is attached as Attachment A for reference. 

Workshops and Meetings

7.       A schedule of Papakura Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from July to December 2013 is attached as Attachment B. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

8.       ACPL manages all non-service properties. These are properties not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development that are owned by Auckland Council or Auckland Transport. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties. ACPL’s improved property knowledge and understanding has enabled it to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities. 

9.       The property portfolio has continued to grow during the last six-months and now totals 1095 properties. Rent arrears and vacancies were effectively managed throughout the period. During Q1 the average monthly collectable arrears rate and vacancies rate were respectively 1.35% and 2.93%. ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the quarter ending 30 September 2013 provides the shareholder a net surplus above YTD budget of $2m.

10.     Property portfolio information detailing current ACPL managed commercial and residential property within the Papakura Local Board area is attached at Attachment C of this report. The report includes each property’s classification or reason for retention along with additional notes to identify the nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with tenancy in place. It has also been updated to show properties for which council directs that the operating budget and lease revenue will be included in local board budgets from July 2014.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment D. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects. ACPL and Auckland Council’s Property Department work collaboratively on a comprehensive review process to identify such properties.

13.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with; council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Maori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision. A detailed process flowchart is provided as Attachment E.

14.     Council is budgeting to receive proceeds from the sale of surplus properties of $80 million in 2012/2013 and $58 million in 2013/2014. The financial implication of not achieving these budgets would be higher debt and therefore higher interest costs compared to budget. 

15.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Papakura Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment C.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

24 King Edward Avenue, Papakura

This property is subject to a Glasgow lease with a perpetual right of renewal on a 21 year term and exclusive right to freehold. Lessee owns improvements, council owns the land. ACPL is processing through the Rationalisation Process to evaluate future use requirements and considerations for council’s interests in the land only.

40 Queen Street, Papakura

This property is subject to a Glasgow lease with a perpetual right of renewal on a 21 year term and exclusive right to freehold. Lessee owns improvements, council owns the land. ACPL is processing through the Rationalisation Process to evaluate future use requirements and considerations for council’s interests in the land only.

39 Taka Street, Takanini

This property is under review for future use opportunities. It passed through the local board and mana whenua phase of the review process in early 2013. ACPL anticipates presenting for a committee decision mid-2014.

 

Place Shaping and Housing Initiatives

16.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into around 40 council-driven place-shaping and housing initiatives region wide. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $400k to in excess of $100million.

17.     There are no current ACPL place-shaping or housing initiatives or proposals in the Papakura Local Board area.

Acquisitions

18.     ACPL continues to support Council and Auckland Transport programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved Council or Auckland Transport budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

19.     A total of 54 property purchases to the value of $8.9m were completed during Q1. The number of acquisitions under active negotiations at the end of Q1 was 300 (253 AT and 47 AC).

20.     Recent council acquisitions have included;

-     meeting open space requirements, particularly for subdivisions

-     City Transformation projects

-     Heritage projects

-     Storm water projects.

21.     Current acquisitions programmes for AT include;

-     AMETI (Auckland Manukau Eastern Tamaki Initiative)

-     CRL (City Rail Link)

-     Te Atatu Road, Te Atatu road widening

-     Dominion Road, Mt Eden road widening.

22.     All properties were purchased within the valuation threshold agreed with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

23.     Due to commercial sensitivities any Papakura Local Board specific acquisitions detail will be provided direct to the local board by the Auckland Council or AT project owner.

Business Interests

24.     ACPL manages eight business interests region wide on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Papakura Local Board area.

Consideration

Local Board Views

25.     This report is for the Papakura Local Board’s information and seeks the views of the Local Board.

Maori Impact Statement

26.     During the past six months ACPL has further developed our Maori engagement initiatives. Our enhanced process engages with the 19 key mana whenua groups in the Tamaki region on three fronts: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests and development partnering discussions. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects. ACPL has additionally undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan pilot programme. The project’s key output will be an operational document outlining how ACPL will contribute to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. The Current State Assessment phase of this project has been completed and we are now in the Improvement Planning phase. ACPL will advise the Papakura Local Board as appropriate of any specific discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

General

27.     This report is intended to help ACPL meet its statutory obligations under the Local Government Act 2002. The relevant sections of the Local Government Act 2002 are noted below for information.

28.     As provided in section 59(1) of the Local Government Act 2002, the principal objective of a CCO is to:

(a)    achieve the objectives of its shareholders, both commercial and non-commercial, as specified in the statement of intent; and

(b)    be a good employer; and

(c)    exhibit a sense of social and environmental responsibility by having regard to the interests of the community in which it operates and by endeavoring to accommodate or encourage these when able to do so; and

(d)   the CCO is a council-controlled trading organisation, conduct its affairs in accordance with sound business practice.

29.     As provided in clause 1 of Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002, the purpose of the SOI is to:

·    state publicly the activities and intentions of a CCO for the year and the objectives to which  those activities will contribute;

·    provide an opportunity for shareholders to influence the direction of the organisation; and

·    provide a basis for the accountability of the directors to their shareholders for the performance of the organisation.

Implementation Issues

30.     There are no implementation issues.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

ACPL Draft Local Board Engagement Plan

101

bView

Schedule of Meetings and Workshops

117

cView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the Local Board Area

119

dView

Property Movement in the Local Board Area

121

eView

Rationalisation Process  Flowchart

123

     

Signatories

Authors

Caitlin Borgfeldt – Local Board Liaison

Authorisers

David Rankin – Chief Executive ACPL

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 
















Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Local Board Feedback on the Local Boards Funding Policy Review

 

File No.: CP2014/06932

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks formal feedback from local boards on the work to date on the Local Boards Funding Policy Review.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council is required to adopt a Local Boards Funding Policy. The current policy was developed within a context of retaining and reflecting legacy council service level and funding decisions. After three years more has been learned and a broader policy discussion can be undertaken.

3.       The review seeks to find the most appropriate funding mechanisms for local board expenditure on asset based services such as parks, libraries, recreation and community facilities and non-asset based services (locally driven initiatives). During the course of the review, equity issues for asset based service levels have been raised, which cannot be resolved via the Local Boards Funding Policy. Resolving these issues will have implications that can only be addressed as part of the wider planning and budgeting process. The review recommends retaining the current funding model for asset based services, but considers options for changing to a fairer funding model for locally driven initiatives.

4.       The timing for the review proposes public consultation in June 2014 to enable a policy to be adopted to form the basis of local board budgets for inclusion in the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025. In order to meet that timeframe engagement with local boards needs to take place in March and April 2014. This will enable the council to consider local board views in determining a proposal for consultation with the public.

5.       A report has been produced setting out options for the Local Boards Funding Policy and the key issues that need to be resolved. This report, “Local boards funding policy review” is appended as Attachment A to this report, and will form the basis of engagement with local boards and the Governing Body to inform decision making on the policy.

6.       On 20 February 2014, the Governing Body agreed the parameters for engagement with local boards on the review of the local boards funding policy. These parameters include:

·        no changes being made to the split between regional and local activities or to decision making responsibility for setting service levels for local activities

·        time frame for the review

·        structure of the policy that is to be considered

·        Governing Body, via operational groups, will work on equity issues in regard to asset based service levels as part of long-term plan process

·        options for a formula based funding allocation

·        parameters for the use of local rates

·        undertaking a review of the council rates remission and postponement legacy schemes that support community and sports related services, and natural, historic or cultural heritage, alongside the review of the Local Boards Funding Policy.

7.       Informal engagement with local boards has been undertaken throughout February and March 2014, and formal feedback is now sought from local boards via resolution.

8.       Following the engagement phase of the policy, all feedback will be presented to the Local Boards Funding Policy Political Working Party in early May, and subsequently the Governing Body when considering the draft policy for consultation in late May.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      agree to consider the policy framework for the Local Boards Funding Policy Review and provide formal feedback on the issues discussed and other associated issues.

 

Discussion

9.       At the 20 February 2014 meeting of the Finance and Performance Committee[3], the following resolutions were passed to guide the engagement phase of the Local Boards Funding Policy:

a)      agree with the following parameters for the review of the Local Boards Funding Policy for engagement with local boards based on the attached report “Local boards funding policy review”:

b)      note that the review of the Local Boards Funding Policy will not change decision making responsibility for:

i)       the split between regional and local activities

ii)       the setting of service levels for local activities.

c)      note that the proposed model for funding asset based services is the same model that is currently used.

d)      note that the Local Boards Funding Policy cannot resolve issues relating to differing asset based service levels and that the issue will be considered as part of the planning process for the long-term plan

e)      agree to adopt the policy by August 2014 to enable clarity in funding decision making to provide predictability of funding in the preparation of local board plans and budgets for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025. This will require the policy to be publically consulted on in June 2014.

f)       agree that the policy improve alignment between funding and expenditure decisions, by having separate funding mechanisms for:

i)       asset based services, such as parks and swimming pools, where service levels in each board area are primarily driven by the Governing Body decisions on the number, nature and location of such assets and the budget available for both capital and operational expenditure on these services.

ii)       locally driven initiatives, where local boards undertake activities for the benefit of their local communities, and control decisions on services, service levels and costs. (This may include asset related service level improvements and capital investment within limits approved by the Governing Body).

g)      agree that the costs of operating and maintaining asset based services (as defined in f) (i)); as well as the consequential operating expenditure (interest and depreciation) associated with governing body investment in local assets; will be funded from general rates, in accordance with asset management plans and the regional budgeting process

h)      agree the next stage of the review will consider options for funding locally driven initiatives (as defined in f) (ii)) by either general rates allocated on a formula basis, local rates collected in each board area, or a mix of general rates allocation and local rates

i)        agree that options for determining the relationship between the Governing Body and local boards for the use of local rates are:

i)       local boards advocate to the Governing Body for local rates and the Governing Body makes the final decision.

ii)       local boards make decisions on the use of local rates, within constraints of regional policy determined by the Governing Body, and the Governing Body implements these decisions.

j)        agree that the council’s rates remission and postponement legacy schemes that support community and sports related services, and natural, historic or cultural heritage be reviewed alongside the Local Boards Funding Policy to:

i)   ensure consistency between local grants schemes and rates relief schemes

ii)       develop a regionally consistent rates remission and postponement policy. Consultation on amendments to the policy should be undertaken alongside consultation on the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

k)      agree to direct staff to consider service level equity issues for local asset based services as part of the development of the Long-term Plan and Asset Management Plans and engage with local boards on this and report back on a timetable.

10.     A full discussion of the options for, and issues associated with, the development of the Local Boards Funding Policy can be found in the attached report “Local boards funding policy review”.

11.     The following discussion summarises the issues related to the setting of parameters for engagement with local boards on the options for the funding policy.

Time Frame

12.     The adoption of a Local Boards Funding Policy is likely to have an impact on the allocation of council budgets. It is recommended that the Local Boards Funding Policy be adopted by mid-August 2014. This would enable the council to prepare local budgets that reflect the new funding policy for public consultation in the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025. Adopting the Local Boards Funding Policy in August will also provide local boards with clarity as to who has decision making authority on the level and source of funding for local activities during the finalisation of budgets for local board plans in September.

13.     To meet this timeline, public consultation on the Local Boards Funding Policy would need to be carried out through a special consultative procedure undertaken in June 2014.

Scope: Policy Structure

14.     The Local Boards Funding Policy sets out how local activities are to be funded (the split between rates and fees and charges) and who should pay where rates are used. Decisions on service levels and how much funding is available are made when budgets are prepared each year. The review of the Local Boards Funding Policy does not set, or seek to change, decision making responsibility for:

·        the split between regional and local activities

·        the setting of service levels for local activities.

15.     Expenditure on local activities can be either capital or operational in nature. Capital expenditure is debt funded, but the ongoing costs associated with this expenditure, such as interest charges, depreciation, staff, consumables and maintenance are operational costs.  Local boards allocated capital funding to deliver governing body investment decisions on local assets, are also allocated the consequential operational expenditure associated with that capital expenditure. Operational expenditure is funded from local fees and charges and rates. The rate requirement is therefore gross operational expenditure, less fees, charges and other revenue.

16.     The ability to undertake capital investment depends on the ability to service the subsequent operational costs. While the Local Boards Funding Policy focuses on funding of operating expenditure, it captures capital decisions by including the subsequent operating costs.

17.     Good public policy links decisions on tax with decisions on expenditure (i.e. service levels).  Where possible this review has identified where better alignment can be made between funding decisions and decisions on levels of service. This has resulted in a policy framework that differentiates between:

·        asset based services such as those associated with parks, swimming pools and community facilities where the Governing Body makes decisions on the location, nature and number of local assets and matches this with funding

·        locally driven initiatives, where local boards undertake activities for the benefit of their local communities, and control decisions on who gets funding and the services and service levels to be delivered.

18.     The table following describes the Governing Body’s and local boards’ decision making roles in relation to asset based services and locally driven initiatives.

 

Governing body role

Local board role

Asset based services

·      Allocates capital funding to local boards in accordance with its decisions on new local assets and major upgrades.

·      Decides approximate location, budget and scope for these projects

·      Governing body decisions on investment will be guided by regional strategies, which should identify funding priorities based on the need to address service gaps and growth

·      Engaged and provide feedback on governing body decisions

·      Engaged and provide feedback on regional strategies

·      Decide precise location of new assets

·      Agrees design of project within scope set by the Governing Body. Can propose to fund increases to project scope as locally driven initiatives

·      Oversees delivery of project

·      Allocates operational expenditure to enable local boards to operate and maintain their local assets in accordance with the asset management plans

·      Approves asset management plans

·      Engaged in development of asset management plans

·      Operate and maintain local assets in accordance with the asset management plans

·      Can fund asset related service level improvements as locally driven initiatives

Locally driven initiatives

Approve or reject locally driven projects that exceed governing body set limits on local board capital investment

·      Can undertake capital projects within limits set by the Governing Body

·      May undertake capital projects over limits set by the Governing Body with approval from the Governing Body

·      Decide services and service levels to be provided for community and allocates operating budgets accordingly

·      Oversee delivery of local services

·      Can fund asset related service level improvements

19.     The review proposes that the existing model for funding asset based services be retained as there is no merit in alternative options for funding these. Under this model asset based services will continue to be funded from general rates. As the distribution of asset based service costs between boards does not align with factors such as local board population size, then funding on this basis will not ensure that local boards can maintain their asset base. There is also:

·        a poor relationship between the user catchment for many asset based services and local board populations

·        using local rates to fund asset based services would be inequitable, and for some boards unsustainable.

20.     Under this funding model, the Governing Body determines how much funding is available to fund agreed service level standards. The Governing Body also has the ability to set regional policies on fees and user charges such as free entry to swimming pools for under 17’s. Local boards undertake an advocacy role in changing agreed service levels and will be engaged in the development of the regional strategies on asset based services that will guide governing body decisions on future investment in assets.

21.     Local boards also have decision making on how asset based services are delivered and operated in their board area. They may make decisions on the level of fees and charges within any regional policy set by the Governing Body. In doing so they receive the benefit of increased revenue or fund any shortfall from other funding sources.

22.     During the course of the review, equity issues for asset based service levels have been raised which cannot be resolved via the Local Boards Funding Policy. Resolving these issues will have implications that can only be addressed as part of the wider planning and budgeting process and will be considered when developing the long-term plan. As part of this process, local boards will be engaged in the development of asset management plans (AMPs) that will determine service levels and capital programmes for asset based services.  Engagement with local boards on the AMPs is currently planned to begin March 2014.

23.     Under the current funding model, funding for locally driven initiatives reflects decisions on service levels made by former councils. The review has found that equity in funding for locally driven initiatives between local boards can be improved in one of three ways. These are by using:

·        general rates allocated to local boards based on factors such as local board population size, possibly adjusted for factors such as deprivation and remoteness

·        local rates collected within each board area

·        a combination of general rates allocation and local rates.

24.     Under a general rate allocation model the amount of locally driven initiative funding available to each local board is determined by the Governing Body. This is affected by decisions made by the Governing Body on the total level of locally driven initiatives funding available each year and the formula used to allocate this to each local board.

25.     A general rate allocation model will see a redistribution of funding between local boards; some will receive more funding while others will receive less. A local board that receives less funding will then have the option to reduce expenditure or to seek an increase in revenue from fees and charges or from local rates.

26.     Under a local rate model, funding for locally driven initiatives is provided entirely from a local rate. The level of funding required from the local rate is determined by the decisions on local fees, charges, services and service levels made by the local board. The local rate will show as a separate line item on the rates invoice.

27.     A combined model will part fund locally driven initiatives via a general rate allocation with the remainder of the funding provided by a local rate.

28.     The proposed Local Boards Funding Policy structure for funding operational expenditure is as follows:

 

 

Funding for asset based services

The cost of operating and maintaining asset based services is funded from general rates, and fees and charges revenue associated with individual assets. Funding is allocated to local boards in accordance with asset management plans and the regional budgeting process.

Funding for locally driven initiatives

Locally driven initiatives will be funded from local fees and charges associated with these activities, and from rates funding. There are three options for rates funding locally driven

initiatives:

·      general rates allocated to local boards based on factors such as local board population size, possibly adjusted for factors such as deprivation and remoteness

·      local rates collected within each board area

·      a combination of general rates allocation and local rates.

29.     The above structure for the funding policy was agreed by the Governing Body for engagement with local boards. The focus for engagement is on how to best fund the locally driven initiatives component of the policy.

Scope: How Local Rates are Used

30.     The use of local rates is an option under any funding model. The review of the local board funding policy provides the opportunity to have greater clarity in the roles that the Governing Body and local boards play in setting local rates. This is particularly relevant where funding decisions are aligned with decisions on levels of service. Legislation constrains this process in that only the Governing Body can set a rate. There are two options for determining the relationship between the Governing Body and local boards, these are:

·        local boards advocate to the Governing Body for new local rates or changes to those set by the Governing Body, and the Governing Body makes the final decision. This is a similar process that is currently used for funding of local assets.

·        local boards make decisions on the use of new local rates or changes to those set by the Governing Body, within constraints of regional policy determined by the Governing Body, and the Governing Body implements these decisions. This is a similar process that is currently used for local fees and charges.

31.     The Local Boards Funding Policy is the appropriate place to set this relationship. The Governing Body agreed the above as relationship options for engagement with local boards.

Policy Implementation: Capital Expenditure

32.     Local boards currently have budgets for capital expenditure from three sources:

·        governing body investment decisions on local assets

·        legacy capital projects inherited from the previous councils

·        an allocation of capital funding for boards to use at their discretion, beginning in the 2012/2013 year.

33.     Governing body provided capital funds for investment in local assets are not discretionary for local boards. While each board has decision making on how specified projects are implemented within their area, projects must be delivered within the scope agreed by the Governing Body.

34.     The review recommends that the Local Boards Funding Policy only allocates operational expenditure to local boards, and does not allocate capital expenditure. Local boards can still undertake capital projects within the limits set by the Governing Body, so long as they can fund the consequential operating expenditure (including depreciation and interest costs) from their operational budgets. Local boards would need to fund this expenditure either by reprioritising their existing budgets (through efficiencies or reduced service levels), or increasing their revenue from rates or fees and charges. This would see local boards funding capital investment in the same way as the Governing Body does.

35.     The review recommends that the few remaining significant legacy capital projects be treated the same as governing body investment decisions. These funds will be considered nondiscretionary, on the basis that it was a governing body decision that these projects continue rather than be reviewed against regional priorities for investment.  Consequential operating expenditure associated with these projects will be part of asset based service funding and will not impact on local board budgets.

36.     The consequential operating expenditure associated with any remaining discretionary capital funds will be treated as funding for locally driven initiatives. This funding will therefore be included in any reallocation of funding for locally driven initiatives.

Scope: Locally Driven Initiatives - General Rate Allocation Formula Options

37.     If the Governing Body determines the total level of funding to be raised through a general rate for locally driven initiatives, some form of allocation method or formula is required. The Strategy and Finance committee agreed at its May 2013 meeting that the following attributes of local boards be considered in the development of the funding policy:

·        population

·        deprivation

·        factors related to rural/geographic isolation

·        rates collected.

38.     It is recommended that the general rate funding allocation formula be restricted to factors related to population, deprivation and rural/geographic isolation only.

39.     Rates collected should not be used as a factor for allocating general rates funding. This is because general rates have an element of both tax and payment for services received. The distribution of rates across groups of ratepayers was a consideration in the development of the rating policy.

40.     If funding local boards based on the level of rates collected in the local board area is desired, then local rates should be used. This would make explicit the link between and rates paid and services received, with each board area paying a local rate for the services undertaken by their board. It also directly links a local board’s decision making on service levels with decisions on the rate revenue required to be collected from their local community.

Scope: Transition

41.     Under the proposed policy, locally driven initiatives can be primarily funded either through local rates, or by general rates allocated to boards based on factors such as population, or a mixture of the two.

42.     A general rate allocation formula will result in significant change in the level of funding for some local boards. As such, the adoption of some form of transition process may be appropriate. The review process will present options for transitioning change as a result of the funding policy over three years, to align with the Long-term plan planning cycle.

43.     The level of change associated with the adoption of local rates for funding locally driven initiatives is smaller. Local boards would also have the opportunity to adjust their local rates revenue requirement by adjusting their service levels. A transition process is unlikely to be of value in this case. However if a mixed funding model is adopted, using both general rates allocation and local rates, there may still be a need to transition the allocated portion of funding. Options for managing this change will be presented.

44.     It is noted that Great Barrier Island local board will experience high levels of change in funding regardless of what funding model is adopted. Options for treating this board as a special case for funding will be presented by the review.

Policy Implementation: Local Fees and Charges

45.     Local boards have the right to set local fees and charges under the allocation of decision making. Under the proposed Local Boards Funding Policy framework, it is recommended that local boards will retain the benefit/bear the cost of any change in fees as a result of their decision making.

46.     Local board decisions on fees and charges related to asset based services needs to be balanced against revenue expectations for those services. These revenue expectations inform the requirement for general rate funding for asset based services in the asset management plans. In this case, it is proposed that operating groups will advise boards on the expected revenue targets for their asset based services starting from the status quo.  Local boards can adjust fees above or below the recommended target, and will then retain the benefit/bear the cost of any resulting change in expected revenue for the service.

47.     In setting fees and charges, there is the risk that actual revenue will vary from expected revenue. If the revenue relates to an asset based service, the operating group will absorb any revenue variance, with any shortfall made up from the groups operating budget. The variance will then be used to inform revenue targets for the service in the following year.

48.     The local board will bear the cost or retain the benefit of any variance in revenue related to locally driven initiatives.

Policy Implementation: Rates Remission and Grants Schemes

49.     The council inherited from the former councils a number of mechanisms that support community and sports related services, and natural, historic or cultural heritage. These included the direct provision of services by the council, grants to third party organisations, and rates remission and postponement schemes.

50.     In general the provision of these services and grant schemes have been classed as local activities, and continue to operate in those local board areas from which they originated. The rates relief schemes are part of the council’s rates remission and postponement policy, which is managed regionally, but continue to be available to qualifying properties within those former council areas that originally offered the schemes.

51.     As a result of the council retaining these legacy services and schemes, local board areas are providing similar community services using varying delivery models:

·        some boards have services, such as community facilities, provided directly by the council

·        other boards have grants schemes directly controlled by the boards that are used to fund third parties to provide similar types of services, including the provision of community facilities; as well as to provide support to local community groups and other organisations

·        in some board areas, community groups and other organisations have access to rates remission or postponement schemes that are not controlled by the local board in terms of eligibility criteria and approval.

52.     The Local Boards Funding Policy has already considered the issue of the use locally controlled grants, compared to where services are being delivered by the council. It is proposed that under the policy, grants that are used to fund local facilities that in other areas are provided by the council, should be funded on the same basis as other asset based services. Grants that are used to fund more discretionary activities, such as one off grants to community groups, will be treated as locally driven initiatives, and be included in the pool of funding for these activities.

53.     The Review of Community Assistance has now identified all sources of community funding assistance provided by the council, by local board area. This enables a review of the council’s rates remission and postponement schemes to be undertaken, to develop an approach to supporting community and other organisations that is consistent across the region.

54.     The council’s rates remission and postponement policy should be regionally consistent.  However most of the rates relief granted under the remission and postponement schemes for community and sports related services, and natural, historic or cultural heritage correspond to grants schemes relate to activities that have been treated as a local board responsibility when support is provided as grants. To ensure consistency, options for moving from rates based schemes to locally controlled grants schemes will be considered, though the financial impact of such a move will need to be assessed.

55.     The Governing Body has agreed that the Auckland Council rates remission and postponement policy be reviewed alongside the development of the Local Boards Funding Policy to ensure consistency between local grants schemes and rates relief schemes, and to develop a regionally consistent rates remission and postponement policy.

56.     Amendments to the rates remission and postponement policy will be publically consulted on alongside consultation on the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

Engagement

57.     Council staff will be undertaking engagement with local boards on the Local Boards Funding Policy through March and April 2014. The attached report “Local boards funding policy review” will form the basis for engagement on the policy options.

Consideration

Local Board Views

58.     This report has been considered by and includes feedback from the Local Boards Funding Policy Political Working Party (LBFP PWP).

59.     The purpose of the working party is to provide a joint forum of the Governing Body and local boards to provide guidance and direction with respect to the development of the local board funding policy. This includes development of comprehensive and robust options for the funding of local activities within the Local Boards Funding Policy.

60.     This report seeks formal feedback from local boards to be considered by the LBFP PWP in early May and will form part of the consideration by the Governing Body when it adopts the draft policy for consultation in late May.

Maori Impact Statement

61.     There are two ways in which Maori could be impacted by the options discussed in this report, these are:

·        under a general rate allocation model the level of locally driven initiative funding available to a local board may change

·        under a local rate funding model the level of rates paid may change.

62.     Maori population is not the same across all local boards. How this will impact on Maori will depend on changes to funding available to local boards and how local boards respond to these changes. This may result in more or less funding being available or lower or higher rates being charged. The impacts by local board will be explored more at the next stage when the draft policy is being considered for consultation.

63.     Within a general rate allocation model the choice of attributes may also have an impact on Maori. Some attributes that can be used in the funding formula, for example deprivation, have a greater alignment with the population distribution of Maori. A funding formula that had greater emphasis on these attributes will provide more funding to local boards with higher Maori populations. How this would impact on Maori would depend on the local boards choose to use this funding.

64.     The review of the Local Boards Funding Policy will not change the Maori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy.

Implementation Issues

65.     There are no implementation issues associated with recommendations in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Boards Funding Policy Review (Under Separate Cover)

 

bView

Guidelines for local board feedback

135

     

Signatories

Authors

Aaron Matich - Principal Advisor Modelling

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Financial Planning for Extreme Weather Events

 

File No.: CP2014/06822

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the current financial management practice for dealing with extreme weather events in local parks across the region.  There are a number of issues and inconsistencies with the current practice and therefore it is recommended that a new and consistent approach be adopted. 

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland is prone to a range of extreme weather events including tornadoes, high tides, high winds, high rainfall and drought, all of which can contribute to sudden erosion, plant loss, tree fall, fixed asset damage and land slips.  Twelve local boards have some funding to deal with land slips and other effects from extreme weather but it is rarely sufficient when serious issues arise.  Nine boards have no inbuilt financial capacity to cope with the impact of weather events.

3.       Council has an obligation to plan for extreme weather events.  There is a legal and moral obligation to ensure that some rates funding is set aside for this purpose given that weather damage, while unpredictable in timing and location, is none-the-less a constant in the Auckland region as a whole. 

4.       Three options are considered in this report.  This first is to continue with the ad-hoc funding arrangement i.e. do nothing.  The second is to pool local board funding to essentially develop a regional self-insurance fund (local unallocated budget).  The third is to seek a regional fund, controlled by the governing body, which is applied for on a case by case basis.  The second approach is recommended.  The current arrangement will result in the need for local boards to cut existing budgets from time to time to react to weather events and overspend or approach the governing body regarding unforecast over expenditure.    The second option, which involves funding moving to the area of greatest need, is likely to cover most weather events, without changing existing regional expenditure, and minimises the time delays/bureaucracy involved.

5.       In 2011, storms affected many areas and resulted in a number of severe slips on Waiheke Island.  In 2012 the Upper Harbour Local Board was hit by a major cyclone event and dealt with the extensive damage via cuts in their current work and over expenditure.  In 2013 all boards were affected by drought and a number of boards have been affected by slips and erosion.  However the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the Waitemata Local Board, in particular, are finding their current liabilities well beyond their individual ability to fund the remedy.  In general terms, extreme weather events affect coastal areas and older suburbs more than rural, flat or inland areas however all areas are prone to wind, drought and flooding.

6.       The financial information relating to events that have occurred in the last three years is poor due to the fact that funds were taken from a variety of Auckland Council sources and expenses were not labelled consistently.  As such the average financial risk for the region over the last three years is not specifically known.  While it is possible for damage to be catastrophic and incalculable (if there is a regional disaster) it is only the common weather occurrence that is contemplated in this report.  Over the last three years costs have been in the realm of six figures every year and the burden has traversed boards. 

7.       Current budgets are operational.  However damage from extreme weather events often results in the need for the development of new retaining or structures to protect existing assets from ongoing slips or similar.  There is currently no capital funding sitting with local boards specifically tagged for storm damage remediation.  It is recommended that a portion of the existing funding be allocated to capital budgets to provide for this eventuality.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      fully support the development of a local unallocated fund to insure against unforeseen impact of extreme weather events to parks and that such funding can be on an as required basis.

b)      support a portion of the pooled operating budgets being allocated to local unallocated capital funding.

c)      note that expenditure against the local unallocated operational and capital storm damage budgets will be reported to all local boards annually.

 

 

Discussion

8.       Auckland is prone to a range of extreme weather events including tornadoes, high tides, high winds, high rainfall and drought all of which can contribute to sudden erosion, plant loss, tree fall, fixed asset damage and land slips. 

9.       The scale or impact of extreme weather events is particularly felt in urban parks where space is at a premium and landscapes are heavily developed.  Although weather events still have an impact on regional parks the scale of the regional park landscapes and the management of those landscapes (i.e. a lot more fully restored streams and coastal dunes) means the impact of extreme weather events can usually be tolerated without affecting the day to day use of the park.  In general terms, extreme weather events also affect coastal areas and older suburbs more than flat or inland areas however all areas are prone to wind, drought and flooding.

10.     The financial impact of managing damage associated with extreme weather events in the urban park environment has historically been dealt with in three ways:

·    Self-insurance – a fund is kept to call on for unforeseen damage

·    Reforecasting – no funds are set aside for unforeseen damage and as a result current projects and operational expenses are put on hold while funding is diverted to managing the impact of extreme weather events.

·    Overspend – where neither of the two options above are possible then some costs have been worn as an overspend

11.     Auckland City Council held specific “storm damage” budgets for parks and other Council’s had a level of self-insurance against unforeseen damage.  Others had nothing.

12.     Upon amalgamation the funding pool held by Auckland City Council was divided amongst the local boards in those areas, and local boards in the old Manukau City had some funding allocated to cater for this possibility in their local budgets.  This resulted in very small buckets of money being allocated to 12 local boards. 

13.     This local board budget allocation has largely defeated the purpose of the self-insurance fund as extreme weather events do not happen regularly in any given area. They can affect a localised area or a large scale area that has no correlation to board boundaries.  This means that individual local boards can go many years without an extreme weather event while its neighbor or another local board may have several events in short succession.  This random occurrence is normal and the current budget allocation does not befit this natural phenomenon.

 

 

 

14.     The current operational “storm damage” budgets held across the region are:

 

YTD Actual (Feb)

 Budget

 Albert-Eden

 

                       $77,558

 Maungakiekie-Tamaki

 

                       $96,947

 Orakei

                       $13,101

                    $109,874

 Puketapapa

                          $2,197

                       $64,632

 Waiheke

 

                       $19,389

 Waitemata

                          $7,508

                    $102,894

 Franklin

 

                       $20,371

 Howick

 

                       $30,451

 Mangere-Otahuhu

 

                       $15,515

 Manurewa

 

                       $16,926

 Otara-Papatoetoe

 

                       $16,715

 Papakura

 

                       $11,158

Total

               $22,806

             $582,431

 

Note: there are a number of commitments or costs expected in Waitemata and Orakei that are not yet shown in the these budgets

Consideration

15.     Council has an obligation to plan for extreme weather events.  Under property law there is a term known as lateral support which is about the right of a landowner to have their land physically supported in its natural state by both adjoining land and underground structures. There are around 4000 local and sports parks and each of these parks have neighbours.  Any excavation or alteration Council makes to park land may, at a later time, damage and affect a neighbour and leave Council liable. Our neighbours have a right to enjoy their land in its natural condition.  This includes the right to have their land held in place from the sides by the neighbouring land unless both are subject to unforeseen natural events.

16.     In addition to this legal obligation to neighbours, some extreme weather events come at such a substantial cost that the budget available to an individual board is either unable to wear the cost of the recovery or the cost of recovery affects a range of other activities within a local board area.  This budget shortfall creates a liability and its own set of risks for Council and the community.

Options

17.     The following options have been considered for ongoing/future management of storm damage:

 

Option

Pro’s

Con’s

1

Do nothing:

Some boards have limited funds available, others have nothing

·   No change to boards budgets.  A small contingency fund remains available for those boards with funding.

·   No boards have sufficient funding to deal with medium size weather event – this exposes council to a range of risks

2

Create local unallocated fund (self-insurance):

This would be a ring fenced fund for all boards to access allocated to the local and sports parks activity.  It would be established from existing storm damage budgets held by some local boards. 

·   Funding is accessible across the region i.e. funds go where the storm goes

·   The size of the fund, pooled across the region, is more likely to accommodate regional extreme weather events than current arbitrary and small funding base available to those boards that have funding

·   Can be established immediately (providing all the boards agree) thereby helping with current liabilities

·   Risk of the fund being inappropriately used for day to day weather events.  This is a current risk and can be more readily mitigated as a local unallocated fund.  It is recommended that there would be a single Tier 4 manager with a regional view determining a consistency of approach.

·   Some boards contribute to this solution while others benefit without contribution – may be seen as inequitable

3

Ask governing body to cater for most impacts of extreme weather events on a case by case basis.

·   No change needed and governing body would pick up costs of damage (if agreed/funding found).  Local boards that have existing funding would potentially need to show expenditure of current budgets before being eligible.

·   The time delay and bureaucracy involved in making this happen means that most applications will be retrospective and expose the Council to financial risk

·   No funding is currently available at a governing body level.  May take time to advocate for/secure

 

Local Board Views

18.     This report is being circulated to all Local Boards to canvas their views on this issue.

Maori Impact Statement

19.     In many cases extreme weather events can damage archeological sites or sites of significance to Tangata Whenua. This can trigger the need for cultural impact assessments and more careful/expensive restoration works to protect the values of the site.  Without a fund to support rehabilitation or restoration work recently discovered or damaged sites of significance cannot be attended to as there are no funds.  A regional self-insurance fund would help to mitigate risk for Council.

General

20.     As previously mentioned a variety of extreme weather events have affected parks over the years.  For instance in 2011 storm damage caused extensive slips across Waiheke.  Repair work is ongoing and existing storm damage funding has been insufficient to cope. In 2012 a tornado hit Hobsonville causing widespread damage to trees and houses.  The arboricultural and general cleanup was unforeseen and no budget for this kind of work was available to the Upper Harbour Local Board.  In this case the cost of repair was funded by savings in the Local Board budget combined with a budget overspend. 

21.     During September last year, a major storm event hit the east coast beaches, particularly in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area but also affecting Rodney, Orakei and Howick Local Boards.  A storm surge of 0.8 metres on top of high tide caused substantial erosion. Orewa Beach was hit the hardest with significant sand loss and coastal structure damage. 

22.     Weather events are part of the life of Auckland.  The current inconsistent, and in many cases non-existent, planning for extreme weather events is a risk and exposes Council to a high likelihood of budget blowout in any given year and local board area. 

23.     The unpredictable nature of extreme weather events means that we cannot anticipate what portion of funding is needed for capital and operational funding.  However, based on the last three years weather events, we know that there is a need for both operational and capital funding.  It is therefore recommended that a portion of the current operational funds be allocated to capital funding to offset these costs.

Implementation Issues

24.     If a regional self-insurance fund, initially created from existing local board funds, is universally supported by formal resolution from all boards then this fund can be created in the current 2013/14 financial year.

25.     The expenditure against the local unallocated operational and capital storm damage budgets will be reported to all local boards annually.

26.     There are currently several areas affected by storm damage that have projected funding shortfalls that could benefit from immediate implementation of the regional solution. The beneficiaries from this fund will change from year to year. Some recent historical events and current events and associated funding requirements are detailed in Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Historical and current events and associated funding requirements

143

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Aickin, Manager Local and Sports Parks Central

Martin Van Jaarsveld, Manager Local and Sports Parks North

Malcolm Page, Manager Local and Sports Parks , South

Grant Jennings, Manager Local and Sports Parks West

Authorisers

 

Ian Maxwell, Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Input into the Council-Controlled Organisations Current State Assessment

 

File No.: CP2014/07246

 

  

 

Purpose

1.    This report seeks input from the Papakura Local Board into the first phase of the council controlled orgranisation review (CCOs): the current state assessment.

Executive Summary

2.   Auckland Council is undertaking a review of its seven substantive CCOs.

3.   The first step of this review consists of an assessment of the current state.  Council has prepared a preliminary assessment reviewing the experience of the council and its CCOs over the last three years from a council perspective, along with a discussion document to guide input.

4.   Local boards are invited to provide their input based on the discussion document.  Feedback will be reported back to the governing body and will inform the first phase of the CCO review: the current state assessment as well as subsequent phases of the review.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)         provides feedback into the CCO review current state assessment, by 30 April 2014.

 

Discussion

5.   Auckland Council is undertaking a review of its substantive CCOs: Auckland Transport, Auckland Council Property Ltd, Auckland Council Investments Limited, Auckland Waterfront Development Agency, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Regional Facilities Auckland and Waterfront Services Limited.

6.   The review aims to determine whether there is a need to change the scope of activities and functions within any CCO, the structures that the CCOs operate within, or any accountability mechanisms between the CCOs and council.

7.   Governing body members, local board chairs, the CCOs and the Independent Māori Statutory Board were all given the opportunity to provide feedback into the draft Terms of Reference. Common themes amongst the feedback received included:

a)  the need to reduce duplication between council and CCO activities

b)  views as to where responsibility should lie for strategy/policy development

c)  questions around effectiveness where an activity is split between council and one or more CCOs 

d)  the need to assess the impact of change on outcomes and delivery

e)  the need for effective communication and collaboration across organisations

f)  the need to achieve constructive and positive engagement with Aucklanders.

8.   The feedback contributed to the development of the Terms of Reference. The final version was adopted by the governing body on 27 February 2014.  It is presented in Attachment A.

9.   The Terms of Reference specify the objectives of the review of CCOs as follows:

a)  To ensure the governance structures and accountability mechanisms:

-           Facilitate appropriate alignment of the CCOs operations with the Auckland Plan and other council strategies and policies

-           Provide an effective and efficient model of service delivery for Auckland Council and Aucklanders

-           Provide a sufficient level of political oversight and public accountability.

b)  In addition the review will seek to:

-      Provide clarity of role and responsibilities e.g.  development of strategies, prioritisation of work programmes

-      Eliminate duplication and gaps between the Auckland Council group organisations

-      Identify any opportunities for better integration of activities and functions.

10. The intention is to complete the review and be ready to implement agreed outcomes by 30 June 2015, which aligns the CCO review with the Long-term Plan process.  This timeline is extended from what was initially proposed to allow for full participation and feedback at the appropriate points of the process.

Current state assessment: preliminary findings

11. The first step of the CCOs review consists of an assessment of the current state.  Auckland Council has prepared a report reviewing the experience of the council and its CCOs over the last three years from a council perspective.

12. The report, entitled “Auckland Council CCO Review, Current State Assessment (Council Persective) (CSA)”, is presented in Attachment B.  It is referred to as the CSA in the rest of this report. The CSA is based on interviews with governing body members and input from Auckland Council staff.

13. Key preliminary findings in the CSA are as follows:

·    CCOs were seen to deliver well for Auckland, and significant progress has been made over the last three years.

·    Some governing body members are considering fine tuning the model while others expect more significant change.

·    Views differ about the relative role of the council and its CCOs in developing mid-level strategies – i.e. strategies that bridge the gap between the Auckland Plan and implementation plans

·    The majority view is that the formal accountability framework between the council and its CCOs needs to be simplified and streamlined, with more rigorous debate when priorities are being communicated through the letter of expectations.

·    Informal accountability and communication is seen just as important as the formal accountability framework.

·    Feedback was received on the importance of integration within the council group for effective operation, and of a strong culture of collaboration, as well as other integration mechanisms.

14. The CCOs have prepared a report to reflect their own perspective, with support from PricewaterhouseCooper (PWC) and informed by interviews with CCO board members and staff of each of the seven CCOs.  The CCOs perspective was sought in recognition that the experience of the CCOs is different from that of council, and to utilise the considerable skills and experience within the CCOs to help inform the review.

15. The intention is to augment the current state assessment with input from local boards.

 

Local board feedback into Auckland Council’s discussion document

16. CCOs, as delivery agents of council, have the potential to have a significant impact on positive outcomes for Auckland residents, ratepayers, and visitors. Local boards have an interest in the extent to which CCOs can contribute to their priorities, in projects being undertaken in their area, and in being kept up-to-date on wider regional projects. While the CCOs are accountable to the governing body as shareholder, they also have relationships with local boards who share decision-making responsibilities of the council with the governing body.

17. Local boards’ views on the CCO current state will enrich the council perspective and local boards are invited to provide feedback based on the discussion document prepared by council. The discussion document, entitled “Auckland Council CCOs, Current State, Council Perspective: Discussion and Questions for Local Boards” provide a series of questions addressed to local boards. It is presented in Attachment C.

18. The local boards are encouraged to:

·    reflect on their experience working with the CCOs over the last three years

·    reflect on what worked well and what can be improved

·    provide feedback on the issues and opportunities that the CCO review may address.

19. In providing their feedback, local board members are invited to base their comments on experience and to provide examples to illustrate the local board’s views.

20. Local board input will inform the analysis of CCOs and related activities and functions as part of the first phase of the CCO review: the current state assessment as well as informing subsequent phases of the review.

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.       This report seeks the views of the local board, which will inform the CCO review.

Maori Impact Statement

22.       The Independent Māori Statutory Board and Te Waka Anganua will be involed at several points in the process of reviewing the CCOs.  They have inputted in the development of the Terms of Reference and have been asked to provide comments on the discussions document.

22.       Consultation with Māori, including mana  whenua, mataawaka and iwi, would form part of any public consultation, should this occur during the third phase of the review.

Implementation Issues

24.       There are no implementation issues at this stage of the CCO review.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Review of Auckland Council CCOs: Terms of Reference

149

bView

Auckland Council CCO Review, Current State Assessment (Council perspective)

155

cView

Auckland Council CCOs, Current State, Council Perspective: Discussion and Question for Local Boards

171

     

Signatories

Authors

Carole Canler – Advisor, Local Board Services

Anna Bray – Policy and Planning Manager, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 







Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

















Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

















 


 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 Submissions Analysis and Responses to Information Requests

 

File No.: CP2014/07103

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide analysis of the annual plan submissions from the Papakura Local Board area, and further information to support the board in its decision-making.

Executive Summary

2.       The Papakura Local Hearings Panel heard submissions on the draft Annual Plan 2014/2015, including the draft Local Board Agreement 2014/2015 on 19 March 2014.

3.       Local boards need to consider any amendments to Local Board Agreements 2014/2015, advocacy areas and any feedback on regional proposals prior to discussions with the Governing Body on 29 and 30 April, and 1 May 2014.

4.       This report contains analysis of the submissions from the Papakura Local Board area, including local and regional submissions.

5.       Subject matter expert responses to requests for further information from the hearings are contained in Attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Considers any amendments to its draft Local Board Agreement 2015/2015, advocacy areas and any feedback on regional proposals arising from the special consultative procedure for the draft Annual Plan 2014/2015.

 

 

Discussion

6.       The Local Government Act 2002 requires Auckland Council to undertake a special consultative procedure (SCP) as part of the development of the Annual Plan 2014/2015, including draft Local Board Agreements 2014/2015.

7.       The submission period for the draft Annual Plan SCP ran from 23 January to 24 February 2014. 

8.       In total, the Council received and processed 1,967 submissions of which 34 were received from the Papakura Local Board area.  Five submitters in the Papakura Local Board area indicated they wished to be heard, with four of these subsequently presenting to the Hearings Panel.

9.       The Papakura Local Hearings Panel held its hearings on the draft Annual Plan 2014/2015, including the Local Board’s draft Local Board Agreement 2014/2015 on 19 March 2014.

Subject matter expert responses to requests for information

 

10.     Following the hearing, the panel had a number of requests for further information. These were sent to the relevant subject matter experts for response.  The responses are attached to inform the Local Board’s decision-making (Attachment A).

 

 

Local submissions from the Papakura Local Board area

 

Key themes and issues from the submissions commenting on local issues include support for:

·    An extension to Papakura Museum

·    The proposed Takanini Library

·    The continued financial support for the maintenance of Bruce Pulman Park

·    Water quality improvements to streams and tributaries which flow into the Pahurehure Inlet and the Manukau Harbour

Submissions also highlighted some opposition to the programme of mangrove removal from the Pahurehure Inlet on the basis that it is costly and will be ineffective in the long term without wider ecological management.

 

Regional submissions from the Papakura Local Board area

 

Feedback on regional proposals:

 

·    Opposition to the Stadium Strategy proposal, from 59% of the 27 submitters on this matter

·    Mixed response to the Arts Festival proposal. With 54% unsure, 32% supporting and 13% opposing

 

There was also feedback on the following:

·    That network utility assets situated on land not owned by the utility operator should not be rateable property, or there should be a nil rate for such assets

Consideration

Local Board Views

11.     The Local Board needs to consider any amendments to its draft Local Board Agreement 2014/2015, advocacy areas and any feedback on regional proposals arising out of the SCP process.

12.     A separate report on this agenda will address the requirement to agree a final balanced budget, advocacy areas for 2014/2015, and if required, resolve on feedback on regional proposals.

Maori Impact Statement

13.     The draft Local Board Agreement 2014/2015 sets out the local activities that Auckland Council will undertake in the Papakura Local Board area over the coming year. These activities are likely to have an impact on Māori and iwi in the local board area. Māori and iwi have had the opportunity to submit on the content of the draft Local Board Agreement as part of the SCP process.

Implementation Issues

14.     The content of the final Local Board Agreement will set out the local activities to be undertaken by Auckland Council in the Papakura Local Board area. Implementation issues will vary depending on the activities undertaken.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Spreadsheet of subject matter expert responses to requests for information from the local hearings panel

193

     

Signatories

Authors

Karen Gadomski – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Local Board Decisions for 2014/2015 Annual Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/07105

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides guidance for local boards on finalising budgets and other decisions required for local board agreements and the Annual Plan 2014/2015. 

Executive Summary

1.   This report provides information to support local boards to make decisions required in order to finalise local board content for the Annual Plan 2014/2015.

 

2.   The draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 was released for public consultation in January, with local board hearings held in March as part of the special consultative procedure.  Following consultation, local boards have considered all new and updated information now available in relation to budgets, advocacy areas and regional proposals for 2014/2015. 

 

3.    Local boards are now asked to:

i)               agree a final balanced budget for 2014/2015 and outer years

ii)   agree an updated set of advocacy areas to the Governing Body and CCOs for inclusion in the Annual Plan 2014/2015

iii)   agree a local fees and charges schedule for 2014/2015

iv)  resolve on any regional proposals being considered as part of the annual plan.

 

 

Recommendation/s

a)         That the Papakura Local Board:

i)       agrees a balanced budget for 2014/2015 and outer years for the Annual Plan 2014/2015 that reflect the allocation of decision-making

ii)      confirms an updated list of advocacy areas for the Governing Body and council-controlled organisations, for inclusion in the Annual Plan 2014/2015 

iii)      agrees a local fees and charges schedule for 2014/2015

iv)     resolves on any feedback on regional proposals being considered as part of the annual plan process for Governing Body consideration

b)         That the Papakura Local Board notes:

i)          local board budgets for 2014/2015 and outer years are required to balance in every year

ii)         if budgets do not balance in every year, the Budget Committee will respond to any advice provided by the local board about how to balance its budget if required.  If this has not occurred, budgets will be balanced by proportionately reducing the budgets for the local boards discretionary projects to address the overspend

iii)         local board budgets will be updated in May to reflect local board prioritisation decisions, any final decisions made by the Budget Committee on 8 May, and updated central cost allocations.  Updated financial statements for 2014/2015 will be provided to local boards in time for local board agreement adoption meetings in June.

 

 

 

Discussion

4.    The draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 was released for public consultation in January, with local board hearings held in March as part of the special consultative procedure.  Following consultation, each local board has reviewed its 2014/2015 and outer year budgets and considered what, if any, reprioritisation is required in order to finalise budgets for the annual plan.    

 

5.    This report provides information on:

·    key budget refresh movements to local board budgets

·    local board decisions required in April to support the annual plan process  

·    next steps to finalise local board budgets and agreements for the 2014/2015 Annual Plan.

 

6.    Local boards are now required to make decisions following the consultation and reprioritisation phases to enable local board content to be updated and finalised for the Annual Plan 2014/2015.   Local boards are asked to:

i)    agree a final balanced budget for 2014/2015 and outer years

ii)   agree an updated set of advocacy areas to the Governing Body and CCOs for inclusion in the Annual Plan 2014/2015

iii)   agree a local fees and charges schedule for 2014/2015

iv)  resolve on any other feedback relating to regional proposals being considered as part of the annual plan.

 

Budget Refresh

 

7.    A budget refresh was undertaken in February to reflect the most accurate budget based on the latest available information and any changes in the business.  Movements are based on factors such as performance year to date and forecast changes in the operating environment. 

 

8.    A summary of key areas of impact on local board budgets is set out in Attachment A.   There is no impact on service levels as a result of budget refresh movements.  Variance analysis for Papakura local board is provided in Attachment B.

 

 

Next steps to finalise local board agreements  

 

9.    Discussions between the Budget Committee and local boards will occur between 29 April and
1 May. 

 

10.  Reports will be prepared for the Budget Committee meeting on 8 May providing an update on local board budgets, advocacy and other feedback and seeking any further decisions required to finalise the Annual Plan 2014/2015.  At this meeting, the Committee will formally consider local board feedback and advocacy.

 

11.  Between 9 and 30 May, local board agreements will be updated and financial statements prepared.  Financial statements will reflect budget prioritisation decisions made by local boards, any further decisions made by the Budget Committee and include central cost allocations, such as depreciation, interest and staff costs. 

 

12.  Local boards will meet to adopt their local board agreements between 9 June and 19 June, with the Governing Body meeting to adopt the final annual plan, including the 21 local board agreements, on 26 June.

 

 

 

 

Consideration

 

Local Boards

 

13.  This report sets out the decisions local boards need to make in order to finalise budgets and agree advocacy areas for the Annual Plan 2014/2015.  Attachment C sets out a draft schedule of local fees and charges for Papakura local board.  Attachment D is a list of advocacy areas for Papakura local board.  Local boards may also provide feedback on region-wide policies and proposals being considered as part of the annual plan.

 

Maori Impact Statement

 

14.  Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Maori. The annual plan and local board agreements are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Maori. The local board agreement is based on the local board plan and the Long-term Plan 2012-2022 which have both been developed through engagement with the community, including Maori.

 

15.  There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes. In particular, the 2014 Local Board Plans and the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 will influence relevant annual plans and local board agreements.

 

Implementation

16.  Local boards’ financial statements reflect the full cost of undertaking local activities within each board’s area.  However, some of these costs are not directly under the control of local boards (e.g. staff costs, corporate overhead, interest and depreciation) and are therefore subject to change outside of the local board’s prioritisation process

 

17.  These central costs will alter as final budget decisions are made by the Budget Committee on 8 May.  As these central costs change, the total funding for each local board will change by the same amount.  These changes will have no impact on a local board’s level of discretionary funding.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Budget Refresh - A summary of key movements

201

bView

Papakura Local Board Budget Refresh Movements - Opex/Capex

203

cView

Draft Local Fees and Charges Schedule 2014/2015

205

dView

Papakura Local Board Advocacy

209

     

Signatories

Authors

Karen Gadomski – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Budget Refresh – A summary of key movements

 

This is a summary of key budget refresh changes applied in February 2014 that impact local board budgets.  There are no level of service impacts as a result of these changes.

 

1.   Depreciation forecasts have been updated to realign with the fixed asset model, taking into account actual capital programme spend to date and deferral of projects.

 

2.   Commercial lease expenditure and revenue has been aligned to local boards in response to a Strategy and Finance resolution passed in June 2013 to ensure financial treatment of the Auckland Council lease portfolio is aligned to an agreed set of principles.

 

3.   Library budget forecasts have been improved by removing duplicated revenue budgets, realigning staff budgets based on a position-by-position review, fixing minor historical errors and identifying the allocation of efficiency savings.

 

4.   CDAC budgets were reviewed to correct legacy budget errors.

 

5.   Some regional activity budgets incorrectly allocated to Local Boards have been corrected.

 

6.   Local parks budgets were reviewed including:

 

a.   street amenities budgets aligning with actual costs based on historical data and current level of service provided;

b.   allocation of budgets for new park purchases and correction of allocation of scheduled/response maintenance contracts across local boards;

c.   identifying the allocation of efficiency savings; and

d.   correction of historical budget errors.

 

7.   Local facility property budgets (both revenue and expenditure) have been correctly aligned to local boards.

 

8.   Leisure facility budgets were reviewed to remove revenue budgets containing legacy errors, unachievable revenue forecasts due to capital project delays, correct legacy errors in marketing budgets and allocate efficiency savings as a result of the RFP for contracted facilities.

 

9.   General budget forecast updates have been applied to some projects based on current and historical information of spend and current levels of service provided.

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board budget refresh movements

The below tables reflect budget refresh movements only. 

Opex

Local Board

Activity

Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 Budget

Revised 2014/2015 Budget

Variance

Papakura

Local libraries

1,426,440

1,558,963

132,523

 

Local community services

1,132,829

1,079,355

-53,473

 

Local arts, culture and events services

754,458

807,235

52,777

 

Local parks services

4,734,792

4,245,474

-489,319

 

Local recreation services

1,496,182

1,498,994

2,812

 

Local economic development

287,317

291,796

4,479

 

Local built and natural environment

34,380

34,380

0

 

Local governance

1,089,931

1,085,360

-4,571

Total

 

10,956,329

10,601,557

-354,772

 

 


Capex

Activity and Project

Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 Budget ($)

Revised 2014/2015 Budget ($)

Variance

Local arts and culture facilities

53,257

85,745

32,488

Art facility renewals

32,265

56,127

23,862

Facility Renewals (Hawkins Theatre)

20,992

29,618

8,626

Local community facilities

246,671

131,915

-114,756

Community facility renewals

34,672

131,915

97,243

Community facility renewals (Papakura)

211,999

0

-211,999

Local community safety initiatives

347,721

105,363

-242,358

Graffiti prevention and target hardening

84,296

105,363

21,067

Community facility growth

263,425

0

-263,425

Local library facilities and services

2,408,695

37,870

-2,370,825

Local library renewals

37,870

37,870

Library development (Takanini)

2,370,825

0

-2,370,825

Local parks

1,748,847

3,138,772

1,389,925

Extension (Mclennan Park)

911,600

911,600

Parks (Pukekiwiriki)

10,496

276,334

265,838

Reserve upgrades

1,049,600

1,149,600

100,000

Cycleways and walkways

209,920

254,366

44,446

Public convenience new

125,952

150,248

24,296

Pahurehure management plan implementation

13,645

32,408

18,763

Foreshore access

31,488

42,973

11,485

Local park car park renewals

73,472

83,742

10,270

Playgrounds minor work

26,240

29,467

3,227

Park bollards

10,496

10,496

Park seats

3,149

3,149

Parks general capital works

5,248

5,248

Parks improvements (Papakura)

26,240

26,240

Open space facilities for young people

68,224

68,224

Reserve lighting installation

10,496

10,496

Structures minor work

26,240

26,240

Street trees planting

52,685

52,685

Town centre water feature

5,256

5,256

Local planning, policy and governance

7,282

14,486

7,204

Local board it hardware (staff)

7,282

14,486

7,204

Local recreation initiatives and facilities

16,794

571,225

554,431

Recreation centre - mitigation of condensation issues (Papakura)

405,269

405,269

Pool development (Papakura)

99,946

99,946

Recreational facilities building renewals

16,794

66,011

49,217

Grand Total

4,829,266

4,085,375

-743,890

 

Capex figures are uninflated.

 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Text Box: Draft local fees and charges schedule 2014/2015

Papakura                      
Text Box:  Text Box: Notes to fees and charges in this schedule:
•	All fees include GST.
•	Unless otherwise specified, proposed fees include a 1 per cent inflationary adjustment which aligns with the increase in user charges revenue budget for all local boards for 2014/2015. 
•	Some fees are adjusted slightly more or less than 1 per cent due to practicality reasons (e.g. rounding to the nearest 10c or dollar).
•	A small number of fees have been proposed to change by significantly more or less than 1 per cent. The rationale for the change is included in the ‘Rationale for change / officer advice’ column of the fee schedule. 
•	The fees for community and arts facilities have been revised following a comprehensive review and workshops with the local boards. The proposed standard fees (included in this schedule) were calculated based on a standardised approach across the region.


 


Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

I.          LOCAL COMMUNITY AND ARTS FACILITIES

 

Proposed rate

as of 1 July 2014

Facility

Room

Standard Peak

per hour

Standard Off-Peak

per hour

Drury Hall

Main Hall

$34

$27

Elizabeth Campbell Centre

Main Hall

$44

$35

Small Meeting Rm

$24

$19

Hawkins Theatre

Hawkins Theatre Venue Hire

$86

$69

Massey Park Grandstand Function Room

Function Room

$34

$27

Papakura Library Meeting Room

Papakura Library Meeting Room 1

$34

$27

Papakura Library Meeting Room 2

$34

$27

Papakura Old Central School

Hall

$44

$35

Main Room

$24

$19

Smiths Avenue Clubrooms

Clubrooms

$24

$19

Takanini Hall

Main Hall

$34

$27



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 



Papakura Local Board

16 April 2014

 

 

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Conference and Annual General Meeting (AGM) 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/07119

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report informs Local Boards about the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and conference in Nelson from Sunday 20 July 2014 to Tuesday 22 July 2014 and invites boards to nominate a representative to attend as relevant.

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government New Zealand annual conference and AGM takes place in Nelson from Sunday 20 July to Tuesday 22 July 2014.

3.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to four official delegates to the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The Governing Body will consider this at their meeting on 27 March 2014.  The four official delegates are likely to be the Mayor as a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor as the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster as Chair LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council, and the Chief Executive.

4.       In addition to the official delegates, local board members are invited to attend.  Local boards should consider the relevance of the conference programme when deciding on attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      nominates a representative to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2014 annual general meeting and conference from 20 July 2014 to 22 July 2014 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board’s work programme.

 

 

Discussion

5.       The LGNZ Conference and AGM are being held in Nelson. The conference commences with the AGM and technical tours from 10.00 am on Sunday 20 July 2014 and concludes at 4.30 pm on Tuesday 22 July 2014.

6.       The theme of this year’s conference is “Powering Local Economies – building community vibrancy”.  The programme includes:

·    Paul Pisasale, Mayor of Ipswich, Transforming towns and cities to build strong local economies and vibrant communities

·    Rod Drury, Factors that make Wellington based Xero a global success and why businesses locate where they do

·    Craig Stobo, Andrew McKenzie and Arihia Bennett, Lifting governance and financial performance

·    Caroline Saunders and Ganesh Nana, Future economic thinking: how will the changing social and economic landscape impact on our future development patterns

·    Lawrence Yule, LGNZ’s 2014 elections manifesto

·    Jonar Nader, Innovation: Something ‘new’ is not always something ‘better’

·    Therese Walsh, National events from metro to grass roots – needs, opportunities and key success factors for a town hosting a major event.

7.       The programme also includes a number of Master Class sessions including:

·    New generation funding models for infrastructure

·    Funding models and the economic impact of cycle ways

·    Transforming local government through smart digital investment

·    Improving governance through strengthening capacity and capability

·    How do we engage with youth?

Annual General Meeting

8.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to have four delegates to the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The four official delegates are likely to be the Mayor (or his nominee), the Deputy Mayor, Councillor Penny Webster (as Chair of Zone 1) and the Chief Executive (or his nominee).

9.       The Mayor is a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor is the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster is the Chair of LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council and Cr Cashmore is a member of the Regional Sector Group of LGNZ.   The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at their meeting on 27 March 2014.

10.     In addition to the official delegates, Local Board Members are entitled to attend.  Local boards should consider the relevance of the conference programme when deciding on attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

Costs

11.     The Local Board Services Department budget will cover the costs of one member per local board to attend the conference.

12.     Registration fees are $1,410.00 (incl GST) if paid by 4 June 2013 and $1,510.00 (incl GST) after that.  Additional costs are accommodation around $150 per night, plus travel.  Local Board Services will be co-ordinating and booking all registrations and accommodation and investigating cost effective travel.

Consideration

Local Board Views

13.     This is a report to the 21 local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

14.     The Local Government NZ conference will better inform local boards and thereby support their decision-making for their communities including Maori.

Implementation Issues

15.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations in this report.

 

 

 

Attachments