I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 14 May 2014

9.30am

Reception Lounge

Level 2
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Community Development and Safety Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Dr Cathy Casey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Members

Cr Anae Arthur Anae

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

 

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

 

Member Kris MacDonald

 

 

Cr Calum Penrose

 

 

Member Josie Smith

 

 

Cr Wayne Walker

 

 

Cr John Watson

 

 

Cr George Wood, CNZM

 

 

 

 

Ex-Officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 6 members)

 

 

Maureen Koch

Democracy Advisor

 

9 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 357 3096

Email: maureen.koch@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Areas of Activity

 

·         Projects and programmes related to children and young people

·         Regional frameworks for local community facilities

·         Social implications of housing and accessibility (e.g. homelessness, provision of  emergency housing, disability accessible housing) including operation of the council’s social housing

·         Projects and programmes focused on specific sectors of the community e.g. seniors, migrants

·         Safety and related community issues e.g. alcohol, graffiti, family violence, commercial sex, and injury prevention

·         Facilitating partnerships and collaborative funding models across the community sector

 

Responsibilities

 

Within the specified area of activity the Committee is responsible for:

 

·         In accordance with the work programme agreed with the parent committee, developing strategy and policy, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

·         Making decisions within delegated powers

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)        where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)        where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)        the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)        the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)        the approval of final policy

(g)        deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)        the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

 

 

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          5  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    5

5.1     Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand                                              5

5.2     Hikurangi Foundation - Rachel Glasier - Partnerships and Development Director                                                                                                                                6

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          6

6.1     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board's Psychoactive Substances Position Paper     7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

9          Changes made to Social Housing by Housing New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development                                                                                                                  9

10        Proposed Committee Portfolios and Meeting Themes to December 2014          11

11        Changes to Problem Gambling Foundation contracts - implications for Auckland    15

12        Psychoactive substances Local Approved Products Policy (LAPP) Issues and options.                                                                                                                                       19

13        Libraries in Community Development: Background Paper                                   35

14        Strategic Relationship with the Be.Institute - year two update                             43

15        Social Aspects of Employment                                                                                  55

16        Youth Employment                                                                                                      61

17        Social Enterprise Update                                                                                            97  

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 19 February 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand

Purpose

1.       To provide opportunity for members of the public to speak to the Community Development and Safety Committee.

Executive summary

2.       A representative from The Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand will speak to the Community Development and Safety Committee regarding the report to this committee titled “Changes to Problem Gambling Foundation contracts - implications for Auckland” and the resolution of the Governing Body on 27 March 2014 number GB/2014/24 regarding the Government’s re-allocation of funding to the Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand and its implications for the prevention and reduction of gambling harm in Auckland.

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from the Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand.

 

 

 

5.2       Hikurangi Foundation - Rachel Glasier - Partnerships and Development Director

Purpose

1.       To provide opportunity for members of the public to speak to the Community Development and Safety Committee.

Executive Summary

2.       Rachel Glasier, Partnerships and Development Director will speak to the Community Development and Safety Committee on behalf of the Hikurangi Foundation regarding the report to this committee titled “Social Enterprise Update”.

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Rachel Glasier, Partnerships and Development Director of the Hikurangi Foundation.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

6.1       Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board's Psychoactive Substances Position Paper

Purpose

1.       At the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board 19 March 2014 business meeting the following resolutions were passed:

22

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board's position on grant of licences for selling psychoactive substances in the local area

 

Resolution number MO/2014/1

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson CM Elliott, seconded by Member TW Togiamua:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Endorses the Psychoactive Substances Position Paper included as Attachment A.

b)      Refer its Psychoactive Substances position paper to the governing body’s Community Development and Safety Committee requesting that the Committee work closely with local boards to facilitate appropriate community development and safety responses to legal high shops in local areas.

c)      Refer its Psychoactive Substances position paper to officers drafting the Auckland Council’s Local Approved Product Policy (LAPP).

d)      Refer its Psychoactive Substances position paper to officers currently compiling a submission to the Ministry of Health on future Psychoactive Substances regulations.

e)      Refer its Psychoactive Substances position paper to the Psychoactive Substances Regulatory Authority, seeking to influence the Authority in its decision-making of where retail premises selling ‘legal highs’ should be located in the local board area.

 

CARRIED

 

2.       The Psychoactive Substances Position Paper is attached as Attachment A.

 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the report.

b)      work closely with the local boards to facilitate appropriate community development and safety responses to legal high shops in local areas.

 

Attachments

a          Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Psychoactive Substances Position Paper 107

 

 


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Changes made to Social Housing by Housing New Zealand and the Ministry of Social Development

 

File No.: CP2014/09089

 

  

Purpose

1.       The Ministry of Social Development was invited as a guest speaker to the Community Development and Safety Committee.

Executive summary

2.       Isabel Evans, Regional Commissioner for Social Development will brief the Social Development and Safety Committee will brief the Community Development and Safety Committee about the changes to Social Housing by the Ministry and Housing New Zealand.

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the verbal presentation by Isabel Evans, Ministry of Social Development.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Maureen Koch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Proposed Committee Portfolios and Meeting Themes to December 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/07856

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents proposed committee member portfolios and meeting themes to December 2014, for endorsement.

Executive Summary

2.       In February 2014, committee members approved the following key focus areas as meeting themes for the committee to July 2015:

·        jobs and enterprise

·        housing and homelessness

·        education, literacy and learning

·        social inclusion, settlement and diverse communities

·        community safety

·        thriving neighbourhoods, accessibility, connectedness and democratic participation

·        children and young people

·        food, health and sustainability

·        capacity building and supporting the community sector.

3.       Members have also expressed their primary interest areas as follows. Endorsement of portfolio holding roles is sought at this meeting.

 

Committee Member

Primary Interest/s

Councillor Cathy Casey (Chair)

Housing and homelessness

Councillor John Walker (Deputy Chair)

Sport and recreation opportunities for youth

Councillor Arthur Anae

Jobs and enterprise

Councillor Linda Cooper

Injury prevention

Councillor Alf Filipaina

Migrants and refugees

Councillor Wayne Walker

Thriving neighbourhoods and sustainable communities

Councillor John Watson

Education and learning, children and young people

Councillor George Wood

Local alcohol policy and psychoactive substances

Councillor Calum Penrose

Crime prevention

Kris McDonald (IMSB)

Maori

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse (ex officio)

Rainbow community, disability and thriving neighbourhoods

 

4.       The committee focus area with no clear potential portfolio holder at present is ‘capacity building and supporting the community sector’. The remainder has at least one potential portfolio holder, based on committee member interests.

5.       The portfolio holder role includes being a champion spokesperson for that portfolio for the committee and being a champion for the portfolio within council and externally, to relevant parties.  Input into meeting agendas, locations and community/stakeholder input will be discussed with the portfolio holder/s. The Committee Chair will continue to have overall responsibility for chairing the committee.

Proposed Meeting Themes to December 2014

6.       The May meeting theme is jobs and enterprise. Based on committee member feedback on their interests, the agreed committee focus areas to July 2015 and council’s strategic direction, the proposed committee meeting themes and portfolio holders to December 2014 are as follows:

Meeting Date

Proposed Themes

Potential Portfolio Holder/s

Potential Agenda

25 June

Children, young people, education, literacy and learning

John Watson

Progress on transformational shifts relating to children and young people

How council supports education, literacy and learning

Libraries update

Sports and recreation update

13 August

Food, health and sustainability

Linda Cooper

 

Council’s role in health and strategic relationships with the health sector

Regional Injury Prevention Plan

Community Food Initiatives

24 September

The South

Cathy Casey, alongside Kris MacDonald and Alf Filipaina

The Southern Initiative

Housing

Maori

Pacific

Early attachment

12 November

Community safety

Calum Penrose and George Wood

Alcohol and drug issues

Crime prevention

Strategic relationships relating to community safety

 

7.       Meeting dates from January to June 2015 have not yet been set. Proposed meeting themes for this period will be presented to the Committee for approval at its 12 November 2014 meeting.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      confirm portfolio holding roles for committee members.

b)      approve the proposed committee meeting themes to December 201.

 

 

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

8.       Local Board members are free to attend and input to committee meetings and local connections will be made as appropriate in each committee agenda.

Maori Impact Statement

9.       Issues relating to Maori will be highlighted in every report of this committee.

Implementation

10.     Each meeting agenda will be discussed with the portfolio holder/s and confirmed with the Committee Chair.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Rachael Trotman - Principal Advisor, Community Development & Safety

Authorisers

Gael Surgenor - Manager Community Development and Safety

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Changes to Problem Gambling Foundation contracts - implications for Auckland

 

File No.: CP2014/05669

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide information on changes to the contracts between the Ministry of Health and the Problem Gambling Foundation, and the implications for Auckland communities.

Executive Summary

2.       The Ministry of Health has recently reviewed the Integrated Problem Gambling Strategy, for which it is responsible under the Gambling Act 2003.

3.       Subsequently the Ministry has re-tendered the main contracts for national provision of problem gambling public health and intervention services, as well as renegotiating other service provider contracts.

4.       One outcome of the re-tendering process is that from 1 July some services are going to be provided by Oasis Services (the Salvation Army), rather than the Problem Gambling Foundation.

5.       At time of writing contract negotiations between the Ministry and provider organisations are still underway so the implications for Auckland communities cannot be assessed.

6.       Officers will provide a verbal update at the meeting if any further information becomes available.

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the report “Changes to Problem Gambling Foundation contracts - implications for Auckland”.

 

 

Discussion

 

7.       On 27 March Graeme Ramsey, CEO of the Problem Gambling Foundation, addressed the Governing Body during public input regarding the Problem Gambling Foundation funding and future viability. Following this presentation the Governing Body resolved that a report be prepared for the 14 May 2014 meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee, regarding the Government’s re-allocation of funding to the Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand and its implications for the prevention and reduction of gambling harm in Auckland. (Resolution number GB/2014/24).

Problem Gambling Strategy review

8.       The Ministry of Health is required, under the relevant sections of the Gambling Act 2003, to develop an integrated problem gambling strategy, which must include:

·    measures to promote public health by preventing and minimising the harm from gambling; and

·    services to treat and assist problem gamblers and their families and whanau; and

·    independent scientific research associated with gambling, including (for example) longitudinal research on the social and economic impacts of gambling, particularly the impacts on different cultural groups; and

·    evaluation.

 

9.       The Ministry must calculate the annual funding requirements for delivery the strategy over a 3-year period and recommend the amount of a problem gambling levy, paid by gambling providers, needed to fund the strategy.

10.     The strategy and funding requirements are reviewed every 3 years. The most recent review of the strategy was completed in 2013 following a process, detailed in section 318 of the Gambling Act, requiring extensive analysis and consultation. The review document is published on the Ministry website under the title: Preventing and Minimising Gambling Harm: Three-year service plan and levy rates for 2013/14 to 2015/16.

Service Provider Contracts

11.     In accordance with the strategy the Ministry has reviewed contracts for public health and intervention services from general or mainstream service providers and a range of population specific providers (i.e. Māori, Pacific, Asian).

12.     Public health services are concerned with keeping people healthy and improving the health of populations rather than with providing individualised care for people who are unwell. These activities include:

·    Promoting healthy public policy

·    Developing personal skills and promoting responsible gambling behaviour

·    Increasing individual and community awareness and action

·    Creating supportive environments

·    Strengthening strategic alliances, skills and knowledge

·    Monitoring, research and evaluation; and

·    Reorienting services and programmes

 

13.     Intervention services provide support and counselling to individuals experiencing gambling harm, including gamblers and those affected by someone else’s gambling. These activities include:

·    Helpline and information services

·    Brief Interventions

·    Full Interventions

·    Facilitation services

·    Follow-up services

 

14.     The two national providers of public health and intervention services are currently the Problem Gambling Foundation and Oasis Services (operated by the Salvation Army). The Woodlands Trust, based in Christchurch and part-funded by grants from pokie trusts, has also provided some national intervention services.

15.     A number of providers have also been contracted separately by the Ministry of Health to provide public health and intervention services to specific population groups. In Auckland those providers currently include:

·    Hapai te Hauora Tapui Auckland (Public Health Services)

·    Odyssey House Auckland (Intervention Services)

·    Pasifika Ola Lelei Services Manukau (Public Health and Intervention Services)

·    Raukura Hauora O Tainui (Intervention Services)

·    TUPU Waitemata DHB Pacific Counselling Service Auckland (Public Health and Intervention Services)

 

16.     As of mid-April, when this report was prepared, the Ministry of Health is still in contract negotiations with its gambling service providers. Those negotiations are commercial-in-confidence and cannot be revealed. The implications for Auckland communities therefore cannot be assessed at this time.

Future Role of Problem Gambling Foundation

17.     The Problem Gambling Foundation will continue to hold provider contracts for services targeted to Asian population groups.

18.     It is unclear, at this stage, what other roles the foundation will play in the future.  The foundation is still considering the matter and has not disclosed its thinking at this time.

Consideration

Local Board Views

19.     Local board views have not been sought for this report.

Maori Impact Statement

20.     The Ministry of Health’s three-year service plan includes the following statement (page 13), among others:

“The 2012 needs assessment found that people living in deprived areas were still at greater risk of harm from gambling than those in less deprived areas, and that Māori and Pacific people were still at greater risk than people of other ethnicities. It also found that most gambling harm is associated with gaming machine gambling, and that gaming machines are disproportionally located in higher deprivation communities, where Māori and Pacific people are over-represented. Accordingly, it is appropriate to focus on these people and communities.”

 

21.     This statement, among others in the document, indicates that provision of gambling harm prevention and minimisation services to Māori remains a high priority for the Ministry.

General

22.     Officers will provide a verbal update at the committee meeting if further information becomes available by that time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

David Hay - Principal Policy Analyst

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Psychoactive substances Local Approved Products Policy (LAPP) Issues and options.

 

File No.: CP2014/07696

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Community Development and Safety Committee’s views on what issues a Local Approved Product Policy (LAPP) should address, how the policy should address these issues and what the desired outcomes of a successful policy will be.

Executive summary

2.       On 6 March 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved a work plan for the development of Auckland Council’s LAPP (Item 9; Res#REG/2014/34). 

3.       At the 27th March 2014 Governing Body meeting, staff were directed to consider options for reducing the development period of the LAPP.  Staff advised that the only viable option for reducing the development time would be to shorten the consultation process to a single round with Local Boards.

4.       The Local Approved Product Policy will set rules regarding where retail outlets of psychoactive substances may operate. The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 provides that a policy may regulate the location of retail outlets by reference to broad areas within a district, proximity to other premises selling approved products and/or distance from certain types of premises such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities.

5.       Despite the designation of ‘low risk’, legal psychoactive substances still cause harm to those that use them and the communities where they live.  Minimising this harm is the key outcome from a successful Local Approved Product Policy.  If an effective LAPP is developed and successfully implemented then communities will see the benefits from fewer vulnerable people with access to substances, less antisocial behavior from substance use and improved economic performance for local business. 

6.       Six options were considered for the LAPP.  Three options were rejected as not being able to achieve the outcomes for a successful LAPP.  The remaining three options were considered to offer the opportunity to develop a LAPP with potential to achieve the desired outcome and are explored in this report.

7.       The LAPP will be one part, albeit an important part, of Auckland’s response to the harm caused by legal psychoactive substances.  It will support the work undertaken by many agencies and other groups to reduce the harm from substance use in Auckland. 

 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      note that despite the designation of ‘low risk’, using legally approved psychoactive substances does cause harm to those that use them and the communities where these people live.

b)      approve the outcome for the Local Approved Product Policy which is to reduce harm from the sale of legally approved psychoactive substances by:

·        reducing access to approved substances for vulnerable people,

·        reducing the impact of antisocial behavior resulting from legal psychoactive substance use

 

·        reducing the impact on the economic performance of local business from antisocial behavior arising from the use of from legal psychoactive substances.

c)      provide feedback on the three proposed options within the report including the identification of a preferred option

d)      note that the next steps in the development of the Local Approved Product Policy will be for the draft policy to be presented to the Regional Strategy and Policy committee for approval on 3 July 2014 and then public notification.

 

 

Comments

Background

The Psychoactive substances Act 2013

8.       The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 (the Act) sets a regulatory framework for the manufacture and sale of psychoactive substances.  The Act’s purpose is to protect the health of, and minimise the harm to, individuals who use psychoactive substances and regulate the availability of psychoactive products.

9.       The Act banned psychoactive substances from being sold in dairies, service stations, supermarkets, convenience stores and places where alcohol is sold.  It also restricted the advertising of products and the sale to those under 18. 

Implementation of the Act

10.     The Ministry of Health estimated that following implementation of the Act, the number of retailers selling psychoactive substances decreased from between 3,000 and 4,000 to fewer than 170.  These remaining retailers were granted interim licences.  The Ministry of Health has reported that an interim licences will be revoked if they receive notification of non-compliance with a LAPP. 

11.     As of the 18th of November 2013, 54 of the current licences were in the Auckland region.  A map and the location of these licences is included in Attachment1.

The Local approved products policy

12.     The Act enables territorial authorities to develop a LAPP for their region.  The LAPP is limited to (Part 3 s68):

·    The location of premises from which approved products may be sold by reference to broad areas. 

·    The location from which approved products may be sold by reference to proximity to other premises from which approved products are sold.

·    The location of premises from which approved products may be sold by reference to proximity to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds (sensitive sites, such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities).

13.     The Act created the Psychoactive Substances Regulatory Authority within the Ministry of Health to administer the legislation.  Currently, there is no requirement for the authority to consider a LAPP in its granting of a licence.  Regulations developed under the Act are expected to provide that a licence must comply with the relevant LAPP in order to be granted. These regulations are expected to be implemented in mid-2015.

14.     On 6 March 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved a work plan for the development of Auckland Council’s LAPP (Item 9; Res#REG/2014/34). 

15.     At the 27th March 2014 Governing Body meeting, staff were directed to consider options for reducing the development period of the LAPP.  Staff advised that the only viable option for reducing the development time would be to shorten the consultation process to a single round with Local Boards.

16.     Council staff are currently undertaking stakeholder and local board engagement.  This work has comprised external stakeholder workshops, local board workshops, recognition of local board position papers and research.  Staff are currently working to develop a preferred option from the feedback and research.

 

What is the problem?

17.     The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 created a regulatory framework allowing the supply of psychoactive substances to the public that the Regulatory Authority has deemed to be low risk.  Despite the designation of ‘low risk’ these substances still cause harm to those that use them and the communities where these people live. 

18.     The use of psychoactive substances has been linked to adverse health outcomes, crime, worsening mental illness and aggressive behaviour, especially amongst vulnerable people.  People using these substances in public places are causing a number of problems for communities.  Communities are reporting public nuisance and disorder, a reduced perception of safety and a decrease in people shopping in nearby businesses.  All of these effects and having a negative impact on the economic and social health of communities. 

19.    Initial discussion with stakeholders has highlighted a number of specific issues.

·        Concerns about mentally ill persons becoming unwell after using approved products.

·        Easy access for the homeless in the CBD has resulted in increased crime and begging.

·        Some outlets in commercial areas are drawing a large number of people to the premises resulting in disorder and a negative impact on the community in these areas.

·        There is anecdotal evidence that since the Act’s introduction people have been travelling significant distances to purchase approved products.

Desired outcome for the LAPP

20.     A successful LAPP will minimise the harm resulting from the use of legal psychoactive substances through controlling the physical location of licences.  It is proposed that the following outcomes will demonstrate harm reduction.

a)     Reducing access to approved substances for vulnerable people.

b)     Reducing the impact of antisocial behavior resulting from approve substance use on the public.

c)     Reducing the impact on the economic performance of local business from antisocial behavior resulting from the use of approved substances.

21.     It should be noted that the LAPP will only be one part, albeit an important part, of Auckland Council’s response to the harm caused by the use of approved psychoactive substances.  It will support the work undertaken in Auckland by many agencies and other groups to reduce the harm from substance use. 

Proposed options for the LAPP

22.     Six options were considered for the LAPP.  Three options were rejected as not being able to achieve the desired outcome set out above.

I.    A ‘do nothing approach’ was rejected as providing no improvement to safety with the only benefit being low cost. 

II.   A market driven option was considered.  This option would allow and encourage the industry to self-regulate the sale of approved products.  This option was rejected as improvements to safety would be in the hands of the market, removing the ability to target those most in need and control harm reduction effects. 

III.  A case by case option was considered.  This would have considered each licence application based on its harms and the mitigations provided by the applicant.  This option was rejected as being too costly and unwieldy for frequent licence applications.

23.     Three options were considered to offer the opportunity to develop a LAPP that had the potential to achieve the desired outcome.  All three options would also include a restriction on how close a shop could be to a sensitive site as well as a restriction on how close shops could be from one another.

IV.  Town Centres - licences would be limited to areas designated as metro or town centres in the proposed unitary plan.  This option follows the position papers presented by a number of local boards as well as other territorial authorities such as Hamilton.  The option would also allow for a single area, such as the CBD, to be the sole location for licences.  While this option would site shops in areas with higher levels of security these are also areas where these resources are stretched by current levels of demand.  Increasing demand without an increase in resources is likely to result in a reduction in security.  There is also a risk that this approach could result in an extremely limited set of locations for licences.  Such a strict limitation may be a target for a Judicial Review as has occurred in Hamilton. 

V.   Industrial - licences would be limited to areas designated as industrial under the proposed unitary plan.  This approach would create a distributed spread of shops around Auckland and remove shops from town centres where significant harm is currently occurring.  The industrial option has the advantage of directly addressing the harm from these substances however it would carry a risk of legal challenge.  The risk would be based on the additional burden that would be placed on a licencee through having to apply for resource consent to operate in an industrial zone.  The burden would be greatest for those seeking to operate a small shop whose only purpose is to sell psychoactive substances (dairies up to 100m2 are permitted in industrial zones while other retail not accessory to an industrial use is non-complying).  Large operations that already import or distribute substances would find it relatively easy to open a small retail shop from their current wholesale business ( retail accessory to an industrial use is permitted).

VI.  Specified areas – licences would be limited to specific areas.  These areas would be designated through an evidence based approach focusing on eliminating licences from high stress areas.  The risks and benefits of this option would very much depend on where was chosen as a specified area.  Removal of substances from commercial and town centres would have a positive effect on harm.  However any move to limit licences to areas requiring resource consent would carry a risk of legal challenge discussed in the industrial option.  This option has the advantage that local boards would be able to determine the preferred specified areas within their district.

24.     The pros and cons of these options are set out in the attached A3 diagram (Attachment  2) and will be discussed in more detail when the report is presented to the committee.

25.     It is important that the LAPP should not create unintended consequences for any part of Auckland or for any of our neighbouring councils.  Each of the possible options will have consequences over and above the direct impact of selling approved psychoactive substances.  Understanding and weighing up these will be crucial in making the best policy decision to protect Auckland. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     Workshops have been conducted with the following local boards: Waitakere Ranges, Henderson – Massey, Whau, Otara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Franklin, Howick, Kaipatiki, Albert-Eden, Devonport – Takapuna, Rodney, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Upper Harbour, and Puketapapa.  Workshops with the remaining four local boards will be conducted before the end of May.  Great Barrier local board have indicated they do not need to be involved in the workshop process.

 

27.     Feedback from these workshops and from the previously prepared position papers from some local boards will play a central role in the development of the draft LAPP.  Staff acknowledge the importance of the local board’s advice on how best to limit the harm to the communities they serve from the sale of legal psychoactive substances.

Maori impact statement

28.     Māori are over represented amongst the groups of vulnerable people likely to be affected by using approved psychoactive substances.  This over representation has two effects.  Firstly getting the right option for the LAPP to maximize harm reduction will be more effective for Māori.  Secondly, any solutions need to be designed in close collaboration with Māori to ensure they are workable and support wider initiatives aimed at improving Māori outcomes.

29.     A workshop has been undertaken with representatives from Hapai Te Hauora Tapui an agency representing Māori health providers in the Auckland region.  .  In addition to the health focused workshop, council staff are working with the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Hapai Te Hauora Tapui to set up hui for iwi feedback.  Information from the workshop and hui will be central to the development of the draft LAPP.

Implementation

 

General

Wider engagement

30.     By the 14th May the stakeholder engagement process will be almost complete.  Internal workshops have been held with representatives from Community Safety and Development, Bylaws and Compliance, Planning, Policy, Economic Development, Youth Strategy and Legal Services.

31.     A number of workshops with external stakeholders have been conducted.  These workshops have involved representatives and feedback from the following agencies: NZ Police, Auckland Regional Public Health Services, Hapai Te Hauora Tapui, Auckland District Health Board, Counties-Manakau District Health Board, Waitemata District Health Board, Salvation Army, St John, Auckland City Mission, Community Alcohol and Drug Services, Odessey house, Child Youth and Family Services, Ministry of Health, Health Promotion Agency, Higher ground, Auckland University, and Massey University.  As part of the external stakeholder review representatives from the industry including STAR trust will be part of the workshop process.

32.     In addition to the above, feedback has been sought from Youth local board representatives and the Youth Advisory Panel through two workshops and targeted interviews.

 

Financial and resourcing implications

33.     There is $5,000 in this year’s budget for pre engagement activities. There is currently $90,000 budgeted for the 2014/2015 financial year to undertake the special consultative procedure and for publications and promotion.

Ministry of Health actions

34.     The latest correspondence from Ministry of Health is that the implementation of regulations will occur in early – mid 2015. This will give councils a chance to develop and implement their LAPPs prior to the regulations coming into effect. The decision to delay the implementation of the regulations means that no new licences will be approved until that time.

35.     The Ministry of Health has advised all territorial authorities that they will give LAPP’s immediate effect.  This will mean any licences not in compliance may be suspended pending a review.  The recent judicial review of the LAPP implementation in Hamilton has included a challenge of the legality of the Ministry’s position on giving the LAPPs immediate effect.  It is unclear if the Ministry will be able to immediately suspend licences that do not comply with a LAPP until this review is completed. 

 

Other responses that are not part of the LAPP

Enforcement

36.     Enforcement will focus on using information sharing and targeting information gathering to ensure compliance with the current legislations.  This will focus on licensees who are believed to be selling to youth and/or operating in a manner that is in contravention of the Act.  In addition this area will use existing bylaws to prevent the use of these substances in public places.  This work will be carried out in collaboration between Police and Auckland council staff.

Intervention

37.     Intervention will focus on providing information on the harm caused by approved psychoactive substances as well as on the available treatment options.  The goal of this approach will be to decrease the use of these substances amongst current users as well as preventing people from beginning to use these substances.  This work will be a collaboration between Auckland Council staff, existing treatment providers and educators.

Next steps

38.     Once feedback has been received from the committee, all of the local boards and external stakeholders, staff will draft a report to present to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.  There will be no further opportunities for feedback outside of the special consultative process once the report have been agreed by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.

Revise timeline

39.     At the 27th March 2014 Governing Body meeting, staff were directed to consider options for reducing the development period of the LAPP.  Staff advised that the only viable option for reducing the development time would be to shorten the consultation process to a single round with Local Boards.  The following table outlines the revised timeline for the development of the LAPP in accordance with the direction of the Governing Body.


 

Step

Estimated timeframe

1. Stakeholder engagement on issues and options

Officers will seek feedback from internal, external and political stakeholders on their preferred approach. The policy will be drafted based on feedback received from stakeholders on the issues and options paper.

March – May

2. Develop final draft for special consultative procedure

Officers will then present a final draft policy to RSPC for approval for consultation.

3 July

3. Special consultative procedure

Officers will follow the special consultative procedure set out in section 83 of Local Government Act 2002. This will include public submissions and hearings.

August – October

4. Adopt final policy

Following the hearings the draft will be finalised and presented to RSPC for adoption.

November

5. Implementation and review

A copy will be sent to Ministry of Health after it has been completed. The LAPP will then be reviewed every five years in accordance with section 69 of the Act. 

Ongoing

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment 1: Interim licences

27

bView

Attachment 2: LAPP Options

33

     

Signatories

Author

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Appendix 1 Locations of the current psychoactive retailers in the Auckland Region as at 18 November 2013

 

Untitled.bmpUntitled.bmp


 

Local Board

Location

Devonport-Takapuna

Peaches and Cream Takapuna, 27 Barrys Point Road, Takapuna, Auckland

Devonport-Takapuna

Unit 12, 326 Sunset Road, Mairangi Bay Auckland 0632

Franklin

211 King Street, Pukekohe

Henderson-Massey

Peaches and Cream Henderson, 4/253 Lincoln Road, Henderson, Auckland

Henderson-Massey

8 Cranwell Street, Henderson

Henderson-Massey

3/333 Great North Road, Henderson, Auckland 0610

Henderson-Massey

Unit 6, 255 Lincoln Road, Henderson

Howick

24 Greenmount Drive, East Tamaki

Howick

6A/219 Moore Street, Howick

Kaipatiki

Peaches and Cream Glenfield, 247 Archers Road, Glenfield, Auckland

Kaipatiki

127 Target Road, Glenfield

Kaipatiki

Unit 1/6 Argus Place, Hillcrest, Auckland

Manurewa

3/206 Great South Road, Manurewa, Auckland

Manurewa

185 Great South Road, Manurewa 2243

Manurewa

Shop T5A, Pacific Square Centre, 792 Great South Road, Manukau

Manurewa

3-63 Churchill Avenue, Manurewa, Auckland

Maungakiekie-Tamaki

Erox Panmure, 16A Queens Road, Panmure, Auckland

Maungakiekie-Tamaki

139 Onehunga Mall, Onehunga, Auckland

Maungakiekie-Tamaki

Shop N41-A W Sylvia Park, Mt Wellington, Auckland

Otara-Papatoetoe

Peaches and Cream Manukau, 40/L Cavendish Drive, Manukau, Auckland

Otara-Papatoetoe

40 Cavendish Road, Manukau

Otara-Papatoetoe

4 East Tamaki Road, Papatoetoe

Papakura

Peaches and Cream Papakura, 72 O'Shannessy Street, Papakura, Auckland

Papakura

255 Great South Road, Papakura

Papakura

186 Great South Road, Papakura

Upper Harbour

10H Vege Place, Rosedale, Auckland

Upper Harbour

P O Box 303183, North Harbour, Auckland

Upper Harbour

6A Dallan Place, Albany, Auckland

Waitakere Ranges

Shop 4/60 Glenmall Place, Glen Eden, Auckland 0602

Waitemata

29 Victoria Street East, Auckland

Waitemata

Peaches and Cream Newmarket, 440 Khyber Pass Road, Newmarket, Auckland

Waitemata

Peaches and Cream K'Rd, 474 Karangahape Road, Auckland Central

Waitemata

The Grinder, 348 Karangahape Road, Auckland Cenral

Waitemata

Exclusive Adult Store, 460 Karangahape Road, Auckland Central

Waitemata

15 Gundry Street, Newton

Waitemata

442D Khyberpass Road, Newmarket, Auckland 1023

Waitemata

51 Hobson Street, Auckland

Waitemata

258A Karanghapa Road, Newton, Auckland

Waitemata

G38 Queens Court, 368 Queen Street, Auckland

Waitemata

308 Queen Street, Auckland 1010

Waitemata

359 Karangahape Road, Newton, Auckland

Waitemata

466 Karangahape Road, Newton, Auckland

Waitemata

Shop 4, 5-7 High Street, Auckland Central 1010

Waitemata

47 Customs Street East, Auckland Central 1010

Waitemata

284 Karangahape Road, Auckland Central 1010

Waitemata

Victoria Park Market, 210 Victoria Street, Auckland 1010

Waitemata

Hightimes, 29 Beach Road, Auckland CBD

Waitemata

29 Broadway, Newmarket, Auckland 1023

Waitemata

Hightimes, 515 Great North Road, Grey Lynn, Auckland

Whau

Peaches and Cream New Lynn, 39 Totara Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

Whau

3100 Great North Road, New Lynn

Whau

3132 Great North Road, New Lynn, Auckland 0600 

Whau

3081 Great North Road, New Lynn, Auckland

Whau

6 Totara Avenue, New Lynn, Auckland

 

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 



Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Libraries in Community Development: Background Paper

 

File No.: CP2014/08762

 

  

Purpose

1.       This is a background paper to provide the Community Development and Safety Committee with an update on library activities early in the triennium.  The paper indicates how the Libraries and Information Department is delivering to the Auckland Plan and Libraries’ 10 year strategic direction Te Kauroa, and how these activities relate to Committee terms of reference and interests.

Executive Summary

2.       Library services are among the most heavily used and most valued of Council services. Libraries are a responsibility of both the Governing Body and Local Boards.  Library direction is guided by the Auckland Plan and Te Kauroa – Future directions, the 10 year strategic plan for Libraries which was endorsed in 2012 and is currently being implemented.

3.       The key focus areas for libraries are: every child a reader; a library in every pocket; engaging future spaces; telling the stories of Aucklanders; inspiring learning and enabling participation; and relevant customer driven collections.

4.       Two areas have been identified where Libraries can make a significant contribution to the Auckland Plan, being support of literacy of all types, and democratic participation.  Note that the Community Development and Safety Committee is the primary reporting committee for library services and that the topics of literacy and democratic participation are included as future Committee discussion topics.

 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the Libraries in community development background report.

b)      note that the Community Development and Safety Committee is the primary reporting committee for activities relating to Libraries and Information.

c)      note that literacy and democratic participation are included as focus areas for future committee consideration.

 

Comments

 

Context

5.       Responsibility for the Libraries and Information activity is split between the Governing Body and Local Boards. The Governing Body is responsible for regional networks and resources including general collections, heritage and research collections and services, the digital library, region-wide programmes, fees and charges related to these functions, and region-wide facilities planning. Local Boards are responsible for local delivery of library services, including the nature and use of the facility, opening hours, and local programmes.


 

Scale

6.       The Libraries network consists of 55 library service points across the region, including the central city library and a library on Great Barrier Island. In addition there are four research centres, one special library (Sir George Grey Special Collections), four mobile library buses, and a corporate library which provides research services to elected representatives and Council staff. There are also 14 rural libraries operated by volunteers located in more remote areas of the region which are supported by Libraries in a variety of ways.

7.       There are 36,500 visitors to physical libraries and 18,000 visitors to the Library website every day.  50,000 items are borrowed every day. 32,000 children participate in reading and information skills programmes every month.  There are 250,000 customer wi-fi sessions each month, and 340,000 items are couriered between libraries each month.  Customer satisfaction with library services is 91%.

8.       Libraries are a substantial contributor to overall ratepayer and resident satisfaction with Auckland Council and to Council’s reputation.

Strategic Direction

9.       Libraries developed a new 10 year strategic direction Te Kauroa – Future Directions during the first triennium of the new Council following a period of research and consultation.  This was endorsed by the Governing Body in late 2012 and is now being implemented.  Libraries are affected by rapid change in many areas, in particular as part of the information sector, and in relation to Auckland’s changing demographics.  Community expectations of libraries and access to information and learning are changing rapidly and it was seen as essential that libraries have a clear forward direction to remain relevant to the communities they serve in alignment with the Auckland Plan.

Key Focus Areas

10.     As Libraries have begun implementing Te Kauroa, key focus areas have emerged which will shape all activity now and in the foreseeable future.

a.       Every Child A Reader

A key aspiration of Libraries is that every child in Auckland is supported to become a reader and lifelong learner, in line with the Auckland Plan vision of putting children and young people first.  This love of reading starts with a focus on early learning/preliteracy with programmes such as Wriggle and Rhyme targeted at 0-2 year olds and their carers, and continues with storytimes in multiple languages and regular connection with schools.  The summer reading programme Dare to Explore now reaches over 8000 children during the December-January holidays and has resulted in sustained increases in library membership.  Participation in the programme has increased from fewer than 2000 participants prior to November 2010. There is anecdotal evidence from schools and parents of the benefits of this programme in maintaining reading levels over the long summer break and we are now working with researchers to measure this outcome using reading assessments administered by schools.  There is also a strong focus on programmes for young people to support their learning and creativity, for example through the availability of 3D printers and maker spaces.  The shift envisaged in Te Kauroa is that we should be out in the community connecting more strongly with schools and promoting whole of family literacy; creating more exciting spaces in our buildings; making children’s collections easier for parents to use; and using new technologies as an exciting tool to help kids connect.


 

b.       A Library in Every Pocket

The digital library is the area of most critical growth and change over the next ten years. This shift will put the library in every pocket, reflecting the speed of change to mobile connection and interaction, as customers both consume and create digital content. The virtual digital library will reflect and extend the experience of the physical space.  This means that there is an expectation that library services can be accessed virtually 24/7, and there is a growing frustration that there is not yet a library app to make this easy, because the library website and catalogue are not easy to search on a small screen.  Key projects underway are the selection of a new content management system to refresh the Libraries website, upgrade of the core library management system software from Millennium to Sierra and upgrade of the public computing network to improve the customer experience. These will provide a basis for other digital initiatives, including improved discovery layers, crowd sourcing, community storytelling, and improved provision of downloadable digital media. Libraries have to be agile in response to a fast changing environment and ensure robust infrastructure and networks support the growing digital library.

c.       Engaging Future Spaces at the Heart of Community

Several new library buildings are currently under construction – Waiheke (due to open mid-year); Te Atatu (late 2014); Ranui (late 2014); Devonport (late 2014); Otahuhu (mid 2015) and Westgate (late 2015).  Flat Bush/Ormiston is at early planning stage.  All are designed with a view to future flexibility and reflecting changes in the focus of library services over time.  Library staff who will move into these new libraries have been involved in a series of ‘Changing Rooms’ workshops to explore how they can work differently to realise the potential of these new spaces to engage with the communities served.  Te Kauroa includes a diagram of a ‘mashup library’, which we are now applying to future thinking about the possibility of new models of flexible multipurpose spaces / hybrid community spaces. A copy of the Mashup diagram, which was originally developed in Denmark, is attached.  

d.       Telling the Stories of Aucklanders

The documentary heritage collections held by Auckland Libraries are unique, extraordinary and internationally significant, potentially a key contributor to Aucklanders’ sense of pride, belonging and identity.  Recently we have worked in partnership to with the NZ Herald and National Library of New Zealand to digitise library copies of the NZ Herald to 1945 - a major achievement celebrated by the Herald in its 30 April 2014 edition with a full page spread. This will be a major resource for World War I commemorative research and storytelling, including Council’s Our Boys our Families initiative.  Key to this access is an active digitisation programme and ongoing collection of material which tells the stories of Aucklanders.  The recent Dominion Road oral history programme is an example.  Future needs include a digital object management and preservation system to safeguard easy and perpetual access to digital content, and a broadening of focus to tell the stories of communities otherwise overlooked, for example Pacific Islands communities in Auckland. Discussions are also underway with the other main documentary heritage institutions in Auckland to understand what advantage might be achieved by working more closely together on exhibition, promotion and storage initiatives.


 

e.       Inspiring Learning, Enabling Participation

Every day about 1600 people take part in a Libraries programme or event.  These include sessions where participants learn the digital skills needed to connect with family and friends, government agencies, service providers and potential employers.  Every day library staff help customers locate a diverse range of information from current newspaper content in print and online to specialist research topics.  Research shows that libraries are among the first places visited by newcomers to Auckland, and several libraries host volunteers who support non-English speakers to practise reading and speaking English.  After-school programming includes homework help and activities that inspire children to keep learning and discovering outside the classroom.  Meaningful play around literary characters and authoring comics and graphics are examples of how young people develop their skills in narrative and creativity.  Author talks, special interest workshops and panel discussions, local and family history talks and creative workshops enable people to connect with others who share their interests, and build the confidence to collaborate or relate to an audience.

f.       Relevant Customer Driven Collections

Collections are still the most important reason for people to use libraries.  The new Collection Development Policy was signed off by Council in 2013, and work to achieve an integrated collection management approach is almost complete.   The challenge for Libraries is the need to shift investment from print to downloadable media, including e-books, e-audio and downloadable music and film.  Digital formats are already the predominant access form for music and film, and customers have high levels of expectation that libraries will deliver this access choice.  Libraries need to provide access to downloadable music and audio, especially with future production of CDs now in question.  The Australian Library and Information Association predicts that print and e-book collections will reach 50/50 equilibrium by 2020.  E-book borrowing in March 2014 showed an increase of 163% compared to March 2013 – the 9 month year to date figure shows an increase of 199%, although this is still just 3% of all borrowing. Continuing to make available all material in all formats is a universal access and equity principle.

 

Other Initiatives

11.     As the largest public library system in Australasia, Auckland Libraries is beginning to establish strong international relationships.   For example, Auckland is hosting the Metropolitan Libraries Association Conference from 11 – 16 May.  This Association represents the largest public libraries in the world.  Fifty delegates are attending from cities such as Philadelphia, Utrecht, Zurich, Helsinki, Bremen, Halifax, Melbourne, Singapore, Zagreb and Montreal.  Auckland is also now the sponsor of the annual Metropolitan Libraries statistics benchmarking.

12.     Following an application compiled by a colleague from Yarra Plenty Regional Libraries (Melbourne) and myself, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Global Libraries programme has decided to invest US$500,000 over a five year period to fund an intensive leadership development programme for emerging leaders from Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.  Several other local partners have been secured also. The first cohort will commence in July 2014. At least one of the convenings will be held in Auckland.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

13.     Libraries are a topic of high interest and regular discussion with Local Boards. Local Board views are sought on a wide range of topics of regional significance, including facilities planning, collection development and asset renewal programmes.  Work is still to be done to refine baseline regional service levels.  Some Local Boards have implemented additional opening hours funded from local rates. Libraries report to each Local Board on a quarterly basis, usually with library staff in attendance.

Maori Impact Statement

14.     Libraries maintain active relationships with Mana Whenua, particularly in relation to the development of new buildings to ensure that these do reflect the people of that area.  The care and exhibition of taonga held in library heritage collections is also supported by maintaining close relationships with iwi and hapū, both Mana Whenua and nationally.  The Manatunga exhibition is a recent example.  All services and programmes have a strong focus on Māori as customers, including Te Reo story times, relevant collections, and customer research.  Events such as Waitangi Day and Matariki are used as vehicles to promote Te Reo and wider community understanding.  Libraries are currently developing a Māori Responsiveness Plan to help deliver the Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

Implementation

 

Opportunities

15.     Te Kauroa identifies some areas of growing need where Libraries can make a significant contribution to Auckland Plan outcomes.  These are as follows:

·        Support of literacy of all types – reading, information, digital, numerical.  Libraries have always worked actively in this area. We see that support of literacy is possibly the single most important contribution that a public library can make to the social, cultural and economic life of its community and many of our programmes are targeted at supporting this outcome.

·        Democratic participation – as e-government and e-local government trends become more prevalent, it is essential that people of all ages and backgrounds have both the skills and the access to connect and participate as citizens.  This includes transacting with government, seeking employment, responding to public consultation, and in future may include online voting.  Most libraries provided ballot boxes for the local government election in September 2014, and staff at a small number of sites were trained to offer special voting.  Library staff support a wide range of Council consultation processes, for example they were trained to assist people to understand how to use the Unitary Plan and how to make submissions on it. One initiative run in south Auckland increased diverse participation in the People’s Panel. Libraries already function as digital community hubs providing access, skills development and support – they are seen as neutral non-threatening spaces and the need for this role is growing.   

16.     These are key focus areas for the Community Development and Safety Committee to consider in more depth at future meetings.   

Issues

17.     While Libraries and Information will report to this committee, Libraries also deliver cultural, recreational and economic outcomes, through documentary heritage collections, promotion of reading, and learning programmes respectively.  As appropriate these issues may be referred to other appropriate committees.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Multipurpose community hubs of the future

41

     

Signatories

Author

Greg Morgan - Manager Service Development, Libraries and Information

Authorisers

Allison Dobbie – Manager,  Libraries and Information

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Strategic Relationship with the Be.Institute - year two update

 

File No.: CP2014/08834

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present the BE.Institute’s year two update report.

Executive summary

2.       In February 2012, in relation to the BE.Institute, the Social and Community Development Forum resolved (SCD/2012/6):

b)    That the forum endorses the development of a Strategic Relationship Agreement

c)    That the forum endorses the following three programmes, as deliverables for the Auckland Council funding, noting their alignment with Auckland Council priorities:

·        assisting local boards in becoming “Accessible Local Boards”

·        set up localised Auckland WebPages on Be.Institute website

·        development  of a Leadership Symposium.

3.       This report presents the year two update from Be.Institute on its deliverables with Auckland Council (see Attachment A), which are delivered through its Be. Accessible programme.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the Auckland Council strategic relationship with Be.Institute – year two update report.

 

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

4.       Building on the first year of work with the Waitemata Local Board, in year two, five more local boards have started working on becoming accessible local boards.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Year Two Be-Accessible report 2013-2014 Key Deliverables

45

     

Signatories

Author

Paul Brown - Strategic Advisor (Disability), Community Development, Arts and Culture

Authoriser

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 










Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Social Aspects of Employment

 

File No.: CP2014/07851

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report canvasses social aspects of employment in Auckland and implications for the Community Development and Safety Committee.

Executive summary

2.       The transformational shifts sought by council relating to social aspects of employment are threefold:

·        dramatically accelerate the prospects of Auckland’s children and young people

·        substantially raise living standards for all Aucklanders, with a focus on those most in need

·        improve Maori social and economic wellbeing.

3.       In the last four years, the global economic downturn has contributed to job losses in Auckland and to increased unemployment and underemployment. The 2013 census unemployment rate was 8.1 per cent, compared with 5.6 per cent in the 2006 Census. The latest Household and Labour Force Survey results (which should not be directly compared with those of the census), indicated an unemployment rate of 6.8 per cent at the end of December 2013.

4.       The youth unemployment rate in Auckland is significantly higher than that of the overall population, at 20.3 per cent (2013 Census). Working age unemployment rates for Maori (14.2%) and Pasifika (14.3%) were also higher than for the population as a whole.

5.       Key factors influencing prosperity and employment in Auckland include:

·        equal access to quality education

·        integration of migrants and making the best use of the skills they bring to Auckland

·        equipping children and young people for success

·        ensuring a labour market and skills match over time.

6.       Opportunities for the Community Development and Safety Committee and jobs and enterprise portfolio holder include being a champion for:

·        increasing youth employment and positive youth transitions from school

·        improving Maori and Pasifika employment, training and education outcomes

·        successfully integrating migrants and fully utilising the skills and talents they bring to Auckland

·        improving the quality of life in Auckland to retain and attract highly skilled and creative people

·        utilising council procurement to increase employment, work experience and development opportunities for population groups that face barriers, disadvantage or discrimination in the job market

·        helping create the conditions for community economic development, social enterprise and innovation to thrive. This is further discussed in the Social Enterprise Update report.


 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee :

a)         endorse council activity for social aspects of employment, in the following areas:

i.           increasing youth employment and positive youth transitions from school

ii.          improving Maori and Pasifika employment, training and education outcomes

iii.         successfully integrating migrants and fully utilising the skills and talents they bring to Auckland

iv.        improving the quality of life in Auckland to retain and attract highly skilled and creative people

v.         utilising council procurement to increase employment, work experience and development opportunities for population groups that face barriers, disadvantage or discrimination in the job market

b)         endorse the portfolio holder for the Community Development and Safety Committee, for jobs and enterprise, to champion these activities during this council term.

 

Comments

 

2013 Census Employment Overview

7.       According to the 2013 Census, the unemployment rate in 2013 was 8.1 per cent, an increase of 2.5 percentage points. The youth unemployment rate was 20.3 per cent, six percentage points higher than that recorded in the 2006 Census.

Text Box: Fig 1: Auckland’s working age population, 2006 & 2013 Census

 

Text Box: Key statistics 2013 Census:
Employment Rate: 61.5%
Participation Rate: 66.9%
Unemployment Rate: 8.1%
Youth Unemployment Rate: 20.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.       The labour market situation in Auckland had weakened in the 2013 census, compared to the 2006 census. As shown above, Auckland’s working age population in employment declined by 3.3 percentage points (largely due to a decline in full time workers of 2.6 percentage points), whereas the percentage of those who were unemployed and not in the labour force increased by 1.6 and 1.7 percentage points respectively.

9.       The Auckland labour market has not yet recovered to the pre-financial crisis levels of 2006. Recovery, however, is continuing. The latest Household and Labour Force Survey (HLFS)[1] showed the unemployment rate for the year ending December 2013 as 6.8 per cent. Unemployment continues to be disproportionately higher for Māori (14.2%) and Pacific peoples (14.3%), compared to those of Asian (6.9%) and European ethnicity (4.0%).

Text Box: Fig 2: Auckland’s employed population aged 15 years and over, 2013 Census

10.     While data for 2013 is not yet available, 43 percent of Auckland’s working age population were born overseas in 2006. Migrants are critical to Auckland’s economy as entrepreneurs and employees and skilled migrants and will be increasingly important to Auckland’s prosperity.[2]

11.     In the 2013 Census, those who were either employers or self-employed and without employees were largely of European (21%) and Asian (17%) ethnicity, compared to 11 per cent for Maori and six per cent for Pacific.

12.     In terms of the unemployed population (57,483), there were slightly more females (54%) unemployed than males, and just under 40 per cent were young people aged 15 to 24 years. Older persons (aged 65 years and over) made up only 1.4 per cent of the unemployed.

13.     Aucklanders are more highly qualified overall than the national average. In 2013, almost a quarter (24.6%) of all Aucklanders have a bachelor's degree or equivalent, or higher, as their highest qualification, compared to 20 per cent across the country as a whole.

Fig 4: Percent of population aged 15 years and over by occupation of

employment, Auckland and NZ, 2013 Census

 

 

 

14.     Just over a quarter (25.5%) of Auckland’s employed population were working in professional occupations in 2013. Aucklanders are three percentage points more likely to work in professional occupations than the national average (Figure 4). Other occupations, which were over represented in Auckland, compared to nationally, include clerical and administrative workers, sales workers and managers.

15.     Over a third (35%) of young people were employed in two industries, retail and trade and accommodation and food services. Twenty one per cent of workers aged 65 years and over were employed in professional, scientific and technical activities and in health care and social assistance.

16.     For those not in the labour force, over a third were aged 65 years and over and a quarter (24.5%) were young people aged 15 to 24 years. Females made up the majority of those not in the labour force at 60 per cent.

17.     The category of young people aged between 15 and 24 years who are not in the labour force and not engaged in education or training is referred to as NEET. The NEET rate for Auckland has fallen from 13 per cent in December 2012 to 8.5 per cent in December 2013, according to the Household Labour Force Survey. Over the past six years, NEET rates have consistently been higher for Māori and Pacific peoples than for European and Asian young people.

Key Council Activity Relating to Social Aspects of Employment

18.     A shared economic development agenda for Auckland has been developed to focus the 2014 -17 implementation of the Auckland Economic Development Strategy (AEDS) on positioning Auckland as a globally competitive city. This includes a focus on raising youth employability and on building, attracting and retaining talent. This shared economic development agenda was reported to the Economic Development Committee (EDC) in February 2014, and an implementation update will be reported to the EDC in May 2014.

19.     Two significant areas of activity for council relate to facilitating an increase in youth employment rates and positive transitions from school, and working collectively to create the conditions for social enterprise and community economic development to thrive. A strong and innovative partnership with Maori and the University of Auckland has recently evolved to support indigenous social enterprise in Tamaki Makarau. These areas of activity are discussed in the Social Enterprise Update report, in this agenda.

20.     Other council activity includes supporting successful attraction and settlement of migrants to Auckland and maximising the skills and talents they bring; supporting lifelong learning and education; and working to improve Maori and Pacific employment outcomes.

21.     The Southern Initiative has an employment focus and has led a consortium bid for a Maori and Pacific trades training initiative (announcements on this bid have not been made as yet). These fields of activity will be covered in-depth as part of the meeting themes proposed for this committee to December 2014.

22.     The Auckland Skills Steering Group (ASSG) is co-chaired by Auckland Council (Economic Development), and the Ministry of Education (Education System Performance). Council and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) co-facilitate the group, which includes permanent representation from eleven central and local government agencies, including Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) and City of Manukau Education Trust (COMET). The group provides an Auckland regional skills system oversight, direction setting, action and monitoring functions.

23.     The ASSG has requested an Auckland skills dashboard, which will support the ASSG’s Auckland skills oversight and monitoring functions. It will include information on sub-groups such as youth, Māori, and Pasifika, and sub-regional priorities such as The Southern Initiative. The dashboard will be available for the Auckland central and local government forum in June 2014.  

 

24.     A further area of council activity relating to the social aspects of employment is council procurement. There is considerable international evidence of the public sector delivering multiple socio-economic and environmental outcomes through procurement. In the United Kingdom, this approach has been so successful that it has been legislated in the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012.

25.     Council has significant buying power (approximately two-thirds of the annual budget is spent buying goods, services and works) and procurement is a key tool for delivering the Auckland Plan. Council’s procurement strategy and policy place considerable emphasis on the need for procurement to contribute to multiple Auckland Plan outcomes. This includes employment, work experience and development opportunities for population groups that face barriers, disadvantage or discrimination in the job market such as:

·        women

Māori

Pasifika peoples

·        people with disabilities

·        people experiencing or at risk of homelessness

young people

sole parents

·        people experiencing long-term unemployment or those not in education, employment or training

migrants and refugees

·        ex/offenders, or people at risk of offending

people with mental health issues.

26.     Examples of current council procurement that includes inclusive labour market measures are the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre (persons with disabilities and local people) and work undertaken for the Tāmaki Transformation Project (local and young people).

27.     The Procurement Strategy and Policy is now being applied to procurement processes that were initiated from late 2013 onwards. This means that many procurements are still in the business case or procurement planning stages and have yet to go out to tender.

28.     Further examples of how the strategy and policy are currently being implemented include creating employment opportunities for local young people in some new facility builds and for disabled people in a waste contract.

Local board views and implications

29.     Local Boards develop strategic priorities and local economic development plans to improve social and economic outcomes in their communities. Opportunities are continually assessed for potential scaling of successful local and subregional initiatives generated through local boards.

Maori impact statement

30.     Improving Maori employment, training and education rates is a priority for the region. The current key focus of this work in council is via the Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan, indigenous social enterprise, The Southern Initiative and the work of Te Waka Angamua.

Implementation

31.     No implementation issues.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Rachael Trotman – Principal Advisor, Community Development & Safety

Authoriser

Louise Mason – Manager, Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Youth Employment

 

File No.: CP2014/07852

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on work underway in council to increase youth employment rates in Auckland and seeks the committee’s endorsement of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland is developing a game-changing approach to youth employment. The approach engages the Council family and external partners (agencies and employers) and supports everyone to work differently, to co-create an Auckland-specific solution.

3.       Auckland Council is taking a leadership role in this process and there are a range of related work streams underway. To accelerate the prospects for young Aucklanders the Mayor has launched a plan to increase positive transitions of young people from school into employment, further education and/or training. The ‘Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan’ includes the following key activities:

·        a pledge to boost numbers in Auckland Council’s graduate and cadet programmes by more than 50 per cent

·        regular summits to bring together young people, business leaders and youth organisations

·        a new business leadership group, headed by Michael Barnett and formed as part of the Shared Economic Development Agenda for Auckland, to lead a workstream focused on youth employability, with a business voice

·        the Auckland Skills Steering Group’s (a multi-agency group) alignment project, which focuses eleven central and local government agencies on better aligning their services, to support the education to employment needs of young Maori and Pasifika in Mangere-Otahuhu

·        the development of a new office or ‘Traction Hub’ to coordinate youth employment initiatives across the region

·        the council delivered “Youth Connections Across Auckland” project has secured $1.85m funding over the next three years from the Tindall Foundation, for youth employment outcomes.

4.       It is proposed that the committee endorses the Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan and becomes a champion for the actions it contains to increase youth employment and positive transitions from school.

 

Recommendation

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      endorse the Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan.

 

 


Comments

 

5.       Finding and retaining meaningful employment is central to the individual and collective wellbeing of Aucklanders. Creation of a prosperous future for young people is a priority in the Auckland Plan.

6.       There are 27,000 young Aucklanders aged 15 to 24 years old not currently in education, employment or training (NEET). The NEET percentages for young Maori are 18.5% and for Pacific 17.2%, compared with all youth at 8.5%.

7.       Auckland needs its young people to be skilled and employable if they are to compete effectively in the labour market and obtain productive employment.

8.       With an ageing population and one in five young Aucklanders unemployed, urgent action is required by Council, agencies and employers.

 

Mayors Youth Employment Traction Plan (MYETP)

 

9.       The Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan provides a new and holistic approach to addressing youth employment in a practical, action focused way. It outlines a game-changing approach that will bring together business, central government, young people and other stakeholders to co-design solutions and streamline pathways to employing young people.

 

10.     With leadership from Auckland Council, and by working together, this new approach will support the region’s young people to find jobs and mobilise businesses to meet their skill and resource needs.

 

11.     The plan outlines all of the existing actions underway across the Council family including I am Auckland, Career Pathways, Youth Connections, the Youth Enterprise Scheme, The Southern Initiative, council’s Procurement Strategy, the Economic Development Skills Strategy, Youth Employability, local board plans, the Youth Advisory Panel and Business Leadership Group.

 

12.     The Traction Plan was launched and explained to key business leaders and youth representatives at a summit on April 9, 2014. The summit MC was Michael Barnett and the keynote speaker was Sir Stephen Tindall. Various business representatives spoke at the summit to provide insights into their youth employment approach, including the Vodafone Foundation and the Sustainable Business Council.  

 

13.     The summit included a collaborative working session to identify how employers’ employment needs can be supported and addressed, while generating youth employment opportunities at the same time.

 

14.     Business leaders attending the launch, plus future summits, will be involved in working with council representatives from the Traction Hub to create a formal commitment to the youth employment issue. Participant feedback from the inaugural summit was very positive, with business leaders valuing the opportunity to work collaboratively.


 

15.     The Mayors Youth Employment Traction Plan (MYETP) incorporates council becoming an exemplar youth employer and using its leadership to remove barriers to youth employment by:

·        building on existing successes (such as Youth Connections, Young Enterprise Scheme, I am Auckland etc.)

·        removing transport barriers for young people

·        providing career pathways for young Aucklanders into, and through, council

·        leveraging council’s supply chains through procurement.

 

Youth Employment Traction Hub

16.     The Traction Hub is regional, cross-functional and focused on youth employment. It is a valuable vehicle for key stakeholder liaison and will include representation from all relevant external sectors and internal departments of council.

17.     The Traction Hub is already operational at Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED), with cross-council membership including Community and Cultural Strategy, Community Development, Arts and Culture, the Economic Development Unit, ATEED and City of Manukau Education Trust (COMET) Auckland.

Working with Central Government

18.     The shared economic development agenda (2014 to 2017) has been developed to focus the implementation of the Auckland Economic Development Strategy (AEDS) on impactful priorities to position Auckland as a globally competitive city.  An Auckland Business Leadership Group led by Michael Barnett will provide business leadership and input.

 

19.     The ‘raise youth/rangatahi employability’ priority area includes a focus on:

·        negotiating a new funding model that combines skills, social welfare and benefits, and private sector resources

·        scaling up the number of opportunities for young people to gain work experience

·        developing and actively communicating a new employers’ pledge to give status and weight to this commitment.

 

20.     The Auckland Skills Steering Group (ASSG) is made of up of eleven central and local government agencies, with education and skills responsibilities. It is co-chaired by Auckland Council (Economic Development Unit), and the Ministry of Education to deliver Auckland skills system oversight, direction setting, action and monitoring functions. 

 

21.     The ASSG has requested an Auckland Skills Dashboard with detailed information on sub-groups such as youth, Māori, and Pasifika, and sub-regional priorities such as The Southern Initiative. This will support its oversight and monitoring functions. In addition, the group has signalled that it will investigate approaches to develop an investment programme for skills in Auckland.

 

22.     The ASSG is also implementing an Alignment Project. This project is focused on improving the alignment of government services that support youth education to employment transitions, Māori and Pasifika as priority groups, and language, literacy and numeracy.  The project includes a geographic focus in The Southern Initiative area (Mangere-Otahuhu), using a collective impact approach.

Council Youth Employment Pledge and Career Pathways

 

23.     Council has made an employment pledge and will increase its graduate programme from 17 to 50 young people and its cadets from 10 to 20 cadets in 2015.

24.     Council is committed to building Career Pathways programmes which are robust, long-term programmes that will provide Auckland’s youth with the qualifications, experience, support and networks they need to start a fulfilling career via four programmes which provide entry level opportunities: graduate programme, internships, cadetships and work experience.

Youth Connections Across Auckland

 

25.     The Youth Connections project is a component of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Traction Plan and has been operating in ten local board areas over the past 24 months.

26.     The Youth Connections project is based on the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs ‘youth to work’ strategy and is implemented by local boards to connect young people into their next steps of education, training and employment.

27.     Results for the Youth Connections project to date includes:

·        connecting with more than 1,100 young people and numerous local agencies responsible for supporting young people

·        working with more than 200 businesses

·        all positions filled - full time, part time, fixed term and casual roles – 500 positions

·        full time positions filled – 176 positions

·        job seeking –120 candidates.

28.     The Tindall Foundation has announced funding of $1.85m over three years to continue support for the council’s Youth Connections Across Auckland programme. A further application for Youth Connections funding is currently with the Auckland Airport Community Trust.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

29.     The Traction Plan launch was attended by local board members. Ten Local Boards are currently involved in delivering Youth Connections projects in their areas. A further four boards have expressed an interest in the Youth Connections programmes.  The Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board will be the focus of the ASSG project.

Maori impact statement

30.     The Youth Employment Traction Plan and Youth Connections have as one of the deliverables to provide evidence of successful transitions from school to employment for Maori youth. The ASSG has a focus on young Māori and Pasifika in Mangere-Otahuhu and the aligned agency support from education to employment as an outcome.

Implementation

31.     The implementation of the Traction Plan is occurring within existing council budgets and work programmes.

 


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Mayor's Youth Employment Traction Plan (January 2014)

67

bView

Youth Employment and Youth Connection Presentation (14 May 2014)

89

     

Signatories

Author

Delwyn Corin - Strategic Advisor (Child & Youth), Community Development, Arts                                     and Culture

Authorisers

Gael Surgenor - Manager Community Development and Safety

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 






















Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 









Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

Social Enterprise Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07853

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report updates the committee on the progress of work within the council family to foster social enterprise in Auckland.

Executive Summary

2.       Social enterprises are hybrid organisations that trade goods and services in order to create social value. They are an important part of the socio-economic landscape in many countries around the world. Social enterprises are a form of Community Economic Development (CED), which is an inclusive term that describes a wide range of activities for building stronger local economies.

3.       Many parts of Auckland Council are involved in social enterprise related initiatives including ATEED, Community Development, Arts and Culture (CDAC), Regional and Local Planning, Te Waka Angamua, Community and Cultural Strategy, Local Board Services and the Research, Investigations and Monitoring Unit (RIMU).

4.       To date, council has been focused on identifying the social enterprise related activity already underway in the region, supporting that activity to grow, and establishing what is needed to create the conditions for social enterprise to thrive in Auckland. Key council activity undertaken or in train to support social enterprise to date includes:

·        six social enterprise capacity building events involving a range of partners from the public, private and third sectors

·        four internal capability building activities to upskill council staff to better support social enterprises

·        the Social Innovation in Auckland 2013 publication, which contained social enterprise stories and case studies

·        stocktake reports of existing social enterprises in their local area for the Waitemata and Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Boards

·        partnerships with the University of Auckland, AUT, Massey University, Hikurangi Foundation, Sustainable Business Network, BNZ and university student clubs to undertake social enterprise related training, events, workshops and resourcing

·        forty community economic development projects are being facilitated across the region, including food and community markets, recycling and resource recovery initiatives, community innovation hubs and youth-led entrepreneurship

·        the Haere Whakamua indigenous social enterprise programme to work with Tangata Whenua to nurture existing and create new social enterprises

5.       In May 2014 Auckland Council, in partnership with the Hikurangi Foundation and the Sustainable Business Network, is launching Social Enterprise Auckland, a brand identity and website that people can use to promote events and workshops related to social enterprise.

6.       A further partnership is in development with the Hikurangi Foundation, to work together to build social enterprise capacity and capability in the region. The Foundation has recently received central government and ASB Community Trust funding to build social enterprise nationally and in the Auckland and Northland regions respectively.

7.       To support the Social Enterprise Auckland initiative a ‘Young Social Entrepreneur Fund’ is proposed in partnership with the Auckland Communities Foundation to provide seed funding to support young people to get started in social enterprise.

 

Recommendations

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      champion social enterprise across the council organisation

b)      request staff to undertake  a feasibility study exploring a rates- neutral credit facility, to support the growth of social enterprises in Auckland

c)      note the creation of the Young Social Entrepreneurs Fund with the Auckland Communities Foundation and the development of a partnership with the Hikurangi Foundation, to support the development of social enterprise

d)      forward this report and presentation to all local boards for their information

 

 

Comments

 

8.       Social enterprises are organisations that combine a business approach with social good. A common way to illustrate how social enterprise works is this continuum developed in the UK in 2007, with traditional charities and community economic development at one end and conventional business at the other.

 

 


Business with a charitable spend

 

Social

Purpose

Business

 

Commercial Enterprise

 

Socially

Responsible

Business

 

Social

Benefit

Enterprise

 

Charity with fundraising and/or grant

income

 

Charity with ‘on mission’ contract

income

 
                                                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Social Enterprise Continuum (NESTA/Young Foundation 2011)

 

9.       The Department of Internal affairs used the following definition for its 2012 mapping project of Social Enterprise in New Zealand:

            To be classed as a social enterprise an organisation demonstrates these three elements:

·        a social, cultural, or environmental mission

·        a substantial portion of its income derived from trade

·        the majority of its profit/surplus reinvested in the fulfillment of its mission

10.     To date, Auckland Council has been identifying social enterprise related activity in Auckland, supporting that activity to grow and asking people what support they need, with key activities as follows:


 

Capacity Building in the Community

·        November 2012 – Supporting the 4th Sector event at University of Auckland

·        March 2013 - SOCANZ Conference and Master classes

·        April 2013 - Launchpad Forum at University of Auckland

·        May 2013 - Social Enterprise and Resource Recovery workshop

·        August 2013 – MJ Kaplan presentation on Social Enterprise

·        October 2013 – Social Enterprise Start Up course at AUT

·        November 2013 – Social Enterprise Auckland event at BNZ

 

Internal Capability Building

·        November 2012 – attendance at SIX Summer School on social enterprise, Adelaide

·        May 2013 - Social Enterprise workshop with Mark Daniels

·        February 2014 - Social Enterprise workshop with Mark Daniels

·        March 2014 - Social Enterprise workshop with Hikurangi Foundation

 

Research

·     November 2012 - Waitematā and Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board Social Enterprise stocktake with CDS

·        February 2013 - Social Innovation in Auckland Report with RIMU

 

Partnerships

·        Haere Whakamua project in partnership with University of Auckland

·        Social Enterprise training courses in partnership with AUT

·        SEA working group in partnership with practitioners and supporters

·        Community Recycling Network in partnership with Solid Waste Team

·        Kickstarter programme with Social Innovation: University of Auckland

·        Mentoring project with Auckland Microfinance student club

·        Community facilities lease partnership with Roskill Coffee Project

 

Procurement

·        Auckland Council’s Procurement Strategy and Policy

 

11.     In a local community context, social enterprise is often referred to as community enterprise.  As of April 2014, council is facilitating the delivery of 40 social or community enterprise projects across the region. Of the 40 projects, 20 percent are in the north/west, 30 percent are in Central, 36 percent are in South and 10 percent are delivered regionally. Seventy percent of the projects are underway and the remaining 30 percent are being planned and scoped. Almost half of these projects are located inside council community facilities.


 

Map of Council Supported Social and Community Enterprise Initiatives in Train

 

 

Young Social Entrepreneurs

12.     One of the key drivers of the evolution of social enterprises in New Zealand is the growth of young entrepreneurs. The social enterprise space is changing rapidly due to the ingenuity of start-ups founded by young people, incubated on campus or in family garages.

13.     CDAC is supporting young social entrepreneurs, for example piloting a t-shirt printing incubator, setting up a kids market, piloting a kickstarter project and planning a youth-led market in partnership with Zeal. Council staff  are working alongside university student clubs to provide mentoring, support and encouragement.

 

Community Innovation Hubs

14.     Community innovation hubs are centres of community life which support community action and innovation.  Ideas and initiatives are created, discussed and brought to life by residents and communities.  CDAC is supporting the creation of hubs either within council facilities or through spaces provided by partners. These one-stop shops can provide a wide range of services including access to digital tools, entrepreneurial training, spaces for collaboration and learning and areas to prototype community enterprises. Community innovation hubs are currently being scoped in the areas of Puketapapa, Maungakiekie-Tamaki and Papakura.

 

Community Markets and Food Initiatives

15.     Of the 35 place-based community enterprise initiatives supported by CDAC, nearly half are programmes supporting community markets and local cafes. They include youth-led markets, ethnic markets, children’s markets and supporting local food producers. Council engagement in these includes business planning, lease of space, technical skills development, coordination and promotion. Supporting markets and cafes entails collaboration among different council departments and external partners and innovation in processes and lease agreements.  

 

Recycling and Waste Minimisation

16.     The Waste Minimisation and Management Plan aims to involve the community in waste reduction such as recycling and the creation of community recycling depots. These depots will make resource recovery and recycling more accessible in communities and increase opportunities for new social enterprises to form and create local jobs.

17.     CDAC is working with the Solid Waste team and community partners to create community recycling depots where community groups are trained and resourced to manage these centres. Staff are also supporting small recycling enterprises such as opportunity shops, bike refurbishing, sewing enterprise and uniform banks to turn waste into resource.

Haere Whakamua

18.     Haere Whakamua was born out of a co-design, co-develop, co-implement model of council working together with Maori.

19.     To date, the following has been achieved:

·        Haere Whakamua team created: CDAC, Te Waka Angamua and the University of Auckland Business School Mira Szazy Research Centre for Māori and Pacific Economic Development

·        working with Makaurau Marae and Ngati Rehua as pioneer partners of Haere Whakamua

·        presentations to Te Waka Angamua Kaitiaki Forum, Independent Māori Statutory Board, Auckland International Airport, Villa Maria Winery, and US Consulate Office

·        marae scoping exercise underway in four marae in the Mangere Gateway

·        capacity building agreement with Ruopotaka Marae underway

·        Environmental Services Unit, Parks, Sport and Recreation and CDAC nursery project underway.

 

 

 

Social Enterprise Auckland

20.     This year Auckland Council has developed a partnership with the Hikurangi Foundation and the Sustainable Business Network called ‘Social Enterprise Auckland’.  Social Enterprise Auckland is a brand identity that people can use to promote events and workshops related to social enterprise.

21.     The Social Enterprise Auckland website will support organisations and their ventures, and help people connect with learning opportunities, resources and places to network.

Young Social Entrepreneur Fund

22.     There is currently no capital fund to support young people to get started in social enterprise. Through the Social Enterprise Auckland initiative the plan is to create one. The ‘Young Social Entrepreneur Fund’ is being developed in partnership with the Auckland Communities Foundation. Auckland Strategy and Research has allocated $10,000 to kick start the fund and through Social Enterprise Auckland match funding opportunities from the philanthropic and private sector will be sought.

23.     Auckland Council is partnering with students from Massey University and Auckland University of Technology (AUT) to pilot a new fundraising competition called the ‘Capital Fund Challenge’ to help grow the fund by $10-$15,000 per annum. These young social entrepreneurs will also be involved in developing the strategic direction of the fund as it grows.

24.     Auckland Council is also partnering with AUT to provide an affordable introduction to Social Enterprise for 20 people each semester. The ‘Social Enterprise Foundation Course’ was piloted in 2013 and is designed to return an additional $10-$15,000 per annum into the fund.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

25.     A social enterprise briefing paper has been prepared for Local Boards on how they can support social enterprise.

26.     The Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, Mangere-Otahuhu, Whau and Henderson-Massey Local Boards have supported the development of social enterprises as a mechanism for local economic development through events, workshops, procurement and funding.

27.     The Waitemata Local Board has included social enterprise development in their Local Economic Development Action Plan, while the Puketapapa Local Board has included it in their Economic and Community Development Portfolio Plan.

28.     Local boards have not provided formal input into this report. However, there is growing interest from local boards in social enterprise as part of fostering local community and economic development.

29.     These are priority areas in current local boards plans and are likely to feature strongly in the new 2014 local board plans. A number of local boards have specifically identified support for social enterprise as a key area for development. The Puketapapa Local Board is advocating to the governing body for greater support for local economic development, including social enterprises.

30.     To date, staff have been working with interested local boards to advise and support local social enterprise activity. In November 2012 and November 2013, the Waitemata Local Board joined with the University of Auckland business school to host ‘Navigating the Fourth Sector’, a conference on starting and sustaining a social enterprise.

31.     Given the important role of local boards, staff have recommended that this report and presentation should be forwarded to all local boards for their information. Staff will work with local board services to continue engagement with interested local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

32.     Lifting Māori social and economic well-being is a key commitment for council. Haere Whakamua will enhance the capacity of Māori to drive economic growth, and improve living standards and social well-being for Māori. Other existing and future social enterprises involve and benefit Maori.

Implementation

33.     Implementation of social enterprise related initiatives occurs through existing council budgets and work programmes.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Paul Brown - Strategic Advisor (Disability), Community Development, Arts and     Culture

Authorisers

Gael Surgenor - Manager Community Development and Safety

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

     

  


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 6.1      Attachment a    Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Psychoactive Substances Position Paper                                                Page 107


Community Development and Safety Committee

14 May 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychoactive Substances

Position Paper

(Local Approved Products)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

CONTENTS

 

1.         Introduction and Overview

2.         Position Paper and Scope

3.         Strategic Alignment

4.         Definitions

5.         Position Paper Guidelines

6.         Monitoring and Implementation

7.         References

8.         Schedules

Schedule 1          (Town Centre Zones where Retail Premises might be located and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Map)

Schedule 2          (List of Sensitive Sites)

Schedule 3          (Areas in Town Centre Zones where Retail Premises should not be located because of proximity to sensitive sites)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REVISION HISTORY

 

Revision

Policy Sponsor

Approval date and date of next scheduled review

Local Board or Committee Decision

Reference

Related Operating Guidelines

1

Carol Rex-McKenzie, Relationship Manager, Local Board Services

3 March 2014

Review by 13 January 2015

Local Board

 

 

 

 


 

1.         INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

 

The purpose of the Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 (the ‘Act’) is to “regulate the availability of psychoactive substances in New Zealand to protect the health of, and minimise harm to, individuals who use psychoactive substances.”

 

To advance this purpose, the Act provides that territorial authorities (such as Auckland Council) may have a Local Approved Product Policy (‘LAPP’) relating to the sale of approved products within their district. In particular, a LAPP may include policies concerning the location of premises that sell approved products - by reference to broad areas in the district, proximity to other such premises and proximity to certain facilities (such as kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools, places of worship, or other community facilities).

 

In advance of the Auckland Council preparing a LAPP, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has decided to adopt this Local Approved Products Position Paper (‘Position Paper’) to make its own local views known.

 

This Position Paper is a set of policy positions made by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board which is intended to give guidance concerning the location of premises selling psychoactive substances in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s geographical area. The Position Paper addresses community concerns regarding the location of such premises, while having regard to the statutory requirements of the Act.

 

The Position Paper is also intended to provide the Psychoactive Substances Regulatory Authority (‘Authority’) with a clear view from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and its community about the location of premises. This is intended to guide the Authority when it makes decisions on any retail licence applications to sell psychoactive substances in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

 

This Position Paper takes a very similar approach to that taken by a number of councils in the Waikato Region (including Hamilton City, Waikato District, Waipa District, Matamata-Piako District, Thames-Coromandel District, Hauraki District and South Waikato District) and Palmerston North City Council.

 

2.         POLICY OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE

 

The main purpose of this Position Paper is for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to provide a clear view that can be applied to all applications that the Authority considers for retail licences to sell approved products in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu. It is also intended to assist Auckland Council as it develops its LAPP.

 

The objectives of the Position Paper are to:

 

·      Minimise the harm to the community caused by psychoactive substances by providing a clear view to the Authority of where retail premises that sell psychoactive substances may be located in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (if at all).

 

·      Ensure that the community, through its Local Board, is able to express a clear view about the location of these retail premises in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu as Auckland Council develops its LAPP.

 

This Position Paper is intended to provide a clear view regarding:

 

·      Any application for a licence to sell approved products from a retail premise from the date that this Position Paper is adopted; and

 

·      Any application for renewal of existing (interim) licences at any retail premises.

 

This Position Paper does not apply to retail premises where internet sales only are made or to premises where the sale of approved products is by wholesale only.

 

The requirements of the Resource Management Act 1991 and any other applicable regulation must be met in respect of any premises holding a retail licence.

 

3.         STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT

 

This Position Paper assists in the delivery of one of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s core priorities as set out in its Local Board Plan - ‘Community safety and wellbeing’. In particular, the Position Paper supports the objective that “Everyone is safe in their families and communities.” Community safety is a core outcome for the local board: “We will focus on enabling safety within the community by partnering with key stakeholders to develop and deliver a range of community based initiatives”. Communities in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s area are particularly sensitive to the sale of these products due to the area’s youthful population and high levels of deprivation.

 

4.         DEFINITIONS

 

When interpreting this Position Paper, use the definitions set out below unless the context requires otherwise. If you see a reference to a repealed Act, regulation, district plan, bylaw or policy, read that as a reference to its replacement.

 

 

Approved Product

Has the meaning given by the Act (a psychoactive product approved by the Authority under Section 37 of the Act)

Authority

Means the Psychoactive Substances Regulatory Authority established by Section 10 of the Act

Town Centre Zone

Means those areas of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu defined by a Town Centre Zone in the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (or resulting Operative Auckland Unitary Plan) as set out in Schedule 1.

Licence

Means a licence granted under Section 16 of the Act that is in force.

Psychoactive Product

Has the meaning given by the Act (a finished product packaged and ready for retail sale that is a psychoactive substance or that contains one or more psychoactive substances).

Psychoactive Substance

Has the meaning given by the Act (a substance, mixture, preparation, article, device, or thing that is capable of inducing a psychoactive effect (by any means) in an individual who uses the psychoactive substance).

Regulations

Means regulations made under the Act

Retail Premises

Has the meaning given by the Act (premises for which a licence to sell approved products by retail has been granted).

Retailer

Has the meaning given by the Act (a person engaged in any business that includes the sale of approved products by retail).

Sell

Has the meaning given by the Act (includes every method of disposition for valuable consideration, for example –

(a) bartering:

(b) offering or attempting to sell or giving in possession for sale, or exposing, sending, or delivering for sale, or causing or allowing to be sold, offered, or exposed for sale:

(c) retailing:

(d) wholesaling)

Sensitive site

Includes kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools, places of worship, or other community facilities

The Act

Means the Psychoactive Substances Act 2013

 


 

5.         POSITION GUIDELINES

 

 

The position of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is as follows:

 

5.1          Location of premises from which approved products may be sold

 

(i)           Currently there are no interim retail licences granted in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is opposed to any retail licences being granted in future in the Local Board area, noting that there are several interim retail licences that have been granted in nearby locations outside the Local Board area.

 

(ii)          However, if at any time in the future, the Authority considers granting a retail licence in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area (despite the view of the Board that none be granted), the location of retail premises from which products may be sold should be restricted to locations within the Town Centre Zones as identified in Schedule 1.

 

Section 68(a) of the Act provides that the location of premises from which approved products may be sold may be indicated by reference to broad areas within a district. The reason for restricting locations to the Town Centre Zone areas only - is mainly about safety. The safety of individuals buying and selling approved products is increased by the presence of high populations, greater visibility, good lighting, coverage of CCTV cameras and increased NZ Police presence in the Town Centre Zones. A focused geographic area also enables easier enforcement. This also reduces the availability of psychoactive substances in residential neighbourhoods.

 

 

5.2          Location of retail premises in relation to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds

 

(i)           Any retail premise from which approved products may be sold should not be permitted within 100 metres of a sensitive site existing at the time the licence application is made.

 

(ii)          For the purposes of clause 5.1(i) the separation distances are measured from the legal boundary of each sensitive site. 

 

Section 68(c) of the Act provides that the location of premises from which approved products may be sold may be indicated by reference to proximity to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds within the district (for example, kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools, places of worship, or other community facilities). This Position Paper identifies sensitive sites as kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools, places of worship, or other community facilities within or close to the Town Centre Zones.

 

The Local Board considers 100 metres to be the appropriate separation distance of retail premises selling approved products from sensitive sites. This distance reduces visibility and profile of retail premises (e.g. at this distance a person could look up the street in an urban environment and not see a retail premise selling approved products clearly).

 

5.3          Location of retail premises in relation to other retail premises from which approved products are sold

 

(i)           New retail premises from which approved products may be sold should not be permitted within 500 metres of another retail premise from which approved products may be sold.

 

(ii)          For the purposes of clause 5.3(i) the separation distances are measured from the legal boundary of the premises.

               

Section 68(b) of the Act provides that the location of premises from which approved products may be sold may be indicated by reference to proximity to other premises from which approved products are sold. The reason for this is to reduce harm caused by the clustering of the activity. Clustering can lead to the development of a ‘red light’ zone and could attract other harm activities to cluster in that area. This can unintentionally change the character of that particular area. In addition, the greater the availability of a harm product within an area, the greater the harm. This is generally due to price competition between retailers. Some of the people buying approved psychoactive products are already under the influence of the product and can exhibit anti-social behaviour. Ensuring a good separation distance between outlets prevents people from congregating.

 


 

 

6.         RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE AUTHORITY ON RETAIL LICENCES AND HOURS OF OPERATION

 

While there are no retail premises in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, nonetheless, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board (in support of other local boards and territorial authorities) requests that the Authority consider the following recommendations to limit the visibility of retail premises to vulnerable groups, particularly school children, as a key harm reduction method.

 

(i)           To further protect groups considered the most at risk of harm from the sale of psychoactive substances, it is strongly recommended that the hours of operation for the sale of approved products be limited to 9:00am – 2:30pm (Monday to Friday).

 

 

7.         REVIEW

 

The Relationship Manager – Local Board Services will monitor the effect of this Position Paper.

 

The Position Paper will be reviewed every five years, or at the request of the Local Board, or in response to changed legislative and statutory requirements, or in response to any issues that may arise.

 

 

 

8.         REFERENCES

 

·      Psychoactive Substances Act 2013

 

 


 

SCHEDULE 1

TOWN CENTRE ZONES WHERE RETAIL PREMISES MIGHT BE LOCATED AND MĀNGERE-ŌTĀHUHU LOCAL BOARD MAP

 

Māngere Town Centre Zone– Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

 

Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Zone– Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Map

 

 

 

 

 


 

SCHEDULE 2

LIST OF SENSITIVE SITES

 

Māngere Town Centre

 

Kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools

 

(a) Kingsdene Kindergarten (62 Mascot Ave)

(b) Nga Iwi Primary School (60 Mascot Ave)

(c) Te Kohanga Reo o Mataatua ki Māngere (17 Killington Crescent)

(d) Barnardos Mangere Early Learning Centre (31 Cape Road)

 

(e) Te Wananga O Aotearoa (15 Canning Crescent)

 

Places of worship

 

(f) Anglican Church St Marys (53 Orly Avenue)

(g) Catholic Church Polynesian Centre (90 Bader Drive)

(h) The Church of The Nazarene, Māngere ‎ (1 Killington Crescent)

(i) Māngere Baptist Church (145 Bader Drive)

(j) Māngere Congregational Church of Jesus (Samoan) (2 Waddon Place)

 

Community facilities

 

(k) Māngere Arts Centre - Nga Tohu o Uenuku (Corner Bader Drive and Orly Avenue)

(l) Māngere Town Centre Library (Bader Drive)

(m) Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa Pool and Leisure Centre (Corner Mascot Avenue and Waddon Place)

 

(n) Hillcrest Hospital (43 Mascot Avenue)

(o) Monte Cecelia Housing Trust (30 Windrush Close)

(p) Māngere Health Centre (12 Waddon Place)

(q) Bader Drive Healthcare (48 Mangere Town Square)

 

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board considers that the Hillcrest Hospital, Monte Cecelia Housing Trust, Māngere Health Centre and Bader Drive Healthcare are community facilities. In addition, these community facilities are particularly sensitive to the local effects of the retail sale of psychoactive products (such as effects on local amenity and good order). This is especially the case with the Hillcrest Hospital which houses vulnerable and ‘at risk’ elderly people.

 

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board considers that Te Wananga O Aotearoa should be treated as a school for the purposes of this Position Paper as it offers NCEA Level classes to students.

 

 

Ōtāhuhu Town Centre

 

Kindergartens, early childhood centres, schools

 

(a) Blossoms Educare Otahuhu‎ (18 Princes Street)

(b) Ōtāhuhu Primary School (41 Station Road)

(c) Seugagogo Aoga Amata Pre-School‎ (54 Mason Avenue)

(d) St Andrews Christian Pre-School‎ (18 Station Road)

(e) Tinytown Learning Centre‎ (37-41 Mason Ave)

 

Places of worship

 

(f) Anglican Church Holy Trinity (‎18 Mason Avenue)

(g) Baptist Church (‎45 Mason Avenue)

(h) Seugagogo Aoga Amata (54 Mason Avenue)

(i) Samoa Worship Centre Christian Ministries NZ (12 Queen Street)

(j) Congregational Christian Church of Samoa (58-64 Station Road)

(k) Ōtāhuhu Seventh-day Adventist Church (17-19 Mason Avenue)

 

 

Community facilities

 

(l) Ōtāhuhu Recreation Centre‎ (30 Mason Avenue)

(m) Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre; Ōtāhuhu Community Library (10-16 High Street)

 

(n) The Willows Home and Hospital (16 Princes Street)

(o) Community Café – Affirming Works (225 Great South Road)

(p) Ōtāhuhu Community Corrections (Ministry of Corrections) (23 Fort Richard Road)

 

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board considers that the Willows Home and Hospital, Community Café – Affirming Works and Ōtāhuhu Community Corrections are community facilities. In addition, these community facilities are particularly sensitive to the local effects of the retail sale of psychoactive products (such as effects on local amenity and good order). This is especially the case with the Willows Home and Hospital which houses vulnerable and ‘at risk’ elderly people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SCHEDULE 3

AREAS IN TOWN CENTRE ZONES WHERE RETAIL PREMISES SHOULD NOT BE LOCATED BECAUSE OF PROXIMITY TO SENSITIVE SITES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



[1] This is a nationwide survey undertaken quarterly with a sample of 16,000 households and is the official measure of employment in New Zealand.

[2] Auckland Council, Economic Development Strategy.