I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Finance and Performance Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 22 May 2014

9.30am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Finance and Performance Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Penny Webster

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Ross Clow

 

Members

Cr Anae Arthur Anae

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Cr Cameron Brewer

Cr Dick Quax

 

Mayor Len Brown, JP

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Member David Taipari

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Member John Tamihere

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Hon Chris Fletcher, QSO

Cr George Wood, CNZM

 

Cr Penny Hulse

 

 

Cr Denise Krum

 

 

Cr Mike Lee

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Crispian Franklin

Democracy Advisor

 

19 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6205

Email: crispian.franklin@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee will be responsible for monitoring overall financial management and the performance of the council parent organisation and the financial monitoring of the Auckland Council Group. It will also make financial decisions required outside of the annual budgeting processes. Key responsibilities include:

 

·         Financial management

·         Approval of non-budgeted expenditure

·         Write-offs

·         Acquisition and disposal of property relating to the Committee’s responsibilities

·         Monitoring achievement  of  financial and other measures of  performance and service levels

·         Recommending the Annual Report to the Governing Body

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)          where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(ii)        Approval of a submission to an external body

(iii)     Powers belonging to another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iv)       Power to establish subcommittees.

 

 

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          5  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    5

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          5

6.1     Development contribution for the development at Ngahue Reserve            5

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

9          Independent Assessment of Expenditure incurred by Auckland Council to achieve Maori Outcomes FY 2012/13

This report was not available at the time of print and will be tabled at the meeting.

 

10        Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members                             7

11        Disposal Recommendation Report                                                                           29

12        Auckland Council group results for the nine months to 31 March 2014              61

13        Auckland Council performance report for the period 1 July 2013 to 31 March 2014   69  

14        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 16 April 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

6.1       Development contribution for the development at Ngahue Reserve

Purpose

Desley Simpson, Chairperson Orakei Local Board and Troy Churton, member wish to speak to the committee regarding the discussion on development contribution in relation to the development at Ngahue Reserve.

 


 

Recommendation

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      thank Desley Simpson, Chairperson Orakei Local Board and Troy Churton, member regarding the discussion on development contribution in relation to the development at Ngahue Reserve.

 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members

 

File No.: CP2014/08039

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members.

2.       To approve the Code of Conduct for advisory panels.

Executive summary

3.       The Remuneration Authority sets remuneration for elected members and approves their expenses policy.  The Authority does not have jurisdiction over appointed members and there is a need to develop a robust system for determining appointed members’ fees and the basis for reimbursing expenses.

4.       An “Auckland Council Fees Framework” has been developed based on the “Cabinet Fees Framework”, which is used for deciding fees for members appointed to government bodies.  This approach means that fees paid to members appointed by Auckland Council will now be benchmarked and will change when there are changes to the Cabinet Fees Framework.

5.       The Expenses Policy is based both on the provisions in the Cabinet Fees Framework and the Elected Members Expenses Policy.

6.       The Code of Conduct for members appointed to advisory panels has been developed to provide guidelines on the expected conduct of appointed members of panels.

 

Recommendations

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      adopt the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members, including the proposed fees.

b)      approve the Code of Conduct for Members appointed to Advisory Panels

 

Comments

 

7.       The Council has a number of panels and other bodies with appointed members.  It is important to establish a framework that sets fees in a consistent manner.  In addition to proposing an Auckland Council Fees Framework, this report recommends fees for:

·   the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel

·   the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

·   the Seniors Advisory Panel

·   the Disability Strategic Advisory Panel

·   the Youth Advisory Panel

·   Independent Planning Commissioners.

8.       Attached as Appendix A is the proposed Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members.

9.       The proposed Auckland Council Fees Framework is based on the Cabinet Fees Framework, which determines fees paid to a number of organisations in which the Crown has an interest. 

10.     A Fees Framework, which uses a scoring system for assessing the level of fee, provides a more robust way of determining fees than in the past.

11.     A summary of suggested fees determined under this Framework follows.  The details of how these are assessed are contained in the Appendix.

 

Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples, Seniors and Disability Strategy Advisory Panels

12.     The proposed meeting fees for members of the Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples, Seniors and Disability Strategy Advisory Panels are as follows:

Meeting fee

Proposed

Previous term

Member

$250

$235

Chairperson

$530

The chairs of the Ethnic and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels received annual fees of $7,000.  Other chairs received the members’ rate.

 

Youth Advisory Panel

13.     The proposed meeting fees for members of the Youth Advisory Panel are as follows.

Meeting

Proposed

Previous term

Member

$173

Nil

Chairperson

$336

Nil

 

14.     Deputy Chairperson

Where a deputy chairperson is appointed to share the workload with the chairperson for the course of the term, the deputy chairperson’s fee is the fee for a member plus 25%.

 

Equivalent annual fee

15.     The Fees Framework provides that the Manager Democracy Services may convert the meeting fee into an equivalent annual fee where meetings are held regularly.  Such a fee is paid in instalments throughout the year, but is a fixed salary paid for all estimated work during the year.

 

Other panels

16.     The Fees Framework provides for the Manager Democracy Services to determine fees for other panels that are to be consistent with the Fees Framework.  Currently other panels include the Rural, Business and Heritage Advisory Panels.  In the past, those who have attended meetings of these Panels as a part of the role for which they are otherwise employed have not sought payment of meeting fees but payments are made to those who are appointed in a personal capacity and who are not otherwise compensated. 

17.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board Terms of Reference state that members will meet on an unpaid voluntary basis.

 


 

Independent Planning Commissioners

18.     An assessment of rates for independent planning commissioners was carried out in 2012.  The Fees Framework proposes that the rates established then are maintained, and that increases are applied when the Cabinet Fees Framework is increased.

 

Expenses Policy for appointed members

19.     The Expenses Policy sets out the rules for compensating appointed members for personal costs arising from undertaking Council business.

20.     Previously the Ethnic and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels received communication allowances of $750 per annum per member.  Other panels did not receive that allowance.  This is the rate that has been determined by the Remuneration Authority for elected members and it is not expected that members of all of the Council’s advisory panels have the same level of requirements as elected members.  There is not sufficient budget to provide all panel members (about 70) and commissioners with this level of allowance and therefore this allowance is not included in the Expenses Policy for Appointed Members.

 

Code of Conduct for Advisory Panel members

21.     A Code of Conduct is attached as Appendix B.

22.     It includes principles, descriptions of roles and relationships, dealing with the media, confidential information, conflicts of interest and complaints about conduct.   These are based on the Council’s Code.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     The Fees Framework will apply to advisory panels set up by local boards.

Maori impact statement

24.     From time to time panels, working parties or steering groups are set up for a limited period and include tangata whenua representation.  The approach taken in the Fees Framework for Appointed Members will be of assistance with determining fees payable to tangata whenua, if applicable.

Implementation

25.     There is provision within the Democracy Services budget for the fees recommended for appointed members.

26.     The Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members will be implemented from 13 May 2014 in order to apply to the induction day for Panel members that was held on that date.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members

11

bView

Code of Conduct for Members Appointed to Advisory Panels

25

      

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite  Delbet - Manager Democracy Services

Grant Taylor - Governance Director

Andrew McKenzie - Chief Finance Officer

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

 

 

AC horizontal colour

 

 

 

AUCKLAND COUNCIL

FEES FRAMEWORK AND EXPENSES POLICY FOR APPOINTED MEMBERS

 

 

 

 

May 2014

 

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

Table of Contents

What this document covers. 4

Auckland Council Fees Framework. 4

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Assessment process. 4

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Daily rates  5

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Hourly rates  5

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Annual fee  5

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               General absence. 6

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Time spent in travelling to and from meetings. 6

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Deputy chair  6

Independent Planning Commissioners. 6

Expenses Policy. 6

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Principles  6

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Mileage allowance. 7

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Public transport and taxis. 7

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Parking  7

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Meals  7

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Other costs  7

APPENDIX A - Assessment criteria.. 8

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Skills, knowledge and experience required of members. 8

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Function, level and scope of authority. 8

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Complexity of issues. 9

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Public interest and profile. 9

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Fee levels  10

APPENDIX B – Determination of fees. 11

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples, Senior, Disability Advisory Panels. 11

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Youth Advisory Panel 12

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Other panels  12

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Additional work  13

 

 

 


This document sets out the policy on payment of fees and expenses to appointed members.

 

This policy is administered by Auckland Council’s Democracy Services Department. For queries on the policy please contact:

Michelle Smith

Business Support Manager

Democracy Services

DDI: +64 9 373 6220

MOB: +64 27 207 0893

michelle.smith@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

This policy may be reviewed annually and is current until superseded.

 


 

What this document covers

 

Auckland Council Fees Framework

 

1.    The Auckland Council Fees Framework is used for setting the fees of appointed members of committees, advisory panels or boards, which have been established by:

·    the Mayor

·    the Governing Body

·    a committee of the Governing Body

·    a Local Board

·    a committee of a Local Board.

2.    The Framework does not apply:

·    if payment is set by the Remuneration Authority, or by legislation

·    if payment is made from some other source (for example if a professional consultant is paid by his or her employer to attend)

·    to any appointments made by the Governing Body or a Local Board to an outside organisation

·    if the Governing Body has formally resolved a different form of payment

·    if payments are made on a contractual basis (for example the members of the Code of Conduct Independent Review Panel submit invoices).

Expenses policy

3.    The Expenses Policy sets out the criteria and type of expense that will be reimbursed and applies to all appointed members, unless personal expense is compensated in some other way.

Auckland Council Fees Framework

4.    The Auckland Council Fees Framework is aligned to the Cabinet Fees Framework, which is used by many Government bodies whose fees are not determined by the Remuneration Authority. The Auckland Council Fees Framework ensures consistency between fees paid to appointees to Auckland Council bodies and fees paid by Government to those on entities in which the Crown has an interest. 

5.    Most appointments that are made by the Governing Body or Local Boards will be to bodies which can be described as “Group 4 - all other committees and other bodies” within the Cabinet Fees Framework.  The assessment criteria for Group 4 have been adapted for use by Auckland Council.  Fees paid under the Auckland Council Fees Framework will be adjusted in line with changes to fees paid under the Cabinet Fees Framework.   The Cabinet Fees Framework was last reviewed in December 2012.

Assessment process

6.    The body (committee, panel)  will be scored on the following factors:

·    skills, knowledge and experience required of members

·    function, level and scope of authority

·    complexity of issues

·    public interest and profile.

7.    The assessment criteria are based on the Cabinet Fees Framework but modified for Auckland Council.  The assessment criteria to be used for scoring are attached as Appendix A.

8.    The resulting total score is used to identify a remuneration band within the Cabinet Fees Framework.  The Governing Body or Local Board decides the remuneration to be paid from within that band.

Daily rates

9.    The remuneration bands are expressed as daily rates. 

10.  A daily rate is a good basis for calculating fees to be paid for attending meetings of groups such as panels.  This is because the length of a meeting tends to be consistent from month to month.  A “meeting fee”, based on the daily rate, is set and applied to all meetings.

11.  Where a fee is based on a daily rate, it is expected that a working day is about 8 hours, and the daily fee is calculated on this basis. Work for longer than 8 hours in one day does not attract an extra payment.

12.  The daily fee applies to all work, including that performed outside of meetings (e.g. preparation, representing the body at other forums, or administrative work) that is required for the body to carry out its role. All work that is required to be performed for the body by the member should be paid at the approved daily rate.

13.  Where a total of 6 hours is worked in one day, a daily fee may be paid. It is accepted that it may not be possible for a member having worked 6 hours in one day on body business to return to other paid work. Where a member spends time, for example one evening, preparing for a meeting the next day, if the preparation and meeting time combined were between 6 and 8 hours, then one daily fee would be paid for the combined preparation and meeting time.

14.  Work other than preparation for meetings must be approved and minuted by the body before it is undertaken. Individual members should not be in a position where they could be considered to be setting their own work programmes without the endorsement of the body.  The ability of the  body to approve additional meetings or work is subject to agreement by the council.

Hourly rates

15.  Hourly pro-rata rates are calculated by dividing the daily rate by 8 and multiplying by the number of hours worked. 

16.  An hourly rate is a good basis for calculating fees paid to independent planning commissioners. An hourly rate requires the submission of a statement of hours worked before each payment.

Annual fee

17.  An annual fee is calculated by multiplying the daily rate by the number of days that will be worked during the year. 

18.  An annual fee is a good basis for calculating fees paid where a meeting fee does not properly cover all work.  Chairpersons of panels receive a higher meeting fee than ordinary members.  The higher fee recognises the additional responsibilities of chairpersons. However, it may be deemed more appropriate to pay a chairperson an annual fee in particular circumstances. 

19.  The annual fee needs to be adjusted in the following ways if there is significant absence:

·    where absence is for a continuous period of more than two months, the annual fee should be pro-rated (e.g. an absence of two months would result in payment of 10/12 of the annual fee)

·    where absence is not necessarily continuous but is frequent over the period of a year, the annual fee should also be pro-rated if the total of monthly meetings missed exceeds three.

General absence

20.  Where a member fails to attend a significant number of meetings, or otherwise perform their duties as a member, the chair needs to raise the issue of expectations about performance with the member and if necessary with the Manager Democracy Services. Consideration should be given at the time of reappointment of members to the issue of continued absences from body business.

Time spent in travelling to and from meetings

21.  The time spent travelling to and from meetings is not paid.  However, reimbursement for the costs of travel is through a mileage allowance payable under the Expenses Policy.

Deputy chair

22.  Where a body appoints a deputy chair who shares the business workload with the chair between meetings, an additional fee of 25% of a member’s fee will be paid.

23.  Where a body does not appoint a deputy chair, then in any instance where a member chairs a meeting that member will receive the daily rate of the chair for that meeting. 

Independent Planning Commissioners

 

24.  In 2012 a survey of fees paid to independent planning commissioners was carried out by Strategic Pay Ltd across 26 councils.  Strategic Pay assessed commissioners as belonging to Group 2 – “Statutory Tribunals and Authorities” within the Cabinet Fees Framework.  Based on the findings of that survey, fees were established of:

·    $170 per hour for chairpersons of hearings panels and sole commissioners

·    $150 per hour for commissioners who are members of a hearings panel.

 

25.  These current fees will continue, but will be aligned to any increases in the Cabinet Fees Framework, such that fees will increase by the same percentage as those within the Group 2 category (“Statutory Tribunals and Authorities”) of the Cabinet Fees Framework.

Expenses Policy

Principles

26.  The principles on which reimbursement of expenses will be approved are:

·    Payments will be for actual and reasonable expenses; this requires receipts to be produced and expenditure to be modest

·    For members of groups such as panels, work conducted other than attending the normal monthly meetings, must be properly approved and minuted prior to the work being carried out.

 Mileage allowance

27.  A mileage allowance is payable for any travel that is required to perform the member’s role as an appointed member.  This includes travel between home and meetings.

28.  The rate for members who are not self-employed, is the IRD rate for employers reimbursing employees, currently being 77 c/km.

29.  A self-employed person may opt to not be paid the mileage allowance in order to claim the cost of mileage in the person’s annual return to the IRD.

Public transport and taxis

30.  Members are expected to use either their personal vehicle or the cheapest form of public transport for undertaking Council business.

31.  A member who uses buses or trains in order to undertake Council business, including travel between home and meetings, may submit receipts for reimbursement.

32.  A member wishing to use a taxi to undertake Council business must obtain prior approval from the Council staff support for that meeting, who will issue a taxi voucher or approve the member lodging a claim for the expense.

Parking

33.  Members will be reimbursed for personal costs of parking in order to undertake Council business.  The method of reimbursement will be arranged by Democracy Services. 

Meals

34.  All meals associated with meetings of groups and hearings panels, will be provided by Democracy Services and will not be a personal cost to members.  A member intending to claim for the cost of a meal should receive prior approval from the Council staff support for that meeting.

Other costs

35.  All other personal expenditure arising from undertaking Council business will be reimbursed in accordance with the principles.

 

 


APPENDIX A - Assessment criteria

Skills, knowledge and experience required of members

Skills, knowledge and experience will vary between members on a particular body. The score below should reflect the level of skill required by the majority of members, and should not be based on any particular individual. This factor has a higher weighting than others, to reflect that it is the application of the skills, knowledge and experience in carrying out their responsibilities that is a major contributor to the successful operation of the committee or body.

 

 

Definition

Score

Pre–eminent

Outstanding and authoritative knowledge, recognised nationally and internationally for expertise in a particular field.

12

Distinguished

Deep and broad knowledge in a specific area or as a leader. Widely respected as a subject matter expert or authority in their field.

10

Substantive

Substantial range of knowledge and experience in a field or professional discipline sometimes associated with senior level functional or technical leadership, executive management or governance roles. May include widely respected people with broad community support.

8

Technical

A number of years experience in a technical, professional field or in a leadership role is a pre-requisite.

6

Specialised experience

No specific experience is required but members would have broad general knowledge and may represent a body of opinion.

4

 

Function, level and scope of authority

 

 

Definition

Score

Strategic decisions

Sets policy or work programme for a major area of economic activity or policy area of importance to the Council’s strategic priorities.

6

Policy decisions

Sets policy or work programme and/or exercises regulatory/disciplinary powers.

5

Expert advice

Provides expert counsel and advice to the Mayor, Governing Body or local boards on technical or policy issues that are of strategic importance. At this level the body would be expected to be proactive in identifying emerging issues and contributing to policy direction.

4

Professionally targeted

Exercises regulatory/disciplinary powers at the individual/professional level. This will include the power to impose sanctions.

3

Technical

Provides a broad range of advice on technical and/or policy issues.

2

Ad hoc

Provides ad hoc advice on minor matters. Generally a limited focus at a single output level.

1

 


 

Complexity of issues

 

 

Definition

Score

Innovative

The development of new concepts is required to find innovative and pathfinding solutions. There will be little or no external guidance (NZ or internationally) to aid resolution of these issues.

5

Constructive

The development of new policy or advice is required where the issues are complex, multidimensional and involve substantial research, consideration of possible alternatives and their consequences. The body may commission research or utilise the findings to inform their policy development or advice.

4

Evaluative

Issues will include circumstances, facts and concepts different to those that have been experienced in the past. Analytical thinking and evaluative judgement will be required to identify realistic alternatives and apply/recommend a solution.

3

Judgement

Solutions will be found from application of professional or personal judgement and generally guided by previous decisions. Circumstances may be different from those previously experienced but there will be a sufficient frame of reference to make a considered decision/recommendation.

2

Operational

Issues to be resolved are generally within existing policy and prior decisions. Decisions can generally be made quickly and with reasonable certainty.

1

 

Public interest and profile

 

 

Definition

Score

Widespread

Widespread public interest in outcomes would be expected. Members will attract strong media interest. Potential risk to personal and/or the body’s reputation is high.

5

Strong

Strong public and stakeholder interest and importance would be associated with these issues. Media interest would also be expected, but potential risk to personal or the body’s reputation is unlikely.

4

Moderate

Moderate but widespread public interest is likely. Reputational risk is minimal.

3

Limited

Public interest is likely to be limited, but the issues would be of interest to other members of the particular profession or sector.

2

Little

There is likely to be little or no wider public interest in the decisions.

1

 


 

Fee levels

 

Total score

Level

Fees range - Chair

Fees range - members

24 – 28

1

$500 - $1,062

$375 - $800

20 – 23

2

$360 - $818

$270 - $518

15 – 19

3

$260 - $530

$190 - $364

10 – 14

4

$230 - $336

$175 - $252

9 or less

5

$190 - $245

$140 - $190

 

Notes

Fees are daily rates.

Fees are as set out in the Cabinet Office Circular CO (12)6, dated 19 December 2012, for Group 4 bodies.

 

 


 

APPENDIX B – Determination of fees

 

Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples, Senior, Disability Advisory Panels

 

Skills, Knowledge & Experience

The panels include widely respected community leaders in their various communities of interest. 

8

Function, Level & Scope

The panels provide advice on a range of policy matters that are relevant to the communities they represent.

2 – 4

Complexity of Issues

Analytical thinking and evaluative judgement are required to consider alternatives and make recommendations.

3

Public Interest and Profile

There is widespread public interest in their work and reputational risk is moderate to high. 

3 – 4

TOTAL

 

16 - 19

 

Equivalent daily rates

                               

Remuneration level

Chair

Member

3

$260 - $530

$190 - $364

 

Fees for these panels will be based on the maximum daily rates for this level ($530 for chair and $364 for member).    The daily rate constitutes 8 hours.  A meeting fee is calculated by applying the equivalent hourly rate to the average length of a meeting, including preparation time.

 

Meeting fees

 

Meeting fee

Proposed

Previous term

Member

(based on 5.5 hours per meeting including preparation)

$250

$235

Chair

(based on 8 hours per meeting including preparation)

$530

$235 per meeting or $7,000 pa[1]

 

Where meetings are regular and can be forecast, it may be possible to convert the meeting fee into an annual fee.   Whether panel members are paid a meeting fee or annual fee will be assessed by the Manager Democracy Services, taking into account the frequency of meetings and likely regularity of attendances. 

 

Where a deputy chair is appointed to share the workload of the chairperson throughout the term, he or she will receive a payment that is 25% higher than that of a member.

 


 

Youth Advisory Panel

 

This panel consists of members from the youth community. The purpose of the panel is to not only advise the Council of youth issues but to provide a learning experience for the members.

 

Skills, Knowledge & Experience

No specific experience is required but members would have broad general knowledge and may represent a body of opinion. 

4

Function, Level & Scope

Provide advice on a range of policy matters that are relevant to the communities they represent.

2

Complexity of Issues

Analytical thinking and evaluative judgement are required to consider alternatives and make recommendations.

2 - 3

Public Interest and Profile

Public interest is likely to be limited, but the issues would be of interest to other members of the youth community

2

TOTAL

 

10 - 11

 

Equivalent daily rates

                               

Remuneration level

Chair

Member

4

$230 - $336

$175 - $252

 

Fees will be based on the maximum daily rates for this level ($336 for chair and $252 for member).  The daily rate constitutes 8 hours.  A meeting fee is calculated by applying the equivalent hourly rate to the average length of a meeting, including preparation time.

 

Meeting fees

 

Meeting fee

Proposed

Previous term

Member

(based on 5.5 hours per meeting including preparation)

$173

Nil

Chair

(based on 8 hours per meeting including preparation)

$336

Nil

 

Where meetings are regular and can be forecast, it may be possible to convert the meeting fee into an annual fee.   Whether panel members are paid a meeting fee or annual fee will be assessed by the Manager Democracy Services, taking into account the frequency of meetings and likely regularity of attendances. 

 

Where a deputy chair is appointed to share the workload of the chairperson throughout the term, he or she will receive a payment that is 25% higher than that of a member.

 

Other panels

 

Panels are established from time to time for various purposes.   The Manager Democracy Services will determine fees to be paid that are consistent with this Framework.

Additional work

Where work is undertaken with prior approval and a meeting fee is not appropriate in the circumstances, the Manager Democracy Services may determine payment on an hourly rate based on the daily rate, subject to the terms of reference for the panel as agreed with the Council (refer  paragraph 14 above).


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

DRAFT Code of Conduct for members appointed to Advisory Panels

[to be considered by the Finance and Performance Committee on  22 May 2014]

1    Purpose

The Code of Conduct sets out expectations for the general conduct of members of Auckland Council advisory panels.

2    Principles

The principles underlying the expected conduct of members include:

2.1    Honesty and Integrity

Members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity at all times.

2.2    Impartiality and Accountability

Members should consider issues on their merits, taking into account the views of others.  This means co-operating fully and honestly to ensure the best advice is provided to the Council.

2.3    Openness

Members should be as open as possible about their actions and advice.  This includes having an open mind and a willingness to listen to differing points of view.  This means giving reasons for advice given; communicating clearly; not being close minded and taking personal ownership of comments made publicly.

2.4    Respect

Members should treat others, including staff, with respect at all times.  This means not using derogatory terms towards others, or about others, including in public-facing new media; not misrepresenting the statements or actions of others (whether they be other individual members, the Governing Body, Local Boards, committees or staff); observing the rights of other people; treating people with courtesy, and recognising the different roles others play in local government decision-making. 

2.5    Duty to Uphold the Law

Members should uphold the law and, on all occasions, act in accordance with the trust the public places in them.

2.6    Stewardship

Members should ensure that they and the Council use resources prudently and for lawful purposes.

2.7    Leadership

Members should promote and support these principles by example.

3    Relationships

3.1    Chairperson

The chairperson is the presiding member at meetings and is the spokesperson for the Panel.

3.2    All members

Members will conduct their dealings with each other in ways that:

·    maintain public confidence in the office to which they have been appointed

·    are open and honest

·    focus on issues rather than personalities.

3.3    Employees of Auckland Council

Members will:

·    recognise that employees of the Auckland Council or any other organisation providing advice or services to the Panel, are subject to employment  relationships and may only be hired, dismissed, instructed or censured by their respective employer

·    not do anything which compromises, or could be seen as compromising, the impartiality of an employee

·    avoid publicly criticising any employee in any way

·    raise concerns about an employee only through the employee’s employer.

 

4    Media

4.1    Spokesperson

The Chairperson is the first point of contact for the official view of the Panel on any issue. Where the Chairperson is absent, any matters will be referred to the Deputy Chairperson.

No other member may comment on behalf of the Panel without having first obtained the approval of the Chairperson.


 

4.2    Personal views

Members are free to express a personal view in public or in the media, at any time. When doing so, they should observe the following:

·    comments must make clear that they represent a personal view and must not state or imply that they represent the views of the Panel

·    where a member is making a statement that is contrary to a Panel policy, the member must not state or imply that his or her statements represent a majority view

·    comments  to the media must observe the other expectations of general conduct, e.g. not disclose confidential information, or compromise the impartiality or integrity of staff.

5    Confidential information

If members receive information that is confidential they must ensure it remains confidential. Confidential information is normally deemed to be such because its public release will cause some harm, either to the Council or to other parties. 

6    Ethics

Members will:

·    claim only for legitimate expenses

·    not influence, or attempt to influence, any officer or employee to take actions that may benefit the member, or the member’s family or business interests

·    not use the resources of the Panel for personal business

·    not solicit, demand, or request any gift, reward or benefit by virtue of the member’s position.

7    Members’ interests

7.1    Acting in the interests of the advisory panel and the public

Members act in the interests of the advisory panel and not in their own interests.

A financial conflict of interest arises when a member stands to benefit financially, either directly or indirectly,  from  advice given by the Panel.

A non-financial conflict may arise from a personal relationship or association with another organisation or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.  In these situations a member may be influenced by interests that conflict with the duty to act in the best interests of the Panel.

Members must declare any private interests or personal benefits relating to their public duties and take steps to resolve any conflicts of interest in such a way that protects the public interest.  This means fully disclosing actual or potential conflicts of interest; avoiding any financial or other obligation to any individual or organisation that might reasonably be thought to influence them in the performance of their duties.

8    Complaints

A complaint about a member’s conduct will be made to the chairperson of the Panel in the first instance, who will counsel the member concerned.   Alternatively, concerns about the conduct of any member or chairperson may be raised with the Democracy Services Manager, who will give advice on options available to resolve the concerns.


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

Disposal Recommendation Report

 

File No.: CP2014/09560

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks approval to sell seven non-service council owned properties that Auckland Council Property Limited (“ACPL”) consider suitable for sale.

Executive summary

2.       ACPL is required to identify properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale to a combined value of $12.3 million by 30 June 2014.  ACPL and Auckland Council Property Department (“ACPD”) work collaboratively on the comprehensive review process to identify such properties. 

3.       Capital receipts from the sale of the surplus properties will contribute to all Auckland Plan outcomes by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects. 

4.       The seven properties outlined in this report have a cumulative rating value of $1.8 million.  These relate to the $12.3 target.  These properties have been through the agreed consultative process including organisation wide internal officer consultation, local board and Iwi engagement.  The feedback has been supportive of the proposed disposal of the sites.

5.       A detailed overview of the rationalisation process undertaken for these properties is outlined in the Comments, Local Board Views and Implications and Maori Impact Statement sections of this report. Site specific detail, including information and feedback gathered through the rationalisation process, is contained herein under the respective property attachment.

 

Recommendations

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      agree that subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes, the Finance and Performance Committee approves the disposal of the land at:

i)        14 Sandstone Road, Whitford comprised of an estate in fee simple, containing 35,675m2 more or less being Lot 1 DP 64475 contained in certificate of title CFR NA24C/382;

ii)       Paerata Road, more or less being Part Allotment 79, Parish of Karaka, Pukekohe comprised of an estate in fee simple, containing 5691m2 (limited as to parcels) contained in certificate of title NA767/242;

iii)      42 Bancroft Crescent, Glendene comprised of an estate in fee simple containing 4740m2 more or less being Part Lot 8 DP 75336 and Lot 9 DP 75336 contained in certificates of title NA90D/745 (Part Lot 8) and NA32A/89 (Lot 9);

iv)      660 New North Road, St Lukes comprised of an estate in fee simple containing 81m2 (limited as to parcels) more or less being part allotment 170 Section 10 Suburbs of Auckland contained in certificate of title CFR 589/319 and 23m2 (limited as to parcels) more or less being part of Lot 16 of a subdivision of part of Allotment 170 of Section 10 of the Suburbs of Auckland contained in certificate of title CFR 561/272;

v)      40 Queen Street, Papakura comprised of an estate in fee simple subject to a perpetually renewable Glasgow lease containing 944m2 more or less being Lot 5 Deposited Plan 16908 contained in certificate of title NA15C/740;

vi)      24 King Edward Avenue, Papakura comprised of an estate in fee simple subject to a perpetually renewable Glasgow lease containing 1012m2 more or less being Lot 97 Block XI Village of Papakura contained in certificate of title NA15C/740; and

vii)     75 Waimahia Avenue, Weymouth comprised of an estate in fee simple containing 368m2 more or less being Lot 1 Deposited Plan 309933 contained in certificate of title CFR 39153;

b)   approve the final terms and conditions under the appropriate delegations.

 

Comments

 

6.       ACPL and ACPD work collaboratively on a comprehensive review process to identify properties in the council portfolio that may be suitable to sell.  Once identified as a potential sale candidate ACPL takes the property through a multi stage engagement process. 

7.       The first phase of the process involves engagement with council departments and relevant CCO’s.  The engagement establishes whether a property is needed for a future funded project or whether it must be retained for some clear strategic purpose.  This is determined by an Expression of Interest (“EOI”) process whereby officers can request that all or part of a property is retained.  Alternatively officers may request that the property be encumbered or covenanted as part of the disposal process.  If the EOI sets out a robust financial analysis and evidence based rationale to retain the properties, then the EOI is endorsed.  If however the reasoning is more subjective a thorough business case is required.  An inter-disciplinary council and ACPL steering group comprised of senior managers, called the Property Review Steering Group (“PRSG”) meets on a monthly basis to assess the business cases.  The PRSG provides an opportunity for properties to be considered in a cohesive and integrated manner by relevant council departments and CCO’s.

8.       The Heritage Unit is also invited prior to the EOI process to flag any particular archaeological merit that need to be assessed further.  ACPL also proactively researches any possible contamination flags that may be associated with a property during the process. 

9.       The EOI process provides the Maori and Strategy Relations team the opportunity to flag any issue that is of particular relevance to Maori in connection with the potential disposal of a site. 

10.     Once a property has been cleared of any service requirements, ACPL then consults with Local Boards, Ward Councillors, Mana Whenua and the Independent Maori Statutory Board.

11.     ACPL encourages feedback by the specified due date, to enable us to compile details and act on feedback in a timely manner.  However late submissions will always be accepted and their requests followed through.  Late feedback will be incorporated into the disposal recommendation report at any time right up until the report’s closing date.

12.     All sale recommendations must be approved by the ACPL Board before it makes the final recommendation to the Strategy and Finance Committee.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     Local Boards are informed of the commencement of the rationalisation process for specific properties.  Following the close of the EOI period, relevant Local Boards are engaged with.  ACPL attend a workshop with the relevant Local Board and provide information about properties being rationalised in their local board area.  Local Boards may then request that ACPL prepare a report for their business meeting so that their views can be formalised.

14.     If a Local Board wishes to retain a site, its’ views are considered by ACPL and if necessary referred to relevant council departments for consideration.  If the rationale for retaining a site is subjective, or is not initially supported by a council department, the Local Board is asked to prepare a business case which sets out the service need that will be met by retaining the site, along with a robust financial analysis and budget for retention. 

15.     ACPL and relevant council departments or CCOs work with Local Boards in preparing the business case.  The business case is then considered by the PRSG.  If the PRSG accepts the business case, the property is transferred back to the service portfolio.  If the PRSG does not accept the business case, the business case is included in the report to the Finance & Performance Committee for a political decision.

16.     The views of the relevant Local Board are contained in the respective property attachments.

Maori impact statement

17.     The importance of effective communication and engagement with Maori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed a robust form of engagement with Mana Whenua groups across the region.  Each relevant mana whenua group is contacted independently by email based on a contact list which is regularly updated.  Each group is provided general property details, including a property map, and requested to give feedback within 15 working days.  Contacts are sent reminder notices a week out from the due date, and alerted of the passing of the due date in the week following if no feedback has been submitted.  Confirmation of any interest expressed is sent in writing and recorded for inclusion in the disposal recommendation report.  A feedback spreadsheet is provided to facilitate responses.  Any requests for extensions of a due date are handled on a case by case basis.

18.     ACPL’s engagement directs mana whenua to respond with any issues of particular cultural significance the group would like to formally express in relation to the subject properties.  We also request express notes regarding any preferred outcomes that the group would like us to consider as part of any disposal process. 

19.     From discussions with our Maori and Strategy Relations team we are developing an understanding of what could amount to a ‘matter of significant cultural relevance’ to Iwi.  We are also developing a range of reasonable outcomes that could be employed when such a matter of cultural significance is raised in relation to a potential disposal property.  Possible outcomes could include commemoration or physical acknowledgment in the form of plaques or other mutually agreed means of recognition.  In the event of any issues of particular cultural significance being raised, ACPL will work with the relevant council departments to assess the merits of any such requests and keeps the interested parties informed along the way. 

20.     Mana whenua groups are also invited to express potential commercial interest in any sites and are put in contact with ACPL’s Development team for preliminary discussions if appropriate to the property.  This facilitates the groups’ early assessment of the merits of a development opportunity to their iwi.  In the event a property is approved for sale all groups are alerted of the decision, and all groups are alerted once a property comes on the market.

21.     Lastly a report is presented to the Independent Maori Statutory Board ahead of presenting any recommendations to sell to the Strategy and Finance Committee detailing how Maori have been engaged throughout the process.

Implementation

22.     As part of the overall review process each property is also legally assessed to see if there are any impediments to sell or if there is a prescribed legal way in which it must be sold.  The last stage of the process is triggered once a resolution to sell is obtained.  This involves a robust ‘add value’ assessment as part of the development of the final sales strategy.  There is specific attention applied to the possible suitability of the site for housing purposes.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

14 Sandstone Road, Whitford property information

33

bView

Paerata Road, Part Allotment 79, Parish of Karaka, Pukekohe

37

cView

42 Bancroft Crescent, Glendene

41

dView

660 New North Road, St Lukes

45

eView

40 Queen Street, Papakura

49

fView

24 King Edward Avenue, Papakura

53

gView

75 Waimahia Avenue, Weymouth

57

     

Signatories

Authors

Letitia McColl, Senior Engagement Advisor, Portfolio Review, Auckland Council Property Limited

Authorisers

 

David Rankin, Chief Executive, Auckland Council Property Limited

Ian Wheeler, Manager Property, Auckland Council Property Department

Andrew McKenzie, Chief Financial Officer, Auckland Council

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 




Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

Auckland Council group results for the nine months to 31 March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/09142

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report discloses the financial performance of the Group for the nine months to 31 March 2014.

Executive summary

2.       This report is part of the regular quarterly reporting to the Finance and Performance Committee on the Council’s Group financial performance for the year to date.

3.       The Council Controlled Organisations report their individual performance to the CCO Governance and Monitoring Committee.

 

Recommendation

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      receive the report.

 

Comments

 

4.       This report is not formally released to meet any other external reporting requirements, and so is simply for internal disclosure on the performance of the group.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

5.       This report is for the Council Group.  Local Boards receive reports specific to their area.

Maori impact statement

6.       The report is limited to financial performance.  Council’s contributions to Maori outcomes will be reported in the annual report.

Implementation

7.       There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Council Group Financial Report 31 March 2014

63

     

Signatories

Authors

Robert Nelson - Financial Controller

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - Manager Finance, Auckland CFO

Andrew McKenzie - Chief Finance Officer

 


Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 







Finance and Performance Committee

22 May 2014

 

Auckland Council performance report for the period 1 July 2013 to 31 March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/09229

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Auckland Council parent performance results for the period 1 July 2013 to 31 March 2014.

Executive summary

2.       This report focuses on the highlights and achievements of the Auckland council parent in the key areas to achieve organisational objectives.

3.       The financial overview provides an indication of how the organisation is performing against the budget and associated financial risks.

 

Recommendations

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      note the performance report for the nine months ended 31 March 2014, highlighting:

i.        Net favourable operating surplus variance to budget of $55 million.

ii.       Capital expenditure of $322 million.

b)      note the following highlights and achievements :

i.        The Retrofit Your Home programme is approaching the $7 million assistance granted mark and requests for assistance are increasing as we move into winter.

ii.       A Seaweek Activity Hub event was run in collaboration with DoC, Auckland University and Sustainable Coastlines, at Silo Park on Sunday 2 March.  The event was well attended and raised awareness of marine biodiversity, with a specific focus on threatened species such as the Little Blue Penguin.

iii.      Devonport Wharf Boardwalk and Marine Square Upgrade - sod turning/blessing on 14 February.  Contractors are onsite for a twelve month construction programme.

iv.      Submissions period for Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, with significant collateral, advertising and media/social media engagement to support and encourage submissions. During March submissions on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan were processed and collated. 8,900+ submissions have been registered, with the final number to be confirmed late April.

v.       Auckland Counts interactive census website is now accessible online. The site has census information specifically for Auckland at local board and Census Area Unit level. It provides interactive mapping, graphing and data export functions.

vi.      “Dare to Explore” Summer Reading Adventure launched on 9 December and ran for six weeks, ending on 19 January 2014. The programme offered children a range of fun and discovery activities to keep them reading and learning over summer. Over 8400 children aged 5 - 13 participated, including 1,215 new library members.

vii.     Lunar New Year - the Year of the Horse was celebrated with over 80 events across the library network and 1,557 participants. Korean activities were also featured, in addition to the traditional Chinese events.

viii.    Libraries added two new eBook platforms just prior to Christmas.  The marketing campaign ‘Wherever you go take the Library with you’ has been particularly successful, with 49,322 eBooks borrowed during January 2014, compared to 16,479 in January 2013.

ix.      Waitawa Regional Park, near Kawakawa Bay, was officially opened.

x.       Music in Parks: over the 11-week season 76 bands played in 35 concerts, attracting 30,630 people to enjoy a wide range of Auckland parks from Maraetai to Warkworth. A very well attended combined movie and music event was delivered at Papakura and a crowd in excess of 1,500 went to watch Gravity at the Auckland Regional Botanic Gardens in Manurewa.

xi.      Lopdell House: a blessing and ribbon-cutting event, followed by a public open day, was held on Saturday 1 March to celebrate the completion of the refurbishment. Around 80 people attended the ceremony and over 1,200 visitors welcomed throughout the day.

xii.     Long Term Plan scene-setting workshops held for staff and elected members.

xiii.    Treasury won in the mtn-i 2013 Global & European Awards as a Global Landmark Deal for the Norwegian Bond issue in September. The Norwegian deal was also voted as Nordic Currency Bond Deal of the Year in the EuroWeek 2013 Awards.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       This report provides an overview of the Auckland Council parent performance results for the period 1 July 2013 to 31 March 2014.

5.       This report presented here is for the Auckland Council parent, not the group. A separate report of the group financial results is presented to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.       Local Boards receive their own reporting for their respective areas.

Maori impact statement

7.       The report details some high level activities delivered in the third quarter of 2013/2014, of which there are several initiatives with positive impacts on, or for, Māori. While this is not a complete list, key activities with positive impacts on or for Māori include:

·    Economic development.  The Papakura Māori Economic Development programme gained approval from the local board and businesses.  It is agreed to set up a Māori Enterprise Association to drive actions and initiatives including a business skills programme, business mentoring, youth internships, networking, showcase of Māori business success, and marketing and publicity.

·    Valuing Te Ao Maori in our workplace strategy.  The 135 Albert Street refit has adopted bi-lingual signage throughout and Te Ao Māori incorporated in to design fit out.

·    Engaging with Maori.  Hui held with mana whenua prior to the close of submissions on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP). This was the last in a series of governance and technical hui held during the preparation and submissions phases of the PAUP. Attendance from mana whenua was high and overall feedback positive.

·    Input into decision making.  A new project to support Māori to contribute to local board decision making. Participants include Te Waka Angamua, IMSB secretariat, Local Board support staff and elected members and an agreed mana whenua and mataawaka focus group. Local Boards involved include Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa, and Papakura. The intended outcome of the ‘Local Board Māori Responsiveness’ project is to provide:

I.       good practice models for mana whenua and mataawaka to participate in Local Board decision making;

II.      a practical way of working to find solutions to local issues by applying the Māori  Responsiveness Framework and Māori world view.

·    Community outcomes.  CDAC Staff contributed to an Auckland Regional Hui: Connecting Education and Communities. It was about engaging with parents, whanau and communities through hubs, with a focus on children’s learning and achievement. Auckland Council collaborated on the hui with JR McKenzie Trust, Inspiring Communities, Family and Community Services, Families Commission, Auckland Communities Foundation, and COMET.

8.       In addition to above, the report details progress with the Treaty Audit Response Programme and delivery of Māori outcomes across Council (Appendix  E). These programmes are intended to transform the council's approach when responding to and providing services to Māori and form part of wider activities intended to lift council's overall responsiveness to Māori.

Implementation

9.       There are no financial or resourcing implications arising from receipt of this report.

10.     Quarterly reporting on performance is not a legal requirement and there are no legislative implications from the receipt of this request.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Performance Report March 2014 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Livschitz - Manager Corporate Performance and Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - Manager Finance, Auckland CFO

Andrew McKenzie - Chief Finance Officer

     

    



[1] Panel chairs received the members’ meeting fee except for the chairpersons of the former Ethnic and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels who received annual fees of $7,000.