I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 May 2014

3.30pm

Council Chamber
Henderson Civic Centre
6 Henderson Valley Road
Henderson

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Shane Henderson

 

Members

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Peter Chan, JP

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Will Flavell

 

 

Tracy Kirkley

 

 

Luke Wilson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

 

Busola Martins

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

9 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 839 3514

Email: busola.martins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

8          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

9          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Auckland Transport Update Report – Henderson-Massey Local Board                7

13        Review of Sturges West Learning Centre                                                                19

14        Waitemata Sports Club Community Loan                                                                21

15        Bylaw review programme update - April 2014                                                         73

16        Smoke-free Policy Implementation                                                                            91

17        Henderson Implementation Framework – To be tabled at the meeting

18        Utility Box Painting Programme - To be tabled at the meeting

19        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                         97

20        Chair's report                                                                                                             109  

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

BOARD MEMBER

ORGANISATION

POSITION

Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chairman)

Ranui Sector Trial

Chair

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chairman)

Waitakere Community Law Service
Ranui Action Project

Employee
Co-Chairman

Brenda Brady, JP

Keep Waitakere Beautiful
Safer West Community Trust
Sunnyvale Residents & Ratepayers Society Inc.
West Auckland Historical Society
District Licensing Committee

Trustee
Trustee
Member
Member
Member

 Peter Chan, JP

Cantonese Opera Society of NZ
Asian Leaders Forum
NZ-Hong Kong Business Ass.
NZ-China Business Ass.
Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

Member
Member
Member
Member
Advisor

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Westgate Pharmacy
West Auckland Hospice
NorSGA Properties
Westgate Pharmacy Ltd
The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd Rodney Local Board
Waitemata District Health Board
Waitakere Licensing Trust
Massey Matters Inc.
Massey Birdwood Settlers Ass.
Taupaki Residents & Ratepayers Ass.

Contractor
Trustee
Director
Director
Director
Elected Member
Elected Member
Elected Member
Member
Member
Member

Will Flavell

Rutherford College

Employee

Tracy Kirkley

District Licensing Committee

Heart of Te Atatu South         

Member

Member

Luke Wilson

NZ Police - Massey Community Constable
D.A.R.E. West

Employee
Member

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         Confirms the  minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 1 May 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Item withdrawn

 

8          Item withdrawn

 

9          Item withdrawn

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report – Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/05551

 

  

 

Purpose

The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport’s activities in their Board area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Report.

 

 

Discussion

INFORMATION REPORTS

 

THANKS AUCKLAND - YOU’RE ONE IN 11 MILLION

1.   Aucklanders are getting on board with trains in record numbers – making a record 11 million trips in the past year.

 

2.   This milestone comes just weeks before Auckland’s new electric trains are introduced and is the highest number of passengers ever on the current rail network.

 

3.   Auckland Transport Chairman Dr Lester Levy says Aucklanders are using public transport more than ever as improvements to services make it a more attractive option. “We are now seeing 5,000 additional passenger journeys each business day compared to a year ago. People are responding to initial improvements such as integrated ticketing, better on-time performance and improved facilities like the new transport hub at Panmure and there’s a lot more to come.”

 

4.   When Britomart Transport Centre opened in 2003, just 2.5 million trips were made on trains.

 

5.   Auckland Mayor Len Brown says the milestone is very welcome.

 

6.   "One thing is certain with regard to public transport in Auckland. If you build it people will use it. I am confident that now integrated ticketing is in place and as our new electric trains go into service; this won't be the last patronage record we will break.

 

7.   The implementation of the New Network and the City Rail Link will also boost numbers."

 

8.   Transdev operates the trains for Auckland Transport. It says it is pleased to see that its major focus on performance over the past 12 months is translating to improved patronage.

 

9.   Transdev Managing Director Terry Scott says “We are working hard with our partners at Auckland Transport and KiwiRail to improve network performance and we are striving every day to achieve excellence in the customer experience.”

 

10. Dr Levy says “the upward trend in numbers is pleasing given that during the past year rail services have been regularly disrupted due to electrification works on the network. “We are making strides with an ageing fleet of diesel trains which are now 60 years old, just imagine what we will do with new trains.”

 

 

 

AT PARKING STRATEGY WORKSHOP

11. Parking impacts on every Aucklander in one way or another, every single day, whether it is parking outside your house, dodging a car parked on a traffic lane on the way home, or trying to find a parking space in the city or a town centre.  As our city grows and develops, there are a number of parking issues – small, medium and large – facing the region which need solutions now.  

 

12. Auckland Transport has developed a set of principles to serve as the basis of a parking strategy, and will be discussed this with Elected Members in early/mid-May, prior to engaging with the wider public across the region in early June. Auckland Transport wants to find the best solutions and outcomes for the city, together.

 

13. The two key drivers for this can be found in the transformational shifts outlined in Council’s Auckland Plan. Both these drivers potentially have significant impacts on how and where Auckland Transport provides parking:

·    A move to outstanding public transport within one network;

·    To radically improve the quality of urban living

 

14. To support the economic development of the Auckland city centre and its metropolitan and town centres while implementing these transformational shifts, Auckland Transport needs to

·    Give priority to the safe and efficient movement of people, services and goods on the road network

·    Provide an outstanding customer experience at AT-operated on- and off-street parking facilities

·    Support place-making, amenity and good urban design outcomes

·    Ensure a fiscally responsible approach to providing, managing and pricing parking facilities, and to ensure that benefits cover costs

·    Prioritise the management of kerbside parking space in recognition of the importance of the public interest

 

15. Auckland Transport is using the “cluster workshop” model to engage with as many Elected Members as possible, both Councillors and Local Board Members. There are three workshops across the region.

 

 

AUCKLAND TRANSPORT’S LOCAL BOARD ENGAGEMENT PLAN

16. Attached to the information report is a draft revision of Auckland Transport’s Local Board Engagement Plan. Some Elected Members may recall that Auckland Transport produced the current version in 2011. This version of the engagement plan is similar in philosophy to the 2011 plan, but has been reworked.  There are three new Annexes, though, which need some explanation:

 

·    Annex 1 is the current work programme for your Local Board area – this was distributed shortly before the end of the last term, and Auckland Transport plan to revise and distribute it again early in the new financial year (probably around August) to reflect the budget decisions taken in June. This will give advance warning of the projects on which some level of engagement will be likely.

 

·    Annex 2 is the current listing of advocacy issues for the Local Board, on which AT reports via our Quarterly Reports to Local Boards. It’s included as a reminder of the Board’s aspirations against which Auckland Transport are regularly reporting.

 

·    Annex 3 is a listing of all the kinds of projects that Auckland Transport might want to undertake in a typical Local Board area, with detailed guidelines as to how and with whom Auckland Transport might engage on each. Auckland Transport is aware that not all Local Board’s operate in the same way, and that communities’ expectations of them and AT in terms of engagement also vary widely across the region. Rather than imposing a “one-size-fits-all” approach, Auckland Transport is open to Local Boards and community organisations suggesting for any of these project types how they would like to be engaged with.

 

17. Auckland Transport is therefore especially interested in the Board’s comments on Annex 3, as it may apply to the Henderson/Massey Local Board area. Specifically, for each of the categories of project listed:

 

18. Is Auckland Transport proposing to deal with the “right” people for this project class? For example, is Auckland Transport proposing to liaise with the TPL in a situation where the whole Board wants visibility over the issue? Or, conversely, is Auckland Transport proposing to bring a project to the whole Board, when the TPL has been delegated by the Board to act on its behalf?

 

19. Is Auckland Transport proposing to “consult” the Board on a matter that it only requires to be “informed” about? Or vice versa?

 

20. Are there “notes” which should be added to clarify any aspect of Auckland Transport proposed engagement on a project? Broadly, Annex 3 as presented reflects the “status quo” for how AT operates in most Local Board areas.

 

21. If, however, a local board has a particular interest in a class of project, then it may be possible to “beef up” Auckland Transport’s engagement on this to meet the Board’s aspirations. Likewise, if a Board has little interest in engaging over a class of project, then AT doesn’t want to waste resources by engaging unnecessarily.

 

22. Proposed engagement on projects with community organisations is also outlined in this Annex. Auckland Transport understands that some Local Boards are happy to be the conduit for feedback from community organisations within their areas, but knows that other Local Boards are unwilling to take on this role. It would be useful for each local board to clarify how it sees this engagement occurring in the case of its own local board area. To ensure that community engagement is undertaken consistently, whether the responsibility lies with the Local Board or Auckland Transport, it needs to be clearly identified which community organisations have an interest in which suburbs within your Local Board area. Auckland Transport purposes that the organisations should “self-nominate” the suburbs that they have an interest in rather than this being prescribed by others.

 

23. Auckland Transport is willing to consider all feedback in good faith, and to make adjustments to their processes where AT can reasonably do so. Ultimately, however, it will remain Auckland Transport’s decision as to the level of engagement that it can commit to, not least if the staff requirements or costs of the engagement proposed are out of proportion to the scale of the project.

 

24. Notwithstanding these are strictly guidelines and that there may be reasons for any given project why Auckland Transport decides to deviate from them. In these circumstances, Auckland Transport would, however, advise the Local Board of the reasons for our decision, and be open to further discussion if the Local Board felt that its approach was unreasonable.

 

25. Local BoardYour feedback is welcomed on the the body of the Engagement Plan and on Annex 3.

 

 

RESPONSES AND PROGRESS REPORTS  

 

TAIKATA ROAD CROSSING REQUEST

26. A request for Auckland Transport to look at the safety issues when crossing Taikata Road and what options are available to mitigate the safety concerns.

 

Response

27. Auckland Transport has visited Taikata Road to understand the feedback provided and also review the feasibility of installing a pedestrian crossing facility. Auckland Transports acknowledges that Taikata Road may be a difficult road to cross especially for children, due to the high number of vehicles travelling along this road.

 

28. It is noted that there are existing alternative options, though in order to use these, the journey becomes longer and requires pedestrians to cross more roads and driveways along the way.

 

29. Outside number 78 Taikata Road Auckland Transport found that the number of people currently crossing the road was relatively low. However, the observation did show a small number of pedestrians and cyclists crossing here and it is believed that there would be benefit for the wider community if access to the park was improved. Therefore Auckland Transport proposes  that a pedestrian refuge island (centre crossing) should be constructed at this location as part of the Minor Improvements Programme.

 

30. A number of projects are already awaiting prioritisation and delivery as part of this programme. The process of prioritisation starts with Auckland Transport collating all proposed projects before ranking them based on their safety and operational issues. Once funding has been provided each financial year the projects will be prioritised which will be completed within the available resources and funding.

 

31. It is important to recognise that due to the low numbers of pedestrians currently crossing outside Te Atatu Park the priority of this proposal is also quite low, when compared to other projects on the Minor Improvements Programme list and Auckland Transport therefore cannot provide a timeframe for implementation of the proposed refuge island. In the meantime AT suggests the use of the available crossing points in the vicinity of Yeovil Road and the patrolled crossing near Matipo Road is the crossing point.

 

DUST NUISANCE SWANSON ROAD

32. A request for Auckland Transport to look at the dust nuisance between 598 and 622 Swanson Road, Swanson.

 

Response

33. Auckland Transport has investigated the issue.  Auckland Transport has sealed the lay-by on Swanson Road which will mitigate the dust nuisance.

 

SUMMERLAND DRIVE ROADING ISSUES

34. A request for Auckland Transport to look at the speeding issues and the increase of heavy vehicles on Summerland Drive, Western Heights

Response

35. Upon Auckland Transport receiving this request it has undertaken an assessment of this area.   Summerland Drive is a scheduled bus route as well as a Collector Road and this type of road has to cater for greater volumes of traffic, including heavy vehicles, than a local road.

 

36. Installing speed humps would affect the capacity and level of service on this route and cause discomfort for bus passengers, and result in on-going maintenance costs due to the high stress the speed bumps would endure. Speed humps located on this type of road would also result in a significant increase in noise and vibrations, particularly when heavy vehicles navigate them. Therefore speed humps are not appropriate for Summerland Drive.

 

37. However, Auckland Transport notes that there are already some other speed calming measures installed on Summerland Drive such as median traffic islands at a few locations, a roundabout at the Harvest Drive intersection, a speed advisory sign near Waterstone Way, bend warning advisory signage, road markings to narrow down traffic lanes and a 40km/h school zone; which all help in reducing vehicle speeds.

38. Auckland Transport is also working with the Henderson-Massey Local Board to install two electronic speed advisory signs between Harvest Drive and Sturges Road and Auckland Transport expects these to be installed by the end of July 2014.

39. Auckland Transport has passed the incident details provided to the Road Corridor Maintenance Department, who will also look into doing maintenance works on the cycle track outside the constituent’s property.

 

INSTALLATION OF DRIVER FEEDBACK SIGN ON AMESBURY RISE/SUMMERLAND DRIVE

40. Auckland Transport has received a request from the Local Board to assess a number of streets in the Henderson Massey Local Board area for the installation of electronic Driver Feedback signs which display the speed of approaching vehicles.  The Driver Feedback sign is solar powered and does not create any noise during its operation.  It is intended that the driver feedback sign will be rotated regularly in other streets within the Henderson Massey Local Board area where speeding issues have been identified or reported.  The proposed site is part of the rotational programme and it is envisaged that the sign will be installed sometime in the next 12-15 months for a minimum period of six months.

 

RESPONSE

41. The local Board is happy where the proposed signs will be placed on Amesbury rise and Summerland Drive.

 

PROPOSED NO STOPPING AT ALL TIMES RESTRICTIONS – METCALFE ROAD/RISERRA DRIVE, RANUI AND SOUTH KENSINGTON WAY, HENDERSON

42. Auckland Transport is proposing two safety improvement proposals;

 

·    Installation of ‘Stop’ priority control at the intersection of Metcalfe Road/Riserra Drive, Ranui

 

This intersection is currently uncontrolled.  Metcalfe Rd is a collector Road with heavy traffic flows during peak hours.  The proposal will improve driver cautiousness before turning into Metcalfe Road.

·    Installation of NSAAT parking restrictions on South Kensington Road between San Marino Dr (T intersection) and No. 29, South Kensington Road, Henderson

 

43. There were a number of complaints from residents during the last two to three years regarding access issues caused by parked vehicles on this section of South Kensington Road.  The road is 5.7m wide and therefore when vehicles are parked both sides of the road too close to each other, the available space is not desirable for other vehicles including emergency vehicles and rubbish trucks to drive in between.

 

44. It was noted (during site visits and through consultation feedback) that the access issue currently occurs only on the section where the NSAAT restrictions are proposed.  However, the street will be reviewed after the restrictions are implemented to see whether or not to extend the restrictions for the whole road.

 

Local Board Response

45. The local board portfolio leads indicated support for what is being proposed.

 

STRID ROAD - STOP CONTROL

46. Auckland Transport is proposing to install a Stop Control at the Strid Road and Te Atatu Road intersection.  A request was received from a resident to improve road safety at the intersection of Strid Road and Te Atatu Road.

47. This section of road is classified as a Local Road and is situated between Edmonton Road and Te Atatu Road in the Henderson Massey Local Board area. This road is in a predominantly residential area.

48. To change the intersection of Strid Road and Te Atatu Road to a Stop Control intersection would help address the limited visibility issue at the intersection and thus improve the road safety at the intersection. The new NSAAT lines on Te Atatu Road would also improve the visibility and thus improve the road safety at the intersection.

49. Nine consultation letters were sent to the affected residents, property owners, on Strid Road and Te Atatu Road in December 2013. Consultation with the affected residents and property owners on Strid Road and Te Atatu Road has been completed.

50. The following responses were received:

·    Two supported the proposal

51. Auckland Transport is proposing to install Stop Signage and Stop Marking on Strid Road and install NSAAT lines on Te Atatu Road to improve Strid Road and Te Atatu Road intersection Road Safety.

Local Board Response

52. The local board portfolio leads indicated support for what is being proposed.

 

HINDMARSH STREET - LATM

53. Auckland Transport is proposing to install speed humps on Hindmarsh Street.

54. Auckland Transport has received a request from the NZ Police to improve road safety on Hindmarsh Street. This section of road is classified as a Local road and is situated between Bruce McLaren Road and Farwood Drive in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area. This street is in a predominantly residential area. The averge daily traffic of Hindmarsh Street is 1280 vehicles per day.

55. Installing speed humps on Hindmarsh Street as per attached drawing is the preferred option, because speed humps are effective at reducing vehicle speeds, could reduce the risk of speeding related crashes, thus improve road safety at the intersection of Wally Nola Place and Hindmarsh Street and improve the overall road safety on Hindmarsh Street to motorists, pedestrians and children. Speed humps are low cost and consistent with treatment in adjacent roads. This scheme is also complementary to the current Neighborhood Policing Programme in this area.

56. 193 consultation letters were sent to the affected residents and property owners on Hindmarsh Street in November 2013. Consultation with the affected residents and property owners on Hindmarsh Street has been completed.

57. The following responses were received:

·    39 residents supported the proposal

·    Eight residents objected to the proposal

One resident thought it was a bus route. It is now confirmed that this is neither a bus route, nor school bus route.

One resident thought Hindmarsh was a very safe road and didnt require speed humps. However the police have requested that AT consider installing traffic calming to improve road safety on Hindmarsh Street.

One resident thought he lived too far away and was not able to notice a problem. This resident lives on 16 Wally Nola Place. Police and other local residents confirmed that there is speeding issue on Hindmarsh Street.

One resident liked to have a better road surface than speed humps. The road surface is considered not to cause major safety issues on the road.

One resident would like Auckland Transport to install NSAAT lines on Hindmarsh Street. There are two playgrounds located on Hindmarsh Street. The installation of NSAAT lines sometimes would increase the speed on the road, thus it does not help slow vehicles down to improve road safety on Hindmarsh Street. There is no visibility issue on the street.

One resident thought that speed humps can damage vehicles, slow emergency services such as ambulance, police and fire service and create economic costs for ratepayer. He also thought that speed humps throughout the city are inconsistently designed and maintained, and at times require speed to drop to less than 5 km/hr. He thought that people must use roads sensibly and take responsibility for their own action and serious consequences need to be enforced for reckless use of roads. There will be increased costs to the road users, cause some certain damage to the car in the long term. However speed humps are effective at reducing vehicle speeds, therefore improving road safety on Hindmarsh Street.

Two residents objected with no comments.

One  resident had no preference

·    The Police requested that Auckland Transport consider installing traffic calming in this street.

·    St John’s and the Fire Services have responded with no comment for this proposal.

 

Local Board Response

58. The local board portfolio leads indicated support for what is being proposed.

 

PROPOSED PARKING RESTRICTIONS – 89, CENTRAL PARK DRIVE, HENDERSON

59. Auckland Transport has received a request to review the existing on-street parking outside No. 89, Central Park Drive.  Safety concerns have been raised with regard to restricted visibility of oncoming vehicles when exiting the driveway due to parked vehicles outside the address. Although this is a common situation across Auckland road network, following the site investigations Auckland Transport concluded that providing broken yellow lines is justified at this location considering the high number of drivers accessing this driveway and a recent accident.  The proposed change is to extend the existing broken yellow lines by approx. 13m between No. 87 and 89 driveways on Central Park Drive as shown on the attached plan.

 

 

Local Board Response

60. The Local Board portfolio leads are happy with what is being proposed.

 

CORBAN AVENUE TRAFFIC CALMING REQUEST

61. The Local Board has requested Auckland Transport to investigate the number of cars using Corban Avenue and their speed to determine what measures are necessary to make the road safe for children to cross.

 

Update

62. Auckland Transport has undertaken an initial review of the feedback provided.  Further detailed investigation now needs to be undertaken to ensure a comprehensive review of this feedback. The existing traffic data was obtained in 2008 and a new survey is required to obtain traffic data, such as traffic volume, average travel speed, heavy vehicle usage. A prioritisation process is required once the data is available.

63. Auckland Transport will also be talking to Bruce McLaren Intermediate School as well.

 

64. This investigation has been prioritised and programmed for review, with an expected completion date of early July 2014 following which Auckland Transport will be able to provide the outcome and recommendations of it’s assessment.

 

CRANWELL PARK/ SEL PEACOCK - FOOTPATH AND PATH SAFETY HAZARDS INTO PARK

65. The Local Board has requested Auckland Transport to undertaken urgent maintenance on the steps down to the path that runs from the footpath along Sel Peacock  Drive  into the  front entrance of the parking area at Westwave. 

 

Response

66. Auckland Transport has undertaken urgent maintenance repairs to the concrete path and willl be undertaking water blasting.  The steps will be “marked” with anti-skid strips at the edges of the steps.

 

PROPOSED LINCOLN ROAD CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT

67. Auckland Transport is reviewing all feedback that has been received from the public consultation period that closed on 7 February 2014. 161 submissions were received on the proposal.  Once the review has been completed Auckland Transport will discuss the next steps with the Local Board.

 

 

TE ATATU CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT – MAY 2014

68.  Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL) is undertaking the acquisition phase of the Te Atatu Corridor Improvement Project.

 

69.  At this stage ACPL has been working on this project for over two years and reports that:

·      102 property interests have been secured with an owner signed agreement and 99 interests have now settled

 

Of the remaining property interests:

·      Three have yet to reach verbal agreement and work is underway to serve a notice pursuant to Section 18 of the Public Works Act 1981 - being a Notice of Desire to Acquire

·    Seven have now been served a notice pursuant to Section 23 of the Public Works Act 1981 - being a Notice of Intention to Take the Land.

·      of these owners have reached verbal agreement but have yet to sign an acquisition agreement

Two of the interests relate to one owner for whom notices under the Public Works Act 1981 cannot be served. This owner has yet to provide a formal acceptance of the proposed terms.

ISSUES PENDING

Subject Name

Description

Date Requested

Request Due Date

Bus Stop Glass Artwork

The Local Board has recently been provided a list of bus shelters in the Henderson/Massey Local Board area.  The Local Board now needs to determine which of these sites they would like to progress with the installation of artwork for the glass.  When this is determined Auckland Transport PT Operations team will work with the Local Board and engage a local artist to design appropriate artwork with a local flavour.  The approximate order of cost per shelter is $2,000.

November 2013

June 2014

Antisocial Use Of Cars And Future Planning Mihini Road, Ranui

A request to Auckland Transport to address the issues of antisocial use of cars in Mihini Road, Henderson.

September 2013

June 2014

 


 

 

WORKSHOPS UNDERTAKEN WITH THE LOCAL BOARD

Subject Name

 Workshop Date

Description

 

Henderson Town Centre Parking Review

 

3 April 2014

Auckland Transport presented the outcome of the consultation on the proposed Henderson Town Centre Parking Review and the Local Board gave feedback on the proposal in support of the changes. 

 

Auckland Transport’s scheme for Glen Road and Waitemata Drive – Minor Safety works

3 April 2014

Auckland Transport presented minor safety works for Glen Road and Waitemata Drive.  The Local Board made comments in support of the proposals.

 

Waitemata Drive – Future Planned Works

3 April 2014

Auckland Transport presented its future plans concerning a road connector on Waitemata Drive West.

 

 

 

ISSUES CLOSED

Subject Name

Description

Subject Requested Date

Subject Closed Date

Installation Of Driver Feedback Sign On Amesbury Rise/Summerland Drive, Bruce McLaren Road, Craiburn Street/Waitemata Drive And Glen Road

Auckland Transport has received a request from the Local Board to assess a number of streets in the Henderson Massey area for the installation of electronic Driver Feedback signs which display the speed of approaching vehicles.  The Transport Portfolio Leads have considered this and are happy with what is being proposed.

November 2013

March 2014

Kintara Drive - Kea Crossing

 

Auckland Transport has received a request from Colwill School to improve pedestrian safety on Kintara Drive. Auckland Transport is proposing to install a Kea Crossing on Kintara Drive. The Transport Portfolio Leads were happy with what was being proposed.

February 2014

 March 2014

Gallony Ave Bus Stop Removal

 

Auckland Transport is proposing to remove the existing bus stop from outside 2 and 9 Gallony Avenue, Massey.  These changes are planned to be implemented in early to mid-2014. The Transport Portfolio Leads were happy with what was being proposed.

February 2014

 March 2014

Proposed P90 Parking Zone For Henderson Town Centre

Auckland Transport will be making changes to the some parking restrictions as a result of consultation with affect business and the Local Board

October 2013

 March 2014

Beach Road Calming Measures

As Beach Road is on a public bus route, speed cushions are being proposed as the traffic calming device rather than speed humps.  In conjunction with the speed cushions, there will be new road markings, signage and a lighting upgrade. These changes will enhance delineation and improve safety.   It is expected that these improvements can be implemented by July 2014. 

September 2013

March 2014

Speeding Issues On Kereru Street, Henderson

Kereru Street is not eligible for immediate changes but Auckland Transport has added it to its ranked list of sites to await future speed calming treatment. This programme of work is subject to an annual reprioritisation of projects for delivery within the allocated resources and funding.  Once the carriageway maintenance works have been completed Auckland Transport will assess the bend for an advisory speed limit and it is expected that the advisory curve warning signage will be installed early in 2014.

November 2013

March 2014

Merchant Avenue - Speed Humps Installation

Merchant Avenue is a short road with two relatively smooth bends. The road slopes downhill from both ends towards 14 Merchant Avenue. The sloping nature of the road seems to encourage some motorists to speed. Taking all of the factors into account, Auckland Transport is proposing to install speed humps on Merchant Avenue to slow the traffic and improve road safety. During the consultation process, Auckland Transport sent out 29 consultation letters to residents. 24 supported the proposal and two had no preference. In the written responses, most of the residents on Merchant Avenue fully supported the installation of the speed humps on Merchant Avenue. The Local Board Transport Leads have seen the proposal and are happy with what is being proposed.

November 2013

March 2014

Ebony Place, Massey Truck Noise Issues

Auckland Transport and Auckland Council have been working on this matter together and have decided this particular enquiry relates to an excessive noise issue, which is managed by Auckland Council.  Auckland Council has advised that the customer has replied to their enquiries for further information and this issue seems to have quietened down.

November 2013

March 2014

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster Elected Member Relationship Manager (West), Auckland Transport)

Authorisers

Roger Wilson, Counil Engagement Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Review of Sturges West Learning Centre

 

File No.: CP2014/07588

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report identifies underuse issues at the Sturges West Learning Centre and seeks the Henderson-Massey Local Board’s approval to close the centre and move the staffing and equipment resource to the new Ranui Library when it opens in late 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Sturges West Learning Centre is situated at 58 Summerland Drive, within the Sturges West Community House in Western Heights.  Council owns the land and building and has a community lease with the Sturges West Community House.

3.       Auckland Libraries provides an IT Suite (Learning Centre) consisting of 12 PCs within the Community House.  A full time Learning Centre Coordinator employed by the Libraries and Information  Department manages the IT Suite.  Auckland residents and ratepayers have free access to the suite and its’ programmes and the services of the coordinator.  All chattels and equipment within the Learning Centre are designated as belonging to Libraries.  Associated costs are paid by Libraries.

4.       With declining usage of the Sturges West Learning Centre, and a large IT suite planned for the new Ranui library 2 kilometres away, consideration for relocating the staff and equipment resource to Ranui and closing Sturges West is requested.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approve the closure of the Sturges West Learning Centre when the new Ranui Library opens in 2014

b)      Approve the relocation of the computers and staff of 1 FTE to the new Ranui Library upon opening,

c)      Recommend that Community Policy and Planning West undertake a needs assessment for the vacated space and report back to the Local Board.

 

Comments

 

5.       Ranui Library is situated 2 kilometres from the Sturges West Community House and Learning Centre.  The usage of the Sturges West Learning Centre has gradually been declining, partly because the adjacent school has a new computer suite.  The Sturges area is Decile 8, relatively affluent, with most people owning their own home.  Its residents are familiar with the use of information technologies, and most have internet access at home.

6.       The usage of the Sturges West Learning Centre is almost half the regional average use of 67% capacity.  The average number of customers is around 30 – 40 per day, which is 35% capacity.   This can be compared to the usage of a similar sized Learning Centre in Glen Eden with a computer use average of 70 – 80%.  Below is a breakdown of programme participants and usage statistics from 2012:

 

 

Number of information skill programme participants:

Location

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Sturges

25

21

45

20

15

15

0

20

39

 

Computer utilisation (The number of minutes the computers were in use divided by the number of minutes the libraries were opened):

Location

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Sturges

35%

27%

24%

23%

27%

18%

9%

26%

28%

 

7.       When completed in 2014 the Ranui library will have 12 computers plus WiFi, with staff supported digital programmes and learning opportunities.  It will be the hub of the community with a focus on providing literacy and educational activities and programmes for children and young people.  Given the deprivation index of 7 (2006 census) at Ranui, redirecting the Learning Centre’s computers and staffing resource will help provide additional support to this community to meet demand.

8.       Financial implications:  Moving the Learning Centre to Ranui Library will reduce some operational and overheads costs for Libraries.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       This issue was flagged in informal discussions with the Local Board in late 2013.

Maori impact statement

10.     The closure of Sturges West Learning Centre has minimal impact to Māori as a larger facility will be available at Ranui.

Implementation

11.     The closure of Sturges West Learning Centre will require community communication and notification.  Auckland Council infrastructure and IS have approved the transfer of existing PCs to the new library building and will assist in this process.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jo Brewster - Manager North and West, West Libraries

Authorisers

Allison Dobbie - Manager – Libraries and Information

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Waitemata Sports Club Community Loan

 

File No.: CP2014/02665

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform the Henderson Massey Local Board about Waitemata City Sports Club’s community loan with Auckland Council and to seek approval from the Henderson Massey Local Board to restructure the loan.

Executive Summary

2.       Waitemata City Sports Club has a community loan of $94,291 with a 7% interest rate.  The Club has failed to make any repayments on this loan since October 1996.  There is no documentation that supports the Club’s belief that the loan was written off by Waitakere City Council. The interest rate on the loan needs to be adjusted to 4.5% to align with Auckland Council community loan interest rates and the Club will need to recommence repayments. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Establishes the starting balance of the loan as $94,291 which does not include any interest accrued.

b)      Approves that the interest rate on the outstanding loan to Waitemata City Association Football Club of $94,291 be changed from 7% to 4.5%.

c)      Approves the recommencement of monthly loan repayments from Waitemata City Association Football Club from 1 July 2014.

 

Discussion

3.       The Waitakere City Sports Club (the Club), previously named Waitemata City Association Football Club, was provided with a Council loan in 1989 of $140,000 to assist in securing full occupancy of their club rooms at McLeod Park.  The Club had constructed its club rooms in a joint arrangement with the Waitemata Cricket Club and the Club wished to fully utilise the clubrooms and grounds as a soccer venue.

4.       The original loan was set at a 10% interest rate and in 1992 it was approved to be reduced to 5%, as it was evident that the cash flow of the Club was never strong enough to service the loan. From 1992, the Club entered into a new arrangement but in 1996 fell behind in payments.  A further one-off payment of $7,500 was received in October 1996.  No further payments have been made following October 1996.

5.       On the 15 September 2010, the Waitakere City Council Chief Financial Officer (Andrew Pollock) submitted a report to Waitakere City Council stating that the Club was sent documentation to recommence payments after it was established that the club had accumulated some funds that would enable repayments to commence. The interest rate established was 7% which was in line with Waitakere City Council community loan interest rates.  The club to date has not made any further repayments and the current amount still owed to Council is $94,291 not including any interest accrued since 1995. The Club has however sent a letter to Council on the 23 October 2010 stating that as far as the Club committee was concerned, this matter was an historic debit which no longer existed.

6.       A meeting was held with the Club committee on the 29 April 2013 and at that meeting it was agreed that Officers would look for any evidence that the loan had been absolved by Waitakere City Council, or further evidence to support the case that the Club would not have to repay the loan. 

7.       From a detailed search through archived documents, no evidence has been found that supports the belief that the loan no longer exists. Therefore it is recommended that Council restructure the loan with a 4.5% interest rate which will align with Auckland Council community loan interest rates.  It is also recommended that the Club recommence monthly repayments from the 1 July 2014 over a period to be established with the Club. It is recommended that any interest accrued on the loan (circa $165,000) not be charged to the club as this will make repayments unrealistic.

Consideration

Local Board Views

8.       There have been no previous resolutions on this subject matter.  The Local Board is currently receiving loan repayments from Badminton Waitakere.

Maori Impact Statement

9.       There is no particular impact on Maori.

Implementation Issues

10.     The Limitations Act 1950 may apply. There is evidence of regular communication between Council and the Club, however there is no documentation that shows Council wrote off the loan with the Club. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Status of Loans to Various Community Type Organisations 15 September 2010

23

bView

Finance and Operational Performance Committee 9 November 2009

49

     

Signatories

Authors

Gabrielle Gofton - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Sharon Rimmer - Manager Recreation Partnerships Programmes and Funding

Leigh Redshaw - Strategic Partnerships Advisor

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 



























Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 
























Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Bylaw review programme update - April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/07952

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on bylaw review (policy) and bylaw implementation (operations), covering June 2013 to April 2014. This joint approach to reporting ensures that local boards have a comprehensive overview of the end-to-end programme through to 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       Consultation on the proposed navigation safety bylaw closed on 17 March 2014. Staff are now preparing a summary of submissions alongside the full submissions to the hearings panel. The proposed cemeteries and crematoria bylaw was adopted by the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and Governing Body in March, and submissions opened from early April.

3.       Further proposed bylaws will be presented to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee shortly covering the next set of topics: Outdoor fires; Stormwater; Trading in public places; Alcohol controls and Animal management (covering animals other than dogs).

4.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Information about the proposed changes will be included with material provided as part of the annual dog registration cycle to minimise costs and ensure simplified communication with these customers.

5.       Implementation projects are well underway for the upcoming commencement of Health and hygiene (from 1 July 2014) and Public safety and nuisance (from 26 May 2014). Planning for the new Health and hygiene bylaw and associated licensing has included particular attention for operators where the rules have changed significantly. The majority of these newly registered premises will receive a visit from a member of the environmental health team, and a welcome pack that summarises the standards they are required to meet.

6.       The Alcohol licensing readiness project has now completed its key work relating to establishing the new licensing structures needed under the new alcohol act. These are running as intended from 18 December 2013.

7.       Review work is continuing on further topics to support completion of the review programme by October 2015, alongside implementation planning for the resulting changes.

8.       No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

9.       An investment proposal for the integrated programme is being progressed, to be submitted for consideration as part of preparing the draft 2015-2024 Long-term Plan.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Notes the progress of bylaw review and implementation and the forward programme that will complete the review of the legacy bylaws by 2015.

 

 

Discussion

The bylaw review programme

10.     The bylaw review programme was originally endorsed by the Regulatory and Bylaws committee in December 2010 (refer CP2010/00962) and February 2011 (refer CP2011/00453). It will review the legacy bylaws (that is, the bylaws inherited from the former councils) across approximately 30 topics. A new bylaw will be prepared for each topic where appropriate, or a recommendation made that the underlying issue or outcome is better handled another way.

11.     The Regulatory and Bylaws Committee has ownership of the review and local boards are participating through individual workshops and reports. Local Boards are also able to propose that local bylaws are made, to apply only in their area (refer sections 24 to 28 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009). Any requests for local bylaws are reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee. As stated above, there have been no local board proposals for local bylaws over the last period. This report covers the period June 2013 to April 2014.

12.     As this is the first report on this programme since the 2013 local government elections, attachment A provides a brief background to bylaws, including an outline of each bylaw topic.

Update on review of bylaw topics

13.     The current state of the review work programme is presented in the table below and the detailed comments for several topics that follow. Attachment B provides an overview of the timeline for the programme.

14.     The table below includes reviews that have already been completed. It also covers bylaws that may be folded into other topics (Freedom camping; Arkles Bay Set Netting); the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules; and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navigation Safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Outdoor / Rural fires

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amend)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On hold pending unitary plan outcomes

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazardous Substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & Marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews by local boards - ongoing

Filming fee review

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Public safety & nuisance

On track

G

This bylaw topic crosses the jurisdiction of both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (meaning there are two parallel bylaws). The new bylaws were adopted in 2013 and come into force in May 2014.

 

Navigation safety

On track

G

Public submissions were invited on this topic from 14 February to 17 March. Just under 400 submissions were received and are being reviewed. A range of communication approaches – including radio and attendance at relevant events – were used to help publicise the proposal and invite submissions. Hearings are expected in May.

 

Trading in public places (policy and bylaw)

On track

G

This review will deliver a single draft policy and two draft bylaws (for the council and Auckland Transport). Drafting of these is well underway. It is expected that these will be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and then the governing body in May. Any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015 (allowing any fee changes to also be put in place with the council’s long-term plan).

 

Signs

On track

G

Discussions with local boards are currently underway to identify their views on particular matters including local approaches to issues such as sandwich boards and cross-street banners. Comments from those discussions and other discussions with representatives of businesses and the signage industry will support the preparation of a draft bylaw later in 2014.

 

This project is also monitoring the progress of the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, as this plan also includes signage provisions.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Election signs bylaw was adopted by Auckland Transport in May 2013, and was in place for the 2013 local government election. A number of operational issues arose during that election period, and the clarity of relevant clauses is planned to be addressed through a series of drafting amendments that will support a better democratic process. These improve clarity for issues including the use of candidate and “team” signs, signs on private property, the readability of authoriser statements and the display of signs promoting election issues rather than candidates or teams. The amendments also provide for the possible later addition of explanatory notes into the bylaw, where desirable to provide further guidance.

 

The proposed amendments are being reported to the Auckland Transport Board in April, to allow for consultation on the proposed changes. Local boards will receive further information then.

 

Changes are also being considered to remove or adjust some of the specified sign sites in the western area. These follow a review of sites against criteria including practicality and safety, and are intended to address issues that arose in 2013. Those local boards where changes are being considered will receive further information on this.

 

Alcohol controls

On track

G

Each of the legacy councils had adopted an Alcohol Control bylaw, and put in place a series of alcohol controls through that bylaw. Alcohol controls (previously called liquor bans) prohibit the consumption of alcohol within a specified place, during a specified time.

 

Legislative changes introduced alongside the government’s reform of laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol provide the council and police with enhanced powers in relation to alcohol controls. Those changes also require the council to review its existing alcohol controls against a new threshold, as part of any decision to carry those controls forward past October 2015. Following a review of available data, the majority of existing controls across Auckland are considered to meet the new requirements.

 

A proposed bylaw is planned to be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee shortly. The existing bylaws are broadly similar, and so the new proposed bylaw will largely seek to continue the current arrangements. In line with consultation with local boards from 2011 (alongside other alcohol-related matters), the new bylaw will facilitate local board involvement in decisions on alcohol controls and an improved community-based focus on alcohol issues.

 

Community-focussed approaches may include crime prevention through environmental design, local community initiatives, discussions with nearby licensees, youth and leadership development programmes, partnering with central government agencies including the Police and the Ministry of Justice, and partnering with local agencies including sports clubs and iwi and town centre / business associations.

 

These non-regulatory approaches can often lead to significant reductions in alcohol harm and have better long-term effects than regulatory approaches such as making an alcohol control.

 

Hazardous substances

On track

G

The former Auckland City Council had a hazardous substances bylaw. A review of this bylaw has indicated that the issues it covered are now addressed adequately through other means, including provisions in other bylaws, the Resource Management Act, National environmental standards, and regulations made under various acts.

 

Comment is being sought from the local boards where the legacy bylaw currently applies, following which a proposed approach (that could include allowing the bylaw to lapse in 2015) will be brought to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee.

 

Dog access review

On track

G

Local boards are able to review dog access rules for local parks and local beaches in their areas on an annual basis. This allows a better response to community views than was possible under the legacy councils’ approaches.

 

For 2014 selected dog access are being reviewed by the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

To ensure that registered dog owners are advised of the proposed changes (as required by legislation) the local boards are including a joint notice within the dog registration package in June. This will reduce costs, and ensure that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council, rather than multiple messages.

 

Filming fees review

On track

G

The Auckland Film Protocol was adopted in 2013, after wide consultation with local boards, the screen production industry, council-controlled organisations and other stakeholders. The protocol aims to create a film-friendly culture across Auckland, based on a two way commitment from the wider council organisation and from filmmakers. It also seeks to help deliver a customer driven service that provides certainty to filmmakers in a globally competitive market, and to enable public good will towards the film industry by setting out expectations of film crews when filming in public places.

 

Currently there is a range of filming fee structures in place, inherited from the former councils. A filming fees review is now underway to understand how this element of the filming process can be harmonised and improved. The Policies and Bylaws unit is working with ATEED on this project, and it is expected that local board input will be sought on this over the next few months.

 

 

Update on implementation of new bylaws

15.     Detailed implementation planning is developed by the responsible operations division alongside the process for reviewing each of the bylaws, through a cross council programme called the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme. Initial planning for implementation starts when the bylaw topic review identifies the issues and options related to each topic. This approach provides the operations division an early indication of the possible shape of the bylaw and its implementation considerations.

16.     This programme includes the main groups involved in operating bylaws and delivering the relevant services to our customers. The programme is also helping ensure bylaw reviews can be aligned to other related transformational changes such as the consolidation of information technology systems, customer service improvement programmes and the organisation’s capacity to implement those changes.

17.     Implementation of new bylaws will generally cover

·    ensuring that the council meets its statutory obligation;

·    ensuring that effective operational practices on the control and enforcement of the new bylaws are implemented consistently across the region, and are made available to the general public;

·    ensuring that communications to the general public and other stakeholders are well planned and implemented in a timely manner;

·    developing and implementing standard business rules and processes that help achieve the council’s customer service standards;

·    ensuring that internal services are planned and delivered when needed, and are in alignment with other transformation initiatives;

·    putting any changes to fees in place; and

·    ensuring that staff are informed throughout the process and are trained on delivering the new services.

18.     The table below shows the current status of implementation projects.

 

Table 4: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

 

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading / Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places policy and bylaw

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

B

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls (liquor bans)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Animals (Stage 2)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 5: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

On track

G

The alcohol licensing project has now completed successfully. This project set out to ensure that the council was able to implement the requirements of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, including the new licensing system and new fees that had to operate from 18 December 2013.

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On track

G

The Governing Body has resolved that the council adopt its own fees for licensed premises. This is provided for in the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. The council can change the fee amounts, using the cost / risk fee categories that have been set by central government. Work is underway to capture actual information on costs, based on operating the new licensing system and the parts of those costs that can be recovered through licensing fees.

 

Health protection

On track

G

The Health protection project is implementing the new Health and hygiene bylaw and code of practice (which will come into force from 1 July 2014). A range of user-friendly brochures that summarise key provisions of the health protection code have been prepared to help communicate the requirements to all the people who operate these businesses.

 

A series of approaches are underway to help ensure operators are aware of the requirements to be followed. The new bylaw (with its risk-based approach) has resulted in some premises that are newly required to be registered, and the communication activities are focussed on these premises. Most of these will receive an individual visit, with an appropriate information pack.

 

There are also some premises that no longer need to be registered with the council, and this is also being communicated to them.

 

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

19.     The scope and scale of the expected changes mean that implementation requires significant effort and resources, and cost, for some topics. The Strategy and Finance committee made an initial provision for funding the IBRI programme at its meeting of 9 May 2013 (in part; refer item 16, SF/2013/67).

20.     As provided for in the resolution, a further investment proposal is being prepared for the 2015-2024 long-term plan. The programme continuously monitors its approach to each bylaw, and where possible captures any cost efficiencies and learnings for later bylaws.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme for local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

22.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

23.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation Issues

24.     Implementation issues are addressed as relevant to each topic, as noted above.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Background to bylaws

81

bView

Overview of the timeline for the programme

89

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Simon Pickering - Manager, Planning, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

An introduction to Bylaws

 

 

Summary

1.       This attachment provides a brief introduction to bylaws and the process that is now underway to review the bylaws that were inherited by the Auckland Council from the former councils. It is being provided to local boards alongside their regular update report, as this is the first such update report since the 2013 local body elections.

2.       A bylaw is a rule or regulation made by a local authority, and it can therefore reflect both regional and local preferences. The Auckland Council inherited 158 bylaws across 32 broad topics from the former councils. These are referred to as “the legacy bylaws”. Most of these current bylaws must be reviewed by 31 October 2015.

3.       A review programme has been underway since 2010, focusing on the outcomes sought for each topic and how these outcomes apply to Auckland. It is taking into account legislative requirements (and timing due to central government’s legislative programme), identified council priorities and alignment with the council’s strategic vision, gaps (if any), other policy work and administrative improvements or cost reductions where possible. It will provide an opportunity for addressing inconsistencies from the various approaches adopted by the former councils, ultimately leading to a coherent and aligned set of Auckland Council bylaws. Not all legacy bylaws will be replaced with new bylaws.

4.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport can both make bylaws within their particular areas of influence. Legislation also provides specific roles related to bylaws for local boards and Watercare Services Limited.

 

What are bylaws

5.       A bylaw is a rule or regulation made by a local authority, and can therefore reflect local preferences. This means they are an important tool for council as it seeks to deliver the agreed community outcomes and reflect community preferences.

6.       Most bylaws are made under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) but other bylaws may be made under such acts or regulations as the Health Act, the Dog Control Act, the Burial and Cremation Act, the Prostitution Reform Act and the Transport Act. Bylaws may not over-ride legislation made by parliament and cannot generally require standards that are higher than those set nationally.

7.       Bylaws generally permit or regulate certain activities, require certain activities to be done in certain ways or prohibit certain activities. Bylaws may also license persons or property and set fees for certificates permits, licences, consents or inspections. In line with good regulatory practice, the LGA 2002 requires a local authority, before making a bylaw, to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing a perceived problem, and to ensure that the proposed bylaw is not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.

8.       The special consultative procedure under the LGA 2002 is used for making, amending, or revoking a bylaw. This requires the council to consider the views and preferences of people likely to be affected, or have an interest in a council decision. It must then publicly notify its proposal to make, amend or revoke a bylaw, outline in writing the reasons for such actions, invite and hear submissions and make deliberations in open meetings on its proposal. For some topics other legislation may modify or over ride some of these general requirements.

9.       Typically the Regulatory and Bylaws committee will receive and endorse each draft bylaw and statement of proposal (SOP), before it is approved by the governing body for public consultation.

 

Auckland Council and bylaws

10.     The Auckland Council originally inherited 158 bylaws from the former councils across 32 broad topics, and transitional legislation provided for these bylaws to remain operative in the former council areas until replaced or revoked. A number of different rules therefore operate across the region, and some of the local board areas have conflicting bylaw rules. Those conflicts must be resolved over time to support consistent governance and customer service.

11.     Auckland-specific legislation sets out particular roles within the bylaw process for local boards and Watercare Services Limited. These groups can perform actions that lead up to bylaw adoption, including proposing bylaws and leading public consultation on those bylaws.

12.     This legislation also makes most of the legacy bylaws expire on 31 October 2015. This means that the review of each topic and the implementation of any new bylaw or non-bylaw approach must be completed by that date.

13.     An outline of the bylaw topics is provided in appendix 2.

14.     Decisions on ten topics were made within the first term of the Auckland Council: Dog management; General administration; Offensive trades; Solid waste; Transport (roads); Food safety; Election signs; Health and hygiene; Public safety and nuisance; and Trade waste.

 

The programme of bylaw review and implementation

15.     The council has established a programme to review the legacy bylaws, and implement any resulting changes to its processes and service delivery. This alignment allows the council to achieve improvements in customer service and efficiencies in an ordered way. As one example, a new approach to food safety was implemented on 1 July 2013. This included a new harmonised approach to the A to E grading of food premises; harmonised fees; and harmonised set of requirements for training of those employed to prepare and sell food across Auckland café’s and restaurants and other food outlets.

16.     A set of eight principles were adopted in 2011 to guide the review. These are set out in appendix 1 and summarised below.

 

1)   Ensure that regulation by bylaw is appropriate

2)   Every bylaw should relate to a strategy or policy

3)   The regulatory framework should be accessible to users

4)   Bylaws should follow a consistent structure

5)   Local boards should be involved in the bylaw-making and review process

6)   Where a bylaw establishes a region-wide framework, it should also provide if appropriate a transparent and locally accountable procedure for making specific operating rules under delegated authority

7)   All bylaws should have a clear, practical and efficient approach to enforcement

8)   The bylaw-making or review process must include consideration of how administration, implementation, monitoring and review elements will be achieved

 

17.     Regular updates on the programme are provided to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and to local boards.

 


Appendix 1: Principles to be reflected in the bylaw review

 

Principle

Comment

1 Ensure that regulation by bylaw is appropriate (Appropriate Mechanism)

The Local Government Act 2002 requires a local authority, before making a bylaw, to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing an objective. Alternatives such as education, self-regulation and advocacy for national standards or regulation should be considered.

Where regulation is appropriate, the right place for this must be determined. For example, a given topic may have been addressed in a bylaw by some of the former councils, and through district plan rules for others (e.g. signs).

2 Every bylaw should relate to a strategy or policy

(Strategic or Policy Alignment)

Bylaws should generally support (and be based on) a policy adopted by the council, e.g. a comprehensive street trading policy for activities such as outdoor dining, busking and events, should be in place before a bylaw is made to regulate such activities. In some cases the policy and the bylaw may be worked on in parallel.

3 The regulatory framework should be accessible to users

(Accessible to Users)

Regulatory requirements for a given activity may be located in a variety of places (e.g. bylaws, the district plan, the building code, codes of subdivision). Providing a carefully designed interface to these documents (and making links between them) will improve customer service and certainty.

4 Bylaws should follow a consistent structure

(Consistent Structure)

The use of a standard bylaw form (with appropriate customisation where necessary) is likely to make bylaws easier to use, and to reduce costs of ongoing maintenance.

5 Local boards should be involved in the bylaw-making and review process

(Local Board Engagement)

This will ensure that Local Boards are involved in development of policy, bylaws, specific rules and delegations that will either affect their local board area, or guide later Local Board decision-making under the adopted bylaw framework.

6 Where a bylaw establishes a region-wide framework, it should also provide if appropriate a transparent and locally accountable procedure for making specific operating rules under delegated authority

(Transparent and locally accountability)

This supports ongoing legislative compliance and provides for efficient decision-making where specific rules are determined pursuant to a bylaw (as opposed to being contained within a bylaw). It will also allow ample opportunity for local decision-making (by local boards or officers) without the need for governing body or committee scrutiny, where appropriate.

 

7 All bylaws should have a clear, practical and efficient approach to enforcement

(Enforceable)

Bylaws must be able to be enforced to be effective. Rules, and the enforcement approaches that can be used when these rules are breached need to be clear.

8 The bylaw-making or review process must include consideration of how administration, implementation, monitoring and review elements will be achieved

(Operational considerations)

Bylaws are typically put in place to address a particular issue or support a particular outcome. This is likely to be achieved in a more effective, efficient and transparent way if operational elements are considered through the policy and bylaw development process.

This would often include the process for making or review of any specific rules to give effect to, or that are required for, the administration of the bylaw, considering the level of delegation proposed, and the information needed to confirm that the bylaw has the intended effect.

This will ensure that bylaws are able to be enforced on commencement, and bylaw development will be viewed as part of a wider process.

 

Appendix 2: Topics covered by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport bylaws

 

Alcohol Control (Auckland Council)

Alcohol control bylaws allow councils to control the possession and consumption of alcohol in public places. This is commonly achieved by creating on-going alcohol controls (also called liquor bans) in specified public places over specified times so that it becomes an offence to consume, bring into or possess liquor in such public places at such times. The council is not able to apply a blanket ban to prevent alcohol being consumed in all or in large parts of its area.

 

Animals and Pests (Auckland Council)

These bylaws generally control the keeping of poultry, pigs, bees and cats and the slaughter of stock in urban areas and deal with stock wandering onto public places in rural areas.

 

Cemeteries (Auckland Council)

Cemetery and crematoria bylaws typically facilitate the management of cemeteries and crematoria under council’s control. They cover the sale of burial plots, reservation of areas for special purposes, provisions for internments, keeping graves and monuments in good order, the control of vehicles and the keeping of records.

 

Commercial sex industry including Brothels (Auckland Council)

The Prostitution Law Reform Act allows territorial authorities to make bylaws to prohibit or regulate signage visible from a public place that advertises commercial sexual services. The same act allows a territorial authority to make bylaws regulating the location of brothels.

 

Construction and development (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Bylaws in these areas often work alongside the requirements of the Building Act. They may be used to protect public safety and amenity by controlling structures, materials and work in, on or over or adjacent (e.g. demolition) to public places. Bylaws may require street damage deposits and manage the construction and use of vehicle crossings. Bylaws may also regulate awnings, verahdahs and balconies over public places so that they meet minimum standards for safety and cleanliness.

 

Dogs (Auckland Council)

The council must have a dog policy, and the dog bylaw gives effect to this policy. The policy and bylaw must set out areas where dogs are prohibited, where they are required to be on-leash, where they can be off-leash and designated dog exercise areas. The Dog Control Act requires dog owners to be notified of proposed changes to the dog policy and dog control bylaw; these changes are co-ordinated where ever possible to minimise cost and simplify messages to owners.

 

Environmental Protection (Auckland Council)

Some councils use bylaws to control the use of outdoor lighting to prevent light spill and glare, whereas others would use district plan rules. Bylaws in this group may require premises to be kept in a clean, hygienic and tidy condition and may require burglar alarms to reset after sounding for a maximum of 15 minutes

 

Food safety (Auckland Council)

These bylaws regulate the sale of food and are complementary to the requirements of the Food Hygiene Regulations. These bylaws allow the closure of unhygienic premises, require staff working in food premises to have a minimum qualification in food hygiene and allow the grading of premises so that customers are informed about the cleanliness and conduct of premises selling food to the public. Provisions also apply to the sale of food from road side stalls so that the food is prepared and sold in a hygienic state.

 

Hazardous substances (Auckland Council)

Bylaws in this area may control the storage of hazardous substances and may also be used to ensure the safe storage of bulk liquids, so that any spillage may be safely contained to prevent water pollution.

 

Health and hygiene (Auckland Council)

These bylaws cover such activities as hair removal, piercing, tattooing, acupuncture to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and HIV through inadequate hygiene practices or un-sterilised equipment. Bylaw provisions generally require the licensing of premises undertaking these activities, the adequate training of staff, sterilisation equipment and practices that reduce the risk of infection.

 

Hostels / boarding houses (Auckland Council)

Auckland City Council was the only council to have a bylaw controlling the standards of low cost accommodation such as hostels, guesthouses, rooming houses, boarding houses, motels and back packer accommodation. These are not licensed by other legislation and can suffer from poor conditions. This bylaw sets standards for safety, ventilation, sanitary conditions, maintenance and maximum occupancy.

 

Liquid and trade wastes (Auckland Council with Watercare Services Limited)

The Auckland Regional Council, Rodney, North Shore and Franklin had trade waste bylaws to regulate the discharge of wastes into sewage systems to prevent damage to those systems and or damage to sewage treatment plants. Watercare Services administers the trade waste bylaws.

 

Auckland City Council had a Waiheke Wastewater Bylaw to ensure the proper operation of septic tanks and other on-site wastewater disposal systems. Rodney, North Shore and Papakura had similar provisions for on-site wastewater disposal.

 

Navigation safety, wharves and marinas (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Bylaws made under this subject matter include the Navigational Safety Bylaw which controls activities on the waters around the region. Provisions regulate the speed of vessels near the shore, near other vessels, around wharves and ramps, include requirements that anchored or moored vessels be seaworthy, and requirements around life jackets. Provisions regulate moorings and anchorages, place controls on water skiing, provide priority for large vessels within pilotage limits, and limit vessels carrying explosives and oil tankers etc.

 

Auckland City also had a bylaw which works in conjunction with the Auckland Regional Council Navigational Safety Bylaw to control the use of Orakei Basin so that there is a safe separation of powered and non-powered vessels using the basin. Some bylaws also cover wharves and marinas.

 

Public safety and nuisance / Street trading (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Public places bylaws provide the ability to enforce general restrictions in public places (parks, reserves, squares, public footpaths and berms etc) to protect those public places from misuse and to protect the safety and amenity of those using such public places. Such bylaws may also cover street trading such as displays and café tables and public performances and events. They may also ban fireworks from certain areas and may also require property owners to exhibit street numbers so buildings are easily identified.

 

Recreational and cultural facilities (Auckland Council)

North Shore, Waitakere, Auckland and Manukau councils had bylaws regulating the use of libraries, swimming pools, art galleries, halls and recreation centres. Some or all of these activities may be able to be regulated by methods other than bylaws, such as, conditions of membership (libraries), conditions of entry (art galleries, recreational centres and pools) or contract (hall hire etc).

 

Rural fires / outdoor fires

Several councils adopted rural or outdoor fire bylaws to help manage risks related to these fires. These assist the rural fire service (which is managed by the council). The bylaw supports the issuing of fire permits and the fire ban process (in times of heightened risk).

 

Solid wastes (Auckland Council)

Solid waste bylaws typically regulate the collection of household (and some cases business) rubbish by council or their contractors. These bylaws may also licence waste collectors and set fees for the disposal of rubbish at council owned sites. The council can include provisions prohibiting placing junk mail into letterboxes which have stickers requesting “no junk mail” or similar. Solid waste bylaws may not be in conflict with the council’s waste management and minimisation plan.

 

Signs (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

These can cover signs such as sandwich boards, banners, ladder signs and real estate signs. Auckland City Council controlled the use of all types of advertising signs through a signs bylaw whereas other councils only used bylaws to control specific types of signs (e.g. temporary signs) and used district plan rules to control other types of signs. Specific rules apply to election signs (usually in a separate bylaw).

 

Stormwater management (Auckland Council)

Auckland City and Papakura District had stormwater management bylaws to manage open watercourses and pipes that are used to discharge stormwater to the coast. These bylaws generally require landowners to keep watercourses free from obstruction so they function correctly for stormwater transport. They also support the ongoing use of stormwater soakage in some volcanic parts of Auckland.

 

Traffic (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Traffic bylaws regulate matters such as one-way roads, roads with weight restrictions, speed limits, the stopping, loading and parking of motor vehicles, bus lanes, cycle paths and shared zones which are not regulated by central government. A traffic bylaw may also address the driving of vehicles on beaches, and controls on specific areas such as the Auckland Domain. Auckland Transport is now responsible for bylaws relating to the Auckland transport system (including roads), with the council responsible for other areas such as roads within parks.

 

Water supply (Auckland Council with Watercare Services Limited)

Most of the amalgamated councils had water supply bylaws. These cover topics including metering, connection, protection of the supply from contamination, water conservation, provision for fire fighting, and use of water from hydrants.

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Smoke-free Policy Implementation

 

File No.: CP2014/07525

 

  

 

Purpose

This report is to provide the Henderson-Massey Local Board (‘the Board’) with recommendations on the implementation of the Auckland Council Smoke-free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) in its local board area.

Executive summary

The Policy sets out a regional position on smoke-free public places and events. The exact detail of the implementation will be a matter for local board discretion, as local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities.

 

Local Boards can:

·    choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·    determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·    decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·    determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

 

To assist local boards progress the implementation of the Policy, staff have made recommendations pertaining to the extent of smoke-free public places, signage requirements, promotion activities and other matters. 

In terms of signage for smoke-free public places, staff do not recommend smoke-free signage in all areas affected by the Policy. Instead, placing additional smoke-free signs in certain ‘high priority sites’ will bear greater benefits in promoting smoke-free public places.

In March 2014, a workshop with the Henderson Massey Local Board was held to confirm high priority sites for the immediate installation of additional smoke-free signage. At this workshop, 18 high priority sites were confirmed. Staff recommend additional budget be allocated for the printing and installation of smoke-free signs in these sites. The cost of additional signage is estimated at $7,560 to $8,000. These values will vary depending on signage printing, size and installation. Also smoke-free stickers can be used as a means to reduce signage costs.

At this workshop, the Board had also signaled interest in making the Henderson town centre smoke-free. Staff can investigate options and provide a report at a later date.    

In order to promote the smoke-free status of these sites, staff recommend that the Board publicises smoke-free public places in their local board area as the Board deems appropriate.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Allocates budget for the printing and installation of additional smoke-free signs in 18 high priority sites which include:

i)        Jack Pringle Village Park and Te Atatu Library site

ii)       West Wave Aquatic Centre, Cranwell Park, Falls Park, Pioneer Park and Tui Glen Reserve sites

iii)      Waitakere Central Library site

iv)      Massey Leisure Centre and Library site

v)      Te Pai Park

vi)      Catherine Mall Plaza (Henderson town centre)

vii)     Te Atatu Peninsula walkway

viii)    Fred Taylor Sports Park

ix)      Henderson Park

x)      Jack Colvin Park

xi)      Massey Domain

xii)     McLeod Park

xiii)    Moire Park (inclu. Manutewhau walk)

xiv)    Paremuka Lakeside

xv)    Ramlea Park

xvi)    Ranui Domain

xvii)   Royal Reserve

xviii)  Te Atatu Peninsula Park

b)      Requests officers to investigate options to implement the Smoke-free Policy in the Henderson town centre

c)      Promotes the smoke-free status of smoke-free public places in Henderson-Massey as the Board deems appropriate

 

 

 


Comments

Background

The Auckland Council Smoke Free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) sets out council’s position on smoke-free public places, events, tobacco control advocacy and workplace smoking cessation. As local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities, the implementation of the Policy at a local level is a matter for local board discretion.

 

Local boards can: 

·    choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·    determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·    decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·    determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

 

According to the 2013 census, Henderson Massey Local Board (‘the Board) area has the sixth highest smoking rate in the region at 17 percent (13 percent for the region). The Board has the highest number of young smokers (aged 15-24 years), with a smoking rate of 10 percent (2.2 percent for the region).

 

The goal for a Smoke-free Auckland, as stated in the Auckland Plan and the Policy, would mean that no more than a five percent smoking rate for the region. In order to reach this target, 12 percent (or approximately 8,890 persons) in Henderson Massey, will need to quit smoking by 2025. 

Policy Implementation

Smoke-free Public Places

Smoke-free in public places aims to discourage the community from smoking in certain public outdoor areas to de-normalise smoking behaviour.  As the Policy is non-regulatory, compliance is voluntary and relies on the public being well informed about these smoke-free areas. As such smoke-free signs need to communicate the smoke-free status of a space.

 

However, the cost of installing smoke-free signage in all public places identified in the Policy outweighs its benefit. Therefore, staff recommend placing smoke-free signs in certain areas where the smoke-free message will have the greatest impact.

 

In order to identify these sites, staff developed a criteria based on the objectives and principles of the Policy. The criteria focused on:

 

·    areas that are frequented by children and youth

·    council-owned facilities

·    areas that are well used and popular within their community

·    sites where several smoke-free public places are clustered in close proximity.

 

Based on scores against the criteria, sites were then divided into four categories. Smoke-free signage implementation varies according to the categories. Sites that are scored highly are ‘Category A sites’ or high priority sites, where there is an opportunity for a higher level of smoke-free signage installation. Table one summarises these categories and smoke-free signage installation.

 

Table 1             Site priority and level of signage installation

Category

Level of smoke-free signage installation

A

High priority sites

·      additional smoke-free signs +

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades occurs

B

Medium priority sites

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades

C

Low priority sites

·      smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they are replaced or upgraded

D

No priority sites

·      no smoke-free signage installation

High priority smoke-free sites

Staff had prepared recommendations on the high priority (Category A) and medium priority (Category B) sites within the Henderson-Massey local board area. In March 2014 a workshop with the Board was held to gather feedback and confirm these high priority sites.

 

Table two outlines the high priority smoke-free sites in the Henderson-Massey local board area.

 

Table 2            High priority smoke-free sites for Henderson-Massey local board area

Site Name

Rationale

Signage and cost

Jack Pringle Village Green, Jack Pringle Park and Te Atatu Library

 

·      Several well used, key facilities located on one site- a park, sports park and library

·      Close to a shopping site – large volumes of people passing through the site

·      Diversity of user groups at most times of day

·      Est. 6-7 wall mounted signs

·      Est. $720-$861

 

West Wave Aquatic Centre and Cranwell Park, Falls Park, Pioneer Park  and Tui Glen Reserve 

 

·      Popular swimming complex within the region, particularly well-used with families and children

·      Cranwell Park, Falls Park and Tui Glen Reserve surround West Wave and are busy parks combining destination play facilities, passive recreation and a popular wedding location

·      Adjacent to the town centre area

·      Est. 5-6 wall mounted signs

·      Est. $720-$738

Waitakere Central Library

 

·      Popular library site, located within area with heavy foot traffic  (including two bus stops located there)

·      Has significant issues with smokers congregating around the site

·      Est. 3-4 wall mounted signs

·      Est cost $480-$492

 

Massey Leisure Centre and Library

 

·      Two key facilities- a library and recreation centre located on this site

·      Popular with families, youth and fairly high profile in the area

·      Est. 4-5 wall mounted signs

·      Est. cost $600-$615

Te Pai Park

·      One of the west’s busiest sports parks containing  the regional netball centre, tennis courts, skate park, playground, and passive recreation space

·      Diversity of users in a highly prominent park area

·      Est. 6-7 wall mounted

·      Est cost $840-$861

Catherine Mall Plaza space

·      One of the main entrances into Westfield Mall, Westcity and the town square on Henderson Main Street.

·      Est. 2 wall mounted

·      Est. $240-$246

Te Atatu Peninsula Walkway

·      (Chapman Strand, Dawnhaven Esp, Gloria Pk, Harbourview-Orangihina, Kelvin Strand, Renata Esp, Spinnaker Strand, Taipari Strand, Waimanu Bay Rsve)

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Fred Taylor Sports Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Henderson Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Jack Colvin Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Massey Domain

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

McLeod Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Moire Park (inclu. Manutewhau Walk)

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Paremuka Lakeside

·      Well-used for passive recreation

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Ramlea Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Ranui Domain

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Royal Reserve

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

Te Atatu Peninsula Park

·      Well-used sports park

·      Combination of signs and stickers

·      Est. 2 wall mounted - $246

NB: these cost estimates are based on (300x150mm and 300x400mm) sizes from one supplier

Smoke-free signage installation in other areas

The Board has opted to include sites that have scored moderately against the criteria or ‘medium priority’ (Category B) sites, as Category A. However, to reduce the initial outlay of signage costs, smoke-free stickers can be used for some of these sites.

 

‘Low priority’ (Category C) sites will have the smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they due for upgrades or replacement. ‘No priority’ (Category D) sites are areas that do not currently have any signage installed.

Smoke-free public places promotion

As the Policy is non-regulatory, raising public awareness around the danger of smoking and the council’s position on achieving a smoke-free Auckland is important.

 

To assist the Board in the promotion of the policy staff suggest the following for consideration:

·    an article in the local paper or magazine near World Smoke-free Day (31 May 2014)

·  a launch event at one of the high priority sites when the majority of smoke-free signs have been installed

·    raise awareness through social media (i.e. local board Facebook page or a website).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

Staff consulted with the Board throughout the development of the Policy in 2012-2013.

In March 2014, staff attended a workshop with the Board to confirm the high and medium priority sites for the implementation of the Policy. The Board was also provided with an indicative cost of introducing additional signage in the identified high priority sites. 

 

At the workshop, the Board had made the following comments: 

•     it is supportive of smoke-free behavior, therefore, smoke-free public places and events

•     it would like to promote Category B sites to Category A sites

•     as a means to reduce the initial outlay of signage costs, the Board will investigate the use of smoke-free stickers

•     supports the use of awareness based messages on signs such as ‘this child-friendly area is smoke-free’

•     it is interested in a smoke-free town centre, particularly as Catherine Place, located in the Henderson town centre, is recognized as a Category A site

•     it would like to be informed of  wider smoke-free initiatives that occur in its Board area

Maori impact statement

The New Zealand Tobacco Use Survey (2009) found that the smoking rate amongst Maori (44 percent) is significantly higher than that of the non-Maori population (18 percent).

Through the development of the Policy, many stakeholders highlighted the disparity between Maori and non-Maori smoking rates within the region as a cause for disproportionate health outcomes for Maori.

The Policy aims to address Maori smoking rates through:

·        the creation of smoke-free public places

·        smoke-free signs to contain awareness based messages in Maori

·        focus on the Southern Initiative smoke-free work stream

Implementation

There will be additional costs to the local board relating to the printing and installation of smoke-free signage in the high priority sites identified in the report.

 

Staff recommend wall- mounted smoke-free signage as these are hard wearing, have a longer life span and minimises signage pollution.

 

The approximate cost of additional smoke-free signs and stickers in the 18 identified sites (Table two) in Phase one is $7,560 to $8,000. The exact costs will vary depending on:

 

·        the exact number of smoke-free signs required on each site

·        if there are many smoke-free messages (e.g. mass printing of one message is more cost effective)

·        the positioning and installation of the smoke-free signs

·        the use of smoke-free stickers to reduce costs

 

The exact costs will be determined in the next stage of this project. These estimated costs are one off costs. Any ongoing costs will be covered within signage maintenance and renewal budgets.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur - Policy Analyst

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2014/09448

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents records of workshops held by the Henderson-Massey Local Board on:

-     1 April 2014

-     3 April 2014

-     8 April 2014

-     15 April 2014 and

-     29 April 2014

Local Board Standing Orders require that workshop records be confirmed at the next meeting of the local board.

 

Recommendation

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Confirms that the records of the workshops held on the following dates are true and correct:  

-     1 April 2014

-     3 April 2014

-     8 April 2014

-     15 April 2014 and

-     29 April 2014

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop record for 1 April 2014

99

bView

Workshop record for 3 April 2014

101

cView

Workshop record for 8 April 2014

103

dView

Workshop record for 15 April 2014

105

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Workshop record for 29 April 2014

107

    

Signatories

Authors

Linda Smith - Senior Local Board Advisor (West)

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop -
Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:     Tuesday, 1 April 2014

Time:                            1.00 pm - 5.00 pm

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Level 2, 6 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

 

PRESENT:

 

Members:       Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chair)

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chair)

Brenda Brady, JP

Peter Chan, JP

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Will Flavell

Tracy Kirkley

Luke Wilson

 

 

Apologies:     There were no apologies

 

 

MATTERS DISCUSSED

 

 

ITEM

PRESENTER

1.0

HENDERSON IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

The Board was updated on the progress so far on the Draft Plan.

Douglas Sadlier and Carl Luca

2.0

AUCKLAND DESIGN MANUAL AND THE DESIGN CHAMPIONS NETWORK

Presentation to the Board about the Auckland Design Manual and the Design Champions Network providing a guide on how to design a house, develop a neighbourhood etc.

Hayley Fitchett

3.0

WASTE SERVICES TO APARTMENTS, UNITS AND OTHER INTENSIVE HOUSING

Presentation to the Board on how best to provide waste services to apartments and units.

Michelle Whitaker and Dorothy Wilson

4.0

RESOURCE CONSENT NOTIFICATION DECISIONS

Outlined the Resource Consent Notification Decision process, such as distribution of the resource consent received list.

Stefan Naude and Lee Ah Ken

5.0

LOCAL BOARD PLAN

Linda spoke with the Board on the engagement feedback from the local board plan..

Linda Smith

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop -
Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:     Thursday, 3 April 2014

Time:                            5.20 pm – 6.30 pm

Venue:                         Council Chambers, Level 2, 6 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

 

PRESENT:

 

Members:       Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chair)

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chair)

Brenda Brady, JP

Peter Chan, JP

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Will Flavell

Tracy Kirkley

Luke Wilson

 

 

Apologies:     There were no apologies

 

 

MATTERS DISCUSSED

 

 

ITEM

PRESENTER

1.0

HENDERSON TOWN CENTRE PARKING REVIEW

Presented outcome of consultation and next steps/ recommendations.

Kelly

2.0

AT SCHEME FOR GLEN ROAD AND WAITEMATA DRIVE

Discussed scheme for Glen Road and Waitemata Drive

Minor Safety works

Working together with the Police and the Local Board on safety

Possible allocation from Transport Capex Fund  board

 

Amit Patel

3.0

WESTERN BYPASS INCLUDING WAITEMATA DRIVE CONNECTION THROUGH TO WAITEMATA DRIVE WEST

Presentation of options for Waitemata Drive connection

Hussam Abdul-Rassol

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop -
Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:     Tuesday, 8 April 2014

Time:                          1.00 pm - 5.00 pm

Venue:                        Council Chambers, Level 2, 6 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

 

PRESENT:

 

Members:       Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chair)

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chair)

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Will Flavell

Tracy Kirkley

Luke Wilson

 

Apologies:     Brenda Brady, JP, Peter Chan, JP

 

 

MATTERS DISCUSSED

 

 

ITEM

PRESENTER

1.0

LOCAL BOARD AGREEMENT

·    Need to agree upon a balanced budget

·    Focus on Capex - ranking of projects

·    Identify advocacy areas

David Rose

2.0

OPEN SPACE NETWORK PLAN

Research and findings to date, specifically the proposed key moves for the Henderson Massey Open Space Network Plan.

Andrew Beer,
Tracey Millar, Graeme Davies and Kate Brown

3.0

WAITEMATA FOOTBALL CLUB LOAN

Discussed the Waitemata Football Club Loan. A report will follow this workshop to HM agenda on 17th April.

Gabrielle Gofton, Leigh Redshaw, Sarah Natch and Michelle Knudsen

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop -
Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:   Tuesday, 15 April 2014

Time:                          1.00 pm - 5.30 pm

Venue:                       Council Chambers, Level 2, 6 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

 

PRESENT:

 

Members:       Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chair)

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chair)

Brenda Brady, JP

Peter Chan, JP

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Will Flavell

Tracy Kirkley

 

Apologies:     Luke Wilson

 

 

MATTERS DISCUSSED

 

 

ITEM

PRESENTER

1.0

WWI CENTENARY PROGRAMME

Gave an overview of the WWI Centenary Programme and provided the board with an opportunity for input into the programme.

Kay Oliver
Beverley Rodgers and Andrew Gregg

2.0

PROPERTY STRATEGY IMPLEMENTATION: WHOLE OF LIFE TOOL AND ASSET BENCHMARKING

Presented to Board a tool that can assist them with making decisions about how to maintain and operate an asset, and to provide an overview of asset benchmarking.

Matt Heywood

3.0

LOCAL BOARD PLAN

Took the Members through the documents making changes where necessary.  Much discussion was had on these documents.

Linda Smith

4.0

HENDERSON FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

The Board went through the documents and prioritised the projects and initiatives for Local Board Plan over the next three years.

Douglas Sadlier
and Carl Luca

5.0

LOCAL BOARD PLAN (continued)

Linda Smith

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop -
Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:   Tuesday, 29 April 2014

Time:                        1.00 pm - 5.00 pm

Venue:                      Central One, large meeting room, 4 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

 

 

PRESENT:

 

Members:       Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chair)

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chair)

Brenda Brady, JP

Peter Chan, JP

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Tracy Kirkley

 

 

Apologies:     Will Flavell, Luke Wilson

 

 

MATTERS DISCUSSED

 

 

ITEM

PRESENTER

1.0

HENDERSON IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

Took the Board through a document on the Henderson Implementation Plan regarding strategic projects to revitalise Henderson to 2040.

Douglas Sadlier

2.0

LBP SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE PROCEDURE

Presentation and discussion to develop the engagement plan for the Local Board plan

Steve Wilcox

3.0

STARLING PARK MURAL

To get feedback on the concept plan. Proposed designs by the artist were presented.

 

Sarah Natac

4.0

LOCAL BOARD PLAN

Further discussion on the contents of the Local Board Plan

Linda Smith

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

15 May 2014

 

 

Chair's report

 

File No.: CP2014/09239

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       To provide an opportunity to the Chairperson of Henderson-Massey Local Board to update the board on her activities, projects and issues since Monday, 14 April 2014.

 

 

Monday
28 April

Henderson-Massey Local Board Weekly Update

Local Board Chairs Forum meeting

Tuesday
29 April

Local Board Agreement Run through

Local Approved Products Policy (psychoactive substances) discussion

Henderson-Massey Local Board Workshop

Wednesday
30 April

Henderson-Massey Local Board & Governing Body on the Annual Plan

Meeting to discuss content of draft LBP - Summary document

Governing Body (Budget Committee) / Local Board Chairs Annual Plan discussion

Thursday
1 May

Briefing on the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan

Auckland’s North West Community
Liaison Group

Henderson-Massey Local Board - Transport Workshop

Henderson-Massey Local Board - Business Meeting

Friday
2 May

Ranui Social Sector Trial Workshop

Saturday
3 May

Living Wage WEST FEST invitation

Monday
14 April

Local Board Funding Policy - Local Board Members Meeting

Westgate Library and Town Square

Henderson-Massey Local Board - Weekly Update

Tuesday
15 April

Transport Portfolio briefing

Henderson-Massey Local Board Workshop

 

Monday
5 May

Local Board Funding Policy PWP - preparatory meeting

Colwill School - Rob Taylor's - Celebrating 10yrs

Henderson-Massey Local Board Weekly Update

Tuesday
6 May

Local Boards Funding Policy Review Political Working Party Workshop

Parks Portfolio catch-up

Transport Portfolio catch-up

Henderson-Massey Local Board Workshop

Wednesday
7 May

Site visit to Te Atatu Library and Community Centre

Photo Shoot at Westgate

Ranui Community Centre House Renovations

Youth Connections Update

Massey Means Business

Thursday
8 May

AT Parking Strategy Workshop

Catch-up with Michael Alofa

Friday
9 May

West Auckland Sport Recreation Advisory Group Meeting

Catch-up with Phil Twyford

Monthly Events portfolio catch up

Saturday
10 May

Trees for Babies

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receives the chair’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau