I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 14 May 2014

9.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ann Hartley, JP

 

Members

Dr Grant Gillon

 

 

John Gillon

 

 

Danielle Grant

 

 

Richard Hills

 

 

Lorene Pigg

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Bianca Wildish

Democracy Advisor

 

7 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 8856

Email: Bianca.Wildish@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board area

 

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board Members

 

 

Kay McIntyre QSM

Chairperson

Ph 09 484 8383

DDI 09 484 8987

Mobile 021 287 8844

kay.mcintyre@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Finance – lead

·      Planning, policy and governance – lead

·     Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – alternate

 

Ann Hartley JP

Deputy Chairperson

Mob 027 490 6909

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 483 7572

ann.hartley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Community Development and Facilities – lead

·      Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – lead

·      Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – alternate

·      Planning, policy and governance – alternate

·     Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – alternate

 

 

Danielle Grant

Local Board Member

Mob 021 835 724

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 442 1271

danielle.grant@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Arts, culture and events services – lead

·       Economic development – lead

·       Natural environment – alternate

 

 

Grant Gillon MPP, PhD

Local Board Member

Mob 027 476 4679

Office 09 484 8383

grant.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Natural environment – lead

·      Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – lead

·     Libraries – alternate

 

John Gillon

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 2288

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 443 1683

john.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Libraries – lead

·       Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – lead

·       Civil defence and emergency management – alternate

 

Lindsay Waugh

Local Board Member

Mob 021 287 1155

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 418 1620

lindsay.waugh@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – lead

·      Arts, culture and events services – alternate

·      Transport and infrastructure – alternate

 

 

Lorene Pigg

Local Board Member

Mob 021 839 375

Office 09 484 8383

lorene.pigg@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Civil defence and emergency management – lead

·       Finance – alternate

·       Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – alternate

 

 

Richard Hills

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 4411

Office 09 484 8383

richard.hills@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Transport and infrastructure – lead

·       Community Development and Facilities – alternate

·       Economic development – alternate

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

12        Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 9 April 2014                                                                                                                                         9

13        Monthly Local Board Services Report - May 2014                                                  29

14        Quarterly Performance Report to the end of March 2014                                      49

15        Auckland Transport – Bike Park Facility Birkenhead Wharf                                103

16        Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in April 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board                                                                                                                                     111

17        Community Lease for Additional Premises to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated, Recreation Drive, Birkenhead                                                                                  115

18        Approval to Advertise Community Lease Vacancy at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote                                                                                                                                     127

19        Smoke-free Public Places Implementation                                                             135

20        Bylaw review programme update - April 2014                                                       141

21        Granted Resource Consent Applications by Local Board Area                          159

22        Members' Reports                                                                                                     165

23        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                         173

24        Generic Reports received for information - April 2014                                         175

25        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops, Wednesday, 2 April 2014, Wednesday, 9 April 2014, and Wednesday, 16 April 2014                                    177

26        Record of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in April 2014             185

27        Applications for Special Exemptions under Section 6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987                                                                                                                      195  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               199

27        Applications for Special Exemptions under Section 6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

a.      83 Hadfield Street                                                                                             199

b.      43 McDowell Crescent                                                                                     199  

 


1          Welcome

 

Mr Smith will lead the meeting in prayer – or whatever set text we decide will appear here.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 9 April 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 9 April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08509

 

  

 

Purpose

The open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipatiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday, 9 April 2014, are attached at item 12 of the Agenda for the information of the Board only.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipātiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday, 9 April 2014 are attached at Item 12 of the agenda for the information of the board only, and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipatiki Local Board 9 April 2014 Unconfirmed Minutes

11

      

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



















Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Monthly Local Board Services Report - May 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08915

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to update the Board on various Council and Council-controlled organisation activities impacting Kaipātiki.

Executive summary

2.       The updates in this report relate to the following:

·        Community Development and Facilities

·        Events

·        Parks

·        Economic Development

·        Psychoactive Substances

·        Northcote survey

·        Election signs bylaw

3.       The full quarterly performance report for the Local Board also appears on this agenda, which provides fuller updates on activity across Local Board service areas.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      Approves funding of $7,500 for delivery of 20 household sustainability workshops in Bayview, utilising unspent funds in the community wellbeing programmes budget

b)      Approves allocation of $8,000 to training and development opportunities to the Kaipātiki Local Youth Board and support to the Converge projects, utilising unspent funds in the youth programmes budget

c)      Approves purchase of the Flagtrax system, providing for 20 double and 10 single flags, utilising $25,960 of unallocated events budget for 2013/2014

d)      Requests that work on the development of the Chelsea Reserve Management Plan is progressed

e)      Approves the concept plan for the bike track at Birkenhead War Memorial Park

f)       Approves $25,000 for the completion of a Commercial Property Market Study for the Kaipātiki Local Board area, utilising unspent funds in the economic development budgets

g)      Provides feedback on the development of the Locally Approved Products Policy for psychoactive substances

 


Comments

Workshops and portfolio briefings

4.       A number of workshops and portfolio briefings were held in April. Records of all of these meetings are attached to separate reports on this agenda.

Strategic Updates

5.       The following updates are provided in this report:

Community Development and Facilities

Funding

6.       There is an underspend of $7,500 in the community wellbeing programmes budget and an underspend of $8,000 in the youth programmes budget.

7.       Following discussions with the Kaipatiki Local Board Community Development and Facilities portfolio holders on 16 April 2014 and the Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust, it is proposed to advance these funds to the Trust to undertake the following project work:

Bayview Household Sustainability Programme

8.       Aim: To educate and empower communities already engaged by Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust in placemaking initiatives, to adopt more sustainable behaviours in their homes and neighbourhoods in the areas of household water, energy use, waste, and local food production.

9.       Cost: $7,500 for delivery of 20 workshops (Energy, Water, Waste, Gardening - 4 x 5).

10.     This is a collaborative initiative between the Trust, who with support from Community Development Arts and Culture (CDAC), would be responsible for community engagement, workshop coordination and administration, recruiting hosts for in-home workshops and/or coordinating community centre workshops with the Environmental Partnerships and Solid Waste teams from Infrastructure and Environmental Services who would coordinate the tutors, workshop content and incentives.

11.     Pending uptake in Bayview and as budget allows, it could be extended to other communities the Trust is working with in the Beach Haven and Northcote central areas.

12.     It is envisioned that from these initial workshops, “Sustainability Street” groups could be encouraged and supported by Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust and/or CDAC to facilitate ongoing sustainability action within the street through the peer support of active neighbours.

Youth Programmes

13.     Aim: To support the Kaipatiki Local Youth Board by providing training and development opportunities to grow skills in leadership and youth participation. A minimum of two workshops will be delivered in collaboration with the Ministry of Youth Development to equip youth with the skills to be effective leaders, and to learn what youth participation is and why the youth voice is important in decision making by learning ways to input into government and community decision making.

14.     Aim:  To support the projects identified at ‘Converge – Equipping Change Makers for Tomorrow’ on 16 April 2014 by 28 Year 10 students who attended and reside in the Kaipatiki Local Board area. The main projects include the redevelopment of the rotunda in Hinemoa Park, organisation of an Intergenerational Cultural Festival and a series of street audits.

15.     Cost: $8,000 to be split between the two work streams.

16.     A schedule of activities, detailed budget, delivery and outcomes will be negotiated to meet shared accountability requirements, and it is proposed that the funds will be advanced by way of a Variation to the Funding Agreement for 2013/2014 with the projects to be delivered in the 2014/2015 calendar year.

Norman King Building

17.     At its community forum on 27 November 2013, the Board resolved the following:

Resolution number KAI/2013/1

MOVED by Member L Waugh, seconded by Member G Gillon:  

“That the Kaipātiki Local Board requests officers to report back with urgency with an action plan to progress the realisation of the Norman King building into a community services centre as identified in 2009 in the Northcote eastern area development framework.”

18.     At its community forum on 26 March 2014, the Board resolved the following:

Resolution number KAI/2014/2

MOVED by Member L Waugh, seconded by Member G Gillon:  

“seek an urgent report on the transfer of the remaining commercial tenancy at the Norman King building to Raeburn House at a community rate.”

19.     In response to the second resolution above, Community Facilities staff have worked with Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL) to investigate issue. This investigation follows a report presented to the Strategy and Finance Committee in June 2013, which created the conditions for local boards to make decisions on buildings which are primarily in community use, such as the Norman King building. This included the revenue derived from the commercial tenancies at this site being treated as local facilities revenue and visible within the Local Board budget from 1 July 2014.

20.     The initial adjustment to align budgets to the agreed principles will be financially neutral, with no net impact at a local or regional level. In general terms, therefore, the Board can resolve to change the use of the site, but this will have a financial impact on the Board’s budget.

21.     There are currently two active commercial leases in the building – one on the first floor, and one on the ground floor. It is recommended that these two leases are treated separately.

Ground floor lease

22.     The ground floor lease (currently used as a laundry) will not expire for a number of years. It is advised that given the potential cost of early termination and no immediate alternative use having been identified for this space, that this is not addressed at this time.

23.     There has been previous interest from the Board in utilising the window space in the storage room (part of the ground floor lease) for Northart exhibitions. ACPL have investigated this, and it could be managed by sectioning off a one metre strip of the lease for sole use by Northart. There would be cost implications to the Board in doing this, as it would be a reduction in the footprint of the lease. This reduction in income would need to be met by Local Board funding.

24.     The installation of a lift into the building may also have an impact on the size of the lease and therefore the income, which is currently being investigated.

First floor lease

25.     The first floor lease is currently on a month to month arrangement, so it can be terminated at any time. To facilitate transfer of this lease to community use would also require Local Board funding of c.$30,000. The only available budget to the Local Board in 2014/2015 is the recently created discretionary opex budget, the quantum of which varies in future years.

26.     Community Facilities advise that, prior to committing this expenditure, consideration be given to the proposed community use for the facility including how the service activity is to be funded. This should be completed before any termination of the lease.

27.     It is proposed that the next steps are discussed with the Board in more detail at a workshop in June, as some of the matters surrounding the current lease conditions are confidential.

 

Glenfield Community Centre

28.     The Board is aware of the weatherproofing issues at Glenfield Community Centre, which was brought to its attention again at the community forum on 16 April.

29.     Community Facilities staff met with the centre management and are taking the next steps in relation to this issue:

·   Seeking legal opinion on the lease between the centre and the church (which owns the site), which once available will be shared with the Board and the Community Centre as to the responsibilities of Council in relation to the building

·   Seeking professional opinion on the work required and cost (the Community Centre have received advice that the cost of repairs will be $1.5 million).

30.     The staff have advised the Community Centre of the Council funding scheme available (the sub regional Community Facility Development Fund), which will not re-open for applications until the new financial year. Community Facilities staff have offered support to the Community Centre from the funding team to assist in preparing an application to this fund. Staff have also advised of other available funders that the Community Centre should approach.

31.     Given the significance of the issue, staff are keen (once the advice sought above is received) to discuss next steps with the Local Board, including any contingency planning for the services provided. A workshop will be organised for the Board on next steps in June.

Events

32.     At the Events portfolio meeting on 10 April, portfolio holders discussed with Events staff options for utilisation of unspent events budget for 2013/2014.$51,562 is unallocated from the Board’s events budget.

33.     Staff recommended that the Board consider utilising these funds to purchase a ‘FlagTrax’ system for the area, which will support marketing and branding initiatives of the Local Board and community groups within the Kaipātiki area.

34.     Street flags are an effective way of providing colour and vibrancy to an area, whilst showcasing local brands. Currently the Board has a number of sites within the area where existing street flag systems are in place. These systems were supplied under contract from Network Visuals to the previous North Shore City Council. The contracts ended in 2009/2010 and were not renewed.  However, Auckland Council has continued to operate under the terms of the expired contract because there were no alternative systems available on the New Zealand market.

35.     The Network Visuals system has not been utilised fully by Council, local boards or the community because it is resource hungry and costly, requiring hire of a cherry picker, qualified installation technicians, traffic management plans and health and safety compliance to install each flag.

36.     Since 2010 Nexus Developments, a New Zealand company based in Wellington, has developed a product range called “FlagTrax”, which is designed to install street flags in seconds from the safety of ground level, using a push-pull rod system and a track and locking mechanism.

37.     The system has been designed to fit to new or existing poles, lampposts, light stands and walls and does not require cherry pickers, traffic management plans or qualified installers.  The system can also accommodate two lengths of flags (2.65m or 1.75m).

38.     Staff believe that the FlagTrax system will be a cost effective solution to the current cost structure for street flags.  The Local Board will be required to make an upfront investment in the system, but there are long term benefits and savings for themselves and the community who will use the system in the future.

39.     The system comes as a single(i.e. one flag per pole) or double system.  The cost of a single system is $649 plus installation costs per pole, or the double system $1,298 plus installation costs per pole.  Installation costs are $80 per pole (single or double) and must be undertaken by an approved installer with the appropriate knowledge, skills and tools.

40.     The savings for the Local Board and the community will come in the erection of flags, as this is a no cost exercise (except for purchase cost of the flag) and can be undertaken by anyone with the special allen key that locks the system to prevent flags being tampered with or stolen.

41.     An example of the cost savings for 20 single flags is as follows:

 

                                                                         Network Visuals             FlagTrax

                                                                                         System               System

 

                 Installation Cost (one off)

                 Hardware Cost                                                         $0                    $649

                 Installation cost                                                        $0                      $80

                 Total Installation Cost                                               $0               $14,580

 

                 Cost of Using system

                 Flag change out cost                                             $60                        $0

                 Traffic management cost (included above)               

 

                 Change outs per year                                                5

                 Total street flags displayed (20 x 5)                       100

                 Total change out costs                                      $6,000                          0

 

                 Total savings per year                                      $6,000

                 Payback period (initial install cost)               2.4 years

 

 

42.     Staff recommend that purchase of 20 double and 10 single systems would provide good coverage of the Local Board area, at a total cost of $25,960.

43.     If the Board wished to pursue this opportunity, Network Visuals would be given 30 days notice to remove their equipment and repair any damage to poles and lampposts.

44.     It is recommended that if the Board would like to progress this, that Events staff work with the Events portfolio holders on the sites for installation and to design a simple booking system.

Parks

Chelsea Reserve Management Plan

45.     At its workshop on 4 December 2013, the Board reviewed a draft of the Chelsea Reserve Management Plan. At this time, the Board requested further information on the stormwater situation at the reserve before progressing the development of the plan any further.

46.     Whilst stormwater planning is underway at the site, this will not be resolved in the immediate term. It is therefore proposed that as this work does not have a material impact on the content of the draft plan, that this work should be progressed due to the current absence of a management plan for the reserve.

47.     The next steps would include:

·        Further work to complete the draft plan, including discussion with iwi to complete relevant sections

·        Sign off from the Board on the draft

·        Public consultation via the special consultative procedure (SCP).

 

Birkenhead Bike Park

48.     The concept plan for the Birkenhead Bike Park was presented to the Local Board at a workshop on 16 April. The plan is attached at attachment A.

49.     A BMX trail area was developed in the 1990s in an area of native bush to the north of No 2 Field. The area has been developed informally by a small group of dedicated users since this time.  The development of a bike track was included in the Birkenhead War Memorial Development Plan that was adopted by the Birkenhead Northcote Community Board 2010, and the project was identified in the Auckland Council Long Term Plan 2012-22.

50.     Consultation was undertaken with the existing bike track users, the Birkenhead Leisure Centre, Sport North Harbour and youth through a Facebook page to look at the design for the track and the location. Due to concerns over surveillance, emergency access and impact on native vegetation, the original site (Site 3) was discounted and another site (Site 1) was identified and used for the concept design. Both national and international tracks were used as a benchmark to ensure the design is at the forefront of techniques and methodology.   

51.     Discussions are also underway with the user group around providing support for the current tracks if they are modified to meet safety criteria.     

Economic Development

52.     At its workshop on 16 April, the Board reviewed a first draft of the Economic Development Action Plan, which will be presented to the Board formally at its meeting in June.

53.     One of the actions identified in the draft plan was the development of a Commercial Property Market Study at a cost of approximately $25,000.

54.     There are unallocated funds remaining in the Board’s Economic Development budget for 2013/2014, so it is therefore recommended that this action could be progressed in this financial year. Attachment B provides a summary scope for the project, as well as additional information on the benefits and purpose of the study.

55.     The unallocated economic development funds total:

·        $48,000 (Employment/economic development action plan budget – plan is nearing completion and has not required the full budget allocated)

·        $12,000 (Wairau Valley - Glenfield economic development initiatives).

Psychoactive substances

56.     At its workshop on 16 April, the Board discussed local board collaboration on possible options for developing a Local Approved Product Policy for psychoactive substances.

57.     The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 (the Act) set a regulatory framework for the manufacture and sale of psychoactive substances. The Act’s purpose is to protect the health of, and minimise the harm to, individuals who use psychoactive substances and regulate the availability of psychoactive products.

58.     The Act banned psychoactive substances from being sold in dairies, service stations, supermarkets, convenience stores and places where alcohol is sold. It also restricted the advertising of products and the sale to those under 18.

59.     The Act enables territorial authorities to develop a Local Approved Products Policy (LAPP) for their region. The LAPP is limited to (Part 3 s68):

·        The location of premises from which approved products may be sold by reference to broad areas

·        The location from which approved products may be sold by reference to proximity to other premises from which approved products are sold

·        The location of premises from which approved products may be sold by reference to proximity to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds (sensitive sites, such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities).

60.     Work to date on the development of the policy has identified three possible options:

·        Town Centres – licences limited to areas designated as metro or town centres. This option follows the position paper presented by a number of local boards, as well as other territorial authorities such as Hamilton.

·        Industrial – licences limited to areas designated as industrial under the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP). Licenses would only be granted in areas zoned for light or heavy industrial use creating a distributed spread of shops.

·        Specified areas – licenses limited to specific areas. These areas would be designated through an evidence based approach, focusing on eliminating licences from high stress areas.

61.     The Board may wish to provide feedback at this stage on which of the three options above it supports for inclusion in the policy.

62.     Following the workshop session on 16 April, a further update was received, which whilst not impacting directly on the development of the policy, should be noted by the Board. This update is outlined in the memo at attachment C.

Northcote survey

63.     Council’s Research, Investigation and Monitoring Unit (RIMU) has been leading research to understand the role of ethnic precincts in Auckland. The research project has focused primarily on Dominion Road, but Northcote Town Centre has also been included.

64.     As part of this research, a survey was sent to 10,000 households in Northcote to enable an understanding of how interactions between people from different ethnic and cultural groups, in a commercial context, influence wider social cohesion.  

65.     Since the survey was distributed, concerns have been raised that it contains questions that, while not intended to be, could be perceived as encouraging racism. Council has therefore decided to withdraw the survey. All recipients are being contacted in writing asking them not to complete the survey, and advising that Council will not process any surveys which have been returned.

66.     Auckland Council will review the survey design and consider issuing a re-designed survey at a later date.

67.     Council will also be reviewing and strengthening its research ethics approval processes to ensure that this does not occur again in the future.

68.     The findings of the research, once complete, will be shared with the Local Board.

Election signs bylaw

69.     Changes are being proposed to the Auckland Transport Election Signs bylaw. These are outlined in more detail in the memo attached at attachment D, and in the draft amendments in the memo attached at attachment E.

70.     This report provides the opportunity for the Board to feedback on these proposals.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

71.     Local board views are sought via this report/

Maori impact statement

72.     No specific positive or adverse impacts on Māori have been identified related to the topics covered in this report.

Implementation

73.     No implementation issues have been identified.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Examples of the FlagTrax System

37

bView

Birkenhead Bikepark Concept Plan

39

cView

Kaipātiki Local Economic Development Action Plan – Project
Summary

41

dView

Psychoactive Substances Memo

43

eView

Election Signs Bylaw Memo

47

     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Broad - Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 




Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Quarterly Performance Report to the end of March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08431

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Kaipatiki Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive summary

2.       The Board’s net cost of service to the end of March 2014 is $13,515k. This result is $946k more than the budget to date. The majority of the variance is related to the cost of the full facility parks contracts and property related costs in recreational services. The parks contract budget allocations for this expenditure amongst the northern local boards is not in line with the location of the assets. This was addressed during budget refresh and the boards allocation was correctly increased to reflect the actual cost for the 2014/2015 financial year. Property related costs were also increased for 2014/2015 to reflect actual costs.

3.       Capital expenditure to date is $1,397k less than budget. This is 37% less than the budget of $5,196k. There are some Parks and Town Centre projects that won’t be completed this financial year. These were discussed with the board during the budget reprioritisation workshops. Parks renewals expenditure however is tracking well against budget to date.

4.       A number of events were held in the last quarter including a number of Neighbours Day events and Celebrating Beach Haven 2014.

5.       The Glenfield Library ran the ‘Dare to Explore’ summer reading programme. All libraries in the area were also involved in Chinese New Year celebrations.

6.       The Greenslade Reserve sports field lighting project was completed in February.

7.       Glenfield Pool and Leisure ran a very successful membership promotion which began in March.

8.       The full report is attached. Additional reports have been included in the March quarterly report, the appendices includes a Treasury report for the quarter and a Rates Data report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      Note the Quarterly Performance Report for the Kaipatiki Local Board for the period ended March 2014.

 

 

Comments

9.       The quarterly performance report is for information only. No actions are required.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.     This report informs the Kaipatiki Local Board of the quarterly performance to date for the period ending March 2014.

Maori impact statement

11.     Maori as stakeholders in the Council are affected and have an interest in any report on financial results. However this report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

Implementation

12.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Quarterly Performance Report March 2014

51

     

Signatories

Authors

Pramod Nair - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 





















































Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport – Bike Park Facility Birkenhead Wharf

 

File No.: CP2014/08783

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides the Kaipātiki Local Board with Auckland Transport’s position on the Bike Park Facility at Birkenhead Wharf.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Transport controls the facilities and infrastructure at all the region’s public transport hubs. The Kaipātiki Local Board requested Auckland Transport give consideration to relocating the new Bike Park Facility at the Birkenhead Ferry Terminal.

3.       The current location of the Bike Park was chosen because as a Local Board Transport Capital Fund project it had to be built on land that was under the control of Auckland Transport and also met the following criteria:

·        Close proximity of the Bike Park to the wharf,

·        Ease of access by users,

·        Minimal loss of car parking,

·        Sightlines to the harbour, and

·        Safety for users.  

4.       It was considered to have less than minor effects on the existing activities that occur adjacent to, and surrounding, the Birkenhead Wharf.  These activities include the operation of the Northcote Birkenhead Yacht club, parking facilities (including disabled car parks near the terminal entry), public transport operations and access by the public to the harbour edge. 

5.       The location of the bike shelter also allows for passive supervision, thereby allowing for safe use of the shelter particularly in the dark. It is set back from the wharf’s edge to preserve pedestrian and fishing access. 

6.       None of the suggested alternate locations deliver the benefits of the current location and all were investigated thoroughly and discussed with the Local Board, prior to the installation of the facility.

7.       Auckland Transport considers the Bike Park is located in the best location and does not support relocating the facility.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport - Bike Park Facility Birkenhead Wharf report.

 

Background

Regional Cycling Program

8.       The more cycling is integrated with public transport services, the easier it becomes for people to combine cycling and public transport on a single trip. This in turn increases the use of both cycling as a mode of travel as well as increasing patronage on public transport. Providing bike parking at public transport interchanges such as ferry terminals is a key component of the successful integration of cycling and public transport. By making available choice for users to either take their bikes on the ferry or leaving them at secure high quality bike parking will contribute to patronage growth and to Auckland becoming a cycle-friendly city.

9.       It is widely accepted that cycling trips to public transport are usually between 1 kilometre and 5 kilometres. The provision of covered bike parking facilities ensures a greater passenger catchment area for the interchange is realised.

10.     Providing covered bike parking aligns with Auckland Transport’s objectives to increase public transport usage across all modes and to encourage multi-modal travel. As well as providing bike parking facilities, Auckland Transport will be developing walking and cycling access plans for catchment areas to provide safe and direct trips to interchanges.

11.     Auckland Transport last year embarked on a programme to provide bike parking at public transport interchanges with the following objectives:

•        Provide short and long term cycle storage/provision at all interchanges

•        Develop facilities consistent with the Auckland Code of Practice and international best practice

•        Develop sufficient capacity of bike parking to meet potential levels of demand

•        Integrate modes by maximising conformity, consistency and clarity for transfers and multi-modal trips

12.     To assess the functionality and operation of controlled access bike parking before a regional rollout, secure enclosures known as Bike Parks were opened at Papatoetoe and Papakura Rail Stations. Not long after this, the Birkenhead Bike Park was opened.

13.     When locating bike parking at interchanges it is important to consider the following factors:

•        Close to building entrances and public transport facilities, integrated where practicable

•        Well lit parking and linkages to public transport facility

•        Highly visible location or overlooked to maximise informal surveillance

•        Ideally monitored by security personnel (in person and by CCTV)

•        Covered shelter and protection from all weather and elements (including rain, sun and sea spray)

Purpose of the Birkenhead Wharf bike shelter

14.     The Kaipātiki Local Board’s decision to use money from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund to construct a bike park facility at Birkenhead Wharf, supports Auckland Transport’s Public Transport Operations initiatives, to encourage the use of alternative modes of transport at ferry wharves and major transport hubs.    Birkenhead Wharf is a popular location for cycle commuters on the North Shore and a shelter adjacent to the terminal is considered necessary amenity. Cycle parking at this location will also reduce the congestion associated with cycle parking at Downtown Ferry Terminal.

Discussion

15.     The project for the installation of a cycle parking facility was first considered by the Kaipātiki Local Board at their meeting of 24 April 2013 when it was resolved:

Resolution number KT/2013/120

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      requests Auckland Transport to investigate the following projects to be funded from the Local Boards Auckland Transport Capital Fund:

i)       Cycle and scooter racks at Birkenhead Wharf – estimate $66,000.

16.     Following this request the relevant information was then provided to the meeting of 22 May 2013 in which the report advised:

Kaipātiki Local Board AT Capital Fund Projects

Paragraph 42. The Local Board also supported investigation into the installation of scooter and cycle storage racks at Birkenhead Wharf to provide full commuter transport options and allocated the sum of $66,000. This amount has been confirmed as the final cost and requires the board’s confirmation so the project can be implemented. A copy of the proposed design and location is attached (Attachment C). As an outcome the Local Board Resolved:

22 May 2013 - Resolution number KT/2013/159

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

d)      confirms the allocation of $66,000 to the installation of cycle and scooter racks at the Birkenhead Wharf to enable construction as per the final order of costs.

17.     In June 2013 the Bike Park Facility was built as a Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project at a cost of $64,213. Close to completion of construction of the project, the Local Board received objections about the placement of the facility and consequently passed a number of resolutions:

14 August 2013 – Resolution Number KT/2013/228

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)        receives the petition from Keith Salmon and Gillian Taylor, requesting action moving the Birkenhead bike shelter from its current location, and thanks Mr Salmon for his attendance and presentation.

b)        requests officers to:

i)   report on the issues raised in the petition.

ii)  report on any options and associated costs to relocate the shelter.

iii)      meet with the presenter of the petition, chair of the Birkenhead Residents Association and the Commodore of the Northcote and Birkenhead Yacht Club to discuss options prior to reporting back.

iv) discuss options with Auckland Transport officers as part of the feedback reports.

c)        delegates to Members Waugh, G Gillon, Marshall and McIntyre authority to receive the above reports with the power to make a recommendation to Auckland Transport to the maximum budget of $40 000 if the reports are not received before the 11 September 2013 meeting.

14 August 2013 – Resolution Number KT/2013/229

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)        receives the petition from Nick Kearney, in support of the Birkenhead bike shelter and its location, and the supporting information from Cycle Action Auckland.

b)        requests officers to:

i)   report on the issues raised in the petition.

ii)  report on any options and associated costs to relocate the shelter.

iii)      offer to meet with the presenter of the petition and a local representative of Cycle Action Auckland to discuss options prior to reporting back.

iv) discuss options with Auckland Transport officers as part of the feedback reports.

c)      delegates to Members Waugh, G Gillon, Marshall and McIntyre authority to receive the above reports with the power to make a recommendation to Auckland Transport to the maximum budget of $40 000 if the reports are not received before the 11 September 2013 meeting.

d)        requests officers to report back as soon as possible before the summer season.

18.     September 2013 - Site Meeting held with Community Groups – The Local Board Relationship Manager met on site with the community groups and reported back to the local board on the suggestions made at the meeting:

11 September 2013 - KT/2013/289

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)        asks that options 4, Aa and Bb on the tabled presentation, or any combination thereof, be costed by staff and reported to the incoming board.

b)        asks that the appropriate representatives of the disabled community be consulted prior to the removal or relocation of any disabled car parks.

c)        asks that the possible options for relocation or replacement of the Birkenhead bike and scooter facility be consulted on before a report back to the incoming board.

19.     Monthly Local Board Services Report - November 2013

Eric Perry, Relationship Manager, and Sarah Broad, Senior Advisor, were in attendance to speak to the report.

13 November 2013 - KT/2013/15

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receives the Monthly Local Board Services Report for November 2013. (note items b to e were not directed at AT)

f)       strongly requests that the bike and scooter facility at Birkenhead Wharf be moved to a location more acceptable to the Kaipātiki Local Board and local residents and stakeholders.

Sites suggested at a Site Meeting with Community Groups

20.     The sites A, B, 4, a & b (as indicated on the aerial image) were all considered and assessed by Auckland Transport at the inception of the project and were not considered practical for the location of a bike park facility for the following reasons:

Location 4

·        Too far away from the terminal for security by passive observation and convenient use by cyclists

·        Loss of 3 – 4 car parks

·        There are significant stormwater issues – overland flow

·        The land is sloping and a level platform is required

·        Creating a level platform in this location would increase the installation cost

Location a

·        Impact on Boat and Trailer parking – loss of car parks

·        Under the cliff face – falling debris

·        Bike and scooter movements in the area of the yachting club activities

·        Location may be too small to accommodate the Bike Park

Location b

·        Loss of car parks

·        Creates obstruction to access/entrance to the boat ramp

·        Will block free flow of footpath for pedestrians

·        Not enough room to accommodate the existing structure

Location A & B at the terminal itself

·        Creates Clutter around the entrance to the terminal

·        Congestion between bus passengers and cyclists

·        Blocks the emergency exit

·        Affects the disabled parking 

21.     The present location of the bike park facility closely aligns with the operational requirements for Auckland Transport. This site meets all health and safety requirements, is fully functional for users, is supported by bike/ferry commuters and Auckland Transport considers it the only viable location for the Bike park facility at Birkenhead Wharf.

22.     The options A, B, a, b and 4, as detailed in the image on page 3, are as a consequence, not considered practical or viable for the purpose of this facility. 

Location selection

23.     In considering the location of the proposed bike shelter, a number of criteria were assessed.  Proximity to the wharf, ease of access by users, minimal loss of car parking, sightlines to the harbour and, passive observation providing safety for users.  The preferred location was selected as it met the criteria specified above, particularly as it related to the safety of users.  As detailed above, alternative sites along Hinemoa Street were also considered but the distance from the terminal, safety concerns and the loss of car parking spaces lead to these options being dismissed.

24.     Auckland Transport considers that the preferred location has minimal effects on the existing activities that occur adjacent to, and surrounding, the Birkenhead Wharf.  These activities include the operation of the Northcote Birkenhead Yacht club, on-street parking facilities, and access by the public to the wharf and harbour edge.

25.     Auckland Transport considers that the current location of the bike shelter is the best location because:

·        It is in close proximity to the terminal

·        It is under the direct observation of the security personnel at the terminal

·        It resulted in the loss of only two car parks

·        It is clear of the bus stop and turning area, disabled parking, and equipment shed to operate the gantries for the ferry.

·        It is set back from the wharf edge to preserve pedestrian access and recreational fishing.

Planning and consenting

26.     The location of the shelter is partially within the Coastal Marine Area (CMA) and partly on Road Reserve.  As such, resource consent was sought from Auckland Council under both the Auckland Council District Plan (North Shore Section) and the Auckland Council Regional Plan: Coastal.

27.     Under these plans, the shelter required consent as a “restricted/limited discretionary” activity. As such, Auckland Council restricted its discretion in granting the resource consent to the consideration of the following matters:

·        Use and design of the facility;

·        Visual amenity;

·        Impact on roading network; and

·        Construction effects.

28.     Auckland Council processing officers reviewed the information provided and were satisfied that any potential adverse effects from the bike shelter were no more than minor.  The application was then referred to an Independent Duty Commissioner for approval and was granted on the 30th May 2013.  The consent reference is LR-2137480 and 41675.

29.     In the consideration of the application, Auckland Council considered that the application met the tests to be considered without limited or full public notification.

30.     Moving the shelter to a different location is likely to require either an application to vary the conditions of the existing consent, or a completely new resource consent application.

Potential relocation costs and timings

31.     Depending on how far the shelter is moved and the required level of consultation with the community, planning fees could range from $3,000 (for a straightforward variation) to $10,000+ (for a new consent where consultation is required). Council resource consent application fees ($750 - $2045); drawings, specialist inputs (e.g. landscape or urban design) and building consent fees would be additional to the planning input.

32.     Timeframes would also be highly variable depending on the complexity in the change of location. The best case scenario would be consent being granted 3 months from the time that the location and drawings finalised however, it could take significantly longer (again, depending on the level of consultation required and the complexity of the change in location).

33.     In terms of building costs, it is difficult to provide accurate estimates of the costs involved in moving the structure, as these would be dependent on the location it was being moved to but these could be considerably more than the $64,000 initial build cost, when reinstatement and access costs for services are taken into account.

Consideration

Local Board Views

34.     This report is for the Local Board’s information.

Maori Impact Statement

35.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

General

36.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation Issues

There are no implementation issues

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Sean Corbett, Property Manager Operations, Auckland Transport

Paul Hancock, Infrastructure and Facilities Manager, Auckland Transport

Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Roger Wilson, Council Engagement Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in April 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/08883

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides information on transport related matters of interest to local board members during April 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         receive the Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in April 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board report.

 

 

Comments

Auckland Transport News

 

New Fanshawe St Bus Lane Opens

2.       A new bus lane has opened on Fanshawe Street.

3.       For bus commuters heading out of the city towards the North Shore it means a journey less impeded by traffic congestion. The bus lane now runs from Albert St all the way to the northern motorway.

4.       Group Manager Public Transport, Mark Lambert, says Auckland Transport has worked hard to get the bus lane up and running within two months of the idea being suggested by Luke Christensen from Generation Zero and supported by Cameron Pitches from Campaign for Better Transport.

5.       Mr Lambert says with a bus every 40 seconds on Fanshawe Street and 70 per cent of the people who travel on Fanshawe Street at peak being on a bus, it makes sense to improve their journey times.

6.       He says the new bus lane is an interim measure while longer term plans continue to extend the Northern Busway to and from the city centre.

Record numbers of Aucklanders using Public Transport

7.       In March there was a big jump in the number of people using public transport in Auckland - there were 7.3 million trips, an increase of 4% on March last year.

8.       The year to March also saw strong growth with just over 71 million trips.

9.       Rail continues to be the star performer with more than 11 million trips in the year to March, up 14% on an annual basis.

10.     Group Manager Public Transport, Mark Lambert, says the growth in rail is very pleasing. “The jump in rail numbers reflects the improved on-time performance, integrated ticketing and the renewed interest in rail with the introduction of the electric trains.  March saw a record number of people using Auckland’s train services.”

11.     The first electric trains have started on the Onehunga line.

12.     The Northern Express bus service also had a record month in March, up 6% for the year.

13.     Other bus services carried 52 million passengers in the year to March, an annual increase of 3%.

14.     Meanwhile, there was an increase of 9% in cycling in March compared to March 2013. The morning peak saw a rise of 20%.

Big Step for Auckland’s City Rail Link

15.     The City Rail Link (CRL) has reached a major milestone with Auckland Transport accepting a recommendation by planning commissioners to confirm the land requirements for the CRL.

16.     Auckland Transport’s chief executive David Warburton says the commissioners noted that the project benefits were essentially uncontested, and recognised it was critical for Auckland’s growth and economic future.

17.     The CRL will connect Auckland’s rail network underground from Britomart to the existing line near Mt Eden station, which will mean faster, more efficient and more direct travel for train users.

18.     “It’s a big step forward for Auckland. A proposal to extend rail through the city centre has been on the books in some form or other for almost a hundred years but never got beyond an idea. At last we have a designated route,” says Dr Warburton.

19.     “The CRL is a major economic development opportunity as well as a significant transport investment and will help shape and grow Auckland.”

20.     The designation identifies land in the district plan for rail purposes and protects the route for the future.

21.     All affected property owners and submitters will be informed of AT’s decision which can be appealed to the Environment Court.

22.     For more information: www.at.govt.nz

23.     CRL conditions: https://www.at.govt.nz/media/393035/CRL-Conditions-Confirmed-4-April-2014.pdf

Planting on Grass Berms 

24.     Auckland Transport is reviewing its policy and guidelines for planting of vegetation on grass berms.

25.     The current policy is that planting is not permitted as it may create safety hazards (impairing sight lines, covering signage etc); cause damage to underground services such as sewerage, water and power;  and increase on-going road corridor maintenance costs, if planting is abandoned by the homeowner.

26.     Chief Operations Officer, Greg Edmonds, says the organisation is aware of a number of residents and businesses who have planted berms outside their property.

27.     “We will not take any action in terms of removal whilst we are reviewing the policy unless those plantings pose a very real safety risk”, he says.

28.     “We will be taking a customer-focused and pragmatic approach to our review, in consultation with Auckland Council; however safety for road users, pedestrians and cyclists will be paramount as will be managing the cost of on-going road corridor maintenance.”

Consideration

Local board views and implications

29.       This report is for the Local Board’s information.

Maori impact statement

30.       No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

 

General

31.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation

32.       There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Liaison, Auckland Transport

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Community Lease for Additional Premises to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated, Recreation Drive, Birkenhead

 

File No.: CP2014/08986

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the Kaipatiki Local Board’s approval to grant a community lease for additional premises to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated to enable the erection of a new garage for props and equipment storage, and to grant landowner consent for this project. 

Executive Summary

2.       North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated (the Club) occupies a site on Recreation Drive, Birkenhead under the terms of a community lease that runs from 1 October 2010 for a period of ten years with one right of renewal for a further ten years (Attachment A).

3.       The Club owns and occupies the clubrooms that provide rehearsal space, a workshop, props and equipment storage.

4.       The Club is seeking the consent of the Local Board to erect a new storage facility on the site to the rear of its facility that was formerly occupied by the North Harbour Racing Pigeon Club garages, now demolished (Attachment C).

5.       As the site for the new building is outside the area currently community leased, a Community Lease for Additional Premises is required.

6.       The terms of the Community Lease for Additional Premises will be synchronised with that of the community lease already held for the site of the existing clubrooms.

7.       The site is held by in fee simple by Auckland Council and classified as Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve.

 

Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)   approves a Deed of Lease for Additional Premises to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated, Recreation Drive, Birkenhead, subject to the following terms and conditions:

·    premises  – the site extending to approximately 132m2 shown cross hatched on Appendix A to this report

·    term – commencing 1 June 2014 expiring 30 September 2020 with one ten year right of renewal

·    rent - $1.00 per annum

·    all other terms and conditions will reflect those contained in the original community lease to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated.

 

b)   grants landowner consent to North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated to erect a new storage facility on the site of the former Pigeon Club garages on Recreation Drive, Birkenhead, subject to the following terms and conditions:

·    the lessee obtaining and adhering to all necessary resource and building consents required

·    the proposed works being carried out within the new community lease boundary by qualified trades people meeting all health and safety requirements

·    the new garage will be used for storage of props and equipment and wardrobe workshop

·    the proposed works being completed in a tidy, efficient and professional manner with as little disruption to other users of the reserve as possible

·    within one month of the completion of the new storage building the Club shall remove the two shipping containers stored on the reserve

·    any changes to the proposal must be notified and approved by the Kaipatiki Local Board.

 

Comments

8.       North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated (the Club) occupies a site on Recreation Drive, Birkenhead, under the terms of a community lease that runs from 1 October 2010 for a period of ten years with one right of renewal for a further ten years.

9.       The Club, which has been on the site since 1963, owns and occupies the clubrooms that provide rehearsal space, a workshop, props and equipment storage and a kitchen.

10.     The Club has a long history of producing quality theatre as a not-for-profit organisation offering members an introduction and training in all aspects of the theatre.

11.     It has three shows planned for this its 50th anniversary year, including ‘Hairspray’ that will show in the Sky City Theatre in August, and ‘Annie Get Your Gun’ in the Pump House Theatre in November.

12.     The Club is seeking the consent of the Board to erect a new storage building on the site behind its clubrooms, in order that it can rationalise its current storage to provide more rehearsal space in the clubrooms to cater for its growing membership, and also to enable the removal of the two shipping containers on the Council reserve in front of the existing buildings (Attachment B).

13.     The proposed building will be an ideal garage structure extending to 132m2 (Attachment D). The building will be situated to the rear of the clubrooms on the site of the former North Harbour Racing Pigeon garages (Attachment C).

14.     The new building will provide set, costume and equipment storage together with a wardrobe workshop. 

15.     The site is outside the area held under the existing community lease; therefore a new Community Lease for Additional Premises is required.

16.     The initial term of the Community Lease for Additional Premises will be for four years and four months to synchronise it with that of the community lease already held for the site of the clubrooms.

17.     All other terms of the Community Lease for Additional Premises will reflect those contained in the existing community lease held by the Club.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

18.     This matter was discussed with the Kaipatiki Local Board community facilities portfolio holder on 16 April 2014, at which time informal support was given to the project.

Maori Impact Statement

19.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

20.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local and sports parks.

21.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

22.     Council staff have sought input from relevant Council departments.

23.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

24.     The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council.  It is classified as Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve, and there is therefore no requirement to publicly notify the proposed Community Lease for Additional Premises.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A North Shore Music Theatre, Recreation Drive, Birkenhead

119

bView

Attachment B Application from North Shore Music Theatre

121

cView

Attachment C Proposed building

123

dView

Attachment D Layout of proposed building

125

     

Signatories

Authors

Maureen Buchanan - Community Lease Advisor North

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Approval to Advertise Community Lease Vacancy at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote

 

File No.: CP2014/08994

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the Kaipatiki Local Board’s approval to advertise the community lease vacancy at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote, and seek expressions of interest from community organisations in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Executive Summary

2.       The ground floor community office space at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote, has been vacated by the Northcote Community Constable (Attachment A).

3.       The accommodation is situated in the building immediately adjacent to the Northcote Library and comprises two small offices and an open plan reception/meeting space. 

4.       The Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommend that any vacant premises be advertised seeking expressions of interest from eligible community organisations wishing to secure a community lease.

5.       Applicants must meet eligibility criteria including legal status, provide programmes or services that align with the relevant local board plan and meet identified needs in the area.

6.       An application has already been received from Citizens Advice Bureau North Shore Incorporated (CABNS). This organisation is currently located on the first floor of the Norman King Building with Raeburn House.

 

Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      Approves the advertising of the vacant ground floor community office space at 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote, seeking expressions of interest from eligible community groups and organisation wishing to secure a community lease. All applications must be in accordance with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      Approves a further report being prepared for consideration at the first available business meeting detailing the applications received.

 

 

Comments

7.       The ground floor office accommodation in the community building next to the Northcote Library has been vacated by the Northcote Community Constable, who has been recalled to Glenfield Police Station.

8.       The premises, which extend to 22.4m2, comprise two small offices and an open plan meeting/reception area that has a kitchen bench and tea point facilities.  There are no toilets in the office, but there are public toilets in the community building adjacent to vacant unit. The space is in good decorative order and in a location that is easy to find and access.

9.       Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommends that all vacancies be publicly advertised seeking expressions of interest from eligible groups and organisations.

10.     The eligibility criteria for applicants includes:

·    legal status, i.e. all applicants must be not-for-profit charitable trusts or incorporated societies

·    applicants must provide programmes or activities that align with and promote the strategic outcomes defined in the Board’s local board plan

·    have a clear and effective governance structure.

11.     An application has been received from Citizens Advice Bureau North Shore Incorporated (CABNS), which currently occupies two rooms in the Raeburn House Settlement Support office on the first floor of the Norman King Building.

12.     There is no lift in the Norman King Building, and the CABNS would like to relocate to the ground floor space vacated by the Community Constable to ensure that the facility and services offered are more visible and accessible to all members of the community. The applicant has the support of Auckland Citizens Advice Bureau Incorporated and CABNS.

13.     The CABNS has confirmed that it can continue to offer the use of the facility to the Northcote Community Constable if required.

14.     The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommend that community groups occupying rooms within larger Council buildings be required to pay an operational charge for the space occupied.  The amount charged is based on recovery of the direct costs to Council of providing the premises. These costs include building insurance, structural maintenance, utility charges, and water charges.  The community office space extends to 22.4m2, resulting in an operational charge of $560 plus GST per annum.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

15.     The Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommend that all vacancies be advertised, seeking expressions of interest from community groups and organisations that meet eligibility criteria and that wish to secure a community lease.

16.     The application received from Citizens Advice Bureau North Shore Incorporated (CABNS) was discussed at the Kaipatiki Local Board Workshop on 4 December 2013.  The Board is aware of the recommendations in the Community Occupancy Guidelines, but may choose to offer the lease to CABNS for the following reasons:

·    the limitations the current accommodation places on CABNS

·    the established and supportive relationship the Local Board holds with CABNS

·    the willingness of CABNS to make the premises available to the Northcote Community Constable when required

·    the proximity to existing clients and support services offered by Raeburn House and the Settlement Support project.

17.     If this is the case, the community lease could be offered on the following terms and conditions:

a)           term - one year commencing 1 June 2014 with one right of renewal for a further one year

b)           rent - $1.00 per annum

c)           operational charge - $560 per annum plus GST commencing 1 June 2014 or date of entry whichever is earlier

d)           the Citizens Advice Bureau North Shore Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan being approved and attached as a schedule to the lease (Attachment B)                                                        

e)           all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Maori Impact Statement

18.     There are no significant changes or impacts for Maori associated within the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

19.     All costs involved in the preparation of the lease document will be borne by Auckland Council.

20.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

21.     The land is owned by Auckland Council and held in fee simple. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A 5 Ernie Mays Street, Northcote

131

bView

Attachment B: Citizens Advice Bureau North Shore Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

133

     

Signatories

Authors

Maureen Buchanan - Community Lease Advisor North

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Smoke-free Public Places Implementation

 

File No.: CP2014/07928

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to provide the Kaipatiki Local Board (‘the Board’) with recommendations on the implementation of the Auckland Council Smoke-free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) in its local board area.

Executive summary

2.       The Policy sets out a regional position on smoke-free public places and events. The exact detail of the implementation will be a matter for local board discretion, as local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities.

3.       Local Boards can:

·        choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·        determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·        decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·        determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

4.       To assist local boards progress the implementation of the Policy, staff have made recommendations pertaining to the extent of smoke-free public places, signage requirements, promotion activities and other matters. 

5.       In terms of signage for smoke-free public places, staff do not recommend smoke-free signage in all areas affected by the Policy. Instead, placing additional smoke-free signs in certain ‘high priority sites’ will bear greater benefits in promoting smoke-free public places.

6.       In April 2014, staff attended a workshop with the Kaipatiki Local Board to confirm high priority sites for the installation of additional smoke-free signage. While the Board expressed support for smoke-free public places, it commented that existing signs within its area are due for upgrade and replacement; and indicated that its preference would be not to fund additional smoke-free signs until existing signs are replaced or upgraded. Instead, the Board favoured the use of smoke-free stickers to communicate the smoke-free message in public places.

7.       Given the planned signage renewals and upgrades, staff recommend additional smoke-free signs be installed as signage upgrades and renewals take place. Due to issues with durability, staff advise stickers be used as an interim measure.

8.       In order to promote the smoke-free status of these sites, staff recommend that the Board publicises smoke-free public places in their local board area as the Board deems appropriate.


 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      allocate budget for additional smoke-free signs and/or stickers in 8 high priority sites which include:

i)        Onepoto Domain

ii)       Shepherds Park

iii)      Birkenhead War Memorial Park, Leisure Centre & Library

iv)      Marlborough Park

v)      Normanton Reserve

vi)      Little Shoal Bay

vii)     Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

viii)    Glenfield Library

b)      align printing and installation of additional smoke-free signs in high priority areas (a(i)-viii)) with signage replacement and upgrades

c)      promotes smoke-free status of smoke-free public places in its area as the Board deems appropriate

 

 

Comments

Background

9.       The Auckland Council Smoke Free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) sets out council’s position on smoke-free public places, events, tobacco control advocacy and workplace smoking cessation.

10.     As local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities, the implementation of the Policy at a local level is a matter for local board discretion.

11.     Local boards can: 

·        choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·        determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·        decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·        determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

12.     According to the 2013 census, the Kaipatiki Local Board (‘the Board’) area smoking rate (12 per cent) is similar to the regional smoking rate (13 per cent). However, the youth smoking rate (15-25 years) for the Board is slightly higher (5 per cent) compared to the region (2.25 per cent).

13.     The Auckland Plan and the Policy has a goal of a smoke-free Auckland by 2025. This means that the region has no more than a five percent smoking rate 2025. In order to reach this target, approximately seven percent or (4,247 persons) in Kaipatiki will need to quit smoking by 2025. 

Policy Implementation

Smoke-free Public Places

14.     Smoke-free in public places aims to discourage the community from smoking in certain public outdoor areas to de-normalise smoking behaviour.  As the Policy is non-regulatory, compliance is voluntary and relies on the public being well informed about these smoke-free areas. As such smoke-free signs need to communicate the smoke-free status of a space.

15.     However, the cost of installing smoke-free signage in all public places identified in the Policy outweighs its benefit. Therefore, staff recommend placing smoke-free signs in certain areas where the smoke-free message will have the greatest impact.

16.     In order to identify these sites, staff developed a criteria based on the objectives and principles of the Policy. The criteria focused on:

·        areas that are frequented by children and youth

·        council-owned facilities

·        areas that are well used and popular within their community

·        sites where several smoke-free public places are clustered in close proximity.

17.     Based on scores against the criteria, sites were then divided into four categories. Smoke-free signage implementation varies according to the categories. Sites that are scored highly are ‘Category A sites’ or high priority sites, where there is an opportunity for a higher level of smoke-free signage installation. Table one summarises these categories and smoke-free signage installation.

 

Table 1             Site priority and level of signage installation

Category

Level of smoke-free signage installation

A

High priority sites

·      additional smoke-free signs

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades occurs

B

Medium priority sites

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades

C

Low priority sites

·      smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they are replaced or upgraded

D

No priority sites

·      no smoke-free signage installation

 

High priority smoke-free sites

18.     Staff had prepared recommendations on the high priority (Category A) and medium priority (Category B) sites within the Kaipatiki local board area. In April 2014 a workshop with the Board was held to gather feedback and confirm these high priority sites. Table two outlines the high priority smoke-free sites in the Kaipatiki local board area.


 

Table 2            High priority smoke-free sites for Kaipatiki local board area

Site Name

Rationale

Approximate costs

Onepoto Domain

·      Popular and busy sports park and playground

·      Frequented by children “Learn to Ride’ course and playground

·      Sports fields used regularly

Approximately 2

·      Signs: Est. $250

·      Stickers: Est. $10

Shepherds Park

·      Popular sports park with sports clubs onsite

 

Approximately 3

·      Signs: Est. $370

·      Stickers Est. $15

Birkenhead War Memorial Park, Birkenhead Leisure Centre & Library

·      Popular park site with a leisure centre and sports fields

·      Diversity of user groups

Approximately 4

·      Signs: Est $500

·      Stickers: Est $20

Marlborough Park

·      Hard courts, playground, sand field, skate park and passive recreation space

·      Well frequented by children and families

Approximately 3

·      Signs: Est: 370

·      Stickers: Est $15

Normanton Reserve

·      Space used for passive recreation by children, families and youth

Approximately 2

·      Signs: Est. $250

·      Stickers: Est. $10

Little Shoal Bay

·      Sports fields, fitness equipment, playground and used for passive recreation

·      Diversity of user groups

Approximately 2

·      Signs: Est. $250

·      Stickers: Est. $10

Glenfield Pool & Leisure Centre

·      Near Glenfield Mall and town centre

·      High profile space, visible council asset

·      Frequented by children and young people

Approximately 3

·      Signs: Est. $370

·      Stickers Est. $15

Glenfield Library

·      In proximity to Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

·      High visible council asset within town centre area

·      Frequented by families and children

Approximately 3

·      Signs: Est. $370

·      Stickers Est. $15

NB: these cost estimates for signs are based on (300x150mm and 300x400mm) sizes from one supplier (Panda Visuals)

Smoke-free signage installation in other areas

19.     Sites that have scored moderately against the criteria, or ‘medium priority’ (Category B) sites, will have temporary smoke-free sticker logo attached onto existing signs (in accordance with the council’s signage manual). As signs are replaced and upgraded, the signs will incorporate the permanent smoke-free logo.

20.     For the Kaipatiki local board area, the medium priority sites are:

1.       Northcote Library

2.       Marlborough Park Hall

3.       Northcote War Memorial Hall

4.       Birkdale Hall

21.     ‘Low priority’ (Category C) sites will have the smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they due for upgrades or replacement. ‘No priority’ (Category D) sites are areas that do not currently have any signage installed.

Smoke-free public places promotion

22.     As the Policy is non-regulatory, raising public awareness around the danger of smoking and the council’s position on achieving a smoke-free Auckland is important.

23.     To assist the Board in the promotion of the Policy staff suggest the following for consideration:

·        an article in the local paper or magazine near World Smoke-free Day (31 May 2014)

·        a launch event at one of the high priority sites on World Smoke-free Day (31 May 2014)

·        raise awareness through social media (i.e. local board Facebook page or a website).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.     Staff consulted with the Board throughout the development of the Policy in 2012-2013.

25.     In April 2014, staff attended a workshop with the Board to confirm the high and medium priority sites for the implementation of the Policy. The Board was also provided with an indicative cost of introducing additional signage in the identified high priority sites. 

26.     At the workshop, the Board made the following comments: 

1.       the Board supports smoke-free public places 

2.       existing signage in identified high priority sites are in urgent need of upgrade and renewal

3.       the Board indicated that it is hesitant to fund additional smoke-free signs in these areas before the existing signs are replaced and/ or upgraded

4.       Instead, the Board indicated that it would be willing to use smoke-free stickers in these high priority areas.

Maori impact statement

27.     The New Zealand Tobacco Use Survey (2009) found that the smoking rate amongst Maori (44 percent) is significantly higher than that of the non-Maori population (18 percent).

28.     Through the development of the Policy, many stakeholders highlighted the disparity between Maori and non-Maori smoking rates within the region as a cause for disproportionate health outcomes for Maori.

29.     The Policy aims to address Maori smoking rates through:

·        the creation of smoke-free public places

·        smoke-free signs to contain awareness based messages in Maori

·        focus on the Southern Initiative smoke-free work stream.

Implementation

30.     There will be additional costs to the local board relating to the printing and installation of smoke-free signage or stickers, in the high priority sites identified in this report.

31.     Wall mounted smoke-free signage is hard-wearing and have a longer life span than stickers. Signs enable the Board to include specific smoke-free messages. Also, there are economies of scale with mass printing of smoke-free signs. However, given the signage upgrades and replacement that are planned in the Board’s area, staff recommend the installation of smoke-free signs when these sign upgrades occur, in order to keep costs low.  

32.     The approximate cost of additional smoke-free signs in the 8 identified sites (Table two) in Phase one is approximately $2,800- $3,000. The exact costs will vary depending on:

·        the exact number of smoke-free signs required on each site

·        if there are many smoke-free messages (e.g. mass printing of one message is more cost effective)

·        the positioning and installation of the smoke-free signs.

33.     If the Board would like to use smoke-free stickers in the 8 identified sites (Table two), the cost is estimated at $110-$200. The exact costs will vary depending on:

·        the decided size of the smoke-free stickers

·        the exact number of smoke-free stickers required on each site.

34.     These estimated costs are one off costs. Any ongoing costs will be covered within signage maintenance and renewal budgets.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur - Policy Analyst

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Bylaw review programme update - April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08432

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on bylaw review (policy) and bylaw implementation (operations), covering June 2013 to April 2014. This joint approach to reporting ensures that local boards have a comprehensive overview of the end-to-end programme through to 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       Consultation on the proposed Navigation safety bylaw closed on 17 March 2014. Staff are now preparing a summary of submissions alongside the full submissions to the hearings panel. The proposed Cemeteries and crematoria bylaw was adopted by the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee and Governing Body in March, and submissions opened from early April.

3.       Further proposed bylaws will be presented to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee shortly covering the next set of topics: Outdoor fires; Stormwater; Trading in public places; Alcohol controls and Animal management (covering animals other than dogs).

4.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Information about the proposed changes will be included with material provided as part of the annual dog registration cycle to minimise costs and ensure simplified communication with these customers.

5.       Implementation projects are well underway for the upcoming commencement of the Health and hygiene (from 1 July 2014) and Public safety and nuisance (from 26 May 2014) bylaws. Planning for the new Health and hygiene bylaw and associated licensing has included particular attention for operators where the rules have changed significantly. The majority of these newly registered premises will receive a visit from a member of the environmental health team, and a welcome pack that summarises the standards they are required to meet.

6.       The Alcohol licensing readiness project has now completed its key work relating to establishing the new licensing structures needed under the new alcohol act. These are running as intended from 18 December 2013.

7.       Review work is continuing on further topics to support completion of the review programme by October 2015, alongside implementation planning for the resulting changes.

8.       No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

9.       An investment proposal for the integrated programme is being progressed, to be submitted for consideration as part of preparing the draft 2015-2024 Long-Term Plan.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      Note the progress of bylaw review and implementation and the forward programme that will complete the review of the legacy bylaws by 2015.

 

 

Discussion

The bylaw review programme

10.     The bylaw review programme was originally endorsed by the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee in December 2010 (refer CP2010/00962) and February 2011 (refer CP2011/00453). It will review the legacy bylaws (that is, the bylaws inherited from the former legacy councils) across approximately 30 topics. A new bylaw will be prepared for each topic where appropriate, or a recommendation made that the underlying issue or outcome is better handled another way.

11.     The Regulatory and Bylaws Committee has ownership of the review and local boards are participating through individual workshops and reports. Local boards are also able to propose that local bylaws are made to apply only in their area (refer sections 24 to 28 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009). Any requests for local bylaws are reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee. As stated above, there have been no local board proposals for local bylaws over the last period. This report covers the period June 2013 to April 2014.

12.     As this is the first report on this programme since the 2013 local government elections, Attachment A provides a brief background to bylaws, including an outline of each bylaw topic.

Update on review of bylaw topics

13.     The current state of the review work programme is presented in the table below and the detailed comments for several topics that follow. Attachment B provides an overview of the timeline for the programme.

14.     The table below includes reviews that have already been completed. It also covers bylaws that may be folded into other topics (e.g. Freedom camping; Arkles Bay set netting), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-SCP

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health and hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Work programme

Navigation safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Outdoor / Rural fires

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amend)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On hold pending Proposed Unitary Plan outcomes

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharves and marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews by local boards - ongoing

Filming fee review

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes:

 

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned; due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts.

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed which may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed which will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled; background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Public safety & nuisance

On track

G

This bylaw topic crosses the jurisdiction of both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (two parallel bylaws). The new bylaws were adopted in 2013 and come into force in May 2014.

 

Navigation safety

On track

G

Public submissions were invited on this topic from 14 February to 17 March. Just under 400 submissions were received and are being reviewed. A range of communication approaches – including radio and attendance at relevant events – were used to help publicise the proposal and invite submissions. Hearings are expected in May.

 

Trading in public places (policy and bylaw)

On track

G

This review will deliver a single draft policy and two draft bylaws (for Council and Auckland Transport); drafting of these is well underway. It is expected that these will be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee and then the Governing Body in May. Any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015 (allowing any fee changes to also be put in place with Council’s Long-Term Plan).

 

Signs

On track

G

Discussions with local boards are currently underway to identify their views on particular matters, including local approaches to issues such as sandwich boards and cross-street banners. Comments from those discussions and other discussions with representatives of businesses and the signage industry will support the preparation of a draft bylaw later in 2014.

 

This project is also monitoring the progress of the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP), as it also includes signage provisions.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Election signs bylaw was adopted by Auckland Transport in May 2013, and was in place for the 2013 local government election. A number of operational issues arose during that election period, and the clarity of relevant clauses is planned to be addressed through a series of drafting amendments that will support better democratic process. These improve clarity for issues including the use of candidate and “team” signs, signs on private property, the readability of authoriser statements and the display of signs promoting election issues rather than candidates or teams. The amendments also provide for the possible later addition of explanatory notes into the bylaw, where desirable to provide further guidance.

 

The proposed amendments are being reported to the Auckland Transport Board in April, to allow for consultation on the proposed changes. Local boards will receive further information then.

 

Changes are also being considered to remove or adjust some of the specified sign sites in the western area. These follow a review of sites against criteria including practicality and safety, and are intended to address issues that arose in 2013. Those local boards where changes are being considered will receive further information on this.

 

Alcohol controls

On track

G

Each of the legacy councils had adopted an Alcohol control bylaw, and put in place a series of alcohol controls through that bylaw. Alcohol controls (previously called liquor bans) prohibit the consumption of alcohol within a specified place, during a specified time.

 

Legislative changes introduced alongside central government’s reform of laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol provides Council and police with enhanced powers in relation to alcohol controls. Those changes also require Council to review its existing alcohol controls against a new threshold, as part of any decision to carry those controls forward past October 2015. Following a review of available data, the majority of existing controls across Auckland are considered to meet the new requirements.

A proposed bylaw is planned to be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee shortly. The existing bylaws are broadly similar, and so the new proposed bylaw will largely seek to continue the current arrangements. In line with consultation with local boards from 2011 (alongside other alcohol-related matters), the new bylaw will facilitate local board involvement in decisions on alcohol controls and an improved community-based focus on alcohol issues.

 

Community-focussed approaches may include crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), local community initiatives, discussions with nearby licensees, youth and leadership development programmes, partnering with central government agencies including the Police and the Ministry of Justice, and partnering with local agencies including sports clubs and iwi and town centre / business associations.

 

These non-regulatory approaches can often lead to significant reductions in alcohol harm and have better long-term effects than regulatory approaches such as making an alcohol control.

 

Hazardous substances

On track

G

The former Auckland City Council had a hazardous substances bylaw. A review of this bylaw has indicated that the issues it covered are now addressed adequately through other means, including provisions in other bylaws, the Resource Management Act, national environmental standards, and regulations made under various acts.

 

Comment is being sought from the local boards where the legacy bylaw currently applies, following which a proposed approach (that could include allowing the bylaw to lapse in 2015) will be brought to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee.

 

Dog access review

On track

G

Local boards are able to review dog access rules for local parks and local beaches in their areas on an annual basis. This allows a better response to community views than was possible under the legacy councils’ approaches.

 

For 2014 selected dog access are being reviewed by the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

To ensure that registered dog owners are advised of the proposed changes (as required by legislation), local boards are including a joint notice within the dog registration package in June. This will reduce costs, and ensure that dog owners receive a single combined communication from Council, rather than multiple messages.

 

Filming fees review

On track

G

The Auckland Film Protocol was adopted in 2013, after wide consultation with local boards, the screen production industry, Council-controlled organisations and other stakeholders. The protocol aims to create a film-friendly culture across Auckland, based on a two way commitment from the wider Council organisation and from filmmakers. It also seeks to help deliver a customer driven service that provides certainty to filmmakers in a globally competitive market, and to enable public goodwill towards the film industry by setting out expectations of film crews when filming in public places.

 

Currently there is a range of filming fee structures in place inherited from the former councils. A filming fees review is now underway to understand how this element of the filming process can be harmonised and improved. The Policies and Bylaws unit is working with ATEED on this project, and it is expected that local board input will be sought on this over the next few months.

 

Update on implementation of new bylaws

15.     Detailed implementation planning is developed by the responsible operations division alongside the process for reviewing each of the bylaws, through a cross-Council programme called the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme. Initial planning for implementation starts when the bylaw topic review identifies the issues and options related to each topic. This approach provides the operations division an early indication of the possible shape of the bylaw and its implementation considerations.

16.     This programme includes the main groups involved in operating bylaws and delivering the relevant services to our customers. The programme is also helping ensure bylaw reviews can be aligned to other related transformational changes, such as the consolidation of information technology systems, customer service improvement programmes and the organisation’s capacity to implement those changes.

17.     Implementation of new bylaws will generally cover:

·    ensuring that Council meets its statutory obligations;

·    ensuring that effective operational practices on the control and enforcement of the new bylaws are implemented consistently across the region, and are made available to the general public;

·    ensuring that communications to the general public and other stakeholders are well planned and implemented in a timely manner;

·    developing and implementing standard business rules and processes that help achieve Council’s customer service standards;

·    ensuring that internal services are planned and delivered when needed, and are in alignment with other transformation initiatives;

·    putting any changes to fees in place; and

·    ensuring that staff are informed throughout the process and are trained on delivering the new services.

18.     The table below shows the current status of implementation projects.

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health and hygiene bylaw and code of practice (see below)

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

 

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading / Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places policy and bylaw

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Proposed future

Air quality

B

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls (liquor bans)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Animals (Stage 2)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

On track

G

The Alcohol licensing project has now completed successfully. This project set out to ensure that Council was able to implement the requirements of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, including the new licensing system and new fees required from 18 December 2013.

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On track

G

The Governing Body has resolved that Council adopt its own fees for licensed premises. This is provided for in the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. Council can change the fee amounts, using the cost / risk fee categories that have been set by central government. Work is underway to capture actual information on costs, based on operating the new licensing system and the parts of those costs that can be recovered through licensing fees.

 

Health protection

On track

G

The Health protection project is implementing the new Health and hygiene bylaw and code of practice, which will come into force from 1 July 2014. A range of user-friendly brochures that summarise key provisions of the health protection code have been prepared to help communicate the requirements to all people who operate these businesses.

 

A series of approaches are underway to help ensure operators are aware of the requirements to be followed. The new bylaw (with its risk-based approach) has resulted in some premises that are now required to be registered, and the communication activities are focussed on these premises. Most of these premises will receive an individual visit and an appropriate information pack.

 

There are also several premises that no longer need to be registered with Council, which will be communicated to affected businesses.

 

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

19.     The scope and scale of the expected changes mean that implementation requires significant effort, resources and cost for some topics. The Strategy and Finance Committee made an initial provision for funding the IBRI programme at its meeting of 9 May 2013 (in part; refer item 16, SF/2013/67).

20.     As provided for in the resolution, a further investment proposal is being prepared for the 2015-2025 Long-Term Plan. The programme continuously monitors its approach to each bylaw, and where possible captures any cost efficiencies and learnings for later bylaws.

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic, consistent with the review principles. This report provides an update on the programme for local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

22.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP)or other initiatives.

General

23.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger Council’s policy on significance.

Implementation Issues

24.     Implementation issues are addressed as relevant to each topic, as noted above.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Background to bylaws

149

bView

Overview of the timeline for the programme

157

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Simon Pickering - Manager, Planning, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 









Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Granted Resource Consent Applications by Local Board Area

 

File No.: CP2014/07703

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Please find attached Northern Resource Consents granted applications for March 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipatiki Local Board:

a)         receive the Granted Resource Consent Applications by Local Board Area report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Granted Applications by Local Board Area Report March 2014

161

    

Signatories

Authors

Jan Asplet - Unit Administrator

Authorisers

Heather Harris - Manager Resource Consents

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 





Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/08504

 

  

 

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the report from Member Richard Hills.

b)      receive any verbal reports of members.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Member Richard Hills' Report

167

     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 







Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

 

File No.: CP2014/08503

 

  

 

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for Governing Body Members to update the board on Governing Body issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Members’ verbal updates.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Generic Reports received for information - April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/06970

 

  

 

Executive Summary

The following generic items have been received for the Board’s information:

Report Title

Referred by

Item

Date of Meeting

Date Received

Request to amend the implementation date of the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013; and accelerate the development of the Local

Approved Products Policy

Governing Body

15

27 March 2014

3 April 2014

 

A copy of the report is available on the Auckland Council website.

 

A copy of the report has been circulated to Board Members, which can also be accessed on the M Drive as follows: M:\Meetings\Kaipatiki\Reports\Circulated Reports

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipatiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Generic Reports received for information – April 2014 report. The report references the following Governing Body report:

·        Request to amend the implementation date of the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013; and accelerate the development of the Local Approved Products Policy

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops, Wednesday, 2 April 2014, Wednesday, 9 April 2014, and Wednesday, 16 April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/09006

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday, 2 April 2014, Wednesday, 9 April 2014, and Wednesday, 16 April 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 2 April 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board heard briefings on:

·        Reprioritisation

·        Fees and Charges

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 9 April 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board heard briefings on:

·        Local Board Plan development

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 16 April 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board heard briefings on:

·        The Dog Access review

·        Kaipatiki Economic Development action plan

·        Smoke-free implementation reports

·        Policy content / process around the psychoactive substances

·        WWI Centenary Programme

·        Historic Heritage Plan and Heritage Assets Stewardship Policy

·        Birkenhead War Memorial Park BMX track concept design

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the records for the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday, 2 April 2014, Wednesday, 9 April 2014, and Wednesday, 16 April 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Record of Workshop 2 April 2014

179

bView

Record of Workshop 9 April 2014

181

cView

Record of Workshop 16 April 2014

183

    

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Record of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/09081

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in April 2014.

Executive summary

2.       In April 2014, the Kaipatiki Local Board held the following Portfolio Briefings:

·    Parks – Tuesday, 8 April 2014

·    Sports and Recreation (Leisure) – Wednesday, 9 April 2014

·    Transport – Wednesday, 9 April 2014

·    Events – Thursday, 10 April 2014

·    Economic Development – Friday, 11 April 2014

·    Finance – Monday, 14 April 2014

·    Parks – Tuesday, 15 April 2014

·    Community Development and Facilities – Wednesday, 16 April 2014

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the records of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in April 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Records of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in April 2014

187

     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 









Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Applications for Special Exemptions under Section 6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

 

File No.: CP2014/07501

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Local Board with applications for special exemption from some of the requirements of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 (the Act).

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Board must conduct a hearing and consider the applications for special exemption. The Local Board must resolve to decline, grant or grant subject to conditions, the exemptions sought.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Kaipatiki Local Board grants the following applications for special exemption, subject to ongoing compliance with NZS8500-2006 Section 3.10 at all times:  

i)        Seren & Nicholas Wilson, 83 Hadfield Street, Beach Haven.

ii)       Fiona Martin, 43 McDowell Crescent, Hillcrest.

 

 

Comments

3.       Auckland Council pool inspectors have inspected the properties, which are the subject of an application before the Local Board.  In each case, the swimming pool fencing does not comply with that Act.  The details of non-compliance are specified in the attachments to this report. The applicants have chosen to seek a special exemption from the requirements of the Act.

4.       The purpose of the Act is stated to be “to promote the safety of young children by requiring the fencing of … swimming pools”.

5.       The Act requires pool owners to fence their pool with a fence.  Specific detail on the means of achieving compliance with the Act is contained in the schedule to the Act.  If a pool is not fenced with a complying fence it is an offence under the Act, unless exempt.

6.       An exemption can only be granted by the Local Board after a consideration of the particular characteristics of the property and the pool, other relevant circumstances and taking into account any conditions it may impose.  Then, only if “satisfied that an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children”, can an exemption be granted.

7.       Defining the immediate pool area will be relevant to considerations concerning the property and the pool. The immediate pool area means the land in or on which the pool is situated and as much of the surrounding area that is used for activities or purposes related to the use of the pool.  The Act provides that the fence should be situated to prevent children moving directly to the pool from the house, other buildings, garden paths and other areas of the property that would normally be available to young children.

8.       Another common consideration for Local Boards in exemption applications will be instances where a building forms part of the pool fence.  Where doors from a building open into the pool area, the territorial authority may grant an exemption from compliance with clauses 8 to 10 of the schedule to the Act.  It may exempt if it is satisfied that compliance with the Act is impossible, unreasonable or in breach of any other Act, regulation or bylaw, and the door is fitted with a locking device that when properly operated prevents the door from being readily opened by children under the age of 6 years. If the Local Board is satisfied that a door within a wall in a building meets that test, the Local Board must also be satisfied that an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children.

9.       When granting a special exemption, the Committee may impose such other conditions relating to the property or the pool as are reasonable in the circumstances (section 6(2) of the Act).  Issues to be considered include:

a.    Will the exemption be personal to the applicant so that on a sale of the property a new owner will need to apply for a new exemption?  This might be appropriate where the personal circumstances of the applicant have been considered as a relevant circumstance and had a bearing on the exercise of the discretion.

b.    Will the exemption be granted for a fixed term and irrespective of changes of ownership so that the exemption runs with the property?

c.    Are there any other conditions which should be imposed, repairs to existing fencing, or a requirement for more frequent inspection of the pool (currently pools are inspected every three years).

10.     Any exemption granted or condition imposed may be amended or revoked by the swimming pool exemption committee by resolution.  The rules of natural justice would however dictate that this action should not be taken without prior notice to the pool owner and allowing the pool owner an opportunity to be heard.

11.     The recommendations contained within this report fall within the Local Board’s delegated authority.

12.     The Act enables an exemption to be granted from clauses 8 to 10 of the Act (doors in walls of buildings) if the Local Board is satisfied that compliance with the Act is impossible, unreasonable or in breach of any other Act, regulation or bylaw and the door is fitted with a locking device that when properly operated prevents the door from being readily opened by children under the age of 6 years.

13.     The overarching consideration in terms of the Act is that a resolution to grant an exemption may only be made after having regard to the particular characteristics of the property and the pool, any other relevant circumstances and any conditions it may impose, and only if it is satisfied that such an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children.

14.     The Local Board may resolve to grant, grant subject to conditions, or decline an application for special exemption. If an application is declined the applicant will be required to fence their pool in accordance with the Act.

15.     The exemption hearing process under the Act does not trigger the significance policy but it is an important statutory function.

16.     The Council is committed to ensuring that Auckland is a safe place for children to live and play in.  Pool fencing issues have a strong relationship with the Council’s strategic priorities for community safety.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

17.     The Local Board is the decision maker in relation to exemption applications under the Act.

18.     Compliance with the Act is a mandatory requirement for all pool owners unless exempt.

19.     Council’s pool inspectors have consulted with the applicants.  The applicants have been made aware of the Council’s requirements to ensure fencing is compliant with the Act.  The applicants have elected to seek a special exemption for individual reasons.

Maori Impact Statement

20.     This report does not raise issues of particular significance for Maori.

Implementation

21.     The decision must be made by resolution.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

83 Hadfield Street - Confidential

 

bView

43 McDowell Crescent - Confidential

 

    

Signatories

Authors

Mark Satherley - Team Leader Compliance and Enforcement

Authorisers

Ian McCormick - Manager Building Control

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

14 May 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

27        Applications for Special Exemptions under Section 6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 - Attachment a - 83 Hadfield Street

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains the applicants details.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

27        Applications for Special Exemptions under Section 6 of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 - Attachment b - 43 McDowell Crescent

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains the applicants details.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.