I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 8 May 2014

6.30pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Dalton

 

Deputy Chairperson

Simeon Brown

 

Members

Michael Bailey

 

 

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

 

Hon George Hawkins, QSO

 

 

Danella McCormick

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Daryl Wrightson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Lee Manaia

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

1 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5421

Email: lee.manaia@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



Manurewa Local Board Portfolios

Portfolio Lead

Portfolio Associate

Portfolio Activity and Responsibilities

Angela Dalton

Chairperson

C/- Shop 3-5
7 Hill Road
Manurewa
Auckland 2105
Mob:  021 283 3311

Email:  Angela.Dalton@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Simeon Brown

·         Governance portfolio

·          Board leadership

·          Board-to-Council relationships

·          Board-to-Board relationships

·          Local Board Plan

·          Local Board agreements

·          Civic duties

·          Advocacy (local, regional, and central government)

·          Community partnerships

·          Relationships with Maoridom and youth

·          Relationships with government departments and agencies

·          Relationships with Watercare

·          Relationship with Property CCO

·          Relationship with Auckland Waterfront Development

·          Local funding policy Political Working Party

·          Relationship with ATEED

·          Relationship with Regional Facilities CCO’s

·          Relationship COMET

·          Relationship Southern Initiative

 

·         Regulatory portfolio

·          Resource consents

·          Heritage

·          Gambling

·          Liquor (Simeon Brown as alternate)

·          Urban design

·          Swimming pools

·          Trees

·          By-laws

·          Airport noise

·          Unitary Plan

·          Waste management

Simeon Brown

Deputy Chairperson

C/- Shop 3-5
7 Hill Road
Manurewa
Auckland 2105
Mob:  021 0272 4242
simeon.brown@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Daryl Wrightson

·         Community and social well-being portfolio

·          Community development (incl. CAYAD, CAB, and Manurewa Senior Citizens)

·          Neighbourhood relationships

·          Funding for neighbourhood projects

·          Community safety (excl. town centres)

·          Graffiti removal

·          Community advocacy

·          Community facilities

·          Youth Council

·          Contact CAB

Michael Bailey

·         Town centres and economic portfolio

·        Town centre renewal (incl. branding)

·        Design and maintenance

·        Town Centre marketing

·        Community safety within town centres

·        Business Improvement Districts (Michael Bailey and Simeon Brown)

·        Local priorities in relation to regional economic development initiatives

Michael Bailey

10 Rimu Road

Manurewa 2102

Mob:  021 287 4422

Email:  Micahel.Bailey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Danella McCormick

·         Sports parks and recreation portfolio

·          Stewardship of sports parks

·          Stewardship of recreation facilities

·          Relationship with sports clubs

·          Neighbourhood parks and reserves (incl. esplanade reserves and the coastline)

·          Design and maintenance

·          Plantings, playgrounds, bollards, and walkways

·          Botanic Gardens and Totara Park

·          Skateparks

·         Associate for the following portfolios:

·        Governance

·        transport

George Hawkins

·         Libraries and recreation portfolio

·        Stewardship of Manurewa libraries

·        Mobile library

George Hawkins

·         Transport portfolio

·        Local transport projects (incl. roading, footpaths, cycleways)

Angela Cunningham –Marino

C/- Auckland Council

Private Bag 92300

Auckland 1142

Ph:  266 4729

Mob:  027 504 0884

Email: 

Angela.Cunningham-Marino@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Daryl Wrightson

·         Arts, Culture and Events portfolio

·          Community celebration

·        Community identity

·        Neighbourhood gatherings and renewal

·        Event compliance

·        Artistic and cultural service levels

·        Promoting artistic endeavour (particularly among Manurewa youth)

·        Regional arts

·        Producing a music and arts centre for Manurewa

Simeon Brown

·         Recreation Services portfolio

·          Contact Manukau Leisure

Danella McCormick

·         Built and Natural Environment portfolio

·        Restoration of wetlands, streams, and waterways

·        Local priorities in relation to regional environmental management

·        Mangroves

·          Manukau Harbour

Danella McCormick

Shop 3-5, 7 Hill Road
Manurewa, Auckland 2105
Mob:  021 800 593

Email:  Danella.McCormick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Angela Cunningham-Marino

·         Civil Defence Emergency Management portfolio

·        Relationships with the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group

·        Community preparedness, disaster response, relief, and recovery

Other Board Members:

George Hawkins, QSO

30 Lakeside Drive
Papakura, Auckland 2113
Mob:  021 969 4444

Email:  George.Hawkins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Ken Penney

146e Great South Road
Manurewa, Auckland 2012 
Mob:  021 287 2244

Email:  Ken.Penney@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Daryl Wrightson

Shop 3-5, 7 Hill Road
Manurewa, Auckland 2105
Mob: 021 839 678

Email:  Daryl.Wrightson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum - Geek Camp - Judy Speight                                                       7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

12        Manurewa Ward Councillors Update                                                                          9

13        Manurewa Youth Council Update                                                                              11

14        Portfolio Update                                                                                                           13

15        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                 15

16        Manurewa Local Board - Community Group Funding - Applications for Consideration - Round Two 2013/2014                                                                                                 17

17        Quarterly Performance Report for the Manurewa Local Board for the period ended March 2014                                                                                                                               25

18        Auckland Transport Update – May 2014                                                                   27

19        Auckland Transport quarterly update to local boards for the quarter -
1 January to 31 March 2014                                                                                       
31

20        Bylaw review programme update - April 2014                                                         69

21        Manurewa Local Board - Funding Allocations                                                        87

22        Submission on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship                                          89

23        Manurewa Local Board feedback on Local Boards Funding Policy Review     103

24        Manurewa Local Board Feedback on the Council Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                     109

25        Local Board input re draft regulations for discharge and dumping in the ocean 113

26        Urgent Decision - Manurewa Local Board area neighbours day events - March 2014                                                                                                                                     123

27        Reports Requested - Pending - Issues                                                                   127

28        Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term      143

29        For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board                      147

30        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Notes                                                               149  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The meeting will begin with a prayer.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 10 April 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

Member Ken Penney was granted leave of absence at the 13 March 2014 local board meeting until 8 May 2014.  An extension to the leave of absence will be required.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Geek Camp - Judy Speight

Purpose

1.       Judy Speight wishes to brief the Manurewa Local Board and seek support for a “Geek Camp” being run in the July school holidays.

Executive summary

2.       N/A.

 


 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Judy Speight for her briefing on the “Geek Camp” being run during the July school holidays.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07913

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manurewa Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Manurewa Local Board on regional matters.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal report be received from:

i)        Councillor Calum Penrose regarding:

·   

ii)       Councillor Sir John Walker regarding:

·   

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Youth Council Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07914

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for the Manurewa Youth Council to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report from the Manurewa Youth Council be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Portfolio Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07915

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for Portfolio Leads to update to the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board

a)         receive the portfolio updates from:

i)       

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Chairperson's Update

 

File No.: CP2014/07916

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for the Chairperson to update the Local Board on issues she has been involved in.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board - Community Group Funding - Applications for Consideration - Round Two 2013/2014

 

File No.: CP2014/06600

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications received under Round Two of the Manurewa Local Board 2013/2014 Community Funding Programme.  The Manurewa Local Board is requested to fund, part fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.   The Manurewa Local Board has a total Community Funding Programme budget for 2013/2014 of $177,594.  This is being distributed to community groups in two funding rounds. The first closed in July 2013 and the second in February 2014.

3.   Under Round One the board committed $51,426 from its Community Funding Programme budget, which leaves a balance of $126,168 for Round Two.

4.   The applications to be considered by the board at this time are those received for Round Two, which is the second and final round in this financial year.

5.   Thirty-five applications have been received, requesting a total of $240,806.

6.   The Manurewa Local Board considered these applications at a workshop on 1 April 2014.

 

Recommendation:

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         considers the applications listed below and agrees to fund, part fund or decline    each application in this round:

Table 1 – Manurewa Local Board Community Funding Applications.

Fund

Organisation

Project to be Funded

Amount requested

Local Board Discretionary Community

Age Concern Counties Manukau Inc.

Towards printing, advertising, equipment hire, catering, entertainment and venue hire for a community meal to celebrate the 2014 International Day of Older Persons in October 2014

$3,263

Local Board Discretionary Community

Alfriston College

Towards the cost to establish a community garden at Alfriston College

$3,390

Local Board Discretionary Community

Alzheimer's Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards the costs to host a weekly community socialisation service walking group at the Manurewa Botanic Gardens for people with dementia between June 2014 and May 2015

$10,080

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust (FYD Auckland)

Towards wages for the Kiwi Can Leader to provide a weekly life-skills and values programmes to Manurewa Intermediate, Weymouth Intermediate,  Clendon Park, Leabank, Manurewa South, Manurewa West and Roscommon primary schools between June and December 2014

$8,000

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland NZ View

Towards the cost of taxis and minibuses to enable members to attend meetings, functions and regular outings between July 2014 and June 2015

$400

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards travel costs, overheads and co-ordination of a Newcomer Supporters Programme from July 2014 to June 2015

$3,840

Local Board Discretionary Community

First Presbyterian Church

Towards the cost for Stan Walker to perform at the one-day youth Transpose Festival to be held at Bruce Pulman Park, Papakura in November/December 2014

$7,005

Local Board Discretionary Community

Foundation for Youth Development

Towards transport, marae koha and catering for 450 Manurewa High School year 9 students to spend one night at Manurewa Marae

$5,400

Local Board Discretionary Community

Getin2life Youth Development Trust

Towards the cost to deliver six Underground Street Play sessions in the 2014/2015 year in the Manurewa Local Board area, including the cost of logistics, administration, community communication and equipment costs (repair and maintenance) between June 2014 and May 2015

$3,288

Local Board Discretionary Community

LifeChurch Manurewa

Towards the costs for 30 youth and 20 facilitators to attend a camp for identified at-risk youth to build relationships with mentors, to be held between June and October 2014

$14,392

Local Board Discretionary Community

Life Education Trust SE Auckland

Towards salary costs for an educator to provide the life education programme to schools in Manurewa between June 2014 and May 2015

$20,000

Local Board Discretionary Community

Manurewa Squash Rackets Club Inc.

Towards the cost of 2013/2014 rates for the property at 171 Weymouth Road, Manurewa

$3,398

Local Board Discretionary Community

Manurewa University of the Third Age

Towards the purchase of a sound system and projector; monthly speaker fees and venue hire for Manurewa Library between June 2014 and May 2015

$1,472

Local Board Discretionary Community

New Foundations Trust

Towards the provision of 12 mentoring sessions for 16 James Cook High School students at risk of expulsion

$9,620

Local Board Discretionary Community

Project LiteFoot Trust

Towards the costs for Counties Manukau Cricket and Homai Bowling club to implement the LiteClub programme by installing products that will reduce their electricity and water usage and waste to landfill

$4,768

Local Board Discretionary Community

Rape Prevention Education

Towards the cost to provide the Sex'n'Respect - Alternative Education programme addressing the increased risk of sexual violence  through prevention and education to 24 participants within alternative education centres and teen parent units in Manurewa (CLS South and Te Ara Poutama) between July 2014 and June 2015

$5,434

Local Board Discretionary Community

RaWiri Residents Association Inc.

Towards the establishment of a community kitchen and purchase of ingredients, utensils and equipment and the replanting and maintenance of the community garden

$6,853

Local Board Discretionary Community

South Asian Trust Inc.

Towards set-up costs (resources, flyers, posters, transport, facilitation, venue hire, projector and blu-ray player) for group therapy and social support services for women from the South Asian community, including those of Indian, Fiji-Indian, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Pakistani, Afghani, and Malaysian backgrounds

$1,998

Local Board Discretionary Community

South Elim Christian Centre

Towards the cost of rides, games, food, promotion/advertising and entertainment for a gala to be held on 15 November 2014 to raise funds for Christians Against Poverty

$10,000

Local Board Discretionary Community

Storylines Children's Literature Charitable Trust of NZ

Towards advertising and promotion, equipment hire and partial parking subsidy for the 2014 Storylines Festival South Auckland Family Day to be held at the Vodafone Events Centre on 30 August 2014

$6,657

Local Board Discretionary Community

Te Ara Poutama AEC Charitable Trust

Towards the purchase of gym equipment to run a Cross-Fit Programme and cost of a trainer for two terms from July to December 2014

$4,972

Local Board Discretionary Community

The Foundation for Peace Studies Aotearoa/NZ Inc. (trading as The Peace Foundation)

Towards trainer's fee, books, travel, project management and administration costs to provide two 12-15 hour Peaceful Family Communication courses designed for parents, grandparents, teachers and caregivers offering a set of skills on effective communication and conflict resolution skills to build more love, respect and peace in families and communities, between July 2014 and June 2015

$5,855

Local Board Discretionary Community

Xcell Trust

Towards a three-day showcase event to celebrate artistic excellence in Māori and Pasifika tattoo and indigenous art to be held at the Vodafone Event Centre from 27 to 29 November 2014

$23,881

Local Board Discretionary Community

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards salaries for two youth workers who will hold 36 seminars, programmes and workshops for the Alfriston College, James Cook and Manurewa High Schools' Youth Health Councils between June 2014 and May 2015

$5,000

Community Crime Prevention

Kidpower Teenpower Fullpower Trust

Towards facilitation and resource costs for the Kidpower programme at Hill Park, Manurewa East, Manurewa West and Roscommon schools between June and December 2014

$2,347

Community Crime Prevention

South Asian Trust Inc.

Towards delivery of two early intervention and prevention programmes (to develop awareness in South Asian community in Counties Manukau about early intervention and prevention of domestic violence and alcohol and drug related addictions

$4,639

Community Crime Prevention

Te Whakaora Tangata

Towards administration costs, graduation ceremony, petrol, catering and cleaning costs for up to 350 attendees at the Essence programmes (Emotional Healing/Family Restoration Course, Parenting Course and One-on-one Family Coaching)

$9,934

Marae Facilities

Manurewa Marae

Towards a building consultant and Auckland Council building consent fees for the relocation of a building from Drury to Manurewa Marae for use by Manurewa Wardens

$8,344

Rates Assistance

Baptist Union of NZ (on behalf of The Dream Centre)

Towards the cost of 2013/2014 rates for the property at 3 Lakewood Court, Manukau

$11,000

Rates Assistance

Lifechurch NZ Community Trust

Towards the cost of 2013/2014 rates for 24 Maich Road, Manurewa

$6,818

Rates Assistance

Melkite Catholic Charitable Trust of New Zealand

Towards the cost of 2013/2014 rates for the property at 5 Mt Lebanon Crescent, Manurewa

$724

Social Investment

Age Concern Counties Manukau Inc.

Towards wages for a counsellor (20 hours per week) for a one-year extension of the counselling support service to residents of Manurewa from July 2014 to June 2015

$12,500

Social Investment

Foundation for Youth Development

Towards the salary for a programme co-ordinator to work in the Manurewa area from June to December 2014

$5,000

Social Investment

South Auckland Christian Foodbank

Towards the salary for a co-ordinator and transport costs for a vehicle to pick up surplus food from cafes and restaurants Monday to Friday that will be used in food parcels for clients in South Auckland between June 2014 and March 2015

$6,300

Social Investment

The Parenting Place (Attitude Youth Division)

Towards the cost to provide the Attitude programme in Alfriston College, James Cook and Manurewa High Schools between June 2014 and May 2015

$4,234

Total Requested

$240,806

 

Discussion

7.         In March 2013 the Regional Operations and Development Committee agreed to the continuation of the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year:

That the Regional Development and Operations Committee endorse the continuation of the interim community funding programme for the 2013/2014 financial year, in accordance with current budgets and decisions-making delegations, due to the complexity of the range of funding models currently operating across the region, with the expectation that a new funding policy be in place for the 2014.2015 financial year, or before.” (RDO/2013/32).

8.         The funds for the legacy community funding and local board discretionary community funding schemes within the southern local board areas cover the following funds:

·          Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund

·          Social Investment Funds

·          School Holiday Programme Fund

·          School Swimming Pool Fund

·          Rates Assistance to Community Groups Owning Land in Manukau

·          Community Crime Prevention Fund

·          Immediate Response Crime/Safety Fund

·          Marae Facilities Fund

9.         Thirty-five applications were received in this round to be considered under the following funds:

·          Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund

·          Community Crime Prevention Fund

·          Marae Facilities Fund

·          Rates Assistance to Community Groups Owning Land in Manukau

·          Social Investment Fund

10.       When considering the applications to the Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund, the Manurewa Local Board should be guided by their Local Board Plan priorities.  These are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to support the local board when considering the merits of each application. 

11.       The Manurewa Local Board held a workshop on 8 April 2014 to consider each application and how each project aligned with the Manurewa Local Board Plan priorities and the south “Community Funding Policy for Grants, Donations and Sponsorships” that currently apply.

 

Community Funding Programme Budget

12.       The following table (Table 2) summarises the budgets for each of the funding schemes applicable to the Manurewa Local Board Community Funding Programme.  The table identifies the grant levels approved to date in each scheme and the balance remaining for 2013/2014.

 

Table 2 - Manurewa Local Board Community Funding Programme Budget

 

2013/14

Annual

Budget

 

Type of Fund

Grants paid

Balance

$40,168

 

Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund

$37,226

$2,942

$54,042

 

Social Investment Fund

$9,700

$44,342

$11,592

 

School Holiday Programme Fund

$0

$11,592

$3,078

 

School Swimming Pool Fund

$0

$3,078

$8,759

 

Rates Assistance to Community Groups owning land in Manukau Fund

$0

$8,759

$28,041

 

Community Crime Prevention and Immediate Response Funds

$4,500

$23,541

$31,914

 

Marae Facilities Fund

$0

$31,914

$177,594

TOTAL

$51,426

$126,168

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

13.       Feedback on these applications was sought at a workshop with the Manurewa Local Board held on 1 April 2014.

14.       Board members received a summary of each application, together with copies of the current legacy community funding schemes’ policy and the local board discretionary community funding guidelines that apply within the southern local board area.

Maori Impact Statement

2.       Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori.  Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.  The provision of community funding to support community development initiatives provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes and activities that benefit Maori.

General

15.       The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan and budgets.

16.       The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Implementation Issues

17.       Staff will confirm in writing all grants made by the local board and will administer payment and receipt of accountability for all grants made.  The team will also notify all unsuccessful applicants in writing.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Funding Co-ordinator South

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Quarterly Performance Report for the Manurewa Local Board for the period ended March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08757

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Manurewa Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2013 to 30 June 2014 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive Summary

2.       This report contains the following Manurewa Local Board reports:

-     Highlights and achievements for the March 2014 quarter

-     Watching brief and recommendation

-     Progress updates on key initiatives and projects for the March 2014 quarter

-     Activity overview for Community Development, Arts and Culture department (CDAC) for the March 2014 quarter

-     Activity overview for Libraries for the March 2014 quarter

-     Activity overview for Sports, Parks and Recreation for the March 2014 quarter

-     Financial report to March 2014 (Appendix A)

-     Parks capital projects summary to March 2014 (Appendix B)

-     CDAC workplan to March 2014 (Appendix C)

-     Treasury report for the quarter ending 31 March 2014 (Appendix D)

-     Rates comparative by local board (Appendix E)

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Quarterly Performance Report for the Manurewa Local Board for the period ended March 2014.

 

 

Discussion

3.       In consultation with local boards this quarterly performance report has been created to give the elected members a comprehensive and common overview of local activities from council departments and council controlled organisations (CCOs).  Future reports are expected to include additional departmental and CCO reports as these are developed for inclusion and discussion.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Quarterly Performance Report for the Manurewa Local Board for the period ended March 2014 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Carolina Gonzalez-Urena – Acting Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay – Manager Finance, Auckland CFO

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – May 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08675

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Manurewa Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to AT activities or the transport sector; and AT media releases for the information of the Board and community.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         receive this report.

b)         approve (under the Local Board Capital Fund for no more than $10,000 including GST) to undertake a feasibility study on the upgrade requirement to make Homai and Manurewa park and ride facilities safer.

 

 

Discussion

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF):

 

3.       The Manurewa Local Board is allocated $593,314 per annum from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. These funds can be used annually or rolled together to use the full three years’ of funding i.e. $1,779,942 for larger projects.

 

4.       During the 2012/13 financial year the Board left $121,402 uncommitted. This money has been rolled over giving the Manurewa Local Board a total pool of approximately $1,901,344 available in this electoral term to be utilised on transport projects.

 

5.       The Board has asked Auckland Transport to investigate utilising the LBCTF allocation to the following projects: 

 

·    Safe park and ride facilities at Homai and Manurewa rail stations: Auckland Transport recommends a feasibility study is undertaken, covering the camera/ lighting needs and locations. This will include a full project budget estimate. The feasibility study will cost no more than $10,000 and will be completed within two months.

Note: Te Mahia will not be included in the scope of this project as there are no current parking facilities at the station.

 

·    Cycle lanes to all rail stations: A gap analysis is being undertaken to understand how all imminent and proposed cycle ways will link into the rail stations.

 

·    Secure bicycle facilities at train stations: Secure, covered bicycle facilities are being trialed with success in other stations around the region. Auckland Transport will investigate this as part of the Park and Ride facility feasibility study. Note: bathroom facilities are not the responsibility of Auckland Transport.

 

6.       The Manurewa Transport lead will work with Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager over the coming month to facilitate feasibility studies and develop project plans in the priority areas stated above.

 

Table 2: Manurewa Local Board project update:

 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

061

Roundabout at Rogers Road and Christmas Road intersection

·         ROC estimated at $50,000

·         FIRM estimate of cost $130,000

Project was carried out in April14.  Final cost is in the order of $115,000 so there is an overall saving of $15,000.

 

164

New Footpaths in Manurewa - arterial roads in Wiri

 

This is for the section on the south side of Wiri Station Rd only - from Ash St to Langley Rd

 

$150,000 has been approved for construction.

 

Tenders will be requested in early May, with work expected to be complete late May / June.

 

176

Speed advisory driver feedback signage in the following locations:

·         Weymouth Road, Manurewa

·         Alfriston Road, Manurewa

·         Mahia Road, Manurewa

·         Hill Road, Manurewa

·         Charles Prevost Drive

Construction approval provided for five sites. Work will be delivered in May via the citywide electronic signs contract that has recently been let.

 

 

Mill Road Corridor project update:

 

7.       The project update as at April 2014 is:

 

a.       The independent ecological assessment is to be completed by the end of May, survey equipment was deployed in the week prior to Easter and the analysis of this data is now being completed.

 

b.       An assessment of an alternative alignment which misses an area of bush (named Cheeseman’s bush) is currently being evaluated, with a report scheduled for presentation to the AT Board in July.  

 

c.       The Notice of Requirement is to be lodged with the Council in August 2014.  

 

 

Long term plan pre-engagement workshops:

 

8.       Angela Dalton, Simeon Brown and Michael Bailey attended the Long term plan pre-engagement workshops.

9.       It was an interactive workshop, facilitated to get members views on the strategic direction for Transport, the prioritisation process Auckland Transport uses to select projects, and the overall levels of expenditure on Local Roads, Public Transport and Walking and Cycling.

 

Board Consultations

 

Speed Calming Randwick Park:

10.     Auckland Transport consulted with the Manurewa Local Board on a proposal regarding speed calming in Randwick Park. The Board is supportive of the proposal and has recommended a raised pedestrian crossing outside the entrance to Riverton Reserve (Riverton Drive).

11.     Further information is being sought for the Board on the priorities for implementation along with the staged plan and cost.

 

General Information Items

Media Reports:

 

Aucklanders are sampling the future of transport

 

12.     The launch of Auckland’s half billion dollar electric train fleet took place on April 27.

 

13.     The trains were launched at Britomart by Mayor Len Brown along with Transport Minister Gerry Brownlee and Auckland Transport Chairman Dr Lester Levy.

 

14.     The trains travel faster than the current fleet and will allow services to run more often and get passengers to their destination quicker.

 

15.     Each train has seating for 232 passengers and standing room for more. The trains have wider doors making it easier for passengers.

 

16.     The central carriage is at platform level for wheelchairs, prams or bikes and automatic ramps mean a seamless transition between the platform and the train.

 

17.     Open gangways between cars mean passengers can move from one end of the train to the other.

 

18.     Fifty-seven trains are being put into service across Auckland between now and the middle of next year.

 

19.     Monday 28 April saw the first paying services start with the electric trains running on the line between Britomart and Onehunga. 

 

20.     Some facts and figures:

·    There are now 12 electric train units in Auckland. Seven have been commissioned - that is, they  have their registration and warrants with five more about to be tested.

·    The supplier, CAF has used equipment from Japan, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Spain - taking the best from the world to create trains specifically for Auckland.

·    It takes more than 15,000 hours to fabricate and assemble one electric train unit, there are 110km of wiring in each unit.

·    Each train is tested for 1000 hours on the tracks.

·    To create the weight of passengers while we were testing the trains, we used 1800 20kgs sandbags on each train.

·    To date we have trained 47 drivers, 86 train managers and 13 supervisors. 

·    We have spent 3008 hours on driver training and 1504 hours on theory.

·    Drivers have spent 752 hours on the electric train simulator.

·    To date we have driven more than 25,000kms with the electric trains during testing and commissioning.

 

Rail patronage cracks 11 million

 

21.     Aucklanders are getting on board with trains in record numbers – making a record 11 million trips in the past year.  When Britomart Transport Centre opened in 2003, just 2.5 million trips were made on trains.

22.     This milestone comes just weeks before Auckland’s new electric trains are introduced and is the highest number of passengers ever on the current rail network.

23.     Continuing service improvements are making public transport a more attractive option.  People are responding to initial improvements such as integrated ticketing, better on-time performance and improved facilities like the new transport hub at Panmure, opened in January 2014.

24.     The implementation of the New Network and the City Rail Link will also boost numbers.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Felicity Merrington – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South), Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport quarterly update to local boards for the quarter -
1 January to 31 March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08726

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform Boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months January - March 2014, and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months April – June 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Attachments include:

A –    Auckland Transport activities, broken down by local board

B –    Decisions of the Transport Co-ordinating Committee, by board

C –    Report against local board advocacy issues

D –    Report on the status of the board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Quarterly Report.

 

 

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Key Agency Initiatives

 

SMART (South Western Multimodal Airport Rapid Transit) Project

3.       Investigation into protecting a corridor to expand the rail network to the Airport.

4.       As part of planning for the future public transport network, Auckland Transport has been talking to Auckland Airport about making provision for a potential rapid transit corridor in their master plan. Rail has been identified as the best long term public transport option for improving transport in Auckland’s airport and south western area. The Auckland Airport has allowed for a rail corridor and station at the terminal as part of their latest master plan. There are no confirmed alignments for rapid transit links outside the airport property yet and further work is required to confirm this and the timing of any construction. The project is currently in the development phase and public consultation will be carried out when more certainty on feasible alignments and station locations are reached. 

 

East West Link

5.       The primary objective of the project is to provide an improved freight connection between SH20, SH1 and the Onehunga/Penrose industrial area. Public Transport, cycling and safety upgrades will also be considered.

6.       The project team has started the process for procurement of professional services contract for the production of the detailed business case in financial year 2014/2015, subject to approval of funding. The contract will be led by the Transport Agency, as principal, but the project will continue to be jointly led by AT and the Transport Agency. Indicatively, the construction is scheduled to start by 2016/2017 with forecast completion by 2019/2020.

 

AMETI Package 1 - Panmure Phase 2

7.       This phase encompasses the replacement of existing Panmure roundabout with a signalised intersection. Construction of a two lane busway on the northern part of Lagoon Drive and a shared path for pedestrians and cyclists along the north side of Lagoon Drive from Queens Road / Jellicoe Road to the new Panmure Bridge, Re-allocation of road space within existing kerb lines to provide for bus priority, cycle lanes, improved footpaths and landscaping along Ellerslie-Panmure Highway from Forge Way to Mt Wellington Highway. Widening of existing footpaths to provide shared footpath/cycle paths at Mt Wellington Highway. This piece of work is part of the AMETI Programme.

8.       The base design is complete. The design will be updated to align with the requirements of the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and to ensure effects (e.g. on cultural heritage sites) are appropriately mitigated. Work has commenced on the consenting phase and a designer is being procured.

Public Transport Development

 

Distributed Stabling - Detailed Design

9.       The project entails the development of outstabling facilities which support Rail Services throughout the region. These facilities are located in Auckland South/CBD and West and comprise facilities for overnight stabling of trains, staff facilities for operational staff as well as lighting and security systems for the remote monitoring of the facilities.

 

Platform Extensions

10.     Extending the platforms of 11 stations 5-15m each to bring them into line with other platforms on the network addressed by KiwiRails DART projects and to accommodate the stopping of 6 car EMU services (147m in length + stopping distances)

11.     First three stations with platform extensions are now nearing completion. Good progress is being made on the next 4 stations. Project Manager has accelerated works to complete all extensions by June 2014.

 

City Rail Link (CRL)

12.     The CRL is a 3.5km double track underground electrified rail line running under Auckland city centre from Britomart Station to the Western Line near the existing Mt Eden Station. Britomart would become a through station and provide for three intermediate stations in the Aotea, Karangahape Road and Newton areas.

13.     The Independent Commissioners’ recommendations, in relation to Auckland Transport’s Notice of Requirement for the designation to construct and operate the City Rail Link, have been received and are under review. The Principal Technical Advisor has completed their Establishment Phase and has commenced the Design Definition Phase in preparation of the Reference Design. The project team continue preparations to be collated in an integrated project office by early April.

 

Upgrade Downtown Ferry Terminal Pier 2

14.     Scope of work is being worked through with PT Operations. New covered waiting area will be installed on Pier 2 by the end of April 2014

 

Upgrade Downtown Ferry Terminal Pier 3 & 4

15.     Scoping and initiation works under development is in coordination with the Harbour Edge Programme.

 

Harbour Bridge Pathway

16.     Harbour Bridge Pathway The purpose of the project is to construct a cycle/foot-bridge below/alongside the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

Road Design and Development

Route optimisation CBD

17.     Improving AT's transport network by maximising use of existing infrastructure, considering all transport modes, improve consistency and customer experience, with a high focus in the City Centre on moving people.

 

Corridor Management Plans (CMPs)

18.     Corridor Management Plans identify the long term (< 30 year) strategic vision for each corridor, based on projected growth and development.  Potential network deficiencies, across all modes, are analysed and the CMPs set an integrated transport and land use approach to enable the anticipated growth.  CMPs also inform Network Operating Plans, for the day-to-day management of the corridor and influence the planning for other AT projects and operations.  A key focus for CMPs is to create robust implementation plans of prioritised projects to address future issues – creating a large portion of AT’s forward programme.

 

January- March 2014

Onewa Road CMP starts

Mt Albert Road - Carrington Rd CMP starts

Great South Road Stage 3 starts

Greenlane East/West starts

Manukau Road CMP starts

New North Road CMP starts

Pakuranga Road CMP underway

Great North Road CMP underway

Brigham Creek Road CMP finishes

Oteha Valley Road CMP finishes

 

April-June 2014 (planned)

Mangere-Otahuhu-Sylvia Park CMP starts

Great North Rd CMP finishes

Onewa Rd CMP finishes

Mt Albert Rd-Carrington Rd CMP finishes

Great South Rd Stage 3 finishes

Greenlane East/West finishes

Manukau Rd CMP finishes

New North Rd CMP finishes

Pakuranga Rd CMP finishes

Great North Rd CMP finishes

Community Transport

School Transport Programme and Road Safety Education

 

19.     The number of schools signed onto the TravelWise Programme has now reached 387.

 

20.     Key activities that were undertaken with the schools included, safety at the school gate parking enforcement, speed enforcement campaigns undertaken with the NZ Police, cycle training, scooter training, school leadership programme for intermediate and high school students and school curriculum transport related activities targeted at road safety and school travel options.

 

21.     Walking School Buses now number 362 in the region with a continued programme of recruitment and recognition for the volunteers who accompany the buses. 

 

22.     Demand for cycle training is still strong from schools and greater partnerships with the NZ Police, Sports Trusts and Bike NZ have been developed to deliver cycle training and cycle safety. 

 

23.     The following regional road safety education campaigns are being delivered over the for the coming six months: 

1.   Local speed  campaign – focused at all road users

2.   Pedestrian safety campaign – focused on youth and at risk sites

3.   Cycle safety- winter campaign focused on be bright be seen

4.   Back to school speed campaign  - focused on targeting drivers speed around schools

 

Travel Planning and Cycle and Walking

 

24.     Commute travel planning packages and personal journey plans being delivered across the region targeting business, communities, business associations and tertiary institutions.

 

25.     The development of the Auckland Cycle network continues with priority being placed on working with the NZTA on Grafton Gully and Waterview, working with Local Board Greenway proposals, Beach Road, Great South Road, Puhinui Road and the New Zealand Cycle Trail network expansion programme of the Airport to City route.

Road Corridor Access

Corridor Access Request Applications

26.     There were 1,366 CAR applications approved in March with 80% processed within 5 working days and 94% processed within 15 working days of lodgement.

27.     In the last 3 months to the end of March 2014 there have been 3,872 CAR applications approved to carry out work on the road network. 

 

Ultra-Fast Broadband Rollout

28.     There continues to be a high volume of work underway on the network as Chorus looks to complete the Year 3 (2013/2014) build before the deadline set by Crown Fibre Holdings of 31 May 2014.  As at the end of March there have been 252 cabinet areas completed of which 133 of these have been signed off and commenced their warranty period.

29.     To date 478 of the 522 Year 1 (2011/2012) and Year 2 (2012/2013) cabinet areas have had the outstanding remedial work completed and have either been moved into warranty or are awaiting final sign off.   The completion of the remaining work remains a high priority for both VisionStream and Chorus and it is expected that the remedial work on the remaining cabinet areas will be fully completed by the end of May 2014.

30.     The demand for customer connections is continuing to grow as the rollout of fibre continues and more retailers enter the market.  Due to improved architecture, Year 3 connections are less disruptive however the connections relating to the Year 1 and Year 2 cabinet areas sometimes require additional deployment and excavation to be undertaken.

 

Watercare Hunua 4 Bulk Watermain

31.     There are currently three crews working at Tidal Road in Mangere, Tutare Road in Papatoetoe and Mountain Road in Mangere Bridge.

32.     The works on Tidal Road are currently taking place between Gee Place and Waokauri Place.  The works are moving northwards and when they reach the industrial part of Tidal Road the work will be undertaken in shorter sections to minimise the impact for adjoining businesses as much as possible. 

33.     Discussions are underway with Watercare on future stages of this project between Onehunga and Campbell Crescent and then from Campbell Crescent through to the Khyber Pass reservoir.  Despite best endeavours from Watercare they have not been able to obtain approval from the Cornwall Park Trust Board to install the pipeline through Cornwall Park and therefore they now intend to follow local roads around the perimeter of Cornwall Park.  The proposed route follows Campbell Road, Wheturangi Road, Wapiti Avenue and Market Road.  This outcome is disappointing as the construction of the pipeline will result in considerable disruption and inconvenience to residents and road users along the proposed route.  Investigation is also underway to determine the preferred route and construction methodology between Campbell Crescent and the Khyber Pass reservoir.  Watercare are investigating the use of tunnelling and other trenchless methods so as to reduce the traffic impacts.

Road Corridor Maintenance

North

34.     Good progress has been made with the resurfacing programme with 16.2 km of asphaltic concrete resurfacing and 88.4 km of chipsealing completed to date. 

35.     There has been 19.3 km of pavement renewals completed to date with projects recently completed on Bentley Avenue and Whangaripo Valley Road.

 

Central

36.     The chipsealing programme was completed by the end of March and comprised the resealing of 32.3 km of sealed roads in the central area

37.     To date this year there has been 19.9 km of footpaths either resurfaced or replaced in the central area.  The UFB rollout has adversely impacted on the delivery of the footpath renewal programme as it has it has affected the availability of suitable resources to carry out the concrete works and the need for coordination of works.

 

West

38.     There has been 13.2 km of AC resurfacing and 33.5 km of chip sealing completed to end of March. 

39.     There has been 10.1 km of footpaths either resurfaced or replaced to date. 

 

South

40.     There has been 17.8 km of AC resurfacing and 140.4 km of chipsealing completed to date.  The remainder of the chipsealing programme will be completed in April with the remaining AC resurfacing carried out during April and May.

41.     There has been 13.2 km of pavement renewals completed to date with projects recently completed Great South Rd (Coles Crescent to Subway Road), Carruth Rd

 

Streetlights

42.     To date there has been 2,903 luminaires renewed and 603 street light poles replaced this year.

 

 

Road Corridor Operations

 

Route Optimisation: Investigation and analysis.

 

43.     Focus for this year is central Auckland.

44.     The Central City has been divided into five key zones and each zone has an assigned technical lead.

45.     Stage 1 Investigation and traffic signal optimisation has now been completed on the following routes:

 

Road/Street

From

To

Quay Street

Lower Hobson St

Solent St

Customs Street

Lower Hobson St

The Strand

Victoria Street

Hobson

Stanley St

Wellesley Street

Hobson

Grafton Rd

The Strand

Quay St

Alten Rd

Albert Street

Quay St

Wellesley

Queen Street

Quay St

Newton Rd

Mayoral Drive/Cook Street

Wellesley St W

Wellseley St E

Nelson Street

SH1

Fanshawe St

Hobson Street

Quay St

SH1

Karangahape Road

Ponsonby Road

Grafton Rd

Wellington Union

Franklin

Karangahape Road

Symonds Street

Mt Eden

Customs

Grafton Road

Khyber Pass

Symonds St

 

46.     Route optimisation has also begun on:

Highbrook Drive

Jervois Road

Ponsonby Road, and

Rosebank Road.

 

Network Safety & Operations Improvement Programme

 

47.     This programme is part of the region wide School Travel Planning process. 2013/14. Safety engineering programme developed for 25 Schools and advance designs for 20 Schools for 2014/15 implementation:

As at 31st March 2014:

15 projects at design stage

13 projects under construction

30 projects have been completed

18 projects at procurement stage

 

48.     Advance Design for 2014/15 schools programme developed for 20 schools:

As at 31st March 2014:

11 projects under investigation

60 projects at scheme stage

67 projects at design stage

 

49.       40% of 2013/14 Minor Safety Improvement Programme delivered to date and 40% of 2013/14 Regional Safety Programme is under construction

 

Urban Kiwi RAP and Red Light Camera Programmes

 

Kiwi RAP

50.     Version 1 of the Urban KiwiRAP risk mapping software has been developed and all Auckland routes, intersections, and vulnerable user groups are mapped and prioritised.

51.     Urban KiwiRAP star-rating tender responses have been evaluated and the tender is expected to be awarded by the end of April.

 

Red Light Cameras

52.     A meeting with NZ Police in February updated AT on the tender process and investigated the possibility of AT buying poles in advance of NZ Police procurement of cameras, expected to be in early 2015.

Parking and Enforcement

City Centre Parking Zone price review

53.     The project entails adjustment of on-street tariff based on the demand as per the price adjustment policy that was approved by the AT Board in 2012. The policies both state that prices should be adjusted regularly to achieve gradual behaviour change and ensure parking is available for customers to use. The price changes will be first since the implementation of the City Centre Parking Zone in December 2012. The proposed on-street price changes will be communicated to LB and Heart of the City. These will also be made available on AT web site.

Newmarket parking review

54.     The proposal is to remove time limits from paid parking areas in Newmarket and move towards a demand responsive pricing approach similar to the Central City Parking Zone.  

 

Howick village parking study

55.     "The purpose of this parking review is to provide guidance on parking management within the Howick town centre to support existing activities and future growth. The scope of the Howick Village parking review was to:

(i)      Review the existing parking demand and determine the public parking supply in Howick Village.

 

(ii)        Identify the location and nature of parking problems.

 

(iii)     Identify and evaluate potential measures to address the problems and improve the overall parking management.

 

(iv)    Recommend specific short -term actions for implementation and longer term options for future parking management.

 

56.       The development of the Howick Village parking review involved:

 

(i)      Parking utilisation and turnover survey

 

(ii)      Local business perception survey

 

(iii)     Consultation with internal and external stakeholders (the Howick Local Board and the Howick Village Business Association).

 

57.     Privately owned and controlled parking provision was not included in this review.

Public Transport

 

Rail Electrification

58.     The delivery of 9 from 57 new electric trains, of which seven have been commenced and two are currently being tested and commissioned.
KiwiRail is continuing the installation of the overhead system and the section from Wiri to Otahuhu was commissioned to allow night time testing of the trains.  Some Sunday to Thursday evening services have been replaced by buses on the Western and Eastern lines to progress the installation of the overhead power supply.

59.     Rail patronage for the twelve months to March 2014 exceeded 11 million, an increase of 11% on the same period the previous year and a new record for heavy rail in the Auckland region.

60.     Rail service punctuality continues to improve and was 87.9% for the twelve months to March 2014, an improvement from 82.9% the previous year.  In January 2014, service punctuality was 91.7% the first time on record that punctuality has exceeded 90%.

 

Bus - Improvements

61.     The major marketing campaign that went live late 2013 is on-going for the “Central Corridors” (Mt Eden Road, Sandringham Road, Dominion Road, Great North Road and New North Road) and is focused on breaking down “myths” and encouraging non-users to change their perceptions of bus travel. The campaign will rolled out to the North Shore region in April 2014. Targeted local direct marketing campaigns providing an overview of local bus services and free tickets to generate trial by non-users that went live late 2013 is on-going with 7,400 households in Tamaki Drive and Albany Central targeted the first quarter of 2014. NZTA has tendered the Total Mobility Administration System and is expected to better manage the TM scheme leading to efficiencies and reduced risk of fraud.  AT PT staff have been involved in the specification development and the subsequent tender evaluation (which is currently on-going) is expected to reach is successful conclusion. 

 

Bus - Integrated ticketing & fares

62.     In March 2014, with the implementation of Auckland Integrated Fare System (AIFS) “HOP” on the remainder of the buses, HOP is now available across over 100% of the bus network marking a major milestone for PT.  AT staff were on the road at key locations to support drivers and customers during the entire roll-out process that began in late 2013.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the third quarter (2013/14) ending 31 March 2014 and forward works programme for the fourth quarter (2013/14) ending 31 June 2014

39

bView

Traffic Control Committee Decisions July-September 2013

61

cView

Local Board Advocacy Report

63

dView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

67

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 























Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 




Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Bylaw review programme update - April 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/07958

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on bylaw review (policy) and bylaw implementation (operations), covering June 2013 to April 2014. This joint approach to reporting ensures that local boards have a comprehensive overview of the end-to-end programme through to 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       Consultation on the proposed navigation safety bylaw closed on 17 March 2014. Staff are now preparing a summary of submissions alongside the full submissions to the hearings panel. The proposed cemeteries and crematoria bylaw was adopted by the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and Governing Body in March, and submissions opened from early April.

3.       Further proposed bylaws will be presented to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee shortly covering the next set of topics: Outdoor fires; Stormwater; Trading in public places; Alcohol controls and Animal management (covering animals other than dogs).

4.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Information about the proposed changes will be included with material provided as part of the annual dog registration cycle to minimise costs and ensure simplified communication with these customers.

5.       Implementation projects are well underway for the upcoming commencement of Health and hygiene (from 1 July 2014) and Public safety and nuisance (from 26 May 2014). Planning for the new Health and hygiene bylaw and associated licensing has included particular attention for operators where the rules have changed significantly. The majority of these newly registered premises will receive a visit from a member of the environmental health team, and a welcome pack that summarises the standards they are required to meet.

6.       The Alcohol licensing readiness project has now completed its key work relating to establishing the new licensing structures needed under the new alcohol act. These are running as intended from 18 December 2013.

7.       Review work is continuing on further topics to support completion of the review programme by October 2015, alongside implementation planning for the resulting changes.

8.       No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

9.       An investment proposal for the integrated programme is being progressed, to be submitted for consideration as part of preparing the draft 2015-2024 Long-term Plan.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      Note the progress of bylaw review and implementation and the forward programme that will complete the review of the legacy bylaws by 2015.

 

 

Discussion

The bylaw review programme

10.     The bylaw review programme was originally endorsed by the Regulatory and Bylaws committee in December 2010 (refer CP2010/00962) and February 2011 (refer CP2011/00453). It will review the legacy bylaws (that is, the bylaws inherited from the former councils) across approximately 30 topics. A new bylaw will be prepared for each topic where appropriate, or a recommendation made that the underlying issue or outcome is better handled another way.

11.     The Regulatory and Bylaws Committee has ownership of the review and local boards are participating through individual workshops and reports. Local Boards are also able to propose that local bylaws are made, to apply only in their area (refer sections 24 to 28 of the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009). Any requests for local bylaws are reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee. As stated above, there have been no local board proposals for local bylaws over the last period. This report covers the period June 2013 to April 2014.

12.     As this is the first report on this programme since the 2013 local government elections, attachment A provides a brief background to bylaws, including an outline of each bylaw topic.

Update on review of bylaw topics

13.     The current state of the review work programme is presented in the table below and the detailed comments for several topics that follow. Attachment B provides an overview of the timeline for the programme.

14.     The table below includes reviews that have already been completed. It also covers bylaws that may be folded into other topics (Freedom camping; Arkles Bay Set Netting); the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules; and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Navigation Safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Outdoor / Rural fires

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amend)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On hold pending unitary plan outcomes

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazardous Substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & Marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reviews by local boards - ongoing

Filming fee review

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Public safety & nuisance

On track

G

This bylaw topic crosses the jurisdiction of both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (meaning there are two parallel bylaws). The new bylaws were adopted in 2013 and come into force in May 2014.

 

Navigation safety

On track

G

Public submissions were invited on this topic from 14 February to 17 March. Just under 400 submissions were received and are being reviewed. A range of communication approaches – including radio and attendance at relevant events – were used to help publicise the proposal and invite submissions. Hearings are expected in May.

 

Trading in public places (policy and bylaw)

On track

G

This review will deliver a single draft policy and two draft bylaws (for the council and Auckland Transport). Drafting of these is well underway. It is expected that these will be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and then the governing body in May. Any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015 (allowing any fee changes to also be put in place with the council’s long-term plan).

 

Signs

On track

G

Discussions with local boards are currently underway to identify their views on particular matters including local approaches to issues such as sandwich boards and cross-street banners. Comments from those discussions and other discussions with representatives of businesses and the signage industry will support the preparation of a draft bylaw later in 2014.

 

This project is also monitoring the progress of the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, as this plan also includes signage provisions.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Election signs bylaw was adopted by Auckland Transport in May 2013, and was in place for the 2013 local government election. A number of operational issues arose during that election period, and the clarity of relevant clauses is planned to be addressed through a series of drafting amendments that will support a better democratic process. These improve clarity for issues including the use of candidate and “team” signs, signs on private property, the readability of authoriser statements and the display of signs promoting election issues rather than candidates or teams. The amendments also provide for the possible later addition of explanatory notes into the bylaw, where desirable to provide further guidance.

 

The proposed amendments are being reported to the Auckland Transport Board in April, to allow for consultation on the proposed changes. Local boards will receive further information then.

 

Changes are also being considered to remove or adjust some of the specified sign sites in the western area. These follow a review of sites against criteria including practicality and safety, and are intended to address issues that arose in 2013. Those local boards where changes are being considered will receive further information on this.

 

Alcohol controls

On track

G

Each of the legacy councils had adopted an Alcohol Control bylaw, and put in place a series of alcohol controls through that bylaw. Alcohol controls (previously called liquor bans) prohibit the consumption of alcohol within a specified place, during a specified time.

 

Legislative changes introduced alongside the government’s reform of laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol provide the council and police with enhanced powers in relation to alcohol controls. Those changes also require the council to review its existing alcohol controls against a new threshold, as part of any decision to carry those controls forward past October 2015. Following a review of available data, the majority of existing controls across Auckland are considered to meet the new requirements.

 

A proposed bylaw is planned to be reported to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee shortly. The existing bylaws are broadly similar, and so the new proposed bylaw will largely seek to continue the current arrangements. In line with consultation with local boards from 2011 (alongside other alcohol-related matters), the new bylaw will facilitate local board involvement in decisions on alcohol controls and an improved community-based focus on alcohol issues.

 

Community-focussed approaches may include crime prevention through environmental design, local community initiatives, discussions with nearby licensees, youth and leadership development programmes, partnering with central government agencies including the Police and the Ministry of Justice, and partnering with local agencies including sports clubs and iwi and town centre / business associations.

 

These non-regulatory approaches can often lead to significant reductions in alcohol harm and have better long-term effects than regulatory approaches such as making an alcohol control.

 

Hazardous substances

On track

G

The former Auckland City Council had a hazardous substances bylaw. A review of this bylaw has indicated that the issues it covered are now addressed adequately through other means, including provisions in other bylaws, the Resource Management Act, National environmental standards, and regulations made under various acts.

 

Comment is being sought from the local boards where the legacy bylaw currently applies, following which a proposed approach (that could include allowing the bylaw to lapse in 2015) will be brought to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee.

 

Dog access review

On track

G

Local boards are able to review dog access rules for local parks and local beaches in their areas on an annual basis. This allows a better response to community views than was possible under the legacy councils’ approaches.

 

For 2014 selected dog access are being reviewed by the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

To ensure that registered dog owners are advised of the proposed changes (as required by legislation) the local boards are including a joint notice within the dog registration package in June. This will reduce costs, and ensure that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council, rather than multiple messages.

 

Filming fees review

On track

G

The Auckland Film Protocol was adopted in 2013, after wide consultation with local boards, the screen production industry, council-controlled organisations and other stakeholders. The protocol aims to create a film-friendly culture across Auckland, based on a two way commitment from the wider council organisation and from filmmakers. It also seeks to help deliver a customer driven service that provides certainty to filmmakers in a globally competitive market, and to enable public good will towards the film industry by setting out expectations of film crews when filming in public places.

 

Currently there is a range of filming fee structures in place, inherited from the former councils. A filming fees review is now underway to understand how this element of the filming process can be harmonised and improved. The Policies and Bylaws unit is working with ATEED on this project, and it is expected that local board input will be sought on this over the next few months.

 

 

Update on implementation of new bylaws

15.     Detailed implementation planning is developed by the responsible operations division alongside the process for reviewing each of the bylaws, through a cross council programme called the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme. Initial planning for implementation starts when the bylaw topic review identifies the issues and options related to each topic. This approach provides the operations division an early indication of the possible shape of the bylaw and its implementation considerations.

16.     This programme includes the main groups involved in operating bylaws and delivering the relevant services to our customers. The programme is also helping ensure bylaw reviews can be aligned to other related transformational changes such as the consolidation of information technology systems, customer service improvement programmes and the organisation’s capacity to implement those changes.

17.     Implementation of new bylaws will generally cover

·    ensuring that the council meets its statutory obligation;

·    ensuring that effective operational practices on the control and enforcement of the new bylaws are implemented consistently across the region, and are made available to the general public;

·    ensuring that communications to the general public and other stakeholders are well planned and implemented in a timely manner;

·    developing and implementing standard business rules and processes that help achieve the council’s customer service standards;

·    ensuring that internal services are planned and delivered when needed, and are in alignment with other transformation initiatives;

·    putting any changes to fees in place; and

·    ensuring that staff are informed throughout the process and are trained on delivering the new services.

18.     The table below shows the current status of implementation projects.

 

Table 4: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

G

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

 

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading / Trading in public places

G

 

 

 

 

Trading in public places policy and bylaw

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

B

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls (liquor bans)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Animals (Stage 2)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 5: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

On track

G

The alcohol licensing project has now completed successfully. This project set out to ensure that the council was able to implement the requirements of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, including the new licensing system and new fees that had to operate from 18 December 2013.

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On track

G

The Governing Body has resolved that the council adopt its own fees for licensed premises. This is provided for in the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. The council can change the fee amounts, using the cost / risk fee categories that have been set by central government. Work is underway to capture actual information on costs, based on operating the new licensing system and the parts of those costs that can be recovered through licensing fees.

 

Health protection

On track

G

The Health protection project is implementing the new Health and hygiene bylaw and code of practice (which will come into force from 1 July 2014). A range of user-friendly brochures that summarise key provisions of the health protection code have been prepared to help communicate the requirements to all the people who operate these businesses.

 

A series of approaches are underway to help ensure operators are aware of the requirements to be followed. The new bylaw (with its risk-based approach) has resulted in some premises that are newly required to be registered, and the communication activities are focussed on these premises. Most of these will receive an individual visit, with an appropriate information pack.

 

There are also some premises that no longer need to be registered with the council, and this is also being communicated to them.

 

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

19.     The scope and scale of the expected changes mean that implementation requires significant effort and resources, and cost, for some topics. The Strategy and Finance committee made an initial provision for funding the IBRI programme at its meeting of 9 May 2013 (in part; refer item 16, SF/2013/67).

20.     As provided for in the resolution, a further investment proposal is being prepared for the 2015-2024 long-term plan. The programme continuously monitors its approach to each bylaw, and where possible captures any cost efficiencies and learnings for later bylaws.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme for local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

22.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

23.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation Issues

24.     Implementation issues are addressed as relevant to each topic, as noted above.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Background to bylaws

77

bView

Overview of the timeline for the programme

85

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Simon Pickering - Manager, Planning, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

An introduction to Bylaws

 

 

Summary

1.       This attachment provides a brief introduction to bylaws and the process that is now underway to review the bylaws that were inherited by the Auckland Council from the former councils. It is being provided to local boards alongside their regular update report, as this is the first such update report since the 2013 local body elections.

2.       A bylaw is a rule or regulation made by a local authority, and it can therefore reflect both regional and local preferences. The Auckland Council inherited 158 bylaws across 32 broad topics from the former councils. These are referred to as “the legacy bylaws”. Most of these current bylaws must be reviewed by 31 October 2015.

3.       A review programme has been underway since 2010, focusing on the outcomes sought for each topic and how these outcomes apply to Auckland. It is taking into account legislative requirements (and timing due to central government’s legislative programme), identified council priorities and alignment with the council’s strategic vision, gaps (if any), other policy work and administrative improvements or cost reductions where possible. It will provide an opportunity for addressing inconsistencies from the various approaches adopted by the former councils, ultimately leading to a coherent and aligned set of Auckland Council bylaws. Not all legacy bylaws will be replaced with new bylaws.

4.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport can both make bylaws within their particular areas of influence. Legislation also provides specific roles related to bylaws for local boards and Watercare Services Limited.

 

What are bylaws

5.       A bylaw is a rule or regulation made by a local authority, and can therefore reflect local preferences. This means they are an important tool for council as it seeks to deliver the agreed community outcomes and reflect community preferences.

6.       Most bylaws are made under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) but other bylaws may be made under such acts or regulations as the Health Act, the Dog Control Act, the Burial and Cremation Act, the Prostitution Reform Act and the Transport Act. Bylaws may not over-ride legislation made by parliament and cannot generally require standards that are higher than those set nationally.

7.       Bylaws generally permit or regulate certain activities, require certain activities to be done in certain ways or prohibit certain activities. Bylaws may also license persons or property and set fees for certificates permits, licences, consents or inspections. In line with good regulatory practice, the LGA 2002 requires a local authority, before making a bylaw, to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing a perceived problem, and to ensure that the proposed bylaw is not inconsistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.

8.       The special consultative procedure under the LGA 2002 is used for making, amending, or revoking a bylaw. This requires the council to consider the views and preferences of people likely to be affected, or have an interest in a council decision. It must then publicly notify its proposal to make, amend or revoke a bylaw, outline in writing the reasons for such actions, invite and hear submissions and make deliberations in open meetings on its proposal. For some topics other legislation may modify or over ride some of these general requirements.

9.       Typically the Regulatory and Bylaws committee will receive and endorse each draft bylaw and statement of proposal (SOP), before it is approved by the governing body for public consultation.

 

Auckland Council and bylaws

10.     The Auckland Council originally inherited 158 bylaws from the former councils across 32 broad topics, and transitional legislation provided for these bylaws to remain operative in the former council areas until replaced or revoked. A number of different rules therefore operate across the region, and some of the local board areas have conflicting bylaw rules. Those conflicts must be resolved over time to support consistent governance and customer service.

11.     Auckland-specific legislation sets out particular roles within the bylaw process for local boards and Watercare Services Limited. These groups can perform actions that lead up to bylaw adoption, including proposing bylaws and leading public consultation on those bylaws.

12.     This legislation also makes most of the legacy bylaws expire on 31 October 2015. This means that the review of each topic and the implementation of any new bylaw or non-bylaw approach must be completed by that date.

13.     An outline of the bylaw topics is provided in appendix 2.

14.     Decisions on ten topics were made within the first term of the Auckland Council: Dog management; General administration; Offensive trades; Solid waste; Transport (roads); Food safety; Election signs; Health and hygiene; Public safety and nuisance; and Trade waste.

 

The programme of bylaw review and implementation

15.     The council has established a programme to review the legacy bylaws, and implement any resulting changes to its processes and service delivery. This alignment allows the council to achieve improvements in customer service and efficiencies in an ordered way. As one example, a new approach to food safety was implemented on 1 July 2013. This included a new harmonised approach to the A to E grading of food premises; harmonised fees; and harmonised set of requirements for training of those employed to prepare and sell food across Auckland café’s and restaurants and other food outlets.

16.     A set of eight principles were adopted in 2011 to guide the review. These are set out in appendix 1 and summarised below.

 

1)   Ensure that regulation by bylaw is appropriate

2)   Every bylaw should relate to a strategy or policy

3)   The regulatory framework should be accessible to users

4)   Bylaws should follow a consistent structure

5)   Local boards should be involved in the bylaw-making and review process

6)   Where a bylaw establishes a region-wide framework, it should also provide if appropriate a transparent and locally accountable procedure for making specific operating rules under delegated authority

7)   All bylaws should have a clear, practical and efficient approach to enforcement

8)   The bylaw-making or review process must include consideration of how administration, implementation, monitoring and review elements will be achieved

 

17.     Regular updates on the programme are provided to the Regulatory and Bylaws committee and to local boards.

 


Appendix 1: Principles to be reflected in the bylaw review

 

Principle

Comment

1 Ensure that regulation by bylaw is appropriate (Appropriate Mechanism)

The Local Government Act 2002 requires a local authority, before making a bylaw, to determine whether a bylaw is the most appropriate way of addressing an objective. Alternatives such as education, self-regulation and advocacy for national standards or regulation should be considered.

Where regulation is appropriate, the right place for this must be determined. For example, a given topic may have been addressed in a bylaw by some of the former councils, and through district plan rules for others (e.g. signs).

2 Every bylaw should relate to a strategy or policy

(Strategic or Policy Alignment)

Bylaws should generally support (and be based on) a policy adopted by the council, e.g. a comprehensive street trading policy for activities such as outdoor dining, busking and events, should be in place before a bylaw is made to regulate such activities. In some cases the policy and the bylaw may be worked on in parallel.

3 The regulatory framework should be accessible to users

(Accessible to Users)

Regulatory requirements for a given activity may be located in a variety of places (e.g. bylaws, the district plan, the building code, codes of subdivision). Providing a carefully designed interface to these documents (and making links between them) will improve customer service and certainty.

4 Bylaws should follow a consistent structure

(Consistent Structure)

The use of a standard bylaw form (with appropriate customisation where necessary) is likely to make bylaws easier to use, and to reduce costs of ongoing maintenance.

5 Local boards should be involved in the bylaw-making and review process

(Local Board Engagement)

This will ensure that Local Boards are involved in development of policy, bylaws, specific rules and delegations that will either affect their local board area, or guide later Local Board decision-making under the adopted bylaw framework.

6 Where a bylaw establishes a region-wide framework, it should also provide if appropriate a transparent and locally accountable procedure for making specific operating rules under delegated authority

(Transparent and locally accountability)

This supports ongoing legislative compliance and provides for efficient decision-making where specific rules are determined pursuant to a bylaw (as opposed to being contained within a bylaw). It will also allow ample opportunity for local decision-making (by local boards or officers) without the need for governing body or committee scrutiny, where appropriate.

 

7 All bylaws should have a clear, practical and efficient approach to enforcement

(Enforceable)

Bylaws must be able to be enforced to be effective. Rules, and the enforcement approaches that can be used when these rules are breached need to be clear.

8 The bylaw-making or review process must include consideration of how administration, implementation, monitoring and review elements will be achieved

(Operational considerations)

Bylaws are typically put in place to address a particular issue or support a particular outcome. This is likely to be achieved in a more effective, efficient and transparent way if operational elements are considered through the policy and bylaw development process.

This would often include the process for making or review of any specific rules to give effect to, or that are required for, the administration of the bylaw, considering the level of delegation proposed, and the information needed to confirm that the bylaw has the intended effect.

This will ensure that bylaws are able to be enforced on commencement, and bylaw development will be viewed as part of a wider process.

 


Appendix 2: Topics covered by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport bylaws

 

Alcohol Control (Auckland Council)

Alcohol control bylaws allow councils to control the possession and consumption of alcohol in public places. This is commonly achieved by creating on-going alcohol controls (also called liquor bans) in specified public places over specified times so that it becomes an offence to consume, bring into or possess liquor in such public places at such times. The council is not able to apply a blanket ban to prevent alcohol being consumed in all or in large parts of its area.

 

Animals and Pests (Auckland Council)

These bylaws generally control the keeping of poultry, pigs, bees and cats and the slaughter of stock in urban areas and deal with stock wandering onto public places in rural areas.

 

Cemeteries (Auckland Council)

Cemetery and crematoria bylaws typically facilitate the management of cemeteries and crematoria under council’s control. They cover the sale of burial plots, reservation of areas for special purposes, provisions for internments, keeping graves and monuments in good order, the control of vehicles and the keeping of records.

 

Commercial sex industry including Brothels (Auckland Council)

The Prostitution Law Reform Act allows territorial authorities to make bylaws to prohibit or regulate signage visible from a public place that advertises commercial sexual services. The same act allows a territorial authority to make bylaws regulating the location of brothels.

 

Construction and development (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Bylaws in these areas often work alongside the requirements of the Building Act. They may be used to protect public safety and amenity by controlling structures, materials and work in, on or over or adjacent (e.g. demolition) to public places. Bylaws may require street damage deposits and manage the construction and use of vehicle crossings. Bylaws may also regulate awnings, verahdahs and balconies over public places so that they meet minimum standards for safety and cleanliness.

 

Dogs (Auckland Council)

The council must have a dog policy, and the dog bylaw gives effect to this policy. The policy and bylaw must set out areas where dogs are prohibited, where they are required to be on-leash, where they can be off-leash and designated dog exercise areas. The Dog Control Act requires dog owners to be notified of proposed changes to the dog policy and dog control bylaw; these changes are co-ordinated where ever possible to minimise cost and simplify messages to owners.

 

Environmental Protection (Auckland Council)

Some councils use bylaws to control the use of outdoor lighting to prevent light spill and glare, whereas others would use district plan rules. Bylaws in this group may require premises to be kept in a clean, hygienic and tidy condition and may require burglar alarms to reset after sounding for a maximum of 15 minutes

 

Food safety (Auckland Council)

These bylaws regulate the sale of food and are complementary to the requirements of the Food Hygiene Regulations. These bylaws allow the closure of unhygienic premises, require staff working in food premises to have a minimum qualification in food hygiene and allow the grading of premises so that customers are informed about the cleanliness and conduct of premises selling food to the public. Provisions also apply to the sale of food from road side stalls so that the food is prepared and sold in a hygienic state.

 


Hazardous substances (Auckland Council)

Bylaws in this area may control the storage of hazardous substances and may also be used to ensure the safe storage of bulk liquids, so that any spillage may be safely contained to prevent water pollution.

 

Health and hygiene (Auckland Council)

These bylaws cover such activities as hair removal, piercing, tattooing, acupuncture to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and HIV through inadequate hygiene practices or un-sterilised equipment. Bylaw provisions generally require the licensing of premises undertaking these activities, the adequate training of staff, sterilisation equipment and practices that reduce the risk of infection.

 

Hostels / boarding houses (Auckland Council)

Auckland City Council was the only council to have a bylaw controlling the standards of low cost accommodation such as hostels, guesthouses, rooming houses, boarding houses, motels and back packer accommodation. These are not licensed by other legislation and can suffer from poor conditions. This bylaw sets standards for safety, ventilation, sanitary conditions, maintenance and maximum occupancy.

 

Liquid and trade wastes (Auckland Council with Watercare Services Limited)

The Auckland Regional Council, Rodney, North Shore and Franklin had trade waste bylaws to regulate the discharge of wastes into sewage systems to prevent damage to those systems and or damage to sewage treatment plants. Watercare Services administers the trade waste bylaws.

 

Auckland City Council had a Waiheke Wastewater Bylaw to ensure the proper operation of septic tanks and other on-site wastewater disposal systems. Rodney, North Shore and Papakura had similar provisions for on-site wastewater disposal.

 

Navigation safety, wharves and marinas (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Bylaws made under this subject matter include the Navigational Safety Bylaw which controls activities on the waters around the region. Provisions regulate the speed of vessels near the shore, near other vessels, around wharves and ramps, include requirements that anchored or moored vessels be seaworthy, and requirements around life jackets. Provisions regulate moorings and anchorages, place controls on water skiing, provide priority for large vessels within pilotage limits, and limit vessels carrying explosives and oil tankers etc.

 

Auckland City also had a bylaw which works in conjunction with the Auckland Regional Council Navigational Safety Bylaw to control the use of Orakei Basin so that there is a safe separation of powered and non-powered vessels using the basin. Some bylaws also cover wharves and marinas.

 

Public safety and nuisance / Street trading (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Public places bylaws provide the ability to enforce general restrictions in public places (parks, reserves, squares, public footpaths and berms etc) to protect those public places from misuse and to protect the safety and amenity of those using such public places. Such bylaws may also cover street trading such as displays and café tables and public performances and events. They may also ban fireworks from certain areas and may also require property owners to exhibit street numbers so buildings are easily identified.

 

Recreational and cultural facilities (Auckland Council)

North Shore, Waitakere, Auckland and Manukau councils had bylaws regulating the use of libraries, swimming pools, art galleries, halls and recreation centres. Some or all of these activities may be able to be regulated by methods other than bylaws, such as, conditions of membership (libraries), conditions of entry (art galleries, recreational centres and pools) or contract (hall hire etc).

 

Rural fires / outdoor fires

Several councils adopted rural or outdoor fire bylaws to help manage risks related to these fires. These assist the rural fire service (which is managed by the council). The bylaw supports the issuing of fire permits and the fire ban process (in times of heightened risk).

 

Solid wastes (Auckland Council)

Solid waste bylaws typically regulate the collection of household (and some cases business) rubbish by council or their contractors. These bylaws may also licence waste collectors and set fees for the disposal of rubbish at council owned sites. The council can include provisions prohibiting placing junk mail into letterboxes which have stickers requesting “no junk mail” or similar. Solid waste bylaws may not be in conflict with the council’s waste management and minimisation plan.

 

Signs (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

These can cover signs such as sandwich boards, banners, ladder signs and real estate signs. Auckland City Council controlled the use of all types of advertising signs through a signs bylaw whereas other councils only used bylaws to control specific types of signs (e.g. temporary signs) and used district plan rules to control other types of signs. Specific rules apply to election signs (usually in a separate bylaw).

 

Stormwater management (Auckland Council)

Auckland City and Papakura District had stormwater management bylaws to manage open watercourses and pipes that are used to discharge stormwater to the coast. These bylaws generally require landowners to keep watercourses free from obstruction so they function correctly for stormwater transport. They also support the ongoing use of stormwater soakage in some volcanic parts of Auckland.

 

Traffic (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Traffic bylaws regulate matters such as one-way roads, roads with weight restrictions, speed limits, the stopping, loading and parking of motor vehicles, bus lanes, cycle paths and shared zones which are not regulated by central government. A traffic bylaw may also address the driving of vehicles on beaches, and controls on specific areas such as the Auckland Domain. Auckland Transport is now responsible for bylaws relating to the Auckland transport system (including roads), with the council responsible for other areas such as roads within parks.

 

Water supply (Auckland Council with Watercare Services Limited)

Most of the amalgamated councils had water supply bylaws. These cover topics including metering, connection, protection of the supply from contamination, water conservation, provision for fire fighting, and use of water from hydrants.



Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board - Funding Allocations

 

File No.: CP2014/08854

 

  

 

 

This report was not available at the time the agenda was compiled.  The report will be circulated separately to members and will be made publicly available at the following Auckland Council webpage:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Submission on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship

 

File No.: CP2014/08173

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to present the submission made to the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship.

Executive summary

2.       In its submission to the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship the Manurewa Local Board outlines a clear and pressing need to protect vulnerable young people from alcohol related harm through greater regulation of alcohol advertising and sponsorship.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      formally endorse its submission made by the Chairperson, Angela Dalton, to the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship.

 

 

Comments

3.       In 2010, the Law Commission presented its report Alcohol in our Lives: Curbing the Harm recommending a three stage programme of advertising interventions which would be in place within five years.

4.       This report was considered by the Justice and Electoral Parliamentary Select Committee on alcohol law reform in 2010/11.

5.       Over 7000 submitters to the Justice and Electoral Select Committee made some comment on alcohol advertising and/or sponsorship. The vast majority were in favour of greater restrictions on advertising, and a ban on sponsorship.

6.       In recognition of the large number of submissions commenting on alcohol advertising and sponsorship issues, Central Government agreed to establish a Forum to examine whether further alcohol advertising and sponsorship restrictions are necessary.

7.       If further restrictions are needed, the forum is to ensure that any recommended changes are in line with the object of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. The object of the Act is to promote the responsible sale, supply and consumption of alcohol, and to minimise alcohol-related harm.

8.       This ‘Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship Forum’ is now constituted to consider whether further restrictions on alcohol advertising and sponsorship are needed to reduce alcohol-related harm. The Forum will report to the Minister of Justice and the Associate Minister of Health later in 2014. 

9.       The Forum has a focus on populations that suffer greater harm from alcohol (including Māori, Pacific and young people) and states it is particularly interested in submissions from or relating to these groups.

10.     The Forum sought submissions from affected stakeholders and the public. Submissions were due by Monday 28th April 2014.

11.     Manurewa Local Board Chair and Deputy Chair consulted amongst members and interested parties on this matter. They received significant feedback and made a Submission accordingly.

12.     In particular, Clendon/Manurewa Community Action on Youth and Drugs (CAYAD) Reference Group provided substantial information. CAYAD is a formally constituted group of residents and stakeholders from the Clendon/Manurewa community who invest in proven and culturally appropriate early intervention programmes to address underlying social issues facing our young people.

13.     Based on all the feedback received, Manurewa Local Board understands that there is a clear and pressing need for greater regulations governing alcohol advertising and sponsorship.

14.     The Board advocates tightening the regulations further, in keeping with the approach recommended by the Law Commission. Leaving the decisions about advertising and sponsorship in the hands of the industry is not seen to be reducing the harmful impact of alcohol abuse, particularly among Maori, Pacific and young people. 

15.     The Board advocates for a comprehensive approach to reduce the exposure of young people to alcohol advertising and sponsorship:

i)        The Board seeks restrictions on advertising on walls and windows of premises, prohibition of sandwich boards on streets, and restrictions on displays inside premises (e.g. Ready to Drink promotions)

ii)       Regarding mass media, the Board seeks Regulations which minimise the exposure of young people to these messages

iii)      The Board believes this should also apply to Social Media being viewed in New Zealand like Facebook.

 

Consideration

16.     Community members repeatedly tell Manurewa Local Board that reducing the harmful impact alcohol and other drugs is a priority. Community concerns are particularly focused on the effects on young people and their families. The Board is informed by constituents that young teenagers are being influenced through advertising and sponsorship to begin drinking at an early age and to drink more heavily to their own detriment.

Local board views and implications

17.     Manurewa Local Board actively advocates at every opportunity for measures to reduce the harmful consumption of alcohol and other drugs.

Maori impact statement

18.     Manurewa Local Board area has a high proportion of young Maori. Young Maori are particularly vulnerable to the impact of alcohol sponsorship and alcohol advertising.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Manurewa Local Board Submission to Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponosorship

91

Signatories

Authors

David Hopkins - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 












Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board feedback on Local Boards Funding Policy Review

 

File No.: CP2014/08500

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks endorsement from the Manurewa Local Board for the feedback to the Local Boards Funding Policy review.

Executive summary

2.       At its 10 April 2014 meeting the board delegated authority to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson to draft the board’s feedback to the Local Boards Funding Policy review.  Feedback was required by 30 April 2014. 

3.       This report attaches the feedback for formal endorsement.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the feedback to the Local Boards Funding Policy review.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Manurewa Local Board feedback to the Local Boards Funding Policy review

105

     

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

AC new logo_horz_b&wLocal Boards Funding Policy Review

 

The Manurewa Local Board provides the following feedback on The Local Board Funding Policy Review.

 

That the Manurewa Local Board

 

A.         notes that Auckland Council is required to adopt a Local Boards Funding Policy and currently has one based predominately on legacy council service levels and funding decisions. As this has now been operational for over three years it is recognised that it is timely to review the policy based on:

i)          experience arising from conferred, allocated and delegated decision making

ii)         asset maintenance programmes

iii)         service levels arising from adopted policies put in place to implement the Auckland Plan

iv)        lessons gained from day to day governance by local boards and the governing body.

 

B.         believes the structure of the Local Boards Funding Policy Review should commence by an examination of the total Auckland Council budget and what is required for local boards and the governing body to undertake their respective governance roles balanced against revenue projections. This should take into account the wider planning and budgetary process and the financial impact of maintaining existing services and work programmes as well as developing new facilities across the city in line with the Auckland Plan.

C.        considers that without examining the total budget and also having all the decision making information available, such as asset management plans and service levels, undertaking the review will be problematic resulting in a less than comprehensive outcome. This in turn will mean that within a short period a further review will be required unless all the relevant information is available to those undertaking the governance of Auckland Council.

D.        now looks forward to a comprehensive review of the Local Boards Funding Policy that moves from a largely legacy informed development to one based on taking Auckland Council forward. The board believes one of the key elements of the policy, apart from being fully informed, will be the essential issues of addressing equity in asset and service provision. The board recognises that Auckland Council has moved towards a single rating system which is staged over a number of years resulting in the region being rated on the samel basis. It also notes that in respect of a wide range of activities the council is progressing to form a single approach rather than being based on legacy council practices. 

E.         recommends that further work is undertaken to determine whether a higher percentage of Auckland Council’s budget would be a more appropriate share for local activities given that locally driven initiatives and local asset based services account for approximately one and ten per cent, respectively, of council’s total operating costs.

F.         supports the 20 February 2014 Finance and Performance Committee resolution directing staff to consider service level equity issues for local asset based services as part of the development of the long-term plan and asset management plans as well as engaging with local boards and reporting back on a timetable. In supporting the resolution it is important to highlight that the Local Boards Funding Policy Review is not solely relevant to local boards but to all involved in the governance of Auckland Council. This reinforces the need for both the governing body and local boards to develop and progress the policy together. As a result the engagement process and the work programme to address service level equity issues and asset provision should be agreed by both the governing body and the local boards.

G.        endorses the process and timelines for the Local Boards Funding Policy Review, provided that the work on service level equity issues and asset provision is progressed in parallel. The work programme to address service level equity issues and asset provision must include a staging of the key deliverables, with prioritised asset classes and service levels for review.  This would be presented to the Local Boards Funding Policy Political Working Party on 6 May 2014.

H.        identifies that clarity on the treatment of both the Waiheke and Great Barrier Local Boards, and understanding the implications for the other local boards is required prior to the adoption of the policy.

I.          emphasises the need for additional areas of work to be undertaken to help with the comprehensive nature of the review and that all involved in the governance of Auckland Council have the information required for good quality decision making. Additional work is required on the following areas:

i.    determine whether more activities and the corresponding funding should sit in the locally driven initiatives category

ii.    understand which council business units have corporate overheads, activity and programming budgets that have a direct relationship with the role of local boards and their decision-making (in particular budgets held by the Community Development, Arts and Culture department), with a view to shift these budgets to local boards, or increase their ability to influence and change budgets to deliver services that reflect their community needs

iii.   determine whether Business Improvement District (BIDs) corporate overheads should be shifted to local asset based services, as the administrative components (i.e. staffing) are allocated based on the rate collected via the BID, and agreed by the BID and the governing body, not the local boards

iv.  determine the appropriate amount of budget for local boards to successfully deliver upon their role, noting the current allocation is based on legacy council budgets. In doing so the principal that the resources follow the decision making that is either conferred by legislation, within the approved allocation of decision making or has been delegated to local boards by the governing body. 

J.         notes that current locally driven initiative allocations allow for minimal discretion for most local boards and any reduction will impact on existing service levels.

K.         recommends that an alternative be considered that addresses a general rate allocation where no local board receives any reduction in funding but additional operational costs are made available based on population and equity. The board notes that each of the general rate reallocation scenarios (scenarios A, B and F) will lead to funding increases and decreases across the local boards.

L.         notes a targeted rate is available to enhance service levels above an agreed standard service level, once standard service levels are established.

M.        notes that local rates can lead to inequity and affordability issues and run a significant risk of locking in legacy council funding models, where historical under investment in some areas would continue.

N.        recommends that:

i.    asset based service levels are funded by the general rate.

ii.    locally driven initiatives are funded via the general rate as local initiatives are core council activities, essential to cohesive communities and Auckland being the world’s most liveable city

O.        recommends that with respect to the allocation method for locally driven initiatives under general rate funding, that population should be the main factor and that an adjustment for deprivation should also be applied, as areas of deprivation have characteristics that may indicate a greater dependency on local services

P.         forward this feedback to the Local Boards Funding Policy Political Working Party and the Finance and Performance Committee for their consideration

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Feedback on the Council Controlled Organisations Review

 

File No.: CP2014/08673

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks endorsement for the Manurewa Local Board feedback on the council controlled organisations (CCOs) review.

Executive summary

2.       The board at its 10 April 2014 meeting delegated authority to draft the board’s feedback to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson. 

3.       Feedback was due on Wednesday, 30 April 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the Manurewa Local Board feedback to the council controlled organisations review.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Manurewa Local Board feedback to the council controlled organisations review

111

     

Signatories

Authors

David Hopkins - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

                                                                                                                                                  Logo

29 April 2014

Attention: Carole Canler

 

Re:  Council Controlled Organisations Review

 

 

1.       Manurewa Local Board welcomes the opportunity to be part of the Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) Review. CCOs deliver important outcomes for Auckland Council, which includes residents, ratepayers, and visitors to Manurewa.

2.       Manurewa Local Board is interested in the work of CCOs which can contribute to its priorities; projects being undertaken in the area, and in being kept up-to-date on wider regional projects.

3.       Of the existing Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs), Manurewa Local Board regularly interacts with Auckland Transport and Auckland Council Properties Limited, and less frequently with Watercare, Auckland Tourism and Economic Development and Regional Facilities Auckland, seldom with Auckland Council Investments Limited, and not at all with Auckland Waterfront Development Agency.

4.       Manurewa Local Board seeks to work positively and closely with CCOs where relevant. The Board provides guidance based on local views and local impacts. The Board acknowledges the skill and expertise that CCOs bring to their work.

5.       In reviewing the effectiveness of CCOs, the Board believes that at a governance level alignment to the objectives of Council and of Local Boards should be paramount.Just as aligning the previous Local Councils and Regional Council into one body, Auckland Council, has brought efficiencies and benefits, a similar integration of the governance and management structures of the CCOs would be likely to lead to huge benefits and reduced costs. Integration would require time and skill but does not need to mean the loss of corporate knowledge and expertise. There are many examples within the Auckland Council of departments and units which have specialised expertise and skill sets and yet manage to work effectively in the unified structure.

6.       It is not clear that CCO management and staff currently understand the place of Local Boards within the governance structure of Auckland Council, which is as equal partners with the governing body. For example, some reports made or submitted to the Board are sometimes not locally specific and contain extensive extraneous information.

7.       Manurewa Local Board considers it is unnecessarily difficult to influence CCOs workplans and strategic agendas where local board priorities are concerned.  The Local Government Act 2000 states one of the principal objectives of the CCOs is to have regard to the interests of the community in which it operates and to endeavour to accommodate or encourage these when able to do so. (LGA 2000 59(1.c)).  We feel that this is being interpreted too narrowly, with the result that CCOs are too separated from ‘business as usual’ within the wider council organisation.

8.       In Manurewa this is particularly relevant in relation to Auckland Transport, where the removal of responsibility for transport from the ordinary business of Council creates a distinct lack of visible accountability to the needs of our local community. This is happening at a time when there are significant pressures on motorway and rail services, and increasing road congestion in Wiri and in many areas of the Southern region. It is harder for people to know who to talk to about something which is important to them; Auckland Council or Auckland Transport.

9.       The separation of Auckland Transport has also created a situation where resources and responsibility for immediately visible local maintenance, such as removing dumped waste and street sweeping, appear to be split, meaning it is difficult to address performance issues where the Council or Local Board is still publicly viewed as the responsible party.

10.     The Local Board believes the Review should question whether the appropriate balance is being found between technical expertise of, for example, the Auckland Transport teams and the stated needs of the public.

11.     At a strategic level, current structures act as a barrier between the local boards and CCO management in relation to decision-making and place-shaping capacity. Timeframes for consultation and decision making, for example, are created largely within each organisation and have unexpected impacts on other related organisations. Roads, for example, need to be maintained according to a regular schedule as they are important for moving cars, trucks and busses. Roads are also streets that people live on and walk and cycle on. Roads, like Great South Road in Manurewa Town Centre, also have major impacts on people’s experience of the Town Centre and on the possibilities for redevelopment.

12.     To achieve cost effectiveness, the Board believes the potential for reducing duplication and reducing the number of CCO should be examined particularly where there is overlap with Council departments and units. For example, the Economic Development activities of ATEED need better alignment with the Economic Development department of Council. The same is true in with ATEED and Council’s Events team. The aim should be to seek efficiencies and increase effectiveness. The position is similar with ACPL in terms of the functional definitions in respect of the Property Department.

13.     The Board believes that formal accountability framework between Council, local boards and CCOs needs to be clarified and streamlined, with more rigorous debate when priorities are being communicated through the letter of expectations and other mechanisms.

14.     The Board looks forward to the successful completion of the Review and to ongoing collaboration with the Council Controlled Organisations to achieve best outcomes for the people of Manurewa.

 

 

Yours sincerely

 

Angela Dalton

Chairperson, Manurewa Local Board

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Local Board input re draft regulations for discharge and dumping in the ocean

 

File No.: CP2014/08750

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides Local Board input to Auckland Council submission to the Ministry of Environment regarding regulations governing the discharge and dumping of waste in the oceans around New Zealand.

Executive summary

2.       Manurewa Local Board endorses the Auckland Council submission to the Ministry of Environment regarding regulations governing dumping and discharge into the ocean around New Zealand and finds the submission has struck a balance which aligns with the values and concerns of the people of Manurewa.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      commends the Auckland Council submission regarding regulations governing the discharge and dumping of waste in the oceans around New Zealand to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

b)      endorses the need identified for more study and more understanding of the effects on marine life of discharge and dumping.

 

 

Comments

 

3.       Manurewa residents have an increasing understanding of the importance of the environment in their wellbeing. This is especially so for the waterways, the Manukau Harbour and the oceans.

4.       The Board has been advised in its consultations that:”It’s time we take pride in our waterways and do all we can to protect and enhance them for the greater good of all.”

5.       No matter what past arrangements businesses and others operated under, people now expect a higher standard of care for the environment from business.

6.       Residents expect that government will play its part in supporting and requiring the necessary changes. This includes a system of expectations enshrined in regulation and effectively monitored. People accept that this will take time and that more knowledge and understanding is required.

7.       Residents expect Auckland Council and Manurewa Local Board to act and advocate in this regard.

8.       Auckland Council has prepared a submission to the Ministry of Environment on the consultation draft of the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects – Discharge and Dumping) Regulations 2014. Manurewa Local Board has reviewed this submission.

9.       The submission relates to the draft regulations for discharges of sediments from mineral prospecting and exploration, discharges from petroleum extraction, and dumping of waste. Several of the activities are already permitted activities under the Exclusive Economic Zone Act. These regulations bring the related discharges under the same Act rather than having them in the Maritime Transport Act.

10.     The recommendations that Auckland Council has suggested have regard to the adverse effects from dumping and discharge which should, as a minimum, be meeting the requirements of the Marine Coastal Regional Plan and the Resource Management Act.

11.     The submission identifies the need for more study and more understanding of the effects on marine life of dumping. The challenges in the submission to the proposed regulations and monitoring in encouraging.

12.     The submission has struck a balance which aligns with the values and concerns of the Manurewa Local Board and the people it represents.

13.     The submission will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 13 May for retrospective approval. An amended version will then be sent to Ministry of Environment if necessary.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The board has been asked to provide feedback for inclusion in the Auckland Council submission.

Maori impact statement

15.     Mana whenua have particular interest in protecting the waterways, harbours and oceans and the marine life within.

Implementation

16.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Council Submission to Ministry of Environment on proposed regulations for discharge and dumping activities under the EEZ Act

115

bView

Manurewa Local Board feedback for incorporation into the Auckland Council Submission to the Ministry of Environment on proposed regulations for discharge and dumping activities under the Exclusive Economic Zone and Contential Shelf (EEZ) Act

121

     

Signatories

Authors

David Hopkins - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Council LOGO Small

 

 

 

 

 

Submission to the

Ministry for the Environment

on the

 

Consultation draft of

proposed regulations for discharge and dumping activities under the EEZ Act

 

 

 

 

19March 2014

Introduction

1.    This is the Auckland Council’s submission on the consultation draft of the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects – Discharge and Dumping) Regulations 2014. 

2.    Auckland Council is the unitary authority for Auckland, a region containing a third of New Zealand’s population.  Auckland has a significant amount of coastal marine area (11,000 km2) which is highly valued by the region’s people.

3.    Auckland Council thanks the Ministry for the opportunity to make a submission on the draft regulations.  We have a strong interest in developments in this areadue to our local communities’ concerns and the linkages with our regulatory functions under the RMA for the coastal marine area.

4.    The council made a submission in September 2013 on the discussion document on activity classifications under the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environment Effects) Act 2012 (EEZ Act).  Some of the points we raised have been addressed in the draft regulations but we wish to reiterate our concerns in other areas.

5.    This submission has not yet been formally approved by Auckland Council.  The short submission period did not allow time for the council’s usual reporting processes or consultation with iwi and local boards.  The draft submission will be presented to the next meeting of our Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee.  If any changes to the submission are required, they will be sent to MfE with a request to amend the submission.

6.    Please direct any enquiries to Dr Roger Blakeley, Chief Planning Officer – phone 09 307 6063 or email roger.blakeley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

General comments

7.    The draft regulations bring various discharge and dumping activities within the scope of the EEZ Act, rather than being split between the EEZ Act and Maritime Transport Act 1994.  The council supports this move to more comprehensive and integrated environmental regulation for the EEZ.

8.    Dumping and discharges can have significant adverse effects on water quality and on marine ecology.  Such effects could spread into the coastal marine area for large scale activities.  It is important that the limits and conditions on permitted and non-notified activities are restrictive enough to avoid the possibility of such effects. 

9.    It is also important that the new regulations do not inadvertently impose barriers on activities that currently occur in the EEZ.  For example, it should not become more onerous to dump dredged material in the EEZ.  We have policies to avoid dumping dredged material within the Hauraki Gulf due to the area’s national significance.  Such material is generally dumped in approved reclamations or at authorised sites in the EEZ.

10.  For these reasons we consider that finalising these regulations should includefurther consideration of the requirements for similar activities in the adjacent coastal marine area.  Greater consistency would enhance integration between the EEZ and RMA regimes for activities close to the coastal marine area boundary.

Discharges of sediments and tailings

11.  The permitted activity discharges of sediments from prospecting and exploration (regulations 6, 7 and 8) have very large volume limits (1000 tonnes for iron sand or phosphate nodules and 100 tonnes for seafloor massive sulphides (SMS)).  In the operative Auckland Regional Plan:Coastal and the proposed Unitary Plan, prospecting as a permitted activity is limited to no more than one cubic metre of sand, shell, shingle and other natural material in any 24 hour period.

12.  TheNIWA report[1], provided as background to the new regulations, indicates that much smaller volumes should be used.  The last paragraph of the report(page 46) notes that effective employment of mitigation strategies requires good knowledge of the spatial distribution of the different benthic habitats with respect to the distribution of the mineral resource within the permit area, as well as the function of marine ecosystems in the area.  The reportstates that “the compilation of available data or a degree of sampling effort to obtain this basic information will be required prior to undertaking prospecting and exploration activities that will involve the discharge of sediment above 100 t for iron sand andphosphorite nodule regions and 10 t for SMS deposit regions, because only below this scale are the impacts of discharges assessed to be negligible or minor”. 

13.  It appears that thepermitted activity thresholds in the draft regulations have been set at the level at which moderate or greater consequencesfor sensitive marine environmentsare expected (NIWA report, page 44).  To ensure that appropriate data gathering and mitigation strategies are employed, and to avoid the risk of effects occurring in the coastal marine area, these thresholds should be at the lower level where impacts are negligibleor minor.

14.  The NIWA report is useful background information but is based on judgements of an expert panel and literature review exercise,rather than field-based assessments of effects.  It involved making large assumptions, particularly for seafloor massive sulphide. The report assessed thresholds by order of magnitude (e.g. 1t, 10t, 100t, 1000t) which is a rather coarse approach when developing legislation for permitted activities.  The conclusions of this report should be treated cautiously and the more restrictive volumes applied to a permitted activity threshold (i.e. the negligible or minor effects level as opposed to the moderate effects level). 

15.  The NIWA report presents an assessment of the potential effects of prospecting and exploration for particular minerals in different areas of the EEZbut the regulations apply the conclusions to prospecting and exploration anywhere in the EEZ.  The report assessed iron sands on the shelf along the west coast, phosphorus nodules on the Chatham Rise and seafloor massive sulphide along the Kermadec trench. The acceptable discharge thresholds that have been determined are closely related to the type of environments where the mining is taking place, as opposed to the actual mineral being mined, or method of mining. The conclusions are specific to the ecology of the different areas.  This has been translated into permitted activity conditions that are inconsistent between the different types of mining.  For example, sediments from phosphate nodule prospecting must be discharged at the bottom of the water column but sediments from SMS prospecting must be discharged at the surface of the water.  Iron sand prospecting has a condition limiting the volume to be discharged in a single event but this is not applied to other mineral types.  It appears that the conditions are specific to the ecology of the areas considered and to the types of discharges from currently possible mining methods.  

16.  The EEZ has a relatively low level of scientific assessment and it is possible that these minerals may be found in other areas in future.  The permitted activities conditions should include geographical locations or habitat types as well as the type of mineral being removed, as these were the key determining factors on environmental effect.One way of doing this would be to restrict the permitted activities to the particular areas that were assessed.  Lower, more precautionary, volume thresholds should be used in other areas of the EEZ. 

17.  The supporting information[2] for the regulations states that the Minister is considering including a condition in the regulations to require, where practical, the discharge of sediments back into the same area of seabed from which sediments were extracted (in particular for the mining of iron sands, SMS and phosphates) (page 20).  Auckland Council supports this suggestion.  It would limit the effects of the discharges to the area already affected by the extraction rather than spreading effects to a new area.

Discharges from petroleum extraction

18.  The supporting information (page 22) notes a change from the proposals in the 2013 discussion document for the discharge of harmful substances from offshore processing drainage, displacement water and production water.  The proposed permitted activity has not been included in the draft regulations.  The information notes that advice was received that such discharges do not occur during the exploration phase of operations.In the unlikely event these discharges were to occur at the exploration stage, they are proposed to be classified as non-notified discretionary (regulation 13(2)).  Auckland Council supports this change to the proposals.

19.  In the draft interpretation section, ‘production water’ is defined as ‘any water extracted from the reservoir’.  It is not clear what ‘the reservoir’ is. Wording from the supporting information suggests it is the resource being drilled in to (i.e. an oil reservoir).  This should be made clearer in the regulations.

Dumping of waste

20.  Auckland Council supports the classification of dumping dredging material in an authorised area as a non-notified discretionary activityand in other areas as a discretionary activity (regulations 25 and 26).  Thislargely carries over the current management approach under the Maritime Transport Act’s Marine Protection Rules which means all dumping requires a permit which Maritime NZ can grant or decline.  Applications must be publicly notified but this requirement can be waived if the Director considers the dumping will have minor adverse effects on the marine environment.  The proposed classification removes the possibility of notification for authorised sitesand gives greater certainty for dredging operations.  As noted earlier, Auckland Council has policies that avoid dumpingdredged material in the Hauraki Gulf.  We do not wish the EEZ regulations to make it any harder to dump material in the EEZ and thereby place greater pressure on the Hauraki Gulf.

21. The draft regulations have insufficient detail regarding how dumping applications will be assessed.  There is no detail on what information applicants have to provide, how the EPA will assess it, or who will monitor any environmental effects from approved activities.  The supporting information (page 60) has some detail on what all marine consent applications need to provide under the EEZ Act.  However, there are no requirements specific to dumping.  Conditions should be included in the dumping regulations to ensure that appropriate matters are taken into account.  For example it could require that an application include sediment plume modelling and benthic habitat assessments.  Such matters are addressed in the Maritime NZ document “New Zealand Guidelines for Sea Disposal of Waste” (Issue No. 1801, 30 June 1999).  The guidelines are incorporated by reference in rule 180.8(2) of the marine protection rules, made by the Minister of Transport under section 389 of the Maritime Transport Act 1994.  A similar linkage to the guidelines should be with respect to the EEZ regulations.

Monitoring

22.  There is very little in the regulations to ensure that adequate monitoring of environmental effects is undertaken.  Regulation 29 requires the EPA to monitor permitted activities to determine whether activities are being undertaken in accordance with the conditions imposed by the regulations. A similar requirement should be included for non-notified discretionary and discretionary activities with the monitoring requirement placed on the consent holder.  There has been very little assessment in the past of activities in the EEZ such as the dumping of dredged material at authorised sites.  Monitoring should be undertaken to determine the scale of environmental effects and how far they extend from the dumping site. There is potential for the effects of such activities to spread into the coastal marine area.

 

Summary of changes sought

23.  Auckland Council seeks that the following changes be made to thedraft regulations for discharges and dumping under the EEZ Act:

a)   Amend the thresholds for discharge of sediments from prospecting and exploration classified as a permitted activity to the volumes given for negligible or minor effects: 100 t for iron sand and phosphorite nodule regions and 10 t for SMS deposit regions

b)   Amend the regulations for the discharge of sediments from prospecting and exploration classified as a permitted activity to limit them to the geographical locations or habitat typesconsidered in the background report i.e. iron sands from the west coast of the North Island, phosphorite nodules from the Chatham Rise and seafloor massive sulphides from the Kermadec volcanic arc.  Use more restrictive volume thresholds for these activities in other areas of the EEZ.

c)   Include a condition in the regulations to require, where practical, the discharge of sediments back into the same area of seabed from which sediments were extracted.

d)   Amend the definition of ‘production water’ to be clear on what is meant by ‘the reservoir’.

e)   Amend the dumping regulations to include conditions to ensure that appropriate matters are taken into account, e.g. to require that an application include sediment plume modelling and benthic habitat assessments.

f)    Ensure that the dumping regulations include a linkage to the Maritime NZ guidelines equivalent to the current requirements under the Maritime Transport Act.

g)   Amend regulation 29 to ensure that non-notified discretionary and discretionary activities are monitored as well as permitted activities. 

 

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Urgent Decision - Manurewa Local Board area neighbours day events - March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08713

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The board is being asked to note an urgent decision for $250 from the Local Event Development Fund for $250 for a Neighbours Day event held in Cade Place, Weymouth on Sunday, 30 March 2014.  Decisions made under the urgent decision provisions must be reported to the Manurewa Local Board. 

Executive summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board note the following urgent decision:

a)      That the Manurewa Local Board approve funding from the Local Event Development Fund of $250 for face painting as part of the children’s entertainment and for the purchase of refreshments for the Sunday, 30 March 2014 Neighbours Day event held in Cade Place, Weymouth.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Urgent decision - Neighbours Day event - March 2014

125

     

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Reports Requested - Pending - Issues

 

File No.: CP2014/07917

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on reports requested and issues raised at previous meetings.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report entitled “reports requested – pending – issues” by the Democracy Advisor be received.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports requested pending listing for May 2014

129

bView

Memo responding to the Manurewa Local Board resolutions on the Local Alcohol Policy

133

    

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

 

Reports Requested/Pending/Issues                                                                                                                                                                                          May 2014

Row No.

Date of Resolution

Group reporting

Issue

Resolution/Description

Target Date

COMMENTS

1.

13 December 2012

Item 20

Resolution f)

 

and

 

11 July 2013

Item 26

Resolution ii)

 

and

 

8 August 2013

Item 28

Resolution b)

 

and

 

12 September 2013

Item 37

Resolution b)

 

Community Facilities

Redevelop Wiri Community Hall

That the Manurewa Local Board requests officers to develop a plan for the redevelopment of Wiri Community Hall, including a process for consulting with the community and other stakeholders, timelines and resource requirements to implement the plan.  The Board notes that there are unallocated funds within the Community Facilities Renewals capital expenditure budget in the Long Term Plan for 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 that could be applied to this project.  Officers are requested to report this plan to the Local Board meeting in February 2013.

 

 

That officers urgently provide an update on the progress of the Wiri community Hall usage and refurbishment.

 

 

That the Manurewa Local Board request community facilities supply a report providing the information requested on rows 3, 4, 7 and 8 of the report.

_______________________________________

 

That the Manurewa Local Board expresses its disappointment at the rate of progress with the development of Wiri Hall, which has been reported as due to the operational department being under resourced; and sees this as an untenable situation and one impacting upon the Boards ability to deliver on its priorities.  The Board requests that Councillors Penrose and Walker raise the resourcing issue with the Chief Executive.

 

Feb 2013

 

April 2014

 

May 2014

 

July 2014

The Local Board Advisors are following up with the community facilities staff on this issue.

 

The Senior Advisor is waiting on information from the Manager, Community Occupancy following a meeting on July 10.

 

The Manager Community Occupancy tabled information in relation to Manurewa venues for hire, usage and utility, fees and charges and accessibility at the 12 September 2013 Manurewa Local Board meeting.

 

The Manager Community Occupancy advises that a report on the community’s preferred options for the redevelopment, timelines and budget will be provided to the Board information in due course.

 

The Manager Community Occupancy advises that a report on the findings and recommendations will be provided for the 12 December 2013 Manurewa Local Board meeting.

 

The Manager Community Development Arts & Culture advises the officers require more time in order to complete community consultation before reporting back to the Board.  The report is expected to the 10 April 2014 Local Board meeting.

 

The Manager Community Development Arts & Culture advises the staff require more time.  The report is expected 10 July 2014 meeting.

 

2.

12 September 2013

Item 26

Resolution d)

Community Development & Safety/ Property Department

 

Safety Aspects Relating to Housing for Older Persons

That the Manurewa Local Board requests a further report on safety aspects for Housing for Older Persons in Manurewa following completion of the current safety assessment.

TBC

The Senior Local Board Advisor will work with the Property Manager South to provide a report that identifies what the issues are and what it will take to resolve them.

 

Team Leader, Social Housing Community Facilities, advises that a property condition survey of all social housing will be completed in May 2014.

 

3.

13 Feb 2014

Item 14

Resolution c)

Policy & Planning

Local Alcohol Policy – restrictions on floor area for sale of RTDs

That the Manurewa Local Board requests a response on the Manurewa Local Board’s Notice of Motion from its 12 December 2013 meeting advocating for rules to be put into the Local Alcohol Policy to restrict the amount of floor area a liquor shop is able to devote to the sale of “Ready to Drink” (RTD’s), and how officers have implemented this into the Local Alcohol Policy development.

 

TBA

The Principal Policy Analyst, Community Policy and Planning has advised that a memo is being drafted to the Local Board in response to this resolution.

 

Refer to attachment B to the reports request pending report for a detailed explanation of the Local Alcohol Policy development to date.

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 










Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term

 

File No.: CP2014/07919

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a register of achievements of the Manurewa Local Board for the 2013 – 2016 Electoral Term.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report entitled “Manurewa Local Board Achievements Register 2013 – 2016 Electoral Term” be received, noting the following additions to the register:

 

i)         

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

2013-2016 Achievements Register

145

    

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

 


MANUREWA LOCAL BOARD

ACHIEVEMENTS REGISTER 2013-2016 ELECTORAL TERM

 

Row

Board Meeting Date

ACHIEVEMENT

1.

30 January 2014

Supported the Manurewa Santa Parade

2.

30 January 2014

Supported the Manurewa Christmas in the Park

3.

30 January 2014

Feedback on the Smoke Free policy

4.

30 January 2014

Feedback on the Boarding Houses and Hostels bylaw

5.

30 January 2014

Feedback on the Animal Management bylaw review

6.

30 January 2014

Position paper on Psychoactive Substances

7.

30 January 2014

Submission to the Hamilton City Council on their Psychoactive Substances Policy

8.

13 February 2014

Supported and attended the Manurewa Waitangi Day event and undertook community consultation for the Local Board Plan

9.

13 February 2014

Supported and attended the Homai Fun Day at Russell Reserve and undertook community consultation for the Local Board Plan

10.

13 February 2014

Submission to the Local Government Act Amendment Bill No. 3

11.

13 February 2014

Local Board Plan community consultation at Southmall

12.

13 March 2014

Supported Elvis in the Gardens event – 20,000 people attended

13.

13 March 2014

Spoke to the Hamilton City Council regarding their Psychoactive Substances Policy

14.

13 March 2014

Held first meeting for the World War I commemorations event

15.

13 March 2014

Attended Long Term Plan scheme setting meeting

16.

13 March 2014

Provided input on the draft Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw

17.

13 March 2014

Provided input into the draft Boarding Houses and Hostels Bylaw

18.

13 March 2014

Provided input into the New National Drug Policy Discussion Document for New Zealand

19.

13 March 2014

Speaking to Select Committee regarding submission to the Local Government Act Amendment Bill No. 3

20.

13 March 2014

Spoke to the Regional Strategy & Policy Committee regarding the psychoactive substances regulations

21.

13 March 2014

Consultation for the informal feedback on the Local Board Plan at Clendon and Southmall

22.

10 April 2014

Consultation with mana whenua regarding the Local Board Plan

23.

10 April 2014

Consultation with Weymouth community regarding the Local Board Plan

24.

10 April 2014

Consultation with elderly and the disability sector on the Local Board Plan

25.

10 April 2014

Opening of the Randwick Park Skate Park – an awesome facility

26.

10 April 2014

Supported Neighbours Day initiatives

27.

10 April 2014

Supported the Sunrise Walk for Hospice.

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/07921

 

  

 

Purpose

Providing an opportunity for the Board to receive reports that have been referred from Governing Body Committee meetings or forums for the information of the Local Board. 

 

At the time the agenda was compiled no reports had been received.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board note the following reports referred for information from the Governing Body committee meetings or forums:

 

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Forum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2014/07923

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Notes taken at the Manurewa Local Board workshops held on 1, 15 and 17 April 2014 are attached.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board receive the notes from the Manurewa Local Board workshops held on 1, 15 and 17 April 2014. 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

1 April - Workshop notes

151

bView

15 April - Workshop notes

155

cView

17 April - Workshop notes

163

    

Signatories

Authors

Lee Manaia - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

Workshop Notes

 

Date of Workshop:               Tuesday, 1 April 2014

Time:                                      6.30pm

Venue:                                    Manurewa Local Board Office Meeting Room
7 Hill Road, Manurewa

 

Present:

Angela Dalton (Chair)

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

Simeon Brown (Deputy Chair)

Danella McCormick

 

Michael Bailey

Daryl Wrightson

 

 

Staff Present:

John Adams, Senior Local Board Advisor

 

Lee Manaia, Democracy Advisor

 

 

Apologies:

George Hawkins, QSO

Ken Penney

 

 

Item

Who to Action

1.         Community Funding Applications

 

The board members present reviewed the community funding applications and recommend to the Manurewa Local Board as follows:

 

 

 

Fund

Organisation

Project Applied for

Amount requested

Recommend to Business Meeting

 

 

 

 

 

Local Board Discretionary Community

Age Concern Counties Manukau Inc.

International Day of Older Persons 2014 Manurewa

$3,263

$3,263

Local Board Discretionary Community

Alfriston College

Community garden project

$3,390

$3,390

Local Board Discretionary Community

Alzheimer's Auckland Charitable Trust

Botanic Gardens Walking Group

$10,080

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust (FYD Auckland)

Kiwi Can - Manurewa

$8,000

$6,633

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland NZ View

Transportation assistance

$400

$400

Local Board Discretionary Community

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Newcomer Supporter Programme

$3,840

$3,840

Local Board Discretionary Community

First Presbyterian Church

Transpose Festival

$7,005

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Foundation for Youth Development

Stars Community Challenge

$5,400

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Getin2life Youth Development Trust

in2it Underground Street Play

$3,288

$3,288

Local Board Discretionary Community

LifeChurch Manurewa

SSLAM: youth leadership and education/awareness

$14,392

$14,392

Local Board Discretionary Community

Life Education Trust SE Auckland

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

$20,000

$7,500

Local Board Discretionary Community

Manurewa Squash Rackets Club Inc.

Rates Rebate

$3,398

$3,398

Local Board Discretionary Community

Manurewa University of the Third Age

Monthly general meetings of Manurewa U3A

$1,472

$1,472

Local Board Discretionary Community

New Foundations Trust

BRIDGE (Building Respect Inspires Dreams Goals and Expectations) - Group Workshops

$9,620

$9,620

Local Board Discretionary Community

Project LiteFoot Trust

Project Litefoot's LiteClub

$4,768

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Rape Prevention Education

Sex'n'Respect - Alternative Education

$5,434

$5,434

Local Board Discretionary Community

RaWiri Residents Association Inc.

RaWiri Healthy Living Project Part 2

$6,853

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

South Asian Trust Inc.

SAHAARA Womens' Group

$1,998

$1,998

Local Board Discretionary Community

South Elim Christian Centre

South Elim Gala

$10,000

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Storylines Children's Literature Charitable Trust of NZ

Storylines Festival South Auckland Family Day

$6,657

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Te Ara Poutama AEC Charitable Trust

Basic Gym and Crossfit Training

$4,972

$2,000

Local Board Discretionary Community

The Foundation for Peace Studies Aotearoa/NZ. Inc. (trading as The Peace Foundation)

Peaceful Family Communication

$5,855

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Xcell Trust

The 2014 Indigenous Ink Festival

$23,881

$0

Local Board Discretionary Community

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Youth Health Councils (YHCs) for South Auckland Secondary Schools

$5,000

$5,000

Community Crime Prevention

Kidpower Teenpower Fullpower Trust

Kidpower for Young Children School Workshops

$2,347

$2,347

Community Crime Prevention

South Asian Trust Inc.

SOCH  (Social Change for Men,Women, Youth and Children)

$4,639

$4,639

Community Crime Prevention

Te Whakaora Tangata

Essence Programme

$9,934

$9,934

Marae Facilities

Manurewa Marae

Manurewa Maori Wardens Relocation Project

$8,344

$8,344

Rates Assistance

Baptist Union of NZ (on behalf of The Dream Centre)

2013/3014 rates

$11,000

$5,000

Rates Assistance

Lifechurch NZ Community Trust

2013/3014 rates

$6,818

$6,818

Rates Assistance

Melkite Catholic Charitable Trust of New Zealand

2013/3014 rates

$724

$724

Social Investment

Age Concern Counties Manukau Inc.

Counsellor Pilot Stage Two

$12,500

$12,500

Social Investment

Foundation for Youth Development

Programme Co-ordinator Salary

$5,000

$0

Social Investment

South Auckland Christian Foodbank

Food Save

$6,300

$0

Social Investment

The Parenting Place (Attitude Youth Division)

Attitude programmes in Howick and Manurewa high schools 2014/15

$4,234

$4,234

 

2.         Nathan Homestead

 

Rhoda Fowler (Policy Analyst, Community Policy & Planning), Richard Griffiths (Consultant, Visitor Solutions) and Craig Jones (Director, visitor Solutions) gave an overview of the needs and aspirations analysis undertaken for Nathan Homestead.

 

Board members shared some ideas for Nathan Homestead:

–     move the café to the back of the facility so there is better connection to the playground.  A lot of people don’t realise the café is on site.  There are not many places around Manurewa to sit down and have a coffee in the weekend. 

-     Noted the childcare facility earned revenue. 

-     Nathan Homestead has been left over the years.  It’s going to take a lot of money to make it a functioning centre.  Wants to get on with the work.

-     Look for synergies between Nathan Homestead and the Botanic Gardens.

-     Suggestion of a jazz festival either in late spring or autumn.

 

The general feeling was that the report confirmed what the Board already knew about Nathan Homestead. 

 

Next steps:  The Board opted for option 2 – costings, feasibility studies and timelines. 

 

The Board were keen to find some short term wins and to get some ball park figures for the Long-term Plan. 

 

Rhoda advised that the Local Board will need to advocate to the Governing Body for earthquake strengthening and the reconfiguration of Nathan Homestead. 

 

Rhoda advised that drawings will be required to get a quantity surveyor to give some figures.  If the project is over $1million it will have to go to the Governing Body.

 

The Board will need to set aside some funds for the drawings in the 2014/2015 budget.

 

Daryl is interested in seeing the drawings for the theatre.  Craig will provide a copy of the drawings to Rhoda to be forwarded on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig

 

  Meeting closed at 8.30pm.


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

Workshop Notes

 

Date of Workshop:            Tuesday, 15 April 2015

Time:                                   5.45pm

Venue:                                 Manurewa Local Board Office meeting room, Shop 3-5, 7 Hill Road, Manurewa

 

Present:

Angela Dalton (Chair) [from 6.25pm]

 

 

Simeon Brown (Deputy Chair)

Danella McCormick

 

Michael Bailey [from 7pm]

Daryl Wrightson

 

 

Staff Present:

David Hopkins, Local Board Advisor

 

Lee Manaia, Democracy Advisor

 

 

Apologies:

Angela Dalton (for lateness)

Angela Cunningham-Marino

 

Michael Bailey (for lateness)

Ken Penney

 

George Hawkins

 

 

 

Item

Who to Action

1.         Age Concern and Grey Power

 

Wendy Bremner (CEO Age Concern Counties Manukau) explained that the Age Concern organisation:

·    Support and deliver health programmes

·    Provide elder abuse services

·    Provide education and awareness about elder abuse

 

She raised the following points:

a)   Expressed a concern that a lot of documentation has aging people invisible - older people always seem to be an add on

b)   By 2030 1 in 4 people will be over 65 - we have a growing aging population

c)   There are more great grandparents and grandparents alive now than there has ever been

d)   There is a huge number of active, healthy older people who aren’t seen as a resource in the community

e)   There are a lot of vulnerable and isolated older people who are marginalised because of the digital divide or through illness

f)    There are issues with accessibility and affordability when people retire

g)   There are not enough wrap around support services to help older people who need help to stay in their own place

h)   We live in silo generations and provide services to specific age groups

i)    The middle generation is under pressure from supporting their parents while often supporting their own children.  If the older generation are supported it would relieve pressure on the middle generation.

j)    Anything the board can do to support accessibility and activity for the older demographic would be appreciated.

k)   Public buildings should be accessible for everyone.

l)    Uneven footpaths are dangerous for everyone, especially the elderly.

m)  Gradient of driveways in new developments are too steep and create problems for wheelchair access.

n)   Not enough consideration is given to footpaths being footpaths

o)   Overhanging trees impede footpath accessibility.

p)   Road works are especially dangerous with uneven surfaces.

q)   There are opportunities with events – older people could be involved in different ways – this could be a potential volunteer base.

r)    There are mentoring opportunities – older people should be given an opportunity to share their expertise

s)   The local board plan should include pictures of older people.  Wendy felt it was about acknowledging the older demographic.  For example covered bus stops and a place to sit.

t)    Carers are not valued yet they are critical to our society.  Carers contribute to social capital.

u)   A community asset map for each local board would be helpful so people know who in the community is a resource that you can could direct people to. 

Wendy believes that the council marginalises older people.  It has taken three years to set up the Senior Advisory Panel.  Wendy was unsure whether the south was represented on the panel.  She advised that many older people she had spoken to did not want to travel into the central business district for meetings.

 

Wendy felt there was almost a cult worship for young people; if you are not young you are no longer valuable to society.  The digital divide is a big thing to come to terms with if you haven’t used it regularly – people in their 80s struggle with technology.

 

Simeon thanked Wendy for sharing her views. 

 

John Ballantyne (President Manukau Grey Power) and Ron Wilkins (Vice-President) advised they meet with all the agencies that deal with older people on a regular basis.  They explained that Grey Power is divided into seven zones and that they were representing the Counties Manukau area. 

 

The following concerns were raised:

·    Younger people and older people are finding it hard to make ends meet.

·    Problem with turning right into Costar Place when travelling north – it is impossible to turn right into Costar Place between 4pm and 6pm.  No-one will give way to let you through.  You end up sitting in a through lane which effectively reduces the carriageway to one lane.  Ron advised he had to go down to the Kerr’s Road to turn a right, do a u-turn and then come back down the road.  He would like the council to have Auckland Transport investigate clearway line markings on Great South Road at the Costar Place intersection.

·    Requested the Police also monitor Cronin Place and Great South Road intersection.  People are undertaking unsafe manoeuvres.

 

Grey Power conveyed their appreciation of the Police’s work for red light runners.

 

The next Grey Power newsletter will include an article about the World War One commemorations.  It will request stories about family members who are recorded on the Manurewa cenotaph. 

 

Grey Power were advised that the development next to St David’s Church is an early childhood centre.  The land is owned by St David’s Church.

 

Southmall redevelopment – Angela advised that one of the bits of feedback from the local board plan consultation is that people want Southmall redeveloped.  She will be meeting with the relevant departments to see what can be done. 

 

The Grey Power National AGM is being held in Invercargill this year.  John and Ron will be presenting Simeon’s remit regarding the Local Approved Products Policy on psychoactive substances.  They are confident there will be 100 per cent support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.         Manurewa Police

 

Julia Lynch (Inspector, Area Commander Counties Manukau) and Sarah Leyland (Youth Community Co-ordinator) introduced themselves.

 

Angela explained that the board was very supportive of the Police.  The board appreciated the Police being visible in the town centre. 

 

Sarah advised that the Neighbourhood Policing Teams’ (NPT’s) boundaries have been increased:

·    Homai NPT will now include southmall

·    Clendon NPT will include the marae

·    Wiri NPT will include the Westfield shopping mall.

 

Julia advised that Auckland Transport has given four mountain bikes and the Homai Neighbourhood Policing team have been using them.  She felt this was an excellent way to have the Police more visible.

 

Julia advised that crime is reducing and gave an overview of some of the strategies and programmes the Police are running. 

 

Prevention First Strategy – preventing crime – fewer victims – less crime.

-     having the right people in the right place doing the right things

-     putting victims at the centre of everything they do

-     staff to adopt a more proactive approach to what they do

-     understanding and responding to drugs and organised crime

-     road policing

 

Priorities:

-     family violence – still too much – is reducing

-     property crime – focusing on repeat offenders

-     burglary

-     car theft

-     theft ex cars

 

Specific initiatives:

-     holiday programmes – putting plans in place for youth at risk

-     back to school operations planned

-     rock on – reducing truancy in schools – early intervention

-     have a core group of youth that come to the Police’s attention – looking at why the youth are offending

 

Road policing:

-     4km tolerance has been introduced

-     Red light running

-     Restraints, speed, alcohol, high risk drivers, young drivers

-     Intersections

-     42 fewer deaths directly related to the 4km tolerance over the Christmas period.

-     Drivers should drive to the conditions

 

Julia asked what were the issues from the community – what could they work on together:

-     Keeping on top of petty crime – identifying the offenders

-     Safety in the town centre – Southmall and Clendon

-     Harrassment and begging

-     Is there a way where the Clendon Residents Group and the Clendon Safety Panel could be bought closer together

-     Window washers – some people feel intimidated.  Julia advised that the council should be taking the lead on window washers.

Angela asked if the Police were aware of any issues to please let the board know so they can pass it on through the community groups.

 

3.         Manurewa Youth Council

 

Angela welcome Matthew Ward (Chairperson Manurewa Youth Council).

 

Matthew advised that the Youth Council executive has allocated portfolio interests.  Lee to ensure the appropriate Youth Council member is invited to the relevant portfolio catch up meetings.

 

David to contact the Southern Initiative to request the opportunity for the Youth Council representative to attend.

 

Matthew advised that the Youth Council have a couple of events coming up. 

 

Matthew supported the City Rail Loop.  He felt it would improve the frequency of the trains. 

 

Discussion ensued regarding

-     funding the city rail link.

-     Travelling costs

-     Youth connections – it is important that there is a good connection between high schools, tertiary and employment

-     A lot of people leaving University end up working in a field that they did not train in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David

4.         Maori Women’s Welfare League

 

Georgina Kupa was unable to attend.

 

 

5.         Manurewa Ministers

 

Angela welcomed Pastor Lui Ponifasio and Pastor Stephen Miller.  She gave an overview of the work the board had been undertaking in relation to

-     the Local Board Plan and some of the feedback they had received as a result of that consultation

-     the Local Approved Products Policy for psychoactive substances. 

-     Prostitution – the legislation will allow councils to specify a special place for the activity.

 

The Ministers advised they had experienced a problem with recreation centres closing at 8.30pm.  They had wanted to run some youth programmes from 8.30pm to 10pm.  This affected both the Manurewa Recreation Centre and the Te Matariki Recreation Centre.  David to investigate when the policy changed and who made the decision.

Discussion focussed around:

-     C3 Church – sausage sizzle

-     A concern with the amount of young people roaming around town

-     Manurewa town centre seems to be quite vibrant.  Through summer there are a lot of young people moving through the town

-     Creative arts facility – is there any work being done?  Manurewa would benefit from a music and arts centre.  There is so much untapped talent in the community.  Perhaps a training and recording studio – start small and build from there.

Daryl talked about a black box facility – a facility that could be configured in different ways.  The size of facility would need to be something smaller than the Vodafone Events Centre.

The Pastors suggested finding an old warehouse and doing it up.  Pastor Miller asked about the empty shop on the corner of Hill Road and Great South Road.  He felt something in the town centre would be ideal.  Something that built a sense of pride.

-     The pastors would like to see the Legal High Shop closed.  The effects of legal highs has a huge impact on families.

-     Prostitutes – numbers seem to have reduced.  Now 3-4 whereas last year there were 10-15.

David to find out the timeframe for the Prostitution Bill.

-     Update on the Solomon Group regarding truancy.  Frank believes truancy is not as big a problem as originally thought.  Angela will meet with Frank with regards to truancy and youth connections.

-     Fighting on the streets seems to be more prevalent.  Groups of young people running around the streets looking for fights.  The Police need to have early access to the information so they can shut it down. 

 

Angela advised that there are people loitering around Gallaher Park.  Angela wants to get lights and CCTV installed in the park to help with security.

 

Angela advised that she is trying to get stories; links to the past regarding World War I.

 

Angela spoke about some of the events that have been held recently.   She will meet with Greg Whaiapu (Chairman, Community Events Trust) to look at partnering for more events in the community.

 

Pastor Miller advised that they will be celebrating their 40th anniversary on 26 and 27 April and invited the board members to attend.  On 27 April the founding pastor will be speaking.

 

Angela talked about getting the good news stories out to the community.

 

Pastor Lui advised that Servolution is coming up in July.

 

Angela thanked the pastors for attending and looked forward to keeping the relationship going.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David

 

 

Jacqueline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacqueline

 

  Meeting closed at 8.40pm.


Manurewa Local Board

08 May 2014

 

 

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

Workshop Notes

 

Date of Workshop:               Thursday, 17 April 2014

Time:                                      6.30pm

Venue:                                    Manurewa Local Board Office Meeting Room
7 Hill Road, Manurewa

 

Present:

Angela Dalton (Chair)

Daryl Wrightson

 

Simeon Brown (Deputy Chair)

 

 

 

 

Staff Present:

Rex Hewitt, Relationship Manager

 

John Adams, Senior Local Board Advisor

 

 

Apologies:

Michael Bailey

George Hawkins, QSO

 

Angela Cunningham-Marino

Ken Penney

 

Danella McCormick

 

 

 

Item

Who to Action

1.         Local Board Plan

 

John tabled a document outlining possible outcomes and outcome statements, objectives and projects/initiatives for the 2014 Local Board Plan.

 

He explained they have been drawn from board conversations and the informal engagement.

 

He wanted to do a sense check with members:

i)          Does this look right?

ii)         Have we missed anything?

iii)         What needs to be added/changed/better emphasized?

 

John advised that a narrative will be developed to support the outcomes. Before he starts to write he wants to be sure that he is on the right track and has captured everything.

 

The board will also be asked to prioritise and define the key projects and initiatives. This will allow John to obtain costings for the draft plan budget.

 

John advised he will include advocacy items (such as for Local Alcohol Policy (LAPs) and Local Approved Products Policy (LAPPs)) in the narrative.

 

John noted that some projects will wrap up in the next financial year. This workshop will focus on new priorities.

 

John explained that this is a draft plan for consultation. There will be the chance to amend it following the special consultative procedure (SCP) process in June/July.

 

 

 

 

 

Outcome

Objectives

Projects, Initiatives

An attractive, prosperous town centre

We enjoy shopping and getting together in the Manurewa town centre.

 

Neighbourhoods are connected to the Manurewa town centre

 

A centre where people choose to live, shop, work and play.

 

 

 

 

 

Develop a vision and plan for the Manurewa town centre

 

Work with the Manurewa Business Association to attract new businesses and activities into the Manurewa town centre

 

Create a programme of events and entertainment for the town centre.

 

People move easily around Manurewa

Our walkways, cycle ways, roads and public transport connect us all to where we want to go

 

Manurewa is an easily accessible area

 

Increased use of buses, trains, bicycles and walking by everyone

 

Improved capacity and safety of roads and intersections

Safe, joined-up cycling and walking routes

 

 

Complete the Manukau harbour esplanade walkway and cycle way

 

Improve and maintain footpaths to standards that meet the needs of all people

 

Install cycling infrastructure for transport and recreational use

 

Produce a map of Manurewa public transport, walkways and cycle ways showing times/distance and major destinations

 

 

Outcome

Objectives

Projects, Initiatives

Our natural heritage and resources are preserved and nurtured for future generations

We enjoy attractive bush, stream and harbour environments that are healthy and free from pollution

 

The health of the Manukau Harbour is improved by reducing sediment and contaminant loads in rivers and streams

There is easy access to the Manukau Harbour for recreation

Our freshwater streams, bush areas and wildlife habitats are restored and protected

The amount of waste taken to landfill from the Manurewa area reduces each year

 

 

Establish a project with Mana Whenua to identify and implement ways to improve water quality

 

Progress the Totara Park re-planting project

 

Streams and waterways

 

Establish a recycling network

 

Continue the removal of mangroves from key points around the Manukau Harbour foreshore

 

Spaces and places that people use and enjoy

We have lots of opportunities for sporting, leisure, creative and community activity on our doorstep

 

Local heritage sites are recognised and protected

There are places to gather, play and create that support peoples’ needs

People take part in a range of activities

 

 

 

 

                

 

Work with Mana Whenua to identify significant heritage sites

Restore Nathan Homestead as a community arts and event centre

 

Build a new music and arts centre for Manurewa

 

Sporting facilities (buildings/playing fields) – Weymouth RC, Memorial Park, Gallaher Park, Mountfort Park

 

Community facilities?

 

Waka Ama?

 

Community gardens

 


 

Outcome

Objectives

Projects, Initiatives

All people are valued and encouraged

People feel welcome here and enjoy being part of our community, helping and supporting each other

 

 

Communities have strong leadership with the support they need

 

Young people are actively engaged in decision-making on what’s important to them

 

Communities are prepared for civil emergencies

 

People from across the Manurewa community work together on common goals and aspirations

 

There are opportunities for artistic and cultural pursuit

 

 

 

A healthy local economy

The Manurewa area supports a range of established and new enterprises that provide employment opportunities for local people. 

 

The Manurewa economy continues to grow

 

Manurewa people are able to access local employment opportunities

 

Successful social enterprises are established in Manurewa

 

Young people are engaged in education, training, employment or other meaningful activity.

 

 

 

Support the Manurewa and Wiri Business Improvement Districts to implement their strategic plans

 

Support local businesses to tender for procurement contracts

 

Create relationships and pathways that support young people into further education, training or work

 

Provide support to local social enterprise start-ups

 

 

 

 

Notes:

Liveability indicators – AP page 359

Strategic Directions – AP from page 361

Children & Young Persons SAP (also CCSS report on young people in Manurewa)

Thriving Communities

Maori Responsiveness Framework & The Maori Plan/outcomes

Positive Aging Strategy

5 Ways to Wellbeing

 

 

 

  Meeting closed at 8.30pm.



[1] NIWA, 2014. Environmental risk assessment of discharges of sediment during prospecting and exploration for seabed minerals, report prepared for the Ministry for the Environment, January 2014.

[2] Ministry for the Environment, 2014. Supporting information for the exposure draft of proposed regulations for discharge and dumping activities under the EEZ Act.  Wellington: Ministry for the Environment.