I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 May 2014

6.00pm

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Simon Randall

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Josephine Bartley

 

 

Brett Clark

 

 

Bridget Graham, QSM

 

 

Obed Unasa

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Brenda Railey

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

12 May 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (021) 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Ellerslie Residents Association                                                                          5

8.2     Auckland Cricket                                                                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Update to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board from Business Improvement Districts (BIDs)                                                                                                                              9

13        Allocation of remaining event fund for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board      135

14        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding: Round Three 2013-14 137

15        Maungakiekie-Tamaki Youth Connections Budget                                               141

16        Waikaraka Park Extension and Mt Smart Stadium Sportsfield Developments  145

17        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2013/2014                                                                                               153

18        Onehunga Foreshore Project: Swimming access for the disabled                     163

19        Auckland Transport Quarterly Report, 1 January to 31 March 2014                  231

20        Financial Planning for Extreme Weather Events                                                   269

21        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Action/Reports Pending Report                 277

22        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                  283

23        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         289

24        Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board                                    295  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 April 2014, including the confidential section and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 April 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

8.1       Ellerslie Residents Association

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for Bryan Johnson, Ellerslie Residents Association Chair, to speak to the Board regarding the Ellerslie Eagles Rugby Football Club rooms and Gavin Street traffic.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board thanks Bryan Johnson from the Ellerslie Residents Association, for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Auckland Cricket

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for Daniel Farrow, Operations Manager for Auckland Cricket, to speak to the Board regarding cricket in the community paper.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board thanks Daniel Farrow from Auckland Cricket for his attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Update to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board from Business Improvement Districts (BIDs)

 

File No.: CP2014/07858

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board with an update from the three local Business Improvement Districts (BIDs), Onehunga, Panmure and Glen Innes as per the requirements of the BIDs Policy.

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board has three BIDs within the local board boundaries. Onehunga Business Association, Panmure Business Associations and Glen Innes Business Association. BIDs are defined within precise geographical boundaries and are a partnership between Council and the business association. The requirements of the BID relationship is set out in the BID Policy.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board receives the report.

Comments

3.    A Business Improvement District Programme operates in a precisely defined geographical area within which the businesses have voted to invest collectively in local improvements to enhance their business environment, and to collaborate with Council to achieve this. The programmes do not replicate services already provided by Council; rather they channel the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve outcomes and achieve common goals.

4.    The BID Partnership Programme is a public-private partnership between Business Associations that have a commitment to develop their local business environment and Auckland Council which has the ability to collect a targeted rate to fund the BID Partnership Programme. The partnership approach goes deeper than the purely financial relationship between the parties – all the parties involved are seeking positive economic outcomes and understand that a collaborative approach is necessary to achieve aspirational goals

5.    The BID Policy provides a complete explanation of the technical and specific roles and responsibilities for BIDs and Local Boards. As part of the policy the Local Board will receive, the Annual Business Plan for BID programme activities. Following acceptance of the business plan, the Local Board will recommend to the Governing Body to strike the BID target rate and any changes (increases) to this.

6.    This report is an opportunity for the BIDs to provide the local board with an update in relation to the following section of the BID Policy. These items have been included as attachments to this report. The Business Association reports to its members (via the AGM) and the Local Board. These parties must be able to access the following:

i.    Annual audited financial accounts;

ii.    A review of the previous year’s activities (Annual Report);

iii.   A strategic plan for the next three to five years;

iv.  An annual plan for the next 12 months (detailed);

v.   A detailed budget for the next 12 months showing expected income and expenditure.

 

7.       Officers have provided reporting in line with the BID policy with particular reference to:

i.    Economic potential of existing BID Partnership Programmes;

The BID Partnership Programme encompasses 46 (soon to increase to 48) business associations operating as BIDs across the Region. The Programme covers retail, commercial and industrial areas.

 

Business area environments can be the seedbed for the enterprise and business creation, skill and expertise development, innovative thinking and collaborative opportunities. The BID approach can encourage the sharing of business knowledge and facilitate investment opportunities in the public and private realm. They advocate for infrastructure development and instigate relationships with stakeholders (for example, Manukau Institute of Technology) that are advantageous for both stakeholders.

 

i.    Ensure that adequate annual reporting on finances and plans occurs

The Auckland Region Business Improvement District Policy (2011) outlines how business associations operating as BIDs are required to share financial information and business directions with their relevant Local Board (section 3.15(2)).

 

The BIDs also need to comply with their business associations individual Constitutions. All BIDs within the region are required under their Constitutions to hold an Annual General Meeting (AGM) where members of the BID are able to view financial reports and business plans. This information is provided to every member in advance of the AGM.

 

ii.   Develop the BID Partnership Programme to further assist the regional economy to grow as outlined in the Economic Development Strategy.

The potential of the approach to contribute to the regional economy is significant. The Programme represents over 20,000 businesses. The BID Partnership Team will continue to encourage business associations to achieve a scale that increases their impact and efficiencies (for example, expansions and amalgamations). This contributes to the regions economy by the creation of opportunities for working collaboratively (for example, supply chain linkages) and identifying opportunities to cut business overheads by shared services approaches (for example, insurance premium reductions for BID members).

Working collaboratively as a business community can also be attractive to investors (new premises development or new business locating).

 

The BID Partnership Team are also very keen to encourage business associations to be more proactive in working towards the retention of  existing businesses and in the attraction of relevant new businesses that increase their competitive advantage. A sharp focus for a business areas on their point of difference (for example, be it migrant numbers or property owner engagement) can be instrumental in step changes to an economic future. Successful business areas offer opportunities for people to find local employment.

BIDs particularly play a key role in regards the Economic Development Strategy direction of creating a vibrant creative world city. The Rugby World Cup provides an example of how business associations working collaboratively, can support the success of major events. Future major events such as the World Masters will be looking to BIDs to create the local vibrancy to attract participant spending.

 

The BID Partnership Team actively work to encourage Auckland's BIDs to be future focused, looking for ways they can do activities and processes more effectively and taking advantage of opportunities that arise. There is an extent to how much the BID Partnership Team can influence the work programmes and direction of individual BIDs due to business associations' status as independent organisations

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       The local board is an important partner in the BID programme. The local board has requested this update to ensure it has a comprehensive understanding of outcomes and activities of the local BID programmes.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

OBA Audited Accounts YR June 2013

13

bView

OBA 2013-2015 Budgets

23

cView

OBA 2013 Annual General Meeting presentation

25

dView

PBA 2013 Audited Accounts (signed)

61

eView

PBA Financial Considerations

75

fView

PBA 2014-2015 draft Budget

77

gView

PBA Strategic Plan comments for performmance review 2012

79

hView

PBA Yearly Work Plan 2013-2014

97

iView

PBA Annual General Meeting Agenda 2013

99

jView

PBA Annual General Meeting Minutes 2013

101

kView

PBA Chair's Report

103

lView

PBA Town Manager's Report

107

mView

GIBA Audited Accounts YR June 2013

111

nView

GIBA Proposed 2014-2015 Budget

119

oView

GIBA Strategic Plan

121

pView

GIBA Annual General Meeting Minutes 2013

129

qView

GIBA 2013 Annual Report

133

      

Signatories

Authors

Nina Siers - Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Allocation of remaining event fund for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/08872

 

  

Purpose

1.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocated $80,000 for general events and $12,000 for civic events for the 2013/14 financial year. Both of these budgets are underspent. This report proposes the remaining funding be reallocated to a special youth event which will span the entire local board area led by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel and Council Officers in partnership with the YMCA.

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki has $17,800 remaining in event funding ($7,800 from the civic event fund and $10,000 from the general fund). It is proposed that this funding be allocated to a youth specific event “I AM MT”.  “I AM MT” is a youth focused event capturing activity throughout the local board area and finishing in a central event at the Panmure Community Hall. The event will have four different activities concurrently occurring throughout the local board area, with buses running between them. The overarching focus is on young people discovering more about the local board area, celebrating and being proud of where they live.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Approves the reallocation of $17,800 from the combined event and civic event funds be used for the “I AM MT” event.

Comments

3.       The local board allocated $10,000 of the Event Fund to the Pt England Safety Day which was not used as the event was rained out. This funding was not uplifted by the event organiser and remains available to the local board to reallocate to an alternative event.

4.       The local board allocated $12,000 to Civic Events for general civic activity, the GIMAC Sod-Turning and Dawn Blessing and supporting local RSA ANZAC Day Ceremonies. The GIMAC Sod-Turning and Dawn Blessing came in under budget. $7,800 remains in this budget.

5.       Collectively the remaining budget is $17,800.

6.       Officers advice was to allocate the remaining budget to other existing events due to take place in the local board area such as the Matariki Event in Glen Innes, or to hold some specific youth events in the local board area.

7.       Based on officers advice, potential for an event with youth was scoped with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel. The panel was extremely enthusiastic and had a number of ideas. Through discussion with the panel, it was agreed that a common theme would be to link young people throughout the local board area and to create an event which strengthened young people’s understanding of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, and make them proud of where they live.

8.       The event concept is directed at teenagers and young people between the ages of 13-20.

9.       The concept that has evolved is a series of 4 events culminating in a party at the Panmure Community Hall. The events are:

I.       A winter swim at Point England, with hot chocolate and muffins for those who complete the course.

II.      A spoken word workshop at the Panmure Community Hall.

III.     A winter fun run with inspirational quote stations on Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill).

IV.     A music/songwriting workshop at Onehunga Community Centre.

10.     These activities would continue throughout the day, and a bus will travel between the activities to transport young people from each activity.

11.     There will be appropriate staffing at the activities such as lifeguards at the swim, tutors at the spoken word and music activities, and supervisors at the run. There will be appropriate levels of staffing at the party, including officers from YMCA and the Council.

12.     Youth panel members will be stationed at each activity (including the buses) to help supervise, create a sense of fun and understanding of the panel.

13.     A ‘passport’ will be designed so young people receive a stamp from each activity and remind them about Maungakiekie-Tāmaki.

14.     The events would run from 10am-4pm.

15.     At around 5pm a party will begin at the Panmure Hall. Images from the day will be projected in the room, and people will perform their spoken word and music created at the day’s events. Music, non-alcoholic drinks and pizzas will be provided. The party would finish by around 9pm. Buses will run people to central points near their home areas at the end of the night.

16.     The event is scheduled to run on the first Saturday in the first week of the school holidays so that more students can participate than those usually tied up in school sports.

17.     It is intended that students will received an I AM MT T-shirt if they have completed one or more of the activities and come to the party at the community hall. It is intended that those attending the party are those that have participated in the day’s events.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     The local board portfolio holders have discussed the event with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel.

19.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel has designed elements of the day and are very supportive of the event proceeding.

Implementation

20.     Council Officer, Local Board Services, and the YMCA will support the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel to deliver this event. The YMCA is beginning a Raise Up Crew in Tāmaki and this event will be a foundation event to support the develop of this group.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Nina Siers - Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding: Round Three 2013-14

 

File No.: CP2014/08967

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications received under Round Three of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2013/2014 Community Funding Programme. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has a total Community Funding Programme budget for 2013/2014 of $80,000. This is being distributed to community groups in three funding rounds.

3.       Under Round One and Round Two the board committed a total of $52,757.10 from its Community Funding Programme budget, which leaves a balance of $27,242.90 for Round Three.

4.       Twenty eight applications have been received for Round Three, requesting a total of $188,846.

5.       Members of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board considered these applications at a workshop on 13 May 2014.

 

Recommendation

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      considers the applications listed in Table 1 and agrees to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

            Table 1: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding Applications

Organisation name

Description of Project

Amount requested

Te Huruhi Trust

Towards renovation costs in the Transit Accommodation area.

$5,000

Coastguard Boating Education

Towards the Safe Boating programme, costs include certificates, life jackets, teaching materials and staff straining at the YMCA Lagoon Leisure and Fitness Centre.

$6,938

Coastguard Boating Education

Towards the Safe Boating programme, costs include certificates, life jackets, teaching materials and staff training at the YMCA Glenn Inness Fitness & Aquatic Centre.

$6,953

Getin2life Youth Development Trust

Towards costs associated with the delivery of six Street Play sessions in the 2014/2015 year in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area. Costs include administration, promotion and equipment costs.

$3,288

Project Litefoot Trust

Towards the costs associated with implementing the LiteClub programme at two sports clubs in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Area.

$4,768

Coastguard Boating Education

Towards the Safe Boating programme, costs include certificates, life jackets, teaching materials and staff training at the Onehunga War Memorial Pool.

$6,953

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards Youth Worker salaries to support the development and continuation of the Youth Health Councils (YHCs) for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Area Secondary Schools.

$5,000

New Zealand Sikh Womens Association Inc.

Towards costs associated with the ‘Breaking the Cycle of Abuse (Nav Jiwan) Project’.  Costs include Programme Coordinator cost, Tutor, Administration, Advertising and Volunteer costs.

$7,060

Life Education Trust South East Auckland trading as Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards the on-going operating costs of delivering the Life Education programme in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and the salary of an Educator.

$15,000

Aoga a le Teuila Preschool Trust

Towards an upgrade of the outdoor play area. Costs include sun and rain shade protection, a play house and toys.

$9,000

ELEVATE Christian Disability Trust

Towards the purchase of protective blinds for the outdoor ramp at the community drop-in centre, Onehunga.

$4,665

Big Brothers, Big Sisters of Auckland

Towards a laptop to support programme delivery and sports equipment for mentoring sessions.

$3,695

The Foundation for Peace Studies Aotearoa/NZ Inc.; The Peace Foundation

Towards the ‘ProPeaceWork’ programme. Costs include project coordination and the trainers fee for two workshops to be held in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.

$3,534

Tāmaki Community Development Trust

Towards updating the webpage and additional business cards.

$1,500

YMCA of Auckland Inc.

Funding towards a boxfit instructor and cost of venues for the Youth Boxfit classes.

$5,892

Mount Wellington Amateur Swimming Club Inc.

Towards a new trophy cabinet and gear storage cage.

$4,720

New Zealand Somali Women's Incorporated Society (NZSWI)

Towards the ‘Refugee & Migrant Women Catering Project’.  Costs include food stall venue hire at the Onehunga Night markets, transport costs, equipment purchase costs.

$9,920

Aotea Sea Scouts

Towards a custom-built boat trailer.

$5,000

New Zealand Tamil Senior Citizens Association

Towards the purchase of sports equipment, venue and transport costs.

$500

Auckland Studio Potters Incorporated Society

Towards the purchase of ‘mugs’ to support the performance activity ‘The Great Mugging’.

$5,000

Dance Therapy NZ

Towards the costs associated to deliver the Arts 4 Us programme. Costs include project coordination, therapist assistant, volunteer costs and training.

$4,500

Tongan Health Society Inc.

Towards gardening tools and volunteers costs to support the ongoing development of the Langimalie Community Garden.

$3,000

Maungarei Community Christian Trust

Towards the rental costs of the offices and the Op-Shop building.

$27,560

Other Waters: Art on the Manukau

Towards costs related to delivering the Other Waters: Art on the Manukau, an event on the Manukau Harbour.

$8,600

St Joseph's Catholic School Onehunga

Towards an outdoor playground upgrade. Costs include weather matting and playground equipment.

$3,000

The Gifted Children's Advancement Charitable Trust

Towards hardship scholarships that support students from low socio-economic areas to access the programmes.

$4,800

Manukau Cruising Club Inc.

Towards costs to undertake a ten-year Development Strategy and Feasibility Study

$20,000

Rainbow Youth Inc.

Towards the ‘I'm Local’ programme. Costs include design, creation, printing and postage of resources for schools, libraries and health centres.

$3,000

Total

$188,846

Comments

 

6.       In March 2013, the Regional Development and Operations Committee agreed to the continuation of the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year:

That the Regional Development and Operations Committee endorse the continuation of the interim community funding programme for the 2013/2014 financial year, in accordance with current budgets and decisions-making delegations, due to the complexity of the range of funding models currently operating across the region, with the expectation that a new funding policy be in place for the 2014/2015 financial year, or before” (RDO/2013/32).

7.       Twenty eight applications have been received in this round, requesting a total of $188,846.

8.       Members of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board held a workshop on 13 May 2014 to consider each application and how each project aligned with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board priorities.

9.       Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding Programme Budget

The following table (Table 2) presents the budget for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding Programme.  It identifies the grant levels approved to date and the balance remaining for 2013/2014.

Table 2: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Funding Programme Budget

2013/14 Annual

Budget

Type of Fund

Grants paid

Balance

$80,000

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

$52,757.10

$27,242.90

 

10.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

11.     The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

12.     Feedback on these applications was sought at a workshop with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board held on 13 May 2014.

13.     Board members received a summary of each application, together with copies of the current legacy community funding scheme’s policy and the local board discretionary community funding guidelines that apply.

Maori Impact Statement

14.     Community funding is a general programme of interest that is accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori.  Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community. The provision of community funding to support community development initiatives provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes and activities that benefit Maori.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Zimmerman - Community Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Youth Connections Budget

 

File No.: CP2014/09126

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to gain local board approval for three projects under the Youth Connections programme.

Executive Summary

2.       Youth Connections is part of the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs, whose focus is youth employment and engagement in local communities.  The purpose of this project is to help young people in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki get local jobs by improving the links between school leavers and local employers and supporting the creation of a skills-matched workforce.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Connections programme has a dedicated steering group with representatives from community, local iwi, the business sector and the secondary and tertiary education sectors. This group brings leadership and advice to Youth Connections in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and supports the activity outlined within this report. The Youth Connections budget for the current year has $32,000 remaining. It is proposed that funding be used in the following way:

·    Driver Licence Support: $12,000

·    Business Business Research Project Business Research Project: $8,000

·    Business Employment Breakfast $12,000

 

 

Recommendations

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve $12,000 for driver licence support to enable 50 students from Onehunga High School and One Tree Hill College, respectively, to sit their learner licences

b)      approve $8,000 for research in the local board area on future workforce planning and skills gap analysis

c)      approve $12,000 to contribute towards a business breakfast focused on youth employment

 

 

Comments

 

4.       Youth Connections is part of the Mayor’s Taskforce for Jobs, whose focus is youth employment and engagement in local communities.  The purpose of this project is to help young people in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki get local jobs by improving the links between school leavers and local employers and supporting the creation of a skills-matched workforce.

5.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Connections programme has a dedicated steering group with representatives from community, local iwi, the business sector and the secondary and tertiary education sectors. This group brings leadership and advice to Youth Connections in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and supports the activity outlined within this report.

Driver Licensing

6.       Youth Connections has identified significant barriers which prevent young people from accessing employment opportunities both locally and across the region. The lack of a driver’s licence poses a barrier to employment due to the cost, unfamiliarity with the process and the time needed to progress through the graduated system.

7.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $32,000 remaining in the current financial year for Youth Connections. It is proposed to allocate $12,000 from this amount to fund a driver’s licence pilot.

8.       There are three high schools in the local board area. Tāmaki College has implemented a driver’s licence pilot funded by Manaiakalani Trust in the current financial year. This pilot would fund a similar level of delivery for both Onehunga High School and One Tree Hill College. The schools will identify students most likely to benefit from this programme such as those in the Building and Construction School at Onehunga High School. Each school would receive funding to deliver learner’s licences for 50 students respectively at a cost of $6,000 for each school.

9.       In future years, it is envisaged that the programme would continue for all three schools, so students can progress through to the end of their restricted licensing. Funding options for this are being explored both locally and regionally.

Business Research

10.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area is an economic powerhouse in the Auckland economy. The value of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in the area was $10.4 billion in 2012, exceeded only by the Waitemata Local Board area. The dominant sector is manufacturing; one in five manufacturing jobs is in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and the services sector is experiencing rapid growth. Conversely, the region has a higher than average unemployment and a higher proportion of residents with no qualifications than the Auckland average. School-leavers without qualifications are less likely to find work, which has negative long-term impacts. Approximately 1500 young people are not in employment, education or training (NEET) in the local board area. At the same time, businesses are reporting skill shortages in the labour market and some are sourcing talent offshore.

11.     It is proposed to allocate $8,000 from the remaining Youth Connections funding for the current financial year to conduct research in the local board area on future workforce planning and skills gap analysis linked to youth employment.  

12.     The proposed objectives of the research are to:

a)    Uncover employer labour force needs pertaining to skills, training and employment

b)    Investigate existing skills shortages and employer outlook for future skills shortage

c)    Determine employer’s attitudes to employing youth and their outlook on employment opportunities for youth

d)    Gauge the need among employers for types of training provision and the qualifications they are looking for in candidates

e)    Determine the positions and occupations that are the hardest to fill

13.     The proposed methodology is to undertake telephone interviews with 60 key decision-makers within business and industry in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area.  The sample frame would include a cross section of businesses by size and industry classification.  One key decision maker from each business will be invited to participate in the survey.

14.     The questionnaire will be finalised in partnership with Auckland Council staff, the Local Board Portfolio holder and the Youth Connections Steering Group.

Business Breakfast

15.     It is proposed to allocate $12,000 from the remainder of the Youth Connections budget for the current financial year to host a business breakfast for key stakeholders to present the research and strengthen local business engagement.

16.     Key outcomes for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki business breakfast:

a)    To encourage the business community to source talent locally

b)    To encourage business to take a long-term workforce planning approach

c)    To identify skills gaps in order to address these with local schools and training providers

d)    To bring local business together to promote the importance of young people being skilled and capable to meet both current and future needs of local workforce recruitment

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

17.     These proposals have the support of the Local Board Youth Connections Steering Group which is chaired by the board chair and portfolio holder.

Maori Impact Statement

18.     While Maori are not being specifically targeted, it is likely that many will be recipients of the pilot.

Implementation

19.     Driver Licensing: Officers have undertaken research and worked closely with high school staff to identify the most effective delivery method. This programme is introduced as a pilot to address an ongoing need. Future delivery will be subject to evaluation and funding priorities.

20.     Business Research: Officers have worked closely with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) who are undertaking a regional piece of work in this area and understand the value in undertaking a local board pilot.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carminia Adona - PA/Business Coordinator

Richard Butler - Community Development Manager  

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Waikaraka Park Extension and Mt Smart Stadium Sportsfield Developments

 

File No.: CP2014/07351

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board of Auckland Council’s intent to modify the Sports Field Capacity Development Programme within the Maungakiekie Tamaki local board area and to seek the board’s endorsement of these changes. These changes relate to splitting the budget allocated for the build of an artificial field at Waikaraka Park Extension between Mt Smart Stadium and Waikaraka Park Extension. From the budget of $1.8M, $1M would contribute to the build of two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium and guarantee significant community access to these fields, while the remaining $0.8M would provide for the development of three soil fields at Waikaraka Park Extension. 

Executive Summary

2.       $1.8M of Sports Field Capacity Development funding was originally ear marked for investment in the build of an artificial sportsfield at Waikaraka Park Extension. However, two factors have prompted officers to reconsider the appropriateness of this investment. These relate to the high cost of stabilising what is a former landfill without any guarantees that there won’t be future settlement over the site and the opportunity to provide part funding for the build of two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium. This funding would guarantee significant community access to these two fields at Mt Smart Stadium and still allow for the build of three soil fields Waikaraka Park Extension.

3.       The main benefit achieved by splitting this investment is the delivery of significantly more community hours of play than could be achieved by the build of one artificial at Waikaraka Park Extension. It also allows for the full development of Waikaraka Park Extension. Other benefits include the availability of ancillary facilities at Mt Smart, improved security for the artificial turf and the potential to develop a facility hub at this site.

4.       Should Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) fail to secure budget to fund their portion of the build of two artificials at Mt Smart Stadium, officers would support the reallocation of all of the available $1.8M budget to deliver two sandcarpet fields with lights, and one soil field, at Waikaraka Park Extension. 

5.       All scenarios presented in this report are subject to confirmation of funding through the Long Term Plan and the Annual Plan approval process.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Receives the report on Waikaraka Park Extension and Mt Smart Stadium Sports Field Developments.

b)      Endorse the plan to reallocate $1.8M of Sports Field Capacity Development funding in order to provide for $1M investment towards the build of two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium and $0.8M for the development of three soil fields at Waikaraka Park Extension. 

c)      The Maungakiekie and Tamaki Local Board recommends that, if the development of two artficials at Mt Smart Stadium fails to progress, the Sports Field Capacity Development Programme budget of $1.8M should be reallocated to the development of two sandcarpet fields with lights, and one soil field, at Waikaraka Park Extension.      

 

 

 

Discussion

6.    Public participation in sport and recreation is currently being constrained by a shortage of sports field capacity across the region and with a shortfall of approximately 121 hours per week existing in the Maungakiekie Tamaki Local Board area. This will increase significantly over the next ten years as population density increases.

 

7.    The Sports Field Capacity Development (SFCD) programme will provide $85million of investment over a ten year period in order to increase sportsfield capacity across the region. The programme, which was approved by all local boards, the Parks Recreation and Heritage Forum and the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) in Nov/Dec 2012.

 

8.    While development of an artificial sportsfield at Waikaraka Park Extension formed part of the initial SFCD programme for delivery in the 2014/15 financial year, recent geotechnical reports have identified issues that make the build of an artificial sportsfield field at the site problematic. Only half of the site (western side) has a sufficiently stable base on which to develop an artificial field (see attached plan). Stabilising the eastern half of the site to the same standard would require dynamic compaction and the laying of an imported granular aggregate (minimum 300mm depth over an 18500m2 area) at an estimated cost of $1M. While this would provide a stable platform for the eastern side of the site, differential settlement could still occur and the low tolerance level of an artificial field to settlement means that there is a considerable risk involved in this option. Risks with settlement are further complicated by the need to avoid any heavy loading around the stormwater pipe that runs along the eastern boundary of the site (see attached plan).

 

9.    There is enough room to build an artificial field on the western half of the site without the need for further compaction but this would be in an alignment that would restrict overall development of the site to two, rather than three, sportsfields and would not provide the space required for a cricket pitch in the summer. 

 

10.  Another consideration is the $1.2M LTP budget which has to fund a 100 space car park (a requirement of the land designation) and the construction of a soil platform over areas of the site that aren’t going to be developed as sportsfields. The car park, because of contamination issues will cost in the region of $500K to build. Carrying out dynamic compaction of the eastern side of the site, at a cost of $1M, therefore creates a budget shortfall of $300,000.

 

11.  The benefits of developing soil or sandfields are twofold. If soil or sandfields are developed at the site then provision of the soil profile over sportsfields (the majority of the site) would be funded from the SFCD budget and only the top soiling of the site margins would need to be funded from the LTP budget. In contrast the development of an artificial field at the site would use up all of the available $1.8M budget on developing one sportfield area, leaving no additional funds to develop a soil profile on the other two sportsfield areas. The LTP budget shortfall with this scenario is estimated to be $550K.

 

12.  The second benefit is the lower cost of compacting and levelling the eastern half of the site due to the fact that both soil and sandfields have greater tolerance for ground settlement. The less expensive method of rolling, rather than dynamically compacting, is therefore sufficient for providing a stable platform for either of these two options. The $700K required to level and roll the site combined with the $500K to build a car park brings the total budget required back within the LTP envelope of $1.2M.

 

13.  Because the SFCD programme does not typically fund the development of platforms onto which sandcarpets are built, the Parks Sports and Recreation Department will be looking to utilize the top soil/sand mix stripped from up to 47 sandcarpet projects across the region in 2014/15. Because all sportsfields have since 2012 been classified as ‘contaminated’, there will be some planning challenges. However, providing contamination levels are within safe limits this initiative could deliver in excess of $800K of savings for the SFCD programme and recycling material rather than sending to landfill is regarded as an important SFCD sustainability initiative.

 

14.  Cost estimates and funding streams are shown for three site development options in the table below. If with option one (artificial field), the site is provided with a top soil profile over all areas outside of the artificial field, the project costs would exceed the available combined budget of $3M (1.2M LTP and $1.8M SFCD) by $900,000. Both options 2 (two sandcarpet fields with lights and one soil field) and 3 (three soil fields) fall within the anticipated available budget.

 

15.  Options for sportsfield developments at Waikaraka Park Extension

 

OPTION 1 -  One Artificial Field  

 

LTP Budget

SFCD Budget

Total Cost

Car Park

$500,000

 

 

Dynamic  Compaction of eastern side of site

$1,000,000

 

 

One artificial field

 

$1,800,000

 

Top soil platform (balance for rest of site)

$550,000

 

 

Totals

$2,050,000

$1,800,000

$3,850,000

OPTION 2 - Two Sand Carpet Fields with lights and one soil field 

Car Park

$500,000

 

 

Roller  Compaction and top soiling margins of site

$700,000

 

 

Top Soil platform

$800,000

 

Two sand carpet fields with lights

 

$750,000

 

Totals

$1,200,000

$1,550,000

$2,750,000

OPTION 3 -  Three Soil Fields

Car Park

$500,000

 

 

Roller  Compaction and top soiling margins of site

$700,000

 

 

Top Soil platform to create three fields

 

$800,000

 

Totals

$1,200,000

$800,000

$2,000,000

 

 

 

16.     It should be noted that all the options provide the bare minimum in terms of site development and additional funds would be required to landscape the site. No plan has been devised for this yet but it is considered that a budget in the region of $600,000 to $800,000 would provide for a high quality park landscape (footpaths, gardens, specimen trees and furniture).  

 

          Mt Smart

17.     The possible transfer of SFCD funds to enable part investment in two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium would be based on the following principles:

·        Contributing $1M of the total $1.8M SFCD budget currently earmarked for the development of an artificial field at Waikaraka Park Extension towards the build of two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium.

·        Agreed hours of community usage for the two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium would equate to 68 hours per week in winter and 24 hours per week in the summer.

·        That access and responsibilities around ownership would be set out in a Heads of Agreement drawn up between Parks Sports and Recreation (PSR) and Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA).

·        Retaining the remaining $0.8M of the original $1.8M budget for investment in three soil fields at Waikaraka Park Extension.

 

18.     A single artificial turf has an estimated cost of $1.8M and delivers around 40-50 hours of capacity per week. The community hours of access to the two artificial turf fields proposed at Mt Smart would total 2392 hours over a year, which equates to a weekly average of 46 hours and therefore compares favorably with the capacity of a single artificial turf. With the remaining $0.8M used to fund construction of three soil fields at Waikaraka Park Extension, this will provide an additional 24 hours per week.  Therefore, the total investment of $1.8M over the two sites will provide in the region of 70 hours average of play per week for community use. This is more cost effective than the three options presented solely for Waikaraka Park Extension and provides more than the 40-50 hours of play that would be generated by a single artificial turf field at Waikaraka Park Extension. Furthermore, the community access hours for the artificial field at Mt Smart Stadium would be 68 hours per week in winter, which is when it is most needed. 

 

19.     The benefits achieved and challenges presented by splitting the SFCD investment ($1.8M) between the two sites include:

 

20.       Pros

·        More hours of play gained from investment spread over the two sites 

·        The use of changing room facilities provided at Mt Smart Stadium (there is no budget currently available to develop additional changing room facilities at Waikaraka Park Extension)

·        SFCD investment spread between two sites thereby giving the community more options

·        Security for the artificial turf at Mt Smart Stadium (passive surveillance and on-site managers during the day, and facility locked at night)

·        Potential to provide a ‘hub’ facility with the co-location of a number of artificial turfs and other sporting facilities at Mt Smart Stadium

·        Co-location of high performance and community sport could support player pathways and skill development for younger players

·        Provision of community access at Mt Smart will ‘activate’ the stadium during ‘down-times’ and ensures maximum usage of facilities

·        Contributes to the Auckland Plan priority “Prioritise and optimise our recreation and sport facilities and public open space use and the capacity of recreation and sport organizations”

·        Contributes to the Sport and Recreation Strategic Acton Plan key actions “Provide quality fit for purpose facilities at regional, sub-regional and local levels for informal recreation and sport”; “Facilitate partnerships to make the most of local facilities and resources”

·        Natural turf fields, in contrast to artificial fields, ensure more open access and continued informal and casual park use of our open spaces

·        Waikaraka Park Extension with natural turf fields will provide a more natural landscape backdrop to Onehunga’s well used and popular foreshore edge and one that is more accessible to casual users. 

21.     Cons

·        When big events take place at Mt Smart Stadium there are likely to be restrictions on play

·        An artificial turf wouldn’t be located at the home of Onehunga Sports Club

·        There may be perceived accessibility barriers initially associated with an artificial at Mt Smart.

22.     A partnership agreement with the RFA to develop two artificials at Mt Smart Stadium and the development of three soil fields at Waikaraka Park, delivering 70 hours of play per week, provides the most costs effective means of generating extra hours of play in the Onehunga area and this is considered the best option. However, if this fails to get off the ground because of funding issues then it is recommended that the $1.8M SFCD budget be invested in two sandcarpet fields with lights, and one soil field, at Waikarka Park Extension.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

23.     Provisional discussions have been held with the Maungakiekie Tamaki Local Board, with members requesting that the contamination and geotech report on Waikaraka Park extension be provided to enable members to make an informed decision regarding the issue. The summary and conclusions of this report has now been made available to board members.

Maori Impact Statement

24.     The contribution of parks outcomes is of signficant importance to tangata whenua, their well being, values, culture and traditions. Sites of significance to tangata whenua are an imortant part of their heritage, established through whakapapa.

25.     Maori are also major participants in sport and the provision of high quality sporting infrastructure is therefore of great importance to the maori community.

General

26.     The contribution of $1M of SFCD funding would be provided to RFA for them to deliver the planning and build of the two artificial fields, with PSR approval required for the sign off of the field layout/design. The RFA would maintain and renew the asset and they would therefore receive the consequential opex and depreciation associated with the $1M investment.

Implementation Issues

27.     The 2,392 hours of play per year on the artificial fields at Mt Smart dedicated to community access would be administered by the Parks Sports and Recreation Department at Auckland Council. Onehunga Sports Club would be allocated access to these fields on an annual basis and at levels that are considered appropriate, and set by, Local and Sports Parks in consultation with the Maungakiekie Tamaki Local Board.            

28.     Budget to provide for the RFA contribution to the build of two artificials at Mt Smart in the 2014/15 financial year has not yet been confirmed. Should the RFA fail to secure budget to develop two artificial fields at Mt Smart Stadium the Parks Sports and Recreation Department would recommend that the $1.8M budget allocated to the build of an artificial field at Waikaraka Park Extension is invested in the development of two sandcarpet fields with lights, plus one soil field, at this site. The intent is to plan and apply for consents where required in the 2014/15 financial year and also to create the platform for future development at Waikaraka Park Extension in the same year. This will allow for the build of sportsfields at both sites in the 2015/16 financial year.

29.     It should also be noted that a major review of the Sports Field Supply and Demand Study will be undertaken over the next few months and the future need for sportsfield development in the Onehunga area will be analysed in the context of this review. The reason for this is that the Supply and Demand Study and the club information gathered from around the isthmus to inform this study is now several years old. There is therefore both a need to update this information and review the methodology applied. Added to this analysis will also be the impact of recent acquisitions (Colin Maiden Park) and other sportsfield developments (Ngahue Reserve, Barrack Rd/Sir Woolf Fisher).

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Field layout plan for Waikaraka Park Extension

151

Signatories

Authors

David Barker - Team Leader Parks Specialists and Programmes

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2013/2014

 

File No.: CP2014/08964

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2013/2014 Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) programme and recommends projects for scoping approval and commencement.

Executive Summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $767,120 SLIPs capital funding (Capex) in the 2013/2014 financial year. Of this, $365,386 has been allocated to projects in financial year 2012/2013 financial year and deferred into year 2013/2014. At the time of this report, $767,120 capital expenditure has been approved totalling 100% of the total available budget.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $247,685 SLIPs operational funding (Opex) to allocate in the 2013/2014 financial year. At the time of this report, $210,110 SLIPs operational expenditure has been approved totalling 85% of the total available budget.

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $234,813 Local Board discretionary capital funding (Capex) in the 2013/2014 financial year. At the time of this report, $237,813 capital expenditure has been approved totalling 100% of the total available budget.

5.       Recommendations are being sought in this report to allocate budget to the scope proposals as detailed below:

1

Concept design for disabled swimming access at one of the Onehunga Foreshore Project beaches.

 $10,293 SLIPs Opex

2

Ruapotaka Marae Grant funding for medicinal planting

 $6,000 SLIPs Opex*

3

Development of a Manukau Harbour Forum Vision and Strategy – funding top-up

 $2,500 SLIPs Opex

4

Anti-graffiti mural for Glen Innes train station underpass

 $10,000 SLIPs Opex

5

Green assets enhancement and fruit trees planting

 $8,782 SLIPs Opex*

6

Top-up Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve Peace Walk - physical works

 $20,481 SLIPs Capex

* These figures are approximate and final budget would be tabled at the Business Meeting

6.       Approval of the recommendations in this report will allocate 100% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and 100% of the available SLIPs operational expenditure.

7.       Eighty percent of 2013/2014 SLIPs projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year to commence and be completed between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014.  The remaining twenty percent to be allocated within the second quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year to allow all projects to commence and be completed between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014.

8.       Most projects will need eight months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year. Projects that had budget allocated to them with less than eight months remaining within the current financial year, are at risk of not being completed by 2013/2014 financial year end. As a result the project completion, as per the agreed delivery programme, may be deferred across into the following 2014/2015 financial year for completion.

9.       Longer term projects will result in SLIPs capital funding being carried forward to the 2014/2015 financial year and these projects will not be delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)       Acknowledge receipt of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2013/2014 SLIPs funding summary programme

b)      Delegate authority to the spokesperson to provide guidance and advice to the SLIPs team regarding their allocated proposals and delegates authority to the spokesperson and chair of the board, to be exercised together, to make additional funding decisions where a variation to a project scope is needed due to unforeseen circumstances

c)       Approves the concept design for disabled swimming access at one of the Onehunga Foreshore Project beaches and allocates $10,293 SLIPs operational budget.

d)      Approves Grant funding to the Ruapotaka Marae for medicinal planting and allocates $6,000 SLIPs operational budget.

e)      Approves top-up funding towards the Development of a Manukau Harbour Forum Vision and Strategy and allocates $2,500 SLIPs operational budget.

f)       Acknowledges $10,000 SLIPs operational funding returned from the Maybury Reserve Concept plan project and approves reallocation of the $10,000 towards the anti-graffiti mural for Glen Innes train station underpass project.

g)      Approves Green assets enhancement and fruit trees planting for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area and allocates $8,782 SLIPs operational budget.

h)      Acknowledges $20,481 SLIPs capital funding savings from the completed Dunkirk road Bollards Project and approves reallocation of the $20,481 savings towards the Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve Peace Walk – physical works project.

Note upon approval of the above recommendations 100% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and SLIPs operational expenditure would be allocated to projects.

 

Comments

10.     Communities are impacted by SLIPs projects. They provide an opportunity for staff and elected representatives to engage with the communities on their specific needs. SLIPs staff will liaise directly with all residents and stakeholders impacted by any SLIPs funded projects to be delivered.

11.     Funding for the proposed projects within this report will come from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s SLIPs budget. After allocating budget to all the projects listed in this report and elsewhere, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will still have unallocated SLIPs capital and operational funding. Further reporting as part of the monthly work programme reporting will be used to determine what other projects the Board may wish to fund.

12.     SLIPs need to comply with all relevant legislation, including the Resource Management Act 1991, the Local Government Act and all Auckland Council policies.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     This report canvasses the views of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

14.     The recommendations contained within this report fall within the Local Boards allocated authority.

Maori Impact Statement

15.     Parks and open spaces contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate consultation will follow.

Implementation

16.     Eighty percent of 2013/2014 SLIPs projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year to commence and be completed between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014. The remaining twenty percent to be allocated within the second quarter of the 2013/2014 financial year to allow all projects to commence and be completed between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014.

17.     Most projects will need eight months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year. Projects that had budget allocated to them with less than eight months remaining within the current financial year, are at risk of not being completed by 2013/2014 financial year end. As a result the project completion, as per the agreed delivery programme, may be deferred across into the following 2014/2015 financial year for completion.

18.     Longer term projects will result in SLIPs capital funding being carried forward to the 2014/2015 financial year and these projects will not be delivered within the 2013/2014 financial year.

19.     Budgets for projects funded from 2013/2014 SLIPs operational expenditure must be fully expended within the 2013/2014 financial year.

20.     The ability to spend/deliver outcomes is dependent on the availability of experienced staff or consultant project management resource.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board SLIPs Programme 2013-2014

157

    

Signatories

Authors

Vandna Kirmani - SLIPs Project Portfolio Leader

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Onehunga Foreshore Project: Swimming access for the disabled

 

File No.: CP2014/09051

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is constructing a 6.8 Hectares park in the Manukau Harbour. This $28 million project is funded by the NZ Transport agency ($18 million) and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board ($10 million).

The purpose of this report is twofold.  One, to establish support in principle for provision of swimming access for the disabled at the Onehunga Foreshore Project site.  And two, a request for funding support to prepare a concept design sufficient for procurement of a price to construct the facility.

Executive summary

2.       Fulton Hogan won the lump sum tender to ‘design and build’ the Onehunga Foreshore Project. The tender includes a 6.8 Hectares reclamation, a bridge connecting the new park to Onehunga, three swimming beaches, headlands, boat ramp, toilet and 1.5 km of footpaths.

The Puketāpapa Local Board has received a request to make provision for swimming access for the disabled at one of the Onehunga Foreshore Project beaches.

There was no provision written into Onehunga Foreshore Project Principal’s Requirements for access to the water specific for disabled persons wishing to swim.

The project budget has already been established and allocated to each aspect of the project. It is not known how much the access for disabled will cost. Funding of $10,293.00 from outside the project budget is requested to fund the design sufficient to procure a price for the facility

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Supports in principle the provision of swimming access for the disabled at one of the Onehunga Foreshore Project beaches.

b)      Allocates $10,293.00 from the local boards funding to provide a concept design for disabled access.

c)      Will advise the Puketāpata Local Board of the price to construct the access for the disabled swimmers and jointly decide if the project can proceed.

Discussion

On 30 May 2013, Nadya Vessey colloquially known as ‘The Mermaid’, addressed the Puketāpapa Local Board seeking provision of special access for swimmers who are disabled.  This led to a meeting on site on 28 June 2013 with Nadya Vessey involving members of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board, Puketāpapa Local Board and Parks staff.  The meeting gained a very good understanding of the difficulties faced by disabled persons and particularly double amputees like Nadya who have great difficulty entering and leaving the water at swimming beaches.

Parks staff have held discussions with the project designer who consider it possible to provide a practical solution.  The attached sketch Attachment ‘A’ illustrates the interpretation of what can be provided.  This is only an illustration, and design work is required to ensure long term durability. During design work, Nadya Vessey will be consulted to ensure the interpretation of requirements has been adequately met.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Illustration of Facility for Disabled Swimmers

165

Signatories

Authors

Neil Forgie, Project Manager (Contract)

Authorisers

Colin Field – Asset Development and Business Support

Ian Maxqell – Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza – Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

































































Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Report, 1 January to 31 March 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/09287

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.   The purpose of this report is to inform Boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months January - March 2014, and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months April – June 2014.

 

2.   Attachments include:

·    A – Auckland Transport activities, broken down by Local Board

·    B – Decisions of the Transport Co-ordinating Committee, by Board

·    C – Report against local board advocacy issues

·    D – Report on the status of the Board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly Report , 1 January to 31 March 2014.

 

Significant activities during the period under review

Key Agency Initiatives

 

SMART (South Western Multimodal Airport Rapid Transit) Project

Investigation into protecting a corridor to expand the rail network to the Airport.

As part of planning for the future public transport network, Auckland Transport has been talking to Auckland Airport about making provision for a potential rapid transit corridor in their master plan. Rail has been identified as the best long term public transport option for improving transport in Auckland’s airport and south western area. The Auckland Airport has allowed for a rail corridor and station at the terminal as part of their latest master plan. There are no confirmed alignments for rapid transit links outside the airport property yet and further work is required to confirm this and the timing of any construction. The project is currently in the development phase and public consultation will be carried out when more certainty on feasible alignments and station locations are reached. 

 

East West Link

The primary objective of the project is to provide an improved freight connection between SH20 SH1 and the Onehunga/Penrose industrial aria. Public Transport, Cycling and safety upgrades will also be considered.

The project team has started the process for procurement of professional services contract for the production of the Detailed Business Case in FY 2014/15, subject to approval of funding. The contract will be led by the Transport Agency, as principal, but the project will continue to be jointly led by AT and the Transport Agency. Indicatively, the construction is scheduled to start by 2016/2017 with forecast completion by 2019/2020.

 

AMETI Package 1 - Panmure Phase 2

This phase encompasses the replacement of existing Panmure roundabout with a signalised intersection. Construction of a two lane busway on the northern part of Lagoon Drive and a shared path for pedestrians and cyclists along the north side of Lagoon Drive from Queens Road / Jellicoe Road to the new Panmure Bridge, Re-allocation of road space within existing kerb lines to provide for bus priority, cycle lanes, improved footpaths and landscaping along Ellerslie-Panmure Highway from Forge Way to Mt Wellington Highway. Widening of existing footpaths to provide shared footpath/cycle paths at Mt Wellington Highway. This piece of work is part of the AMETI Programme.

The base design is complete. The design will be updated to align with the requirements of the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and to ensure effects (e.g. on cultural heritage sites) are appropriately mitigated. Work has commenced on the consenting phase and a designer is being procured.

 

PT Development

 

Distributed Stabling - Detailed Design

The project entails the development of outstabling facilities which support Rail Services throughout the region. These facilities are located in Auckland South/CBD and West and comprise facilities for overnight stabling of trains, staff facilities for operational staff as well as lighting and security systems for the remote monitoring of the facilities.

 

Platform Extensions

Extending the platforms of 11 stations 5-15m each to bring them into line with other platforms on the network addressed by KiwiRails DART projects and to accommodate the stopping of 6 car EMU services (147m in length + stopping distances)

First three stations with platform extensions are now nearing completion. Good progress is being made on the next 4 stations. Project Manager has accelerated works to complete all extensions by June 2014.

 

City Rail Link

The City Rail Link (CRL) is a 3.5km double track underground electrified rail line running under Auckland City centre from Britomart Station to the Western Line near the existing Mt Eden Station. Britomart would become a through station and provide for 3 intermediate stations in the Aotea, Karangahape Road and Newton areas.

The Independent Commissioners’ recommendations, in relation to Auckland Transport’s Notice of Requirement for the designation to construct and operate the CRL, have been received and are under review. The Principal Technical Advisor has completed their Establishment Phase and has commenced the Design Definition Phase in preparation of the Reference Design. The project team continue preparations to be collated in an integrated project office by early April.

 

Upgrade Downtown Ferry Terminals

Scope of work is being worked through with Public Transport Operations. A new covered waiting area will be installed on Pier 2 by the end of April 2014

Upgrade Downtown Ferry Terminal Pier 3 & 4 - Scoping and initiation works under development is in coordination with the Harbour Edge Programme.

 

Harbour Bridge Pathway

Harbour Bridge Pathway The purpose of the project is to construct a cycle/foot-bridge below/alongside the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

 

 

Road Design and Development

 

Route optimisation CBD

Improving Auckland Transport's transport network by maximising use of existing infrastructure, considering all transport modes, improve consistency and customer experience, with a high focus in the City Centre on moving people.

Corridor Management Plans (CMPs)

Corridor Management Plans identify the long term (< 30 year) strategic vision for each corridor, based on projected growth and development.  Potential network deficiencies, across all modes, are analysed and the CMPs set an integrated transport and land use approach to enable the anticipated growth.  CMPs also inform Network Operating Plans, for the day-to-day management of the corridor and influence the planning for other AT projects and operations.  A key focus for CMPs is to create robust implementation plans of prioritised projects to address future issues – creating a large portion of AT’s forward programme.

 

January- March 2014

Onewa Rd CMP starts

Mt Albert Rd-Carrington Rd CMP starts

Great South Rd Stage 3 starts

Greenlane East/West starts

Manukau Rd CMP starts

New North Rd CMP starts

Pakuranga Rd CMP underway

Great North Rd CMP underway

Brigham Creek Rd CMP finishes

Oteha Valley Rd CMP finishes

 

April-June 2014 (planned)

Mangere-Otahuhu-Sylvia Park CMP starts

Great North Rd CMP finishes

Onewa Rd CMP finishes

Mt Albert Rd-Carrington Rd CMP finishes

Great South Rd Stage 3 finishes

Greenlane East/West finishes

Manukau Rd CMP finishes

New North Rd CMP finishes

Pakuranga Rd CMP finishes

Great North Rd CMP finishes

 

 

Community Transport

 

School Transport Programme and Road Safety Education

·        The number of schools signed onto the TravelWise Programme has now reached 387.

 

·        Key activities that were undertaken with the schools included, safety at the school gate parking enforcement, speed enforcement campaigns undertaken with the NZ Police, cycle training, scooter training, school leadership programme for intermediate and high school students and school curriculum transport related activities targeted at road safety and school travel options.

 

·        Walking School Buses now number 362 in the region with a continued programme of recruitment and recognition for the volunteers who accompany the buses. 

 

·        Demand for cycle training is still strong from schools and greater partnerships with the NZ Police, Sports Trusts and Bike NZ have been developed to deliver cycle training and cycle safety. 

·        The following regional road safety education campaigns are being delivered over the for the coming six months: 

1.    Local speed  campaign – focused at all road users

2.    Pedestrian safety campaign – focused on youth and at risk sites

3.    Cycle safety- winter campaign focused on be bright be seen

4.    Back to school speed campaign  - focused on targeting drivers speed around schools

Travel Planning and Cycle and Walking

·      Commute travel planning packages and personal journey plans being delivered across the region targeting business, communities, business associations and tertiary institutions.

 

·      The development of the Auckland Cycle network continues with priority being placed on working with the NZTA on Grafton Gully and Waterview, working with Local Board Greenway proposals, Beach Road, Great South Road, Puhinui Road and the New Zealand Cycle Trail network expansion programme of the Airport to City route.

 

 

Road Corridor Access

 

Corridor Access Request Applications (CAR)

There were 1,366 CAR applications approved in March with 80% processed within 5 working days and 94% processed within 15 working days of lodgement.

In the last 3 months to the end of March 2014 there have been 3,872 CAR applications approved to carry out work on the road network. 

 

Ultra-Fast Broadband Rollout (UFB)

There continues to be a high volume of work underway on the network as Chorus looks to complete the Year 3 (2013/14) build before the deadline set by Crown Fibre Holdings of 31 May 2014.  As at the end of March there have been 252 cabinet areas completed of which 133 of these have been signed off and commenced their warranty period.

To date 478 of the 522 Year 1 (2011/12) and Year 2 (2012/13) cabinet areas have had the outstanding remedial work completed and have either been moved into warranty or are awaiting final sign off.   The completion of the remaining work remains a high priority for both VisionStream and Chorus and it is expected that the remedial work on the remaining cabinet areas will be fully completed by the end of May 2014.

The demand for customer connections is continuing to grow as the rollout of fibre continues and more retailers enter the market.  Due to improved architecture, Year 3 connections are less disruptive however the connections relating to the Year 1 and Year 2 cabinet areas sometimes require additional deployment and excavation to be undertaken.

 

Watercare Hunua 4 Bulk Watermain

There are currently three crews working at Tidal Road in Mangere, Tutare Road in Papatoetoe and Mountain Road in Mangere Bridge.

The works on Tidal Road are currently taking place between Gee Place and Waokauri Place.  The works are moving northwards and when they reach the industrial part of Tidal Road the work will be undertaken in shorter sections to minimise the impact for adjoining businesses as much as possible. 

Discussions are underway with Watercare on future stages of this project between Onehunga and Campbell Crescent and then from Campbell Crescent through to the Khyber Pass reservoir.  Despite best endeavours from Watercare they have not been able to obtain approval from the Cornwall Park Trust Board to install the pipeline through Cornwall Park and therefore they now intend to follow local roads around the perimeter of Cornwall Park.  The proposed route follows Campbell Road, Wheturangi Road, Wapiti Avenue and Market Road.  This outcome is disappointing as the construction of the pipeline will result in considerable disruption and inconvenience to residents and road users along the proposed route.  Investigation is also underway to determine the preferred route and construction methodology between Campbell Crescent and the Khyber Pass reservoir.  Watercare are investigating the use of tunnelling and other trenchless methods so as to reduce the traffic impacts.

 

 

Road Corridor Maintenance

North

·    Good progress has been made with the resurfacing programme with 16.2 km of asphaltic concrete (AC) resurfacing and 88.4 km of chipsealing completed to date. 

·    There has been 19.3 km of pavement renewals completed to date with projects recently completed on Bentley Avenue and Whangaripo Valley Road.

 

Central

·    The chipsealing programme was completed by the end of March and comprised the resealing of 32.3 km of sealed roads in the central area

·    To date this year there has been 19.9 km of footpaths either resurfaced or replaced in the central area.  The UFB rollout has adversely impacted on the delivery of the footpath renewal programme as it has it has affected the availability of suitable resources to carry out the concrete works and the need for coordination of works.

 

West

·    There has been 13.2 km of AC resurfacing and 33.5 km of chip sealing completed to end of March. 

·    There has been 10.1 km of footpaths either resurfaced or replaced to date. 

 

South

·    There has been 17.8 km of AC resurfacing and 140.4 km of chipsealing completed to date.  The remainder of the chipsealing programme will be completed in April with the remaining AC resurfacing carried out during April and May.

·    There has been 13.2 km of pavement renewals completed to date with projects recently completed Great South Rd (Coles Crescent to Subway Road), Carruth Rd

 

Streetlights

·    To date there has been 2,903 luminaires renewed and 603 street light poles replaced this year.

 

 

Road Corridor Operations

 

1)   Route Optimisation: Investigation and analysis.

 

Focus for this year is central Auckland.

The Central City has been divided into five key zones and each zone has an assigned technical lead.

Stage 1 Investigation and traffic signal optimisation has now been completed on the following routes:

 

Road/Street

From

To

Quay Street

Lower Hobson St

Solent St

Customs Street

Lower Hobson St

The Strand

Victoria Street

Hobson

Stanley St

Wellesley Street

Hobson

Grafton Rd

The Strand

Quay St

Alten Rd

Albert Street

Quay St

Wellesley

Queen Street

Quay St

Newton Rd

Mayoral Drive/Cook Street

Wellesley St W

Wellseley St E

Nelson Street

SH1

Fanshawe St

Hobson Street

Quay St

SH1

Karangahape Road

Ponsonby Road

Grafton Rd

Wellington Union

Franklin

Karangahape Road

Symonds Street

Mt Eden

Customs

Grafton Road

Khyber Pass

Symonds St

 

Route optimisation has also begun on:

Highbrook Drive

Jervois Road

Ponsonby Road, and

Rosebank Road.

 

2)   Network Safety & Operations Improvement Programme

 

This programme is part of the region wide School Travel Planning process. 2013/14. Safety engineering programme developed for 25 Schools and advance designs for 20 Schools for 2014/15 implementation:

 

As at 31st March 2014:

15 projects at design stage

13 projects under construction

30 projects have been completed

18 projects at procurement stage

 

Advance Design for 2014/15 schools programme developed for 20 schools:

 

As at 31st March 2014:

11 projects under investigation

60 projects at scheme stage

67 projects at design stage

 

40% of 2013/14 Minor Safety Improvement Programme delivered to date and 40% of 2013/14 Regional Safety Programme is under construction

 

3)   Urban Kiwi RAP and Red Light Camera Programmes

 

Kiwi RAP

Version 1 of the Urban KiwiRAP risk mapping software has been developed and all Auckland routes, intersections, and vulnerable user groups are mapped and prioritised.

Urban KiwiRAP star-rating tender responses have been evaluated and the tender is expected to be awarded by the end of April.

 

Red Light Cameras

A meeting with NZ Police in February updated AT on the tender process and investigated the possibility of AT buying poles in advance of NZ Police procurement of cameras, expected to be in early 2015.

 

 

Parking and Enforcement

 

City Centre Parking Zone price review

The project entails adjustment of on-street tariff based on the demand as per the price adjustment policy that was approved by the AT Board in 2012. The policies both state that prices should be adjusted regularly to achieve gradual behaviour change and ensure parking is available for customers to use. The price changes will be first since the implementation of the City Centre Parking Zone in December 2012. The proposed on-street price changes will be communicated to LB and Heart of the City. These will also be made available on AT web site.

 

Newmarket parking review

The proposal is to remove time limits from paid parking areas in Newmarket and move towards a demand responsive pricing approach similar to the Central City Parking Zone.  

 

Howick village parking study

"The purpose of this parking review is to provide guidance on parking management within the Howick town centre to support existing activities and future growth. The scope of the Howick Village parking review was to:

(i)      Review the existing parking demand and determine the public parking supply in Howick Village.

(ii)      Identify the location and nature of parking problems.

(iii)     Identify and evaluate potential measures to address the problems and improve the overall parking management.

(iv)    Recommend specific short -term actions for implementation and longer term options for future parking management. The development of the Howick Village parking review involved:

(i)      Parking utilisation and turnover survey

(ii)      Local business perception survey

(iii)     Consultation with internal and external stakeholders (the Howick Local Board and the Howick Village Business Association).

                        Privately owned and controlled parking provision was not included in this review.

 

 

Public Transport

 

Rail Electrification

The delivery of 9 from 57 new electric trains, of which seven have been commenced and two are currently being tested and commissioned.

KiwiRail is continuing the installation of the overhead system and the section from Wiri to Otahuhu was commissioned to allow night time testing of the trains.  Some Sunday to Thursday evening services have been replaced by buses on the Western and Eastern lines to progress the installation of the overhead power supply.

Rail patronage for the twelve months to March 2014 exceeded 11 million, an increase of 11% on the same period the previous year and a new record for heavy rail in the Auckland region.

Rail service punctuality continues to improve and was 87.9% for the twelve months to March 2014, an improvement from 82.9% the previous year.  In January 2014, service punctuality was 91.7% the first time on record that punctuality has exceeded 90%.

 

Bus - Improvements

The major marketing campaign that went live late 2013 is on-going for the “Central Corridors” (Mt Eden Road, Sandringham Road, Dominion Road, Great North Road and New North Road) and is focused on breaking down “myths” and encouraging non-users to change their perceptions of bus travel. The campaign will rolled out to the North Shore region in April 2014. Targeted local direct marketing campaigns providing an overview of local bus services and free tickets to generate trial by non-users that went live late 2013 is on-going with 7,400 households in Tamaki Drive and Albany Central targeted the first quarter of 2014. NZTA has tendered the Total Mobility (TM) Administration System and is expected to better manage the TM scheme leading to efficiencies and reduced risk of fraud.  AT Public Transport staff have been involved in the specification development and the subsequent tender evaluation (which is currently on-going) is expected to reach is successful conclusion. 

 

Bus - Integrated ticketing & fares

In March 2014, with the implementation of Auckland Integrated Fare System (AIFS) “HOP” on the remainder of the buses, HOP is now available across over 100% of the bus network marking a major milestone for PT.  AT staff were on the road at key locations to support drivers and customers during the entire roll-out process that began in late 2013.

     Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the third quarter (2013/14) ending 31 March 2014 and forward works programme for the fourth quarter (2013/14) ending 30 June 2014

239

bView

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

263

cView

Local Board Advocacy Report

265

dView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

267

     

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart (Various Auckland Transport authors)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

























Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Financial Planning for Extreme Weather Events

 

File No.: CP2014/08292

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the current financial management practice for dealing with extreme weather events in local parks assets across the region.  There are a number of issues and inconsistencies with the current practice and therefore it is recommended that a new and consistent approach be adopted. 

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland is prone to a range of extreme weather events including tornadoes, high tides, high winds, high rainfall and drought, all of which can contribute to sudden erosion, plant loss, tree fall, fixed asset damage and land slips.  12 local boards have some funding to deal with land slips and other effects from extreme weather but it is rarely sufficient when serious issues arise.  Nine boards have no inbuilt financial capacity to cope with the impact of weather events.

3.       Council has an obligation to plan for extreme weather events.  There is a legal and moral obligation to ensure that some rates funding is set aside for this purpose given that weather damage, while unpredictable in timing and location, is none-the-less a constant in the Auckland region as a whole. 

4.       Three options are considered in this report.  This first is to continue with the ad-hoc funding arrangement i.e. do nothing.  The second is to pool local board funding to essentially develop a regional self-insurance fund (local unallocated budget).  The third is to seek a regional fund, controlled by the governing body, which is applied for on a case by case basis.  The second approach is recommended.  The current arrangement will result in the need for local boards to cut existing budgets from time to time to react to weather events and overspend or approach the governing body regarding unforecast over expenditure.    The second option, which involves funding moving to the area of greatest need, is likely to cover most weather events, without changing existing regional expenditure, and minimizes the time delays/bureaucracy involved.

5.       In 2011, storms affected many areas and resulted in a number of severe slips on Waiheke Island.  In 2012 the Upper Harbour Local Board was hit by a major cyclone event and dealt with the extensive damage via cuts in their current work and over expenditure.  In 2013 all boards were affected by drought and a number of local boards have been affected by slips and erosion.  The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and the Waitemata Local Board, in particular, are finding their current liabilities well beyond their individual ability to fund the remedies.  In general terms, extreme weather events affect coastal areas and older suburbs more than rural, flat or inland areas however all areas are prone to wind, drought and flooding.

6.       The financial information relating to events that have occurred in the last three years is poor due to the fact that funds were taken from a variety of Auckland Council sources and expenses were not labelled consistently.  As such the average financial risk for the region over the last three years is not specifically known.  While it is possible for damage to be catastrophic and incalculable (if there is a regional disaster) it is only the common weather occurrence that is contemplated in this report.  Over the last three years costs have been in the realm of six figures every year and the burden has traversed local boards. 

7.       Current budgets are operational.  Damage from extreme weather events often results in the need for the development of new retaining or structures to protect existing assets from ongoing slips or similar.  There is currently no capital funding sitting with local boards specifically tagged for storm damage remediation.  It is recommended that a portion of the existing funding be allocated to capital budgets to provide for this eventuality.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agrees to allocate the current (less expenses to date) and future “storm damage” budget of $96,947 to a local unallocated “extreme weather event” self-insurance budget, which can be utilized by the board for repair or rehabilitation of areas affected by extreme weather events on an as required basis.

b)      supports a portion of the pooled operating budgets being allocated to local unallocated capital funding.

c)      notes that expenditure against the local unallocated operational and capital storm damage budgets will be reported to all local boards annually.

 

Discussion

8.       Auckland is prone to a range of extreme weather events including tornadoes, high tides, high winds, high rainfall and drought all of which can contribute to sudden erosion, plant loss, tree fall, fixed asset damage and land slips. 

9.       The scale or impact of extreme weather events is particularly felt in urban parks where space is at a premium and landscapes are heavily developed.  Although weather events still have an impact on regional parks the scale of the regional park landscapes and the management of those landscapes (i.e. a lot more fully restored streams and coastal dunes) means the impact of extreme weather events can usually be tolerated without affecting the day to day use of the park.  In general terms, extreme weather events also affect coastal areas and older suburbs more than flat or inland areas however all areas are prone to wind, drought and flooding.

10.     The financial impact of managing damage associated with extreme weather events in the urban park environment has historically been dealt with in three ways:

·    Self-insurance – a fund is kept to call on for unforeseen damage

·    Reforecasting – no funds are set aside for unforeseen damage and as a result current projects and operational expenses are put on hold while funding is diverted to managing the impact of extreme weather events.

·    Overspend – where neither of the two options above are possible then some costs have been worn as an overspend

11.     Auckland City Council held specific “storm damage” budgets for parks and other Council’s had a level of self-insurance against unforeseen damage.  Others had nothing.

12.     Upon amalgamation the funding pool held by Auckland City Council was divided amongst the local boards in those areas. Local boards in the old Manukau City had some funding allocated to cater for this possibility in their local budgets.  This resulted in very small buckets of money being allocated to 12 local boards. 

13.     This local board budget allocation has largely defeated the purpose of the self-insurance fund as extreme weather events do not happen regularly in any given area. They can affect a localised area or a large scale area that has no correlation to local board boundaries.  This means that individual local boards can go many years without an extreme weather event while its neighbor or another local board may have several events in short succession.  This random occurrence is normal and the current budget allocation does not befit this natural phenomenon.


 

14.     The current operational “storm damage” budgets held across the region are:

 

YTD Actual (Feb)

 Budget

 Albert-Eden

 

                       $77,558

 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

 

                       $96,947

 Orakei

                       $13,101

                    $109,874

 Puketapapa

                          $2,197

                       $64,632

 Waiheke

 

                       $19,389

 Waitemata

                          $7,508

                    $102,894

 Franklin

 

                       $20,371

 Howick

 

                       $30,451

 Mangere-Otahuhu

 

                       $15,515

 Manurewa

 

                       $16,926

 Otara-Papatoetoe

 

                       $16,715

 Papakura

 

                       $11,158

Total

               $22,806

             $582,431

Note: there are a number of commitments or costs expected in Waitemata and Orakei that are not yet shown in the these budgets

Consideration

15.     Council has an obligation to plan for extreme weather events.  Under property law there is term known as lateral support which is about the right of a landowner to have their land physically supported in its natural state by both adjoining land and underground structures. There are around 4000 local and sports parks and each of these parks have neighbours.  Any excavation or alteration council makes to park land may, at a later time, damage and affect a neighbour and leave council liable. Our neighbours have a right to enjoy their land in its natural condition.  This includes the right to have their land held in place from the sides by the neighbouring land unless both are subject to unforeseen natural events.

16.     In addition to this legal obligation to neighbours, some extreme weather events come at such a substantial cost that the budget available to an individual board is either unable to wear the cost of the recovery or the cost of recovery affects a range of other activities within a local board area.  This budget shortfall creates a liability and its own set of risks for council and the community.


Options

17.     The following options have been considered for ongoing/future management of storm damage:

 

Option

Pro’s

Con’s

1

Do nothing:

Some boards have limited funds available, others have nothing

·   No change to boards budgets.  A small contingency fund remains available for those boards with funding.

·   No boards have sufficient funding to deal with medium size weather event – this exposes council to a range of risks

2

Create local unallocated fund (self-insurance):

This would be a ring fenced fund for all boards to access allocated to the local and sports parks activity.  It would be established from existing storm damage budgets held by some local boards. 

·   Funding is accessible across the region i.e. funds go where the storm goes

·   The size of the fund, pooled across the region, is more likely to accommodate regional extreme weather events than current arbitrary and small funding base available to those boards that have funding

·   Can be established immediately (providing all the boards agree) thereby helping with current liabilities

·   Risk of the fund being inappropriately used for day to day weather events.  This is a current risk and can be more readily mitigated as a local unallocated fund.  It is recommended that there would be a single Tier 4 manager with a regional view determining a consistency of approach.

·   Some boards contribute to this solution while others benefit without contribution – may be seen as inequitable

3

Ask governing body to cater for most impacts of extreme weather events on a case by case basis.

·   No change needed and governing body would pick up costs of damage (if agreed/funding found).  Local boards that have existing funding would potentially need to show expenditure of current budgets before being eligible.

·   The time delay and bureaucracy involved in making this happen means that most applications will be retrospective and expose the Council to financial risk

·   No funding is currently available at a governing body level.  May take time to advocate for/secure

Local Board Views

18.     This report is being circulated to all local boards to canvas their views on this issue.

Maori Impact Statement

19.     In many cases extreme weather events can damage archeological sites or sites of significance to Tangata Whenua. This can trigger the need for cultural impact assessments and more careful/expensive restoration works to protect the values of the site.  Without a fund to support rehabilitation or restoration work recently discovered or damaged sites of significance cannot be attended to as there are no funds.  A regional self-insurance fund would help to mitigate risk for council.

General

20.     As previously mentioned a variety of extreme weather events have affected parks over the years.  For instance in 2011 storm damage caused extensive slips across Waiheke.  Repair work is ongoing and existing storm damage funding has been insufficient to cope. In 2012 a tornado hit Hobsonville causing widespread damage to trees and houses.  The arboricultural and general cleanup was unforeseen and no budget for this kind of work was available to the Upper Harbour Local Board.  In this case the cost of repair was funded by savings in the local board budget combined with a budget overspend. 

21.     During September last year, a major storm event hit the east coast beaches, particularly in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area but also affecting Rodney, Orakei and Howick Local Boards.  A storm surge of 0.8 metres on top of high tide caused substantial erosion. Orewa Beach was hit the hardest with significant sand loss and coastal structure damage. 

22.     Weather events are part of the life of Auckland.  The current inconsistent, and in many cases non-existent, planning for extreme weather events is a risk and exposes council to a high likelihood of budget blowout in any given year and local board area. 

23.     The unpredictable nature of extreme weather events means that we cannot anticipate what portion of funding is needed for capital and operational funding.  However, based on the last three years weather events, we know that there is a need for both operational and capital funding.  It is therefore recommended that a portion of the current operational funds be allocated to capital funding to offset these costs.

Implementation Issues

24.     If a regional self-insurance fund, initially created from existing local board funds, is universally supported by formal resolution from all local boards then this fund can be created in the current 2013/14 financial year.

25.     The expenditure against the local unallocated operational and capital storm damage budgets will be reported to all local boards annually.

26.     There are currently several areas affected by storm damage that have projected funding shortfalls that could benefit from immediate implementation of the regional solution. The beneficiaries from this fund will change from year to year. Some recent historical events and current events and associated funding requirements are detailed in Attachment A.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Historical and current events and associated funding requirements

275

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Aickin - Manager Local and Sports Parks Central

Martin van Jaarsveld - Manager, Local & Sports Parks North; Local & Sports Parks

Malcolm  Page - Manager Local & Sports Parks South

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Action/Reports Pending Report

 

File No.: CP2014/09345

 

  

 

Purpose

This report provides an update on actions and reports pending/requested at previous meetings or workshops.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Action/Reports Pending report for May 2014 be received.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Action/Reports Pending Report, May 2014

279

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 





Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

 

File No.: CP2014/08855

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The attached workshop records provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops.

2.       These sessions are held to give an information opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects, and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Recommendation/s

That the record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops report for April 2014 be received.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Record of Workshops, April 2014

285

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 





Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Board Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/08853

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the reports from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Members be received,

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bridget Graham, April- May 2014 2014

291

bView

Member Chris Makoare, April 2014 Report

293

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014

 

 

Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/08838

 

  

 

 

Executive summary

1.       Providing the Chairperson, Simon Randall, with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues he has been involved with since the last meeting

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board receives the Chair’s report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chair's Report, May 2014

297

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

20 May 2014