I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 9 July 2014

9.30am

Reception Lounge Level 2
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

 

Cr Ross Clow

 

 

Cr Chris Darby

 

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

 

Cr Mike Lee

 

 

Member Liane Ngamane

 

 

Cr John Watson

 

 

Member Karen Wilson

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Cr Penny Hulse

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Crispian Franklin

Democracy Advisor

 

3 July 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6205

Email: crispian.franklin@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Areas of Activity

 

·         Management and monitoring of Auckland’s bio-diversity and eco-systems including natural hazards

·         Sustainability frameworks for natural resource management

·         Projects and programmes to deliver on energy management and climate change targets

·         Environmental initiatives including coastal and freshwater management

·         Environmental and climate change impacts of waste management

·         Facilitating partnerships and collaborative funding models to support environmental initiatives

 

Responsibilities

 

Within the specified area of activity the Committee is responsible for:

 

·         In accordance with the work programme agreed with the parent committee, developing strategy and policy, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

·         Making decisions within delegated powers

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

 

 

 


Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

09 July 2014

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

5.1     Earthship Biotecture - Passive, solar, off-the-grid, sustainable housing - Mesepa Edwards and Will 'Ilolahia                                                                                   7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

9          Update on the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group                            9

10        Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy                                            15  

11        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 28 May 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Earthship Biotecture - Passive, solar, off-the-grid, sustainable housing - Mesepa Edwards and Will 'Ilolahia

Purpose

1.       Mesepa Edwards and Will ‘Ilolahia wish to speak to the Committee regarding ‘Earthship Biotechture – passive solar, off-the-grid and sustainable housing.

Recommendation/s

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)      thank  Mesepa Edwards and Will ‘Ilolahia regarding ‘Earthship Biotechture’ – passive solar, off-the-grid and sustainable housing.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

09 July 2014

 

Update on the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group

 

File No.: CP2014/13590

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee with an update on the current status and future direction of the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group.

Executive summary

2.       The Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group (IKHMG) was established in 2005 and its key purpose is to promote integrated management and inter-agency coordination and kaitiakitanga of the Kaipara Harbour and its catchment.

3.       The IKHMG successfully works in a collaborative, multi-stakeholder and partnership environment for the purposes of achieving a common vision of ‘a healthy and productive Kaipara Harbour’.

4.       This report provides the committee with an update of key achievements to date, including the flagship site programme, restoration initiatives and research projects undertaken to fill gaps identified in the Information Review and Gap Analysis.

5.       The report also outlines future initiatives being undertaken by the Group, including a community event to be held in November 2014 and marine spatial planning for the Kaipara Harbour.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)      receive the update on the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group report.

 

 

Comments

 

Background

6.       The Kaipara Harbour is New Zealand’s largest estuarine ecosystem and is the receiving environment of a massive 640,000ha catchment that extends across the Auckland and Northland regions (and associated planning boundaries).  Ngāti Whātua are spiritually and physically intertwined with their most sacred treasure – the Kaipara Harbour. 

7.       Various aspects of the Kaipara Harbour and catchments are managed by six local and central government departments.  This fragmented management approach has contributed to the decline of the health of the Kaipara.

8.       To address the ongoing environmental degradation to the health of the Kaipara, Ngāti Whātua kaumātua have led the establishment of the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group (IKHMG), a multiple-stakeholder partnership combining two approaches to environmental management: one indigenous (Mātauranga Māori) and the other derived from western knowledge.  This forms the basis for future research, planning, policy development and management of the Kaipara ecosystems, harbour and catchment.

9.       The IKHMG was established in 2005 and its key purpose is to promote integrated management and inter-agency coordination and kaitiakitanga of the Kaipara Harbour and its catchment.  IKHMG work in a collaborative, multi-stakeholder and partnership environment for the purposes of achieving a common vision of ‘a healthy and productive Kaipara Harbour’.  The work and relationship of the IKHMG is guided by a set of four principles:

1.    Kaitiakitanga

2.    Integrated, Ecosystem-Based Management

3.    Co-management

4.    Manaakitanga Respect

10.     IKHMG partners include:

·      Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust

·      Ngati Whātua o Kaipara

·      Department of Conservation (DoC)

·      Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research

·      Kaipara District Council (KDC)

·      Auckland Council (AC)

·      Northland Regional Council (NRC)

·      Royal Forest & Bird Society of New Zealand

·      Kaipara Harbour Sustainable Fisheries Management Study Group

·      Whangarei District Council (WDC)

·      National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)

·      Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI)

11.     The IKHMG form partnerships, commission information and knowledge gathering and influence regulation and policy.  The IKHMG Terms of Reference underpins all work of the Group, clarifying structural relationships and functional aspects of the group.  The IKHMG does not direct the executive roles of its constituent parties nor the conduct of their respective functions, duties and powers.  Rather, the IKHMG has been formed in support of the kaitiakitanga exercised by Ngāti Whātua and in recognition of the opportunities that it presents to promote integrated and co-ordinated management of the Harbour. 

12.     IKHMG adds value by promoting integrated management so that ‘one’ Kaipara is managed as holistically as possible in decision-making for resource consents, planning, policy, research and monitoring.

13.     The “Kaipara Moana He Mahere Rautaki Whakakotahi Integrated Strategic Plan of Action” directs the work of the IKHMG for 10 years (2011-2021).  The Plan broadly outlines how the vision will be achieved through establishing objectives and priority actions.  It provides a mechanism to integrate activity across stakeholders and identifies joint activities.

14.     Annual workplans are developed to deliver on the Integrated Strategic Plan of Action.  The workplan identifies a range of actions and deliverables to be undertaken over the July-June period.

15.     IKHMG hold quarterly hui at various locations around the Kaipara Harbour.  Additionally, sub-komiti are formed to address particular issues as they arise.

Achievements

16.     The IKHMG has successfully undertaken a number of initiatives.  Some of these are set out below.

 

Flagship sites

17.     An initiative to establish ‘flagship sites’ was commenced in 2011.  The purpose of the flagship sites is to contribute towards understanding what sustainable best-practice resource use means for the restoration of the Kaipara.  The programme will establish 11 sites (farming, industrial and marine).  Field days are held at the flagship farms that focus on practical methods to, for example, reduce the delivery of sediment, nutrients and faecal coliforms to waterways of the Kaipara catchment and into the Harbour.

18.     The flagship site initiative was reviewed in June 2014 by an independent consultant.  The purpose of the review was to understand the impact of the program, its effectiveness and if objectives had been achieved.  The review found that it:

a)   achieved an IKHMG field presence and branding;

b)   achieved 9 sites (8 farms, 1 industrial);

c)   demonstrated sustainable and integrated best-practice that mitigates delivery of sediment, nutrient and faecal contaminants to the Kaipara moana;

d)   raised awareness of the value of restoring the Kaipara moana to local and regional people;

e)   increased the number of local and regional people involved in IKHMG activities.

19.     In particular, the field programme tests and showcases what IKHMG stands for; keeps IKHMG in touch with the real world; is a contemporary practice of kaitiakitanga and utilisation of mātauranga Māori; and encourages action for environmental outcomes by landowners and resource users.

Research hub

20.     The Information Review and Gap Analysis was presented to the Auckland Vision Committee in June 2011.  The purpose of this report was to outline gaps and opportunities within three knowledge-bases (biogeophysical, Mātauranga Māori (traditional Māori knowledge), socio-economic) to assist with achieving the common vision.  Key outputs include the Information Review and Gap Analysis and the Kaipara Atlas: an Integrated Database.

21.     A number of crown research projects have been undertaken in the Kaipara Harbour and catchment, including NIWA, AgResearch and Landcare Research initiatives to fill priorities identified in the gap analysis.

22.     The Kaipara Harbour has also been a place of interest for post-graduate students.  For example, projects have focused on an integrated approach to coastal marine spatial planning, soundscape of Kaipara harbour, snapper spawning and benthic ecology.

Restoration initiatives

23.     “Plant 2 Million Trees by 2015” is a broader restoration project to that of the Flagship program.  Over 50,000 plants have been planted to date.  Fencing, wetland restoration, landcare groups and pest and weed management are some of the initiatives supported by IKHMG.

24.     The IKHMG spatially maps restoration opportunities throughout the catchment and harbour in order to evaluate progress towards the common vision.

Future Direction

Kaipara Moana – Looking Back…Thinking Forward

25.     An event, Kaipara Moana – Looking Back…Thinking Forward Me huri whakamuri ka titiro whakamua will be held at Te Ao Marama Māori Cultural Centre in Te Hana on 15-16 November.

26.     The inaugural event’s purpose is to showcase and celebrate the special and unique taonga that the Kaipara Harbour is.  It will provide opportunities to share case studies and ideas, and to connect with the Kaipara community, scientists and other stakeholders.

27.     It is an opportunity to look for future partnerships for practical work, research and policy implementation.

28.     Targeting the communities of the Kaipara Harbour catchment, the event will offer something of interest to all - from farmers to environment managers, industry to hapū, government and non-government organisations.

IKHMG Business Plan

29.     The IKHMG is currently preparing a three year Business Plan.  Two draft priority issues have been identified: (1) Lack of integration and coordination of governance and management; and (2) Isolation of hapū, landowners and communities from restoration opportunities.

30.     Priority actions for resolving the issues include:

·      Build capacity through resourcing, partnerships, evaluation and monitoring;

·      Integrate governance and management and coordinate action – this includes marine spatial planning as discussed below.

·      Resource, connect and inspire restoration through a broadly based field program.

Marine Spatial Planning

31.     Directive 7.13 of the Auckland Plan states: “Ensure integrated and sustainable management of marine areas through marine spatial planning for the Hauraki Gulf, Kaipara Harbour, Manukau Harbour and west coast”. 

32.     The IKHMG is well positioned to lead and support the development of a marine spatial plan for the Kaipara Harbour.  The key interested parties are well represented on the IKHMG and the group has an existing Terms of Reference and guiding principles that support marine spatial planning.

33.     The Kaipara Atlas is a key information resource for the Kaipara Harbour marine spatial plan.  It can be accessed through the website http://www.kaiparaharbour.net.nz/ and provides access to relevant technical information on the whole of Kaipara Harbour.

34.     Preparation for marine spatial planning for the Kaipara occurred during 2013/14, with a sub-komiti of the IKHMG forming and providing briefing reports to the wider IKHMG.  The need for a Kaipara Harbour Marine Spatial Plan has now been included in IKHMG’s Proposed Business Plan for 2014-2017. 

35.     The steps to deliver the final marine spatial plan are still developing and evolving.  The marine spatial plan is likely to be completed in 2017 (note that the Auckland Plan timeframe is 2015).  A proposal has been put forward as part of the Long Term Plan (LTP) process for improved resourcing to complete the marine spatial plan for Kaipara.

36.     The marine spatial planning project will produce a non-statutory plan that the relevant agencies and interested parties will implement.  Amongst other agencies, statutory implementation under the Resource Management Act could include the Auckland Council making changes to its Unitary Plan to incorporate new or revised provisions identified in the marine spatial plan for the Kaipara Harbour and its contributing catchments in the region. 

37.     The plan is also likely to provide advice and guidance to other non-statutory strategies, plans and actions of the agencies involved and to promote voluntary actions and initiatives by mana whenua, industry and the wider community.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

38.     The Rodney Local Board is a partner to IKHMG. 

39.     The Local Board has supported the establishment of a joint political committee with Ngāti Whātua collective and agencies with environmental responsbilities for the Kaipara.  The committee currently supports the work of the IKHMG.

Maori impact statement

40.     The IKHMG was established by Ngāti Whātua in 2005 and is led by the hapū Te Uri o Hau and Ngāti Whātua Ngā Rima o Kaipara.  The approach taken by IKHMG is shaped and grounded with Ngāti Whātua ki Kaipara hapū tikanga and values.

Implementation

41.     Development and implementation of IKHMG initiatives, including the marine spatial plan project, will require that ongoing resource and staff commitment be addressed.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Cushla Salt, Coastal Specialist

Authorisers

Ludo Campbell-Reid - Environmental Strategy & Policy Manager

 


Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

09 July 2014

 

Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy

 

File No.: CP2014/09424

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek that the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee recommend that the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approve the Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy.

Executive summary

2.       Kauri is an iconic New Zealand species. Ecologically, Kauri is a keystone species with a profound influence on surrounding plant communities.  Culturally, Kauri is considered a taonga species by many Māori.  Socially, Kauri is an integral part of New Zealand’s identity and a significant part of many people’s experience and enjoyment of the natural environment.  Historically, the exploitation of Kauri has provided Auckland with significant benefits in terms of timber, gum, and the conversion of forest to urban and rural land uses. Today, Kauri continues to provide direct economic benefits in terms of timber use and tourism.  Less than 1% of original Kauri forest now remains, both nationally and in the Auckland region. 

3.       Kauri dieback is the key threat and management issue for remaining Kauri populations. Kauri dieback is a deadly disease caused by a new to science organism with the interim designation of Phytophthora taxon ‘Agathis’ (PTA). Kauri dieback appears to be host-specific to Kauri. It causes a range of symptoms cumulating in tree mortality.  It affects trees of all ages from seedlings to mature trees. There is no known cure for Kauri dieback.  The loss of Kauri as a species would have significant costs in terms of cultural, social, economic, biodiversity, and landscape values.

4.       Auckland Council currently undertakes a range of activities to manage Kauri dieback under a range of planning documents.  Many activities are undertaken as part of Council’s commitment to the joint agency Kauri Dieback Long-term Management Programme.  Many activities are undertaken in accordance with the Regional Parks Management Plan.  Other activities, such as the proposed identification of Kauri dieback as a pest in the Regional Pest Management Plan, are undertaken independent of those agencies and plans. The Kauri dieback control group has identified the need for an overarching strategy to ensure that the Kauri dieback management activities and planning undertaken by Council are co-ordinated and aligned with the Auckland Plan outcomes and Council’s transformational shifts.

5.       The Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy (the Strategy) gives effect to Council’s strong commitment to environmental action and green growth and seeks to align and co-ordinate Council’s Kauri dieback management activities.  The objective of the Strategy is to prevent or minimise the adverse effects of Kauri dieback.  The Strategy sets out  a range of methods and activities to achieve this objective including partnership with mana whenua; continued participation in the joint agency Kauri Dieback Long-term Management Programme; surveillance and monitoring; vector control and impact management; regulation; and advocacy and research.

6.       The overarching outcome for the Strategy is that Kauri forests continue to exist and their ecological viability is maintained in the Auckland Region.

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)      recommend that the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approve the draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy in principle pending further information regarding any additional cost implications.

 

 

Comments

Background

Kauri

7.       Kauri (Agathis australis) is one of New Zealand’s largest endemic tree species, and can be very long-lived, with some specimens up to 2000 years old.  Ecologically, Kauri is a keystone species with a profound influence on surrounding plant communities.  Culturally, Kauri is considered a taonga species by many Māori.  Socially, Kauri is an iconic species and an integral part of New Zealand’s identity.

8.       Economically, Kauri has supported people since their arrival here.  To European pioneers, the felling and milling of Kauri was a significant industry for a growing population.  Kauri provides high quality timber which is light, strong and versatile.  Kauri provides large volumes of unblemished timber as the trees shed their lower braches on maturity.  Kauri timber was put to a wide range of uses including housing, furniture and boat building.  Large areas of Kauri forest were cleared for agriculture.  Kauri gum was collected for use in a variety of products including varnishes and linoleum.  Gum was collected by bleeding live trees and by digging in areas where forests had previously stood.  Today there is a small continuing timber industry. Areas of Kauri forest and large specimens in particular are important tourist attractions.

9.       Growing naturally only in the upper half of the North Island, Kauri have already experienced substantial range restrictions as a result of historical clearance.  Less than 1% of original Kauri forest now remains, both nationally and in the Auckland region.

10.     Within the Auckland Region, significant remnant Kauri populations occur in many regional and local parks and on private properties, most notably in the Hunuas, Waitākeres and on offshore islands in the Hauraki Gulf. Significant remnants of Kauri forest can also be found in north Auckland.

11.     Kauri dieback is the key threat and management issue for remaining Kauri populations.

Kauri Dieback

12.     Kauri dieback is a deadly disease caused by a new to science organism with the interim designation of Phytophthora taxon Agathis (PTA). Kauri dieback appears to be host-specific to Kauri, and causes a range of symptoms including collar rot, lesions bleeding gum, yellowing leaves, canopy thinning, and tree mortality. It affects trees of all ages from seedlings to mature trees. There is no known cure for Kauri dieback.

13.     Kauri dieback is soil and water-borne.  Research to date indicates that human activities are key causes of spread. Since its identification, Kauri dieback has spread to many of the Kauri populations within the Auckland Region, including the Waitākere Ranges, Awhitu, Great Barrier Island, and several bush reserves in north Auckland. Kauri dieback is still notably absent from the Hunua area and several offshore islands in the Hauraki Gulf. Within infected areas of the Waitākere Ranges and north Auckland there are still discrete areas of healthy Kauri.

14.     The extinction of Kauri as a species would have significant cultural, economic, social and environmental costs.  Culturally, the extinction of Kauri would have significant impacts on the relationship of Māori with their ancestral taonga.  The loss of Kauri would also mean the loss of an iconic and emblematic species.  Socially, the loss of Kauri would reduce many Aucklanders’ enjoyment of the natural environment and recreational opportunities.

15.     The direct economic costs of loss of the current Kauri timber industry nationally were estimated in 2009 at between $65.7m and $154.6m net present value.  The potential cost of Kauri dieback to tourism was estimated at up to $48 m/year in 2013.  The economic cost of recreational opportunities threatened by Kauri dieback in Northland was estimated in 2013 at $1.03 m/year.  The equivalent figure for Auckland may be lower but is still likely to be substantial.  It is proposed that a full estimate of the costs of the loss of Kauri to Auckland be carried out as part of the cost/benefit analysis required to propose Kauri dieback as a pest in the Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan.

16.     Kauri is a key-stone species, having a profound effect on its ecosystem through its modification of surrounding soils. Ecologically, the loss of Kauri would lead to considerable ecosystem modification with the loss of canopy structure, changes in soil type, changes in the types of other plants and animals inhabiting the forest and the food web interactions among these species. Alternative replacement canopy tree species do not have equivalent function or impact. This would have profound effects on biodiversity, ecosystem processes and landscape values. Kauri stores up to 1000 tonnes of carbon per hectare, meaning loss of Kauri forest could result in carbon release valued in 2013 at up to $162.5m.

Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy

17.     Auckland Council currently undertakes a range of activities to manage Kauri dieback under a range of planning documents.  Activities undertaken include:

·    surveillance and monitoring for Kauri dieback

·    vector control and impact management

·    research

·    regulation

18.     Further detail on each of these activities can be found in the implementation section of the Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy.

19.     Auckland Council is a partner in the national Kauri Dieback Long Term Management Plan 2010 - 2014 along with the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), the Department of Conservation (DOC), Tāngata Whenua and Northland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty Regional Councils.

20.     Auckland Council also undertakes Kauri dieback activities in accordance with the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010, the Regional Parks Operations Plan and the Auckland Council Kauri dieback Communications and Engagement Plan 2013-2104.  Council has included Kauri dieback vector controls in the earthworks and vegetation provisions of the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan.  In addition, Council is currently reviewing its Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP) and proposes to include Kauri dieback as a pest in that plan.

21.     The Kauri dieback control group (comprising staff from the Biosecurity, Regional and Specialist Parks, Local and Sports Parks, Biodiversity, and Natural Heritage teams) has identified the need for an overarching strategy to ensure that the Kauri dieback management activities and planning undertaken by Council are co-ordinated and aligned with the Auckland Plan outcomes and Council’s transformational shifts.

22.     The overarching objective of the Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy is to prevent or minimise the adverse effects of Kauri dieback.  Five methods are identified to give effect to that objective. They are:

·    partnership with mana whenua

·    participating in the joint agency Kauri Dieback Long-term Management Programme

·    regulation

·    management of Auckland Kauri lands

·    advocacy and research

22.     The draft Strategy provides detail and explanation on each of those methods.  The majority of the draft Strategy comprises a table of implementation activities with supporting detail on each.  The draft Strategy includes a monitoring section with one overarching outcome and five outcomes for each method. The overarching outcome is that:

“Kauri Forests continue to exist and their ecological viability is maintained in the Auckland Region.”

23.     It is proposed that the draft Strategy be reviewed on an annual basis.

Consideration

Auckland Plan Outcomes and Transformational Shifts

 

24. The Draft Kauri Dieback Management Strategy makes a significant contribution to the achievement of Council’s key transformational shifts and the achievement of the Auckland Plan’s outcomes.

 

25. Strategic Direction 7 of the Auckland Plan addresses environmental issues and includes directive 7.5 which requires that significant ecosystems and areas of indigenous biodiversity are protected and restored across public and private land within the region. The Auckland Plan sets three relevant targets:

·    ensuring no regional extinctions of indigenous species

·    ensuring no loss in the area of significant landscape, natural character and natural features

·    reducing vulnerability of identified ecosystems to ensure a 95% chance of ecosystem viability in 2040

26. Kauri dieback threatens the achievement of all those targets.  The loss of Kauri would be a regional extinction.  Because of Kauri’s keystone role ecologically, the dieback of Kauri flows on to significant losses in terms of biodiversity, ecosystem viability, landscapes and natural character.

 

27. The management of Kauri dieback therefore contributes significantly to the Auckland Plan outcome of a Green Auckland.  Because of the cultural, recreational, social, current economic and future economic significance of Kauri the Kauri Dieback Management Strategy contributes to the achievement of a healthy, prosperous, culturally rich and creative, beautiful Auckland that is loved by its people.

 

28. The Draft Kauri Dieback Management Strategy demonstrates Council’s strong commitment to environmental action and green growth.

Local board views and implications

 

29.     Kauri dieback is a local, as well as a regional and national issue. As part of the initial round of consultation with Local Boards for the Regional Pest Management Plan Review Biosecurity and Natural Heritage Policy staff have been consulting on Kauri dieback at workshops and local board portfolio holder meetings.  There has been uniform approval for Council continuing to address Kauri dieback.  This includes highly urban local boards such as Waitematā and Puketāpapa where board members have shown strong interest in Kauri dieback and its management. 

30.     Franklin, Waitākere, Rodney and Kaipatiki Local Boards can be considered to be more directly affected by Kauri dieback.  Board members have demonstrated strong concern regarding the effects of Kauri dieback and have been supportive of continued Council efforts to manage the disease.

31.     The Strategy includes working with local boards as part of the Communications and Engagement activity detail.  This includes aligning work with the Waitākere Local Board funding of a FTE position to work on Kauri dieback management in that area.

Māori impact statement

 

32.     Kauri dieback is considered to pose a significant threat to the relationship of Māori with their ancestral taonga.

33.     The Strategy recognises this by placing a strong emphasis on meaningful partnership with mana whenua. In part, this partnership is given effect to through continued participation in the Joint Management Agency which includes a Tāngata Whenua Roopū to represent tāngata whenua in the leadership team and all workstreams.  This partnership is also given effect to through the consultation that has been undertaken or will be undertaken for the plans and documents that give effect to the Strategy (e.g. the existing Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 and the to-be-developed Regional Pest Management Plan 2015 to 2025).

34.     Independent of these documents, the Strategy requires continued commitment to engagement and communication with mana whenua.  The Strategy has been reviewed by staff at Te Waka Angamua who advised it was excellent and that they had no additions to make. The partnership with mana whenua will also be given effect to through the development of an Auckland Iwi Engagement Plan, with the assistance of Te Waka Angamua.

Implementation

 

35.     The Strategy contains a mix of existing practices and possible additional interventions. Any  additional  interventions are  still be evaluated and costed.  Recommendations arising from this evaluation and the associated cost implications will be reported back in the future for Councillor’s consideration. 

 

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Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Auckland Kauri Dieback Management Strategy

21

     

Signatories

Authors

Dave Marshall - Principal Specialist Natural Heritage

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Ludo Campbell-Reid - Environmental Strategy & Policy Manager

 


Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

09 July 2014