I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

4.30pm

Local Board Office
2 Glen Road
Browns Bay

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Sayers

 

Members

David Cooper

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gaye Harding

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Lovisa Rasmussen

 

 

Lisa Whyte

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

10 July 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Portfolio

Description

Local Board Members

Local planning, policy and governance

Relationship with governing body, Chairs meeting, protocols, code of conduct, local area plans, structure plans, Unitary Plan, RUB, plan changes

Julia Parfitt –Chairperson
Greg Sayers - Deputy Chairperson

Arts and culture

Arts centres, art programmes

Greg Sayers – Lead
Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Events

General oversight of events programme
music in parks, movies in parks

Greg Sayers and Julia Parfitt

Community services and facilities

Community development and safety, grants and funding, community facilities, community houses, community leases, Youth Connections

Julia Parfitt –Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Youth

Local board Youth Forum, Youth Representative

Lovisa Rasmussen – Lead
Gaye Harding - Alternate

Libraries

 

Lisa Whyte –Lead
Gaye Harding - Alternate

Recreation services

Pools, multi-sport facilities

Gaye Harding – Lead
Lisa Whyte - Alternate

Parks

Reserve management plans, park usage, leasing on parks, liaison with parks staff on land owner approval

David Cooper –Lead
Julia Parfitt –Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen - Alternate

Built and natural environment

Heritage, infrastructure (including stormwater, wastewater, water), environmental programmes, conservation and biodiversity, biosecurity, waste minimisation

Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Economic Development

Economic development plans, developing ATEED relationship, broadband

Gary Holmes – Lead
Gaye Harding -Alternate

Street environment and town centres

Gateways and mainstreet upgrades, Urban design champion

David Cooper and Gary Holmes – Leads
Janet Fitzgerald -Alternate

Transport

 

David Cooper – Lead
Gary Holmes – Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Greg Sayers - Alternate

Regulatory, bylaws and compliance

Bylaw policy feedback

Gaye Harding -Lead

Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Resource consent applications

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Communications and engagement

Media, stakeholder and community engagement including iwi relationships, Hibiscus and Bays Youth Voice and YAP

Julia Parfitt – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen -Alternate

Finance

Budget overview, financial prudence and reporting, local board funding policy

Lisa Whyte – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Civil defence/ emergency management

 

David Cooper –Lead
Greg Sayers -Alternate

Urban Design Champion

 

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Friends of Okura Bush                                                                                        5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Approval of Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan                                                                                                                                         7

13        New Community Lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated, 15 Wainui Road, Silverdale                                                                                              11

14        Local Alcohol Policy Project - Draft Policy for Local Board Feedback                19

15        Local board role in alcohol licence applications                                                     41

16        Parks Capital Works Programme 2014/2015                                                            51

17        Allocation of Decision Making Review                                                                     57

18        Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, July 2014        99

19        New Road Names - Park Lane, Ocean View Terrace, Plantation Terrace and Rewa Rewa Lane                                                                                                                             111

20        New Road Names - Harvest Avenue, Ascension Crescent, Tawa Place, Taraire Place                                                                                                                                     119

21        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         125

22        Local Board Members Reports                                                                                127

23        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                129  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               135

C1       Confidential - Special Housing Areas: Tranche 4                                                 135  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Member LC Rasmussen has been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 18 June 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

8.1       Friends of Okura Bush

1.       Lezette Reid from East Coast Bays Coastal Protection Society, also known as Friends of Okura Bush, has requested a deputation to make a presentation on the work of the organisation.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Reid for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Approval of Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/13959

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval of the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan.

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting of 18 December 2013, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved to approve the terms of the proposed lease to be granted to the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated for the site occupied on the corner of Centreway Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway. The resolution number was HB/2013/258.

3.       One of the terms of the proposed lease is the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan being approved and the document attached to the lease agreement following the public notification process.

4.       This report recommends the approval of the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment A) for the building located on the corner of Centreway Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       At its meeting of 18 December 2013, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved to approve the terms of the proposed lease to be granted to the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated for the site occupied on the corner of Centreway Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway. The resolution number was HB/2013/258.

6.       One of the terms of the proposed lease is the Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan being approved and the document attached to the lease agreement following the public notification process.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       The Community Lease Advisor tabled the Community Outcomes Plan at a Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Facilities and Reserves Workshop on 11 April 2014.

8.       The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Maori impact statement

9.       There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

10.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

11.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Hibiscus Coast Community House Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

9

      

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Advisor Community Lease

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

New Community Lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated, 15 Wainui Road, Silverdale

 

File No.: CP2014/14450

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval to grant a new community lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated for part of Silverdale Reserve, 15 Wainui Road, Silverdale.

Executive summary

2.       The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated (the Association) had a community lease with the legacy Rodney District Council for a term of 20 years commencing 1 April 1981, with one 10-year right of renewal that reached final expiry on 31 March 2011.  Since that date the Association’s community lease has been continuing on a month by month basis.  The Association owns the Silverdale Playcentre located on Silverdale Reserve and wishes to continue leasing with Auckland Council.

3.       The land is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve.  It is vested in Auckland Council in trust for that purpose and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated for 10 years commencing 1 April 2011 with one ten-year right of renewal.  This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve granting a new community lease to The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated for part of Silverdale Reserve, 15 Wainui Road, Silverdale being Allotment 556 Waiwera Parish (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2011 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

Comments

5.       The Association had a community lease with the legacy Rodney District Council for a term of 20 years commencing 1 April 1981, with one 10-year right of renewal that reached final expiry on 31 March 2011.  Since that date the Association’s community lease has been continuing on a month by month basis.  The Association owns the Silverdale Playcentre located on Silverdale Reserve and wishes to continue leasing with Auckland Council.

6.       The Association was registered as an Incorporated Society on 22 November 1973.  Its objectives are to:

·    Work with nga whanau/families to provide quality learning experiences for young children

·    Assist nga matua/parents to provide a playcentre, and maintain, equip and supervise it

·    Advise, assist, encourage and co-ordinate the activities of existing playcentres

·    Develop public awareness of the playcentre movement and to develop public conscience concerning the welfare of young children

·    Bring nga matua/parents the knowledge available of principles and methods of management and care of young children and foster better matua/parent/child relationships.

7.       The Silverdale Playcentre caters for children up to six (6) years of age and has been operating for more than 45 years.  The playcentre’s outdoor play area has a shade covered sand pit, a playhouse, large swing area and a large play structure. The playcentre building is also used for playcentre parent meetings and training courses. The Silverdale Playcentre is expecting its membership to grow with the development of Millwater.

8.       The land is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for that purpose and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

9.       Council staff have sought input from relevant council departments.

 

Consideration

 

Local board views and implications

10.     Council staff sought input from the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee on 20 March 2014.  No objections were raised.

11.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

 

Maori impact statement

12.     Ensuring community facilities are well maintained and accessible for all members of the community, will be of benefit to all, including Maori.

 

Implementation

13.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

14.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Site Plan for the North Shore Play Centre Association Incorporated Silverdale Reserve, 15 Wainui Road, Silverdale

15

bView

North Shore Playcentre Association Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

17

 

 

Signatories

Author

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Local Alcohol Policy Project - Draft Policy for Local Board Feedback

 

File No.: CP2014/13495

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To request formal feedback from local boards on the draft Auckland Council Local Alcohol Policy.

Executive summary

2.       This report is to provide local boards with a copy of the draft Auckland Council Local Alcohol Policy (LAP) and to request formal feedback by resolution. 

3.       On 13 May 2014, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee adopted the LAP Project: Statement of Proposal, which includes the draft Auckland Council LAP, for public consultation (resolution number REG/2014/60(a).  Following this decision, the council commenced public consultation (using the special consultative procedure), on 16 June 2014. 

4.       In addition to the public consultation process, council staff are seeking feedback from local boards on the draft LAP.  Throughout June 2014, staff have facilitated workshops with local boards to discuss the content of the draft LAP.  This report is a follow up to those workshops and provides local boards with an opportunity to pass formal feedback on the proposals.  A list of key topics for local boards to consider passing resolutions on is included as Attachment C.

5.       The draft LAP includes proposals relating to the following:

·    location of licensed premises by reference to broad areas

·    location of licensed premises by reference to proximity to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds

·    whether further licences (or licences of a particular kind or kinds) should be issued for premises in the district concerned or any stated part of the district

·    maximum trading hours

·    the issue of licences, subject to discretionary conditions.

6.       The details of these proposals are outlined in the body of this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback (by passing resolutions) on the draft Auckland Council Local Alcohol Policy, noting that the resolutions will be included in the officers’ report to the Local Alcohol Policy Project Hearings Panel.

 

 

Comments

Legislative framework

Background: law reform

7.       In December 2012, Parliament enacted the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (the Act).  The Act introduced a new national framework for regulating the sale and supply of alcohol.

8.       One of the key policy drivers behind the new legislation was an increased focus on local decision-making.  In line with this, the Act removed the ability for council staff to consider alcohol licence applications under delegation and instead established new, strengthened local decision-making bodies (district licensing committees; “DLCs”).  The Act also introduced the ability for local authorities to tailor some of the new national provisions (such as maximum trading hours) to their own local circumstances and to create additional regulations (such as the regulation of licence density) through the development of local alcohol policies (“LAPs”).

9.       Whilst LAPs are not mandatory, the Act specifically empowers local authorities to develop them.  The Act also explicitly requires licensing decision-makers, including DLCs and the new appellate body, the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority (“ARLA”), to have regard to the content of LAPs when making decisions under the Act.  This statutory recognition represents a significant change from the previous system and allows local authorities, in consultation with their communities and stakeholders, to have greater influence over their local licensing environments.

 

Scope of LAPs

10.     The Act restricts the scope of LAPs to the following licensing matters (section 77 of the Act):

·    location of licensed premises by reference to broad areas

·    location of licensed premises by reference to proximity to premises or facilities of a particular kind or kinds

·    whether further licences (or licences of a particular kind or kinds) should be issued for premises in the district concerned or any stated part of the district

·    maximum trading hours

·    the issue of licences, subject to discretionary conditions

·    one-way door restrictions.

11.     Rules relating to each of these matters can be applied to: on-licences (e.g. bars, restaurants, taverns); off-licences (e.g. bottle stores or supermarkets) and club licences (e.g. sports clubs, RSAs) through the LAP.  For special licences, a LAP can only include rules on hours, discretionary conditions and one-way door restrictions. 

 

Effect of LAPs

12.     The Act specifies when a LAP must be considered by licensing decision-makers (i.e. the DLC and ARLA).  It also stipulates the effect that LAPs can have on the outcomes of different types of applications.  The provisions of the Act relevant to these matters are summarised in the table below.

Table 1. Application of a LAP in licensing decisions

 

Summary

When LAP to be considered

·      The Act requires the DLC and ARLA to “have regard to” the LAP when deciding whether to issue or renew a licence. 

Effect of LAP on applications for new licences

·      The Act provides that where issuing a new licence would be inconsistent with the LAP, the DLC and ARLA may refuse to issue the licence (section 108)

·      Alternatively, the DLC or ARLA may issue the licence subject to particular conditions to address the inconsistencies with the LAP (section 109)

Effect of LAP on existing licences

·      For applications to renew a licence, the DLC and ARLA cannot refuse to issue the licence on the grounds that it is inconsistent with the LAP.  They can however, impose conditions on the licence to reduce the inconsistency (section 133).

o   The main implication of this is that location and density policies contained within a LAP will not apply to existing licences, meaning it will take time to give effect to the intention of location and density policies. 

·      Provisions of a LAP relating to maximum hours and one-way door policies will apply to all licensees at the time that those provisions come into force (section 45).

o   This cannot be less than three months after public notice of adoption of the LAP, providing all appeals have been resolved.

o   The effect of this is that licensees with longer hours will have to revert to the maximum trading hours stated in the LAP, while licensees with shorter hours will not be affected.

 

 

Statutory process for developing LAPs

13.     The Act prescribes the process for developing a LAP.  In particular, it:

·    outlines the matters that local authorities must have regard to when developing a LAP (section 78(2))

·    requires local authorities to consult with the police, inspectors and medical officers of health before producing a draft LAP (section 78(4))

·    requires local authorities to develop a draft LAP (section 78(1)), to give public notice of the draft LAP and to use the special consultative procedure to consult with the public (section 79(1)).  (The draft policy then becomes the provisional policy.)

·    requires local authorities to publicly notify the provisional policy and to allow submitters to appeal against the provisional policy (section 80).

14.     The Act also sets out an appeal process and states that:

·    only those who have made a submission on the draft LAP may appeal

·    the only ground on which an appeal can be lodged is that the provisional LAP (or a part thereof) is unreasonable in light of the object of the Act.

15.     The object of the Act (section 4) is that:

a)   the sale, supply, and consumption of alcohol should be undertaken safely and responsibly; and

b)   the harm caused by the excessive or inappropriate consumption of alcohol should be minimised.

16.     The Statement of Proposal, as well as the sections below, provide information on the process Auckland Council has followed in developing its draft LAP, in line with the statutory requirements.

 

Auckland Council’s Local Alcohol Policy Project

Council’s decision to develop a LAP

17.     In 2012, in anticipation of the new Act, Auckland Council completed the LAP Research Project, which focused on gathering and analysing information to support the development of a LAP. In May 2012, staff presented the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) with a copy of a research report, which was structured around the information requirements as set out in the then Alcohol Reform Bill (and that were later carried through into the final legislation). 

18.     After considering the research report, the RDOC approved the development of an Auckland Council LAP, subject to the passing of the Bill (resolution number RDO/2012/78(d)).  This decision was later confirmed by the governing body in January 2013, after the new Act received Royal assent on 18 December 2012.

 

Project plan: key steps for developing council’s LAP

19.     Auckland Council has followed an extensive process in preparing its draft LAP.  The key steps are outlined in the table below.  (Step 8 onwards will occur after the consultation process).

 

Table 2. Project plan overview

Step

Description

Timeframe

1.   Project organisation / governance

·      Established stakeholder reference groups and Joint Political Working Party

Complete

2.   Issues analysis

·      Reviewed, updated and analysed information gathered as part of Local Alcohol Policy Research Project in accordance with statutory requirements

Complete

3.   Options analysis

 

·      Identified assessed options available, within the parameters of the Act, to the council for addressing the issues identified at step 2.

·      Develop an issues and options paper with input from political working party and stakeholder reference group

Complete

4.   Initial engagement period

·      Initial engagement with internal, external and political stakeholders on issues and options paper

Complete

5.   Engagement on staff position

·      Developed a position paper with staff recommendations based on issues and options analysis, and feedback received through initial engagement period

·      Reported position back to internal, external and political stakeholders involved in the initial engagement period for further feedback

Complete

6.   Develop and gain approval of draft policy

·      Analysed outcomes of steps 2 to 5, completed detailed impact assessment, completed final engagement with elected members and developed draft policy

·      Present draft policy to the Committee for approval

·      Publicly notify draft policy

Complete

7.   Special consultative procedure

·      Follow special consultative procedure as set out in the Local Government Act 2002, which includes receiving written submissions, holding hearings and deliberating in public (i.e. full public consultation)

·      Parallel process for local boards and council advisory panels to provide feedback on the draft LAP

Current – September 2014

8.   Provisional policy

·      Work with Hearings Panel to report back to Governing Body with Provisional LAP

·      If the Governing Body endorses the provisional policy, give public notice of:

the provisional policy

rights of appeal against it

the ground on which an appeal may be made.

October / November 2014

9.   Appeals

·      Appeals will be dealt with in accordance with the Act

TBC

10.  Adopt final policy

·      Adopt final policy in accordance with the Act

·      Timing will depend on whether appeals have been lodged and if so, when they are resolved.  

TBC

11.  Implementation

·      Work with officers from Licensing and Compliance and other relevant areas of council on the implementation of the policy.  Officers will also develop a monitoring and evaluation framework. 

TBC

Auckland Council’s draft Local Alcohol Policy

Council’s decision to adopt the draft Auckland Council LAP for public consultation

20.     On 13 May 2014, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee adopted the Local Alcohol Policy Project: Statement of Proposal, which includes the draft Auckland Council LAP, for public consultation (resolution number REG/2014/60(a); a full copy of the resolutions is provided in Attachment A of this report).

21.     Following this decision, the council commenced the public consultation process (using the special consultative procedure), on 16 June 2014.  The key consultation dates are summarised in the table below:

 

 

Table 3. Key consultation dates

Date

Milestone

16 June 2014

Written submission period opened

16 July 2014

Written submission period closes

July/August 2014

·      Officers will review and analyse all submissions and report to Hearings Panel.

·      This report will include all resolutions passed by the local boards and council advisory panels with feedback on the draft policy.

Late August/ September 2014

·      Public hearings will be held

·      Local Boards will be invited to attend a meeting with the Hearings Panel.

October 2014

Hearings Panel will report back to Governing Body with a provisional LAP

 

 

Background to draft LAP: stakeholder feedback

22.    The following paragraphs provide an overview of the feedback received on the key issues associated with the project.  A detailed summary of the feedback received from different feedback groups on the specific policy levers and proposals outlined in the staff position paper is provided in Attachment B. 

23.    There was a reasonable level of agreement across the different feedback groups on the following matters:

·       Variation by licence – That the draft LAP needs to set different rules for different kinds of licences (i.e. on-licences, off-licences, club licences and special licences).

·       Local variationThat given the size and diversity of the Auckland region, the draft LAP should provide a degree of local variation.  Most agreed that at least the Central City should be treated differently, particularly in relation to on-licence hours.

·       Club licences Staff received very little feedback on how the LAP should regulate club licences, at both the issues and options stage and in response to the position paper.  Of those that did comment, most agreed that issues with club licences are typically related to the operation and management of the premises, rather than location or density.  Feedback also focused on wider issues beyond the scope of the LAP, such as the interrelationship between alcohol and sport. 

·       Discretionary conditions There was strong support for the LAP to specify a range of discretionary conditions, even from industry groups, provided the conditions are clear (both in terms of compliance and the rationale), practical and reasonable.

24.    Feedback varied across the different groups on most other matters, particularly the following: 

Off-licence density

·       Most agreed that the proliferation of off-licence premises across Auckland is one of the most pressing issues to be addressed through the LAP.  Statutory stakeholders, public health sector stakeholders, community groups, residents and local boards (especially the southern boards) were all particularly concerned with this issue and wanted to see strict density controls through the LAP.  The on-licence industry also expressed concern about clusters of off-licences within close proximity to on-licences and the issues this can create with pre- and side-loading. 

·       The off-licence industry however, opposed the use of density controls.  Supermarkets in particular, argued that whilst density and clustering of premises may be an issue for other types of off-licences, it is not a concern for supermarkets. 

·       Other off-licensees (such as bottle stores), as well as umbrella organisations representing different retailers (e.g. business associations) acknowledged that there are issues with off-licence density in some parts of Auckland, but suggested that blanket rules would not be appropriate.  These groups argued that the issues associated with off-licence clusters would be better managed through policy approaches designed to improve compliance combined with greater monitoring and enforcement of the Act.  The main concern here was that blanket (‘umbrella’) rules penalise ‘good’ operators rather than targeting those with poor compliance.

 

On-licence density

·       By contrast, most feedback groups seemed supportive of on-licence clustering, although comments tended to focus on positive notions of vibrancy and economic development associated with clusters of restaurants and cafes.

·       Statutory stakeholders expressed concerns that the clustering of other types of on-licences (particularly late night bars) can have negative amenity effects and cumulative impacts on an area, ultimately leading to increased alcohol-related harm.  The police and medical officer of health advocated for strong regulation of on-licence density.

·       Licence inspectors acknowledged there can be issues with on-licence clusters but also suggested concentrating on-licences in certain areas can allow for easier enforcement. 

 

Off-licence opening times

·       Most stakeholders, community groups and residents were supportive of the LAP reducing off-licences hours across the region.  Statutory stakeholders and public health sector stakeholders were particularly supportive, and some wanted to see trading hours even further restricted than those recommended by staff.

·       The off-licence industry (with the exception of supermarkets) were also generally supportive of reduced trading hours for off-licences, provided that all types of premises were treated the same (i.e. that restrictions should be applied to bottle stores and supermarkets).

·       Representatives for the supermarkets were strongly opposed to any restrictions on off-licence hours provided under the Act.  They were especially opposed to the proposed opening time of 9am.  The supermarkets argued that alcohol sales between 7am and 9am are minor and that this would inconvenience their shoppers.

·       Other stakeholders, members of the community and elected members had mixed views on whether supermarkets should be treated separately. 

 

On-licence closing times

·       The topic of on-licence closing times has been the most contentious issue throughout the policy development process.  Almost all groups (except the hospitality industry) were supportive of the shift away from 24 hour licensing that the Act has provided.  However, in terms of ‘which parts of Auckland should close when’, the feedback was very mixed.

·       The police argued strongly for 3am closing in the Central City with 1am closing everywhere else.  The medical officer of health also shared these views, although on occasion suggested even more restrictive hours. 

·       Public health sector stakeholders were mixed.  Some supported the Police recommendations, others suggested very strict closing times  and others still, supported the staff position paper recommendations.

·       The on-licence industry’s feedback was that ideally the LAP would override the 4am default position set in the Act, but if not, then no further restrictions to the default hours are required.  The on-licence industry was also opposed to the idea of restrictions based solely on location as this fails to take account for the quality of individual operators (in terms of host responsibility etc).

·       Community views were very mixed.  Staff met with some community groups that wanted to see certain types of premises open late, whereas other groups were comfortable with 3am or 4am closing. 

 

 

One-way door policy

·       Throughout the initial engagement period, there was some support for the use of the one-way door policy.  However, other stakeholders raised concerns about the practicality of this tool and the potential for other unintended consequences such as:

Risks to individual safety (e.g. if an individual is separated from their group of friends)

Increased drinking in public places

Higher risk of conflicts for security staff (e.g. large queues just before one-way door commences, issues with outside smoking etc.)

 

 

Background to draft LAP: local board feedback

25.     Throughout the development of the draft LAP, staff regularly engaged with, and considered the views and preferences of local boards.  In particular, staff:

·    reported to the Alcohol Programme Political Working Party, which included local board membership

·    provided local boards with individualised research summaries on alcohol-related issues within their local board areas

·    held workshops with local boards on the issues and options paper

·    reported to local boards to gather feedback on the position paper.

26.     Table 4 below summarises the feedback received from local boards on the position paper, which was released prior to the development of the draft LAP.  (Note: This summary represents an overview of the feedback received.  Some individual boards may not have agreed with the majority views). 

27.     Feedback received specifically from this local board is included, along with a response from officers, in the “Local board views and implications” section of this report (below). 

 

Table 4. Summary of local board feedback

Position paper proposal

Summary of Feedback

Policy lever 1 – Location: Broad Areas

Establish six broad policy areas; five based on zoning in the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and a sixth “high stress/high risk” overlay.

Mixed views.

·      Some supported in principle

·      Others preferred a regional approach

·      Some suggested that some areas needed to be shifted between areas 2 and 3 (e.g. Devonport/Takapuna re-categorised as Area 3)

·      Some wanted local boards to be able to make rules in their area.

Use of a high stress overlay to identify problem areas or vulnerable communities

Mostly very supportive.

Policy lever 2 – Location: Proximity

Indirectly regulate the location of off-licences in relation to schools:

·      through the cumulative impact process

·      by delaying off-licence opening times until 9am

·      by regulating advertising through the signage bylaw

Mixed views.

·      Most supported the cumulative impact assessment including this as a consideration.

·      Southern boards supportive of buffer zone, others happy to rely on discretionary conditions

·      Concern around advertising

 

 

Policy lever 3 – Density

Allow clustering of on-licences in urbanised/ business focused areas (Broad Areas A and B)

Unclear.

·      General agreement that there is a case to treat the CBD differently, less certain on metropolitan centres

·      Some local boards considered that clusters of on-licences (e.g. restaurants) could be beneficial from an economic perspective and in terms of creating vibrancy etc.

 

Temporary freeze on off-licences in the CBD and high stress areas

 

Mostly supportive.

·      Mostly concerned with density of off-licences

·      Support for combination of cumulative impact approach and area based temporary freezes

·      A minority did not like this approach

The use of cumulative impact assessments to limit the establishment of new licences in other areas

Mostly supportive.

·      Many supported in principle but requested more information

·      Some suggested this should be required across the whole region.

·      Others wanted stronger density controls such as a sinking lid or cap

Policy lever 4 – Maximum trading hours

Maximum hours of 9am to 10pm for off-licences across the region

 

Supportive

·      Some boards, especially Southern boards, would prefer even greater restrictions

·      The rest were generally supportive of the proposed regional approach

Maximum hours of 8am to 1am for club licences across the region

Negligible feedback on club hours.

Maximum on-licence hours varied across the region:

·      CBD: 8am to4am

·      Metro centres:8am to 3am

·      Rest of Auckland (including high-stress areas):8am to 1am

Mixed views.

·      Some were happy with the hours proposed

·      Some Southern boards wanted earlier closing but would be happy if this was picked up through the high stress overlay

·      There was reasonable support for having localised entertainment hubs (i.e. metropolitan centres) to reduce migration to CBD

Trial extensions for operators in Broad Area A and Broad Area B

Mixed.

·      Some supported extended hours based on good behaviour.

Policy lever 5 – One-way door

No one-way door

Very mixed.

Policy lever 6 – Discretionary conditions

A range of discretionary conditions based on licence type

 

Supportive.

·      General support for a range of conditions, especially those that support good host responsibility

 

Summary of draft LAP content

28.     This section of the report summarises the proposals contained within the draft LAP.  The proposals:

·        are evidence-based

·        align with the object of the Act

·        as far as possible, respond to feedback and concerns from elected members and stakeholders.

Purpose (section 1 of draft LAP)

29.     The purpose of the draft LAP is to provide guidance to the DLC and ARLA on alcohol licensing matters in a manner that:

·    is appropriate to the Auckland Council region

·    reflects the views and preferences of Auckland’s communities and stakeholders

·    is consistent with the object of the Act.

30.     Overall, the draft LAP aims to reduce Auckland’s issues with alcohol-related harm by:

·    prioritising areas where the LAP can have the greatest impact on harm reduction

·    controlling where new licences are allowed

·    controlling how many new licences are allowed

·    reducing the hours that licensed premises can sell alcohol

·    identifying additional conditions that the DLC can apply to licences to help improve the consistency of standards across Auckland’s premises.

31.     This purpose aligns with the object of the Act, the requirement for the LAP to be reasonable in light of this object and the policy intent of the Act to provide greater local input into licensing decisions.

Location and density of licences

32.     Auckland’s differing communities and areas means a blanket approach to policy provisions is not suitable. The draft LAP categorises the Auckland region into three broad areas each of which has different rules (reference to draft policy: Part B: Section 2 and appendices).

 

Table 5a. Policy areas

Area

Overview

Broad Area A (City Centre, Ponsonby, Newton)

The three centres included in this broad area function as the region’s main entertainment hub.  However, these areas also experience high levels of alcohol-related harm, including crime and anti-social behaviour. 

Broad Area B (rest of the region)

The intended outcomes across the region are relatively consistent and therefore can be achieved through consistent policy tools.

A priority overlay which provides additional rules.

The priority overlay identifies areas that have high numbers of existing licences and communities that experience higher levels of alcohol-related harm. These are termed priority areas. The overlay will help protect these areas from further harm by imposing specific policies and rules.

 

33.    The draft LAP also proposes the following policy tools to manage location and density issues.

34.     Temporary freeze: The distribution of off-licences across Auckland is uneven and some areas have much higher licence density than others (e.g. the City Centre and many centres captured by the Priority Areas Overlay).  Evidence shows that these areas also tend to experience disproportionate levels of alcohol-related harm.  The draft LAP therefore, proposes that the DLC and ARLA should refuse to issue new off-licences in these specific areas for a period of 24 months from when the policy is adopted. 

35.     International case studies show that the temporary freeze is a useful policy tool, not only to allow time for saturated areas to recover but it can also lead to improved compliance.  These are both important in achieving the object of the Act. 

36.     Environmental and Cumulative Impacts Assessment Process: Staff are proposing that certain applications for new licences would need to undergo an Environmental and Cumulative Impacts Assessment (ECIA) to help the DLC or ARLA in determining a licence application.  Whether an ECIA is required would depend on the location of the proposed site and the risk profile of the premises under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fees) Regulations 2013. 

37.     The process would build on the decision-making criteria under the Act to provide a more comprehensive framework for the assessment of new licence applications.  In particular, it would ensure that following matters were fully considered, in order to better manage location (including proximity to sensitive sites) and density issues arising from applications for new licences:

·        The risks associated with the location (including external and environmental risks such as the existing licence environment and the current levels of alcohol-related crime); and

·        The individual risks associated with the proposed licence (such as the type of premises, the risk profile etc).

38.     A key advantage with this approach is that rather than requiring absolute policy provisions (which would be very difficult to apply in an area as vast as Auckland), it allows the DLC and ARLA to exercise discretion and consider applications in the Auckland context, yet in a consistent and transparent manner. 

39.     The ECIA process is applied in the draft LAP in different ways, depending on the kind of licence and the location, but ultimately the process would assist the DLC and ARLA to determine which of the following outcomes is most appropriate:

·        That the licence should be issued

·        That the licences should be issued subject to certain discretionary conditions

·        That the licence should not be issued. 

40.     Rebuttable presumption: The rebuttable presumption is the most restrictive way that the ECIA process is applied through the draft LAP.  Staff have recommended that it be used in specific parts of the region where there is evidence that the alcohol licensing environment has a negative cumulative impact on the area (e.g. to restrict the establishment of new off-licences in neighbourhood centres).  The effect of the rebuttable presumption would be that applications for new off-licences would generally be refused, unless the DLC or ARLA was satisfied that the operation of the premises would not unreasonably add to the environmental and cumulative impacts of alcohol on the area. 

Maximum trading hours 

41.     The draft LAP proposes regional hours for club and off-licences, and hours based on location for on-licences.  The hours proposed are as follows (reference to draft policy: Part B: Section 3.4; and sections 4 to 7):

Table 5b. Proposed maximum trading hours

Licence

Proposed hours

Off-licences

9am to 10pm

On-licences

·        Broad Area A: 9am to 3am

·        Broad Area B: 9am to 1am

·        Priority Overlay: Same as underlying broad area.

Club licences

9am to 1am

Special licences

Case by case, with consideration for location and nature of event/risks associated with event

 

42.     Restricting the hours that alcohol is available can help to decrease alcohol-related harm. The licensed hours proposed in the draft LAP:

·    represent a reduction from the national default hours (implemented in December 2013)

·    reflect the views of the statutory stakeholders (Police, medical officers of health and licence inspectors)

·    accommodate a majority of club and on-licence premises’ existing licensed hours

·    will help to decrease inappropriate consumption (e.g. “side-loading” – leaving a bar to purchase cheaper alcohol from an off-licence before returning to the bar).

Trial extensions of hours for on-licences

43.     The draft policy allows for on-licences (except those in the priority overlay) to apply for a two-hour maximum trial extension of hours.

·    These will be granted on a trial basis, at the DLC’s discretion and following the completion of an environmental and cumulative impact assessment.

·    Applicants will have a history of best-practice operation, and will need to continue to demonstrate high levels of compliance to keep the extension.

·    Trial extensions will be preferred in the city centre for Broad Area A and in the metropolitan centres for Broad Area B.

·    No extensions will be allowed in the priority areas.

 

Additional discretionary conditions

44.     The draft LAP recommends a range of discretionary conditions for the DLC to apply. These conditions strengthen provisions already in the Act, and will help minimise harm to individuals and the community from inappropriate and excessive drinking.

 

Table 6. Discretionary conditions

Conditions recommended for all licences

Conditions which can be applied on a case-by-case basis

Where in draft LAP

Includes:

·       an onsite incident register

·       host responsibility policies  for club and on-licences

·       prohibition on single unit sales for off-licences

 

Includes:

·       Restrictions on drinks prior to closing

·       Clean public areas outside

·       Certified manager to be onsite at BYO and club licences (already required for on- and off-licences)

·       CCTV

·       Monitoring of outdoor areas for late-trading premises (on-licences).

Part B: Sections 4 to 7

 

Summary of on-licence provisions

45.    The table below demonstrates how the policy tools described above are applied to on-licences within the draft LAP.  This on-licence policy package is designed to:

·    reduce alcohol-related harm by:

requiring greater scrutiny of new on-licence applications, taking into account not only the applicant’s proposals but also the surrounding environment and existing licences.

significantly reducing licence hours from the previous 24-hour licensing regime, and only allowing best practice on-licence operators to trade later.  These operators will also be subject to higher standards.

·        provide targeted policy interventions and additional protection for vulnerable communities from alcohol-related harm in Priority Areas

·        improved practices amongst the off-licence industry through a range of discretionary conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7. Summary of draft LAP provisions for on-licences

Policy lever

Policy tool

Risk profile

Broad Area A

Broad Area B

Priority Areas

Metro Centres

Neigh-

bourhood centres

Rest of Broad Area B

Location / density

ECIA

Very High

Required

Required

Required

Required

Required

High

Required

Required

Required

Required

Required

Medium

NA

NA

Required

Required

Required

Low

NA

NA

Required

NA

Required

Very Low

NA

NA

NA

NA

Required

Proximity to sensitive sites

ECIA

Risk profile is one of the triggers

DLC & ARLA directed to consider proximity to sensitive sites as part of ECIA

Hours

Standard maximum hours

-

9am- 3am

9am - 1am

·      Hours to align with underlying area

·      LAP encourages even more restrictive hours

Trial extension for best practice operators

Risk is a factor in considering applications for extensions

Up to 2 hours

Morning or evening (not both)

 

Preferred over other parts of Broad Area B

Directs DLC not to grant extensions in these areas

Up to 2 hours

Morning or evening (not both)

Centres preferred

Directs DLC not to grant extensions in these areas

Conditions

-

-

 

Range of conditions

 

Note: An A4 version of this table is provided in Attachment B.

Summary of off-licence provisions

46.    The table below demonstrates how the policy tools are applied to off-licences within the draft LAP.  This off-licence policy package recommended is designed to achieve the following:

·    Enable the direct consideration of proximity issues by ensuring that the DLC and ARLA are made aware of any sensitive sites and existing premises relevant to an application, allowing them to make an informed decision as to what is appropriate

·    Reduced access to alcohol from off-licences and reduced issues with pre and side-loading, especially in the Central City

·    Strong regulation of off-licence density in areas with the greatest density and greatest levels of alcohol-related harm (e.g. the Central City and Priority Areas) and in neighbourhood centres, to align with feedback that ‘bottle stores on every corner’ are not appropriate or desirable

·    Improved practices amongst the off-licence industry through a range of discretionary conditions.


 

Table 8. Summary of draft LAP provisions for off-licences

Policy lever

Policy tool

Risk profile

Broad Area A

Broad Area B

Priority Areas

First 24 months

After 24 months

At all times policy in force

First 24 months

After 24 months

Neigh-

bourhood centres

Rest of Broad Area B

Location / density

ECIA

Very High

 

 

Temporary freeze

 

ECIA required

 

Presumption against approval

 

ECIA required

 

Presumption against approval

 

 

 

 

 

ECIA required

 

DLC to “take into account

 

Temporary freeze

 

ECIA required

 

Presumption against approval

High

 

 

Medium

 

 

Low

 

 

Very Low

 

 

NA

Proximity to sensitive sites

ECIA

Risk profile is one of the triggers

DLC & ARLA directed to consider proximity to sensitive sites as part of ECIA

Hours

Reduced hours

-

 

9am to 10pm regional maximum

6am to 10pm remote sales by off-licence (e.g. online sales)

(Note: transaction can occur at any time but delivery times restricted)

Condition

-

-

Range of conditions

 

Note: An A4 version of this table is provided in Attachment B.

Special licences

47.    The draft LAP proposes the following for special licences:

·    Maximum hours should be determined on a case-by-case basis but should generally be in accordance with the policies that would apply to the Broad Area within which the event will be held

·    A range of discretionary conditions designed to improve host responsibility and to reduce the overall alcohol-related harm associated with events.

Other options considered

48.     Staff have not recommended the use of the one-way door policy, as overall, there is insufficient evidence to show its effectiveness in reducing alcohol-related harm.  Key points from the research are summarised as follows:

·    Some studies report displacement of patrons from area to area as an unintended consequence of the one-way door policy.  This could result in increased drink driving if patrons then travelled across the city. 

·    When looking at case study examples, staff found that Melbourne has experienced issues with two ‘swills’ due to the one-way door approach: one as people leave one area to get to another area with longer hours before the one-way door commences; and then a second at closing time. Other research has even shown that the one-way door approach may increase some types of alcohol related harm such as damage to licensed premises, and vehicle-related offences.

·    In areas where there was a decline in harm following the implementation of a one-way door, this tended to be for a short period before behaviours adjusted and incidence of harm returned to previous levels or increased.

49.     Staff considered a range of other options throughout the development of the draft LAP.  These are detailed in the attached Statement of Proposal. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

50.     The table below outlines the feedback received from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in 2013 on the Issues and Options paper and/or the Staff Position Paper and provides a response from officers to show how the feedback has informed the draft LAP, or if not, why this is the case.

Table 9. Hibiscus and Bays Local Board feedback

Topic

Local Board feedback

Officer response

Density

·      Supported the use of a cumulative impact assessment tool

·      Agreed with using this approach to determine the outcome of application but also to determine conditions and hours.

·      The draft LAP directly addresses this feedback. It proposes an “Environmental and Cumulative Impact Assessment” (ECIA) process to assess certain licence applications, depending on the location and risk of the proposed premises.

·      The draft LAP directs the DLC to use the ECIA process to:

Determine the outcome of an application

Determine the appropriate conditions and hours of an application.

Density

·      Supported use of temporary freeze on an area by area basis.

·      The draft LAP directly addresses this feedback.  It includes a temporary freeze on the issuing of new off-licences in Broad Area A and the Priority Overlay for two years from the date that the policy comes into force.

·      These areas have been targeted as Police data shows they experience disproportionate levels of alcohol-related crime and most also have greater licence density than other parts of the region.

Hours

·      Suggested maximum hours for Local Board area should be 3am and supports trial extensions for new operators.

·      The draft LAP directly addresses this feedback. The draft LAP proposes that the standard maximum hours for on-licences in Broad Area B (which encompasses this local board area) should be 9am – 1am, and it provides for best practice on-licensees to be able to apply for an extension of up to two hours (i.e. up to 3am). 

 

Maori impact statement

Research and data on Maori and alcohol

51.     Where possible, staff have gathered data on alcohol-related issues by ethnicity.  For example, data collected from the three Auckland-based district health boards (2012) showed that for the 2010/11 fiscal year, Maori had proportionately higher rates of alcohol-related emergency department presentations.

52.     Throughout the initial engagement phases of the project, staff worked with the Policies and Bylaws team, Te Waka Angamua (Maori Strategy and Relations Department), policy advisors at the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) and Hapai Te Hauora to deliver a program for engaging with Maori on alcohol issues. 

53.     As part of this, staff ran a workshop with rangatahi (youth), organised a rangatahi engagement session as part of the Atamira event and held a hui with mana whenua and mataa waka to discuss both the LAP Project and the Alcohol Control (Liquor Ban) Bylaw Project. 

54.     The IMSB was represented on the Political Working Party.  Hapai Te Hauora Tapui was represented on the Public Health Sector Reference Group.

55.     There are no specific references in Iwi Management Plans to alcohol or alcohol policy, other than a statement about general health and well-being.

Implementation

56.     Community Policy and Planning staff have worked closely with Licensing and Compliance Services throughout the development of this draft LAP. 

57.     As part of the options analysis, staff carefully considered practicality and ease of implementation.  The proposals included in the draft LAP meet these criteria. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee meeting May 2014 - Resolutions on draft Local Alcohol Policy

35

bView

A4 Copies of Tables 7 and 8 from report

37

cView

Key Topics for Feedback from Local Boards

39

     

Signatories

Author

Belinda Hansen - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Local board role in alcohol licence applications

 

File No.: CP2014/15043

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek local board feedback on the role local boards could play in alcohol licence applications, a process that was established by the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

Executive summary

2.       The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (the Act) establishes processes for alcohol licence applications.  Some local boards wish to have input into the application process, due to concerns about alcohol-related harm within some Auckland communities. 

3.       To inform the discussion about the role of local boards in alcohol licence applications, Local Board Services has drafted an issues paper for consideration by local boards.  Local boards’ formal feedback is being sought on this issue.  This formal feedback will inform a report to the governing body on this issue.  The report will seek the governing body’s decision on the preferred option for local boards to provide input into alcohol licence applications.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the preferred option for local boards to provide input into alcohol licence applications.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       The Act establishes processes for alcohol licence applications.

5.       The governing body has a number of roles under the Act. 

·     It sets a local alcohol policy for the region, with input from local boards.  This establishes the overall policy framework, covering matters such as location of licenced premises and maximum trading hours.  The governing body has developed a draft local alcohol policy for public consultation.

·     It establishes District Licensing Committees (DLCs), which have responsibility for all uncontested and contested licensing applications.

·     It has the statutory power to object to licence applications (although it is unlikely that the governing body would exercise this power).

6.       Local boards provide input into the development by the governing body of the local alcohol policy.  Local board members can also be appointed to sit on DLCs.  Under current Auckland Council policy, DLC members cannot hear applications relating to their local board area.  Local boards do not currently have the power to object to licence applications

7.       Local boards have standing under the Act to object to licence applications, as a local board can be expected to have a greater interest in the issue than the public generally.  However, in order to exercise this, the governing body must first allocate or delegate the power to object to local boards.

8.       Given the role of local boards as advocates for their communities and the strategic importance placed on managing alcohol related harm by a number of them, it is reasonable to expect that at least some local boards will wish to express a view on alcohol licence applications.

9.       To inform the discussion about the role of local boards in alcohol licence applications, Local Board Services has drafted an issues paper which is attached as Attachment A.  The issues paper sets out the role the governing body and local boards currently have under the Act, the process for licence applications under the Act and options for local board involvement.

10.     Feedback from local boards is being sought on the preferred option for local boards to provide input into alcohol licence applications.  This formal feedback will inform a report to the governing body on this issue.  The report will seek the governing body’s decision on the preferred option for local boards to provide input into alcohol licence applications.  All formal local board feedback will be compiled into a report and included as an appendix to the governing body report.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     Local board views are being sought via this report.  An outcome of this process could see local boards playing a different role in alcohol licence applications to what they presently do.

Maori impact statement

12.     Māori are likely to be interested in and impacted by DLC decisions on alcohol licence applications.  This is an issue for the DLCs when considering alcohol licence applications.

 

Implementation

13.     Local board feedback will be analysed and will inform a report to the governing body.  This report will seek a decision from the governing body on their preferred role of local boards in alcohol licence applications.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local board role in alxohol liclence applications - issues and options

43

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Gulik – Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 







 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Parks Capital Works Programme 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/14613

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To present the final 2014/2015 Parks Capital Works Programme for endorsement and approval by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

Executive summary

2.       Key staff involved in preparation of the proposed 2014/2015 Parks Capital Works Programme (see attachment A) have attended a number of workshops with parks portfolio holders since March 2014.  The most recent workshop occurred on 25 June 2014 with the full Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.  These meetings, as referencing the Auckland Council annual plan, have enabled discussion, confirmation and development of the proposed 2014/2015 capital works programme.

3.       The proposed work programme presented is based on known annual plan budget information and includes deferrals from the financial year 2013/2014.  The work programme, information is strategic to enable council officers to further scope projects in detail and set priorities, which will be reported back to the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee prior to works commencing.

4.       This report also seeks flexibility in project scoping, by acknowledging that asset conditions are dynamic and subject to change.  Officers require the ability to amend the priorities for asset renewal to accommodate unforeseen circumstances, effectively deliver the renewals work programme and militate against unforeseen health and safety issues.  Should priorities change from those identified and approved, updates will be brought back to, and approval sought from Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee throughout the year.       

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2014/2015 Parks Capital Work Programme, as detailed in Attachment A, dated 30 June 2014, to this report.

b)      delegate authority to the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee to reprioritise existing Parks asset renewals detailed in the approved work programme as informed by current condition assessments for the 2014/2015 financial year.

c)      delegate authority to the Hibiscus and Bays Parks Facilities and Reserves Committee to approve design drawings for new capital works projects from the approved work programme in 2014/2015 financial year.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       The Parks Works Programme for 2014/2015 has a strategic focus to embed the flexibility needed to adapt to changing environments within parks.  For renewal of existing assets the information provided is the best information available to date while recognising that as time progresses updated information will be verified as part of asset management best practice. The condition of parks assets is dynamic and subject to factors beyond control (weather events, vandalism, theft etc.).  Flexibility is therefore recommended to address unforeseen urgent renewals that at best are an inconvenience, but at worst present significant health and safety risks to council.

6.       While a number of parks and assets have been highlighted within the work programme, it may be necessary to adjust those priorities throughout the year as information comes to light of urgent renewals required.  Should renewal priorities change from those identified and approved, updates will be brought to the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee throughout the year.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have provided feedback on the proposed work programme at a workshop meeting on 25 June 2014.

Maori impact statement

8.       The impacts on Māori from each project will be assessed during consultation phases and reported back to the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee in the first instance.

Implementation

9.       There are no implementation issues identified with these recommendations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Hibiscus and Bays Work Programme 2014/2015

53

     

Signatories

Author

Tony  Strange - Parks Advisor Hibiscus and Bays

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Allocation of Decision Making Review

 

File No.: CP2014/14185

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek local board input to a review of the non-regulatory allocation of decision making as part of the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan (LTP).

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (Act) sets out the functions and powers of the governing body and local boards.

3.       The governing body is reviewing the non-regulatory decision-making allocation as part of the development of the 2015-2025 LTP.  The review is based on the current allocation, with amendments proposed “by exception” where governance experience has demonstrated a need to amend the allocation.

4.       To inform the review, Local Board Services has drafted an issues paper for consideration by local boards.  The issues paper will be updated to include formal feedback from local boards and reported to the Budget Committee in August 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to members Cooper and Parfitt to approve the local board feedback on the allocation of decision making review issues paper and to identify any additional issues relevant to the scope of the review.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 (Act) sets out the functions and powers of the governing body and local boards.  Local boards functions and powers come from three sources:

i.        those directly conferred by the Act;

ii.       non-regulatory activities allocated by the governing body to local boards;

iii.      regulatory or non-regulatory functions and powers delegated by the governing body or Auckland Transport to the local boards.

6.       The initial decision-making allocation to local boards was made by the Auckland Transition Agency (ATA).  The current decision-making allocation was determined as part of the 2012-2022 Long-term Plan (LTP) and was adopted by the governing body.  These were both robust and extensive processes.  A copy of the current allocation table is Appendix A of this report’s Attachment A.

7.       The governing body is reviewing the non-regulatory decision-making allocation as part of the development of the 2015-2025 LTP.  This review is based on the current allocation, with amendments proposed “by exception” where governance experience has demonstrated a need to amend the allocation.

8.       To inform the review, Local Board Services has drafted an issues paper which is attached at Attachment A.  The issues paper sets out the approach and scope of the review and includes issues identified for consideration and feedback from local boards.

9.       Local board feedback is not limited to these issues, but should focus on governance rather than operational issues as the latter are out of scope of the review.

10.     The issues paper will be updated to include formal feedback from local boards and reported to the Budget Committee in August 2014.  Changes to the allocation table will be part of the public consultation on the draft 2015-2025 LTP and any changes to the allocation will not come into effect until 1 July 2015.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     Local board views are being sought via this report. Changes to the allocation of non-regulatory decisions could have implications for local board decision-making and budgets.

12.     There are no particular impacts on Maori in relation to this report, which are different from other population groups in Auckland.

Maori impact statement

13.     Local board feedback will be analysed and reported to the Budget Committee on 13 August 2014. Changes to the allocation table will be part of public consultation on the draft 2015-2025 LTP and any changes to the allocation would come into effect on 1 July 2015.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Allocation of Non-Regulatory Decision-Making Responsibilities - Issues Paper - Local Boards

59

  

  

Signatories

Authors

Alastair Child – Principal Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 









































Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, July 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/14695

 

  

 

Purpose

 

1.      To respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities.

 

Executive summary

2.       The report provides an update on transport matters for the information of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and a register of transport issues in the local board’s area, as collated by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager North.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for July 2014.

 

 

Comments

 

Hibiscus Coast New Network Consultation Opens 14 July

 

3.       The next consultation for the New Network (bus review) will take place in the Hibiscus Coast and Warkworth region, with consultation open from Monday 14 July to Thursday 14 August 2014.

 

4.       A series of events at which residents can speak to AT representatives to find out more about the changes will be held, with a special Seniors Information Session on Wednesday 23 July 2014, at the Orewa Community Hall from 10am to 12pm. The presentation starts at 10.30am, but to book a seat for this session residents should phone (09) 366 6400 or 0800 10 30 80, or email:  busreview@aucklandtransport.govt.nz.

 

5.    Other events scheduled, for which no bookings are required, will be held:

 

·        Sunday 20 July 8.00am - 12.30pm: Orewa Farmers Market, Hibiscus Coast Highway/Florence Avenue, Orewa;

·        Wednesday 23 July - 2.00pm - 7.00pm: Orewa Public Information Afternoon, Orewa Community Centre, 368 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa;

·        Saturday 26 July - 8.00am - 1.00pm: Silverdale Public Information Day, St Johns Ambulance Hall, 36 Silverdale Street, Silverdale;

·        Saturday 26 July - 10.00am - 1.30pm: Whangaparaoa Library Drop in Day, 9 Main Street, Whangaparaoa;

·        Sunday 27 July - 10.00am - 2.00pm: Hobbs Wharf Markets, The Anchorage, off Pinecrest Drive, Gulf Harbour;

·        Wednesday 6 August - 5.00pm - 11.00pm: Whangaparaoa Night Markets, Whangaparaoa Plaza Carpark, 719 Whangaparaoa Road; and

·        Saturday 9 August - 10.00am - 2.30pm: Orewa Library Drop in Day, 12 Moana Ave, Orewa.

 

6.      Further information on the Hibiscus Coast New Network Consultation will be available on: www.at.govt.nz when consultation opens on 14 July 2014.

 

Gulf Harbour Ferry Sailings to Increase

 

7.       The number of ferry sailings between Gulf Harbour and Auckland is increasing from four to 12 each day.  During peak times sailings will increase from two to three, with another two sailings each way in the middle of the day.  The increased services will appeal to workers and students alike, and also provide shopping and visiting options for those not needing to travel at peak times.

 

8.       The draft timetable is the result of feedback AT has received about improving services to Gulf Harbour and submissions have been sought from both current and potential users about whether these sailing times are right for them.

 

9.       Consultation closed on Sunday, 29 June 2014 and the new timetable could start next month subject to the outcomes of that consultation.

 

10.     To view the e proposed timetable and give feedback go to:

www.AT.govt.nz/gulfharbourferry

 

Extension of Consultation Period for Draft Parking Discussion Document

 

11.    Due to the level of interest in Auckland’s Draft Parking Discussion Document, Auckland Transport (AT) has extended the public consultation period to 31 July 2014.

 

12.    To briefly recap, AT is looking at parking requirements and principles across the region and proposing a new set of parking principles which will bring benefits to residents and businesses and assist AT’s contribution to economic growth in the region.  Residents are being asked what they think of the proposed approach, with AT seeking high level views at this stage and signalling an opportunity for more localised, detailed and specific feedback later.

 

13.    Residents have been asked to comment on a range of suggested approaches, but specifically on those relating to the city centre, metropolitan and town centres, residential streets, off-street parking facilities (parking buildings), on-street parking restrictions, parking permits and park and rides.

 

14.    The timeline for the process is:

 

·        31 July 2014 - Submissions close on 31 July 2014.

·        August/September 2014 - Submissions are collated and grouped, then proposed responses are developed by AT’s Strategic Planning Group working with Auckland Council.

·        September/October 2014 - Recommendations are considered by the AT Board and a decision on key principles which will form the Parking Strategy for the Auckland region made.

·        November/December 2014 – The document is finalised.

·        2015 - Detailed, localised public consultations begin on each parking principle. Implementation timeframes will be dependent on the scale of each principle - some may be sooner, while others may be phased in over a period of years.

 

15.  The main issues and themes coming through the submissions received include:

 

·        Conflicts between business and residential parking requirements.

·        Competing demands between residents and commuters over limited parking spaces, particularly in the city centre and fringe.

·        Removal of on-street parking on arterial roads or use of extended clearways to enable faster public transport journeys.

·        Long stay commuter parking and short stay parking impacting on local businesses.

·        Insufficient park and ride supply to assist public transport growth.

·        A desire for improved public transport to limit the use of private vehicles to help manage congestion.

·        Effective parking management and public transport supply for industrial park areas.

 

16.    Further information, including details about possible solutions and an online feedback form, are available at: https://at.govt.nz/parkingfeedback. Alternatively, information packs are available from AT’s customer response team on 09 355 3553.

 

Public Transport Fare Changes from 6 July

 

17.    AT has completed its annual fare review in accordance with its service contract obligations with transport operatorsThe annual review takes into account operator cost increases (e.g. fuel and wages), revenue and patronage movements.  AT is also undertaking a strategic review of all public transport costs and pricing, due to be completed towards the end of the year.

 

18.    As a result of the review, ticket prices on buses, trains and ferries change from 6 July 2014. Adults who use the AT HOP card for their travel will receive a 20% discount off the single trip adult cash fare (excluding NiteRider, Airbus Express and Waiheke ferry services).  Child and tertiary AT HOP users will also continue to receive discounts on most services when compared to the equivalent cash fares.  In contrast, most cash fares for bus and train and some cash fares for ferries will increase (some AT HOP fares for ferries will also increase).

 

19.    AT believes that public transport must be seen as a viable alternative to the car if Auckland is to resolve its transport problems.  By making travel even more attractive on the AT HOP card, it is hoped that more people will switch to public transport.

 

20.    In addition to an increased discount on AT HOP, AT will remove the 25 cent top-up fee and reduce the minimum top-up amount on the card from $10 to $5, both from 6 July 2014.  The cost of the card itself will also remain at $5 until at least 31 January 2015.

 

21.    From 6 July 2014 when the new fares are implemented, cash fares will be in 50 cent multiples which will reduce cash handling on buses in particular (with the exception of the City LINK child cash fare which will remain at 30 cents).  AT is hoping to move to implementing an exact fare/no change given policy in the future and will investigate the potential of removing cash fares altogether, as has recently been introduced in Sydney.

 

Update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

 

22.    Construction of the following LBTCF projects nominated by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has now been completed:

 

·        Duck Creek Road, Stillwater – new footpath (Project 097);

·        201-246 Centreway Road, Orewa – new footpath (Project 100);

·        Titan Place to Silverdale Township, Silverdale – new footpath (Project 098);

·        East Coast Road (vicinity of Spencer Road), Pinehill – footpath upgrade (Project 094);

·        504 Beach Road, Murrays Bay – footpath upgrade (Project 099);

·        Grand Drive – Tauranga Place, Orewa – new walkway and footpath (Project 101);

·        St John’s School, Mairangi Bay – new footpath (Project 229).

 

23.    A consultant has been asked to provide a quote for the cost of a design for Project 090, Access to Matakatia Scenic Reserve, Whangaparaoa.   It is anticipated that this will be made known to the local board in July 2014.

 

24.    Auckland Council’s Principal Planner North-West, Andrew Trevelyan, has been asked to provide a concept plan for Project 091, provision of a footpath with a higher than normal amenity value on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay, and discussions with AT staff on the draft plan continue.  Further information on the estimated cost of the work will be made available to the local board when the design is complete.  An additional $70,000 has been set aside for this project from the local board’s TCF budget.

 

25.    A design for safety improvements on Awaruku Road, Torbay (Project 096) is currently underway and a firm cost estimate will be provided to the local board on its completion.  Providing the firm cost estimate meets with the local board’s approval, construction will be carried out by AT’s minor works contractor.

 

26.    The car parking adjacent to Stillwater Reserve (Project 209) will be provided on completion of a new community hall on the reserve.  The design for the hall and car parking is being managed by the community hall project manager and a firm cost estimate will be provided once the design for the car parking has been completed.

 

27.    AT staff are currently collating rough cost estimates for the following projects on behalf of the local board:

 

·        Whangaparaoa Road, Whangaparaoa – new footpath to Cedar Terrace;

·        Ferry Road, Arkles Bay – new footpath to Wade River Road;

·        Okura River Road, Okura – new footpath Vaughans Road to Okura Hall;

·        Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale – provision of additional lighting for footpath constructed by the Board in 2013 (Project 098);

·        Tavern Road, Silverdale – provision of pedestrian crossing facilities.

 

28.    Construction of a safe temporary footpath on Glenvar Road, Torbay (Project 239) has been completed.  The local board will be advised of the cost to construct the remaining sections, where retaining walls and/or boardwalks are required, when the design has been completed. The local board may then wish to give consideration to providing further funding for these works from its LBTCF.

 

Consultations

 

29.     The local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads (TPLs) have been asked to provide feedback on the following proposals over the period 26 May – 24 June 2014:

 

·        Installation of NSAAT restrictions on Deep Creek Road, Torbay, in response to concerns raised by local residents with regard to a restricted straight through movement when vehicles are parked outside No. 49 Deep Creek Road.  No comments were received from local board members.

·        A draft of AT’s 'Getting Around Stanmore Bay' map, produced by AT's Walking and Cycling Team.  Members Whyte and Sayers provided comments in support of the document.  No other comments were received.

·        Installation of a pedestrian refuge and associated pram crossings at 659 Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay, in response to requests from elderly people who cross from the Red Hibiscus Road area to shops on the opposite side of Whangaparaoa Road.  No comments were received.

·        Installation of NSAAT restrictions on Stredwick Drive, Torbay, in response to concerns raised by local residents regarding parked cars on the bend outside 15-17 Stredwick Drive.  No comments were received.

·        Installation of a bus parking area and standardisation of the existing parking controls on Longmore Lane outside Silverdale Primary School, Silverdale.  Responses were requested no later than 28 July 2014.

·        Increased ferry sailings to/from Gulf Harbour from four to 12 each day.  No comments were received.

·        Installation of a bus stop on Millwater Parkway opposite Silverdale Medical Centre, Silverdale.  Responses were requested no later than 4 July 2014;

·        Cycle lane improvements on Orewa South Bridge, Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa, to cater for both recreational and confident cyclists.  Responses were requested no later than 11 July 2014;

·        Proposed bus stop relocation and new bus shelter at No. 1897 East Coast Road, Dairy Flat.  Responses were requested no later than 25 July 2014.

 

Issues Update

 

30.  The following Issues Update comprises issues raised by Elected Members and Local Board Services staff to 30 June 2014:

 

Location

Issue

Status

1

Moana and Florence Avenues, Orewa

Request for safety improvements at the intersections of Moana and Florence Avenues / Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa.

At a meeting attended by the chairperson, Julia Parfitt, member Harding and representatives of Destination Orewa Beach and Auckland Transport, concerns were expressed about the position of the pedestrian crossing at the Florence Avenue/Hibiscus Coast Highway intersection, together with the informal crossings located at the Hibiscus Coast Highway/Moana and Tamariki/Moenui intersections. AT staff agreed to carry out pedestrian and vehicle speed counts with a view to investigating possible safety enhancements. Note: While the results of the traffic and pedestrian counts are still being analysed, the words ‘Check Before You Step’ have been stencilled on the informal crossings at Moana, Tamariki and Moenui Avenues.   Investigations into options for further improvements to pedestrian safety are continuing.

2

Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay

Request for pedestrian improvements on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay.

At a meeting on 18 March 2014 member Cooper asked that consideration be given to improving pedestrian safety on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay, with the installation of NSAAT restrictions on the southern side from 16 – 26 Hastings Road, to facilitate access to/egress from the driveway to Mairangi Bay Park, and installation of a pedestrian crossing in the vicinity of 8 – 10 Hasting Road, to improve safety for pedestrians wishing to access the park. Documentation describing a proposal to install NSAAT restrictions to address the concerns raised was forwarded to the TPLs on 2 April 2014, and on 17 June 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that the pedestrian count undertaken as part of the more detailed investigation into the request for a pedestrian crossing indicated that pedestrian numbers are insufficient to justify its installation at this stage. However, should pedestrian numbers increase as a result of the enhanced and more conspicuous entrance to the Mairangi Bay Art Centre that will result from the local board’s Mairangi Bay Art Walk project, the pedestrian counts can be repeated in future.

3

Glen Road, Browns Bay

Request for changes to parking in Glen Road, Browns Bay.

Members asked at a meeting on 19 March 2014 that parking restrictions for six spaces in the vicinity of the local board offices at 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay, where people have been parking for extended periods of time so that visitors to the offices are unable to find a car park, be reviewed and altered to reflect P180 parking restrictions. The local board was advised that Parking Design staff will undertake a review of the current unrestricted parking spaces in the immediate area, which will include consultation with affected residents and property owners, and the results will be advised on completion of the survey, expected in late June/early July 2014.

4

Beach Front Lane, Browns Bay

Request for drop-off/pick-up parking in Beach Front Lane, Browns Bay.

At the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting on Wednesday, 21 May 2014, a representative of the Browns Bay Business Association requested that provision for drop-off/pick-up parking be made in the vicinity of the skate park on Beach Front Lane, Browns Bay, where parents are forced to stop in the carriageway to drop off their children. A response from Parking Design staff is expected late June/early July 2014.

5

Palmgreen Court, Whangaparaoa

Requested improvements for Palmgreen Court traffic entering Whangaparaoa Road.

Member Fitzgerald requested improvements for drivers travelling to the west on Whangaparaoa Road and turning into Palmgreen Court who are hampered by vehicles travelling to the east and turning into Link Crescent on 26 May 2014. She advised that those drivers exiting Palmgreen Court onto Whangaparaoa Road are also held up by the traffic stopped on Whangaparaoa Road waiting to make these turns. Referred to Road Corridor Operations.

6

Totara Road, Stanmore Bay

Request for complaint regarding 

Cr Walker asked on 27 May 2014 that CAS-286252-X5R2R3 be escalated and that he be copied in on the response. The case relates to buses turning out of Totara Road onto Whangaparaoa Road where recent resurfacing has increased the height of the road to such a steep angle that the front of buses drag on the road. On 26 June 2014 Cr Walker was advised that the surfaces of both Totara and Whangaparaoa Roads at this intersection have been inspected by AT’s Road Corridor Maintenance engineers who advise that, whilst Whangaparaoa Road was resurfaced, the intersection was raised as well, so the level of both roads are now sympathetic to each other. With regard to changes to the bus routes, the Hibiscus Coast part of the New Network review will be launched on 14 July 2014 and, while changes may be implemented on the peninsula as a result of that review, no changes will be made in the interim. It was also noted that, at some time in the future, this section of Whangaparaoa Road will be widened, either in conjunction with the construction of Penlink or a continuation of the widening project initiated by Rodney District Council. At that time, improvements will be made at both the Totara and Brightside Road intersections. 

7

Ashley Avenue, Long Bay

Completion of work on Ashley Avenue, Browns Bay.

Local board chairperson, Julia Parfitt, requested an update on the work on Ashley Avenue, Long Bay, noting that the fields on Ashley Reserve had recently been astro turfed at considerable expense and that metal tracked in from the currently unsealed road may damage this surface. Members were advised at the local board's business meeting on 18 June 2014 that Ashley Avenue would be sealed during 2015 by Todd Developments, but as yet no definite timeframe had been established.

8

Albany Ward general

Information requested on weed control in the Albany ward area.

Crs John Watson and Wayne Walker asked on 6 June 2014 for information about the type of weed control that will be used on the Hibiscus Coast by AT’s contractor, Fulton Hogan, and in the balance of the north east urban contract area. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance for response.

9

Te Ara Tahuna, Orewa

Funding for lights along a section of Te Ara Tahuna, Orewa.

Local board chairperson, Julia Parfitt requested that AT pay for lights along the section of Te Ara Tahuna through Western Reserve, Orewa, where the local board has widened the footpath and laid cable for lights. Mrs Parfitt believed that funding should be available for these through the Greenways initiative or from NZTA. On 19 June 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that Greenways initiatives are funded jointly by AT/local boards, with AT funding those portions within the road reserve and the boards funding the portions through their parks and reserves. Whilst NZTA funding may have been used by Rodney District Council for the initial stages of Te Ara Tahuna, this too is only now made available to AT for walking and cycling projects on the roading network. A rough order of costs was advised so the local board could consider providing the lights through its LBTCF.

10

Hibiscus Coast Busway Station, Silverdale

Temporary bus stops at Hibiscus Coast Busway Station, Silverdale.

At the local board's TPL meeting on 11 June 2014 Member Fitzgerald asked when the temporary bus stops/transfer station, mentioned recently in Hibiscus Matters, will be constructed at the Hibiscus Coast Busway Station and whether this will mean that the interchange will be shifted to the Busway Station from Silverdale Street, Silverdale. On 17 June the TPLs were advised that the new bus services to be implemented as a result of the Hibiscus Coast phase of the New Network review are expected to begin early in 2015, though there is yet no set date for this. From that time, bus transfers will occur at the temporary stops at the Hibiscus Coast Busway Station, but until then they will continue to take place as they do now on Silverdale Street.

11

214 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa

Request for repeat investigation into access/egress issues at 214 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa.

On 18 June 2014 local board staff requested a repeat investigation into improvements to the access/egress from 214 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa, as a result of growing safety concerns. The local board’s TPLs and staff were advised on 30 June 2014 that an investigation is underway into the installation of on-road cycle lanes on both sides of the Highway and installation of a central median which will enable right turning traffic from 214 Hibiscus Coast Highway to wait in the middle of the road prior to merging. These facilities will effectively narrow the lanes at this location, slowing the traffic. It is noted that the vehicle entrance at 214 Hibiscus Coast Highway is only 8.1m wide, therefore not wide enough for two lanes of traffic to wait at the ‘Stop’ control. In addition, because of the installation of the cycle lanes, it is important to retain this ‘Stop’ control and not encourage left turning traffic to merge. There is no safety issue with cars queuing inside the car park at peak times. Feedback on the proposed improvements has been sought from the local board and Cycle Action Auckland prior to public consultation. There is a set of traffic signals at the intersection of Centreway Road/Hibiscus Coast Highway, close to the park entrance. The southbound heavy traffic on the Highway is a combination of the arriving right turning traffic from Centreway Road and the through movement on Hibiscus Coast Highway. The demand on other approaches is less, depending on beach events or weekend activities. The setting for these signals does have phases to stop the through movement on Hibiscus Coast Highway; however, these depend on demand at the intersection. Unfortunately a separate phase to stop all traffic and facilitate easier egress from 214 Hibiscus Coast Highway cannot be created because of the irregular need for this.

12

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale - complaints about construction of new footpath.

The President of the Silverdale Business Association raised concerns about construction of a footpath on  Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale, in relation to the loss of plants from a garden removed during the construction, lack of consultation with the local board and the property owner, and the replacement of a perfectly good footpath when there are others in much worse condition in Silverdale Village. On 20 May 2014 local board members were provided with documentation about the footpath proposal forwarded to them and the owner of the affected property at 2 Silverdale Street in May 2013, confirming that the local board and affected property owner had indeed been advised of the work. Members were advised that the Association's representative was provided with copies of the consultation documents on Monday, prior to her attendance at the local board meeting. Removal of the garden encroaching into the road reserve was necessary for construction of the footpath, installed in response to concerns raised by residents and businesses about the lack of facilities and pedestrian safety in the Silverdale area generally, and in this vicinity in particular. The plants which could be preserved had been left at the boundary for their owner to uplift and those that could not be saved were disposed of at the cost of ratepayers. No complaints were received about the traffic management from local business during the work, which did not affect any Silverdale businesses, with the contractor occupying only two parking spaces at any time (there are over 100 car park spaces in the area), and the entrance to Silverdale Street not being blocked off at any time. With regard to comments about footpaths in Silverdale being in disrepair, the Association's representative has been advised previously that current budget constraints faced by AC and AT preclude the possibility of complete footpath renewals unless these are absolutely necessary, but that she should advise AT’s call centre (09 355 3553) about genuine safety (trip) hazards so that these can be addressed without delay.

13

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale

Complaints about congestion on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale.

Member Harding forwarded a complaint about congestion on Hibiscus Coast Highway from an Arkles Bay resident on 17 June 2014. On 23 June 2014 the local board’s TPLs and member Harding were advised that similar complaints had been responded to previously on 25 October 2012 and 16 December 2013. The more recent concerns relate to general congestion, rather than any specific fault with the phasing of the lights and preference being given to one road over another. As noted previously, traffic signals operate according to traffic flow, with sensors built into the road so that flows can be managed to optimum benefit at all times, especially during peak periods. On Hibiscus Coast Highway in Silverdale, additional cameras and detectors have been installed to measure traffic volumes and detect any problems in the area that operators can respond to immediately, with traffic signals control staff continuing to monitor the three signalised intersections to ensure their optimum performance. It needs to be acknowledged that traffic on Auckland motorways is growing and that congestion on all main arterials is the result of this. Many people choose to vary the time of their travel to avoid peak times, or take public transport, but this isn’t always possible. However, residents should be assured that both NZTA and AT are taking proactive steps within available funding and resources to reduce congestion by undertaking route optimisation works and managing the existing motorways in the best way possible.

14

73 Knights Road, Rothesay Bay

Request for repairs to vehicle crossing and driveway at 73 Knights Road, Rothesay Bay.

In response to a request from the owner of 73 Knights Road, Rothesay Bay, for repairs to the vehicle crossing and driveway, on 23 June 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that any repairs/modifications to vehicle crossings are the responsibility of the property owner. Members were provided with relevant information from the former North Shore City Council bylaw, the Local Government Act and a link to relevant material on AT’s website.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

31.       This report is for the local board’s information.

 

Maori impact statement

32.       No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

Implementation

33.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the significance policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

 

 

Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

New Road Names - Park Lane, Ocean View Terrace, Plantation Terrace and Rewa Rewa Lane

 

File No.: CP2014/15136

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval for new road names in the Kensington Park Holdings Limited subdivision off Centreway Road, Orewa.

Executive summary

2.       A condition of the subdivision consent required the applicant to suggest to council names for the new roads within the subdivision which will vest in council.

3.       The applicant wishes to name roads that will provide access to further stages of development, Ocean View Terrace, Plantation Terrace and Rewa Rewa Lane.  The applicant also wishes to go through the legal process of officially naming Park Lane, following confusion as to whether this process had occurred or not.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 of Ocean View Terrace, Plantation Terrace, Rewa Rewa Lane and Park Lane for the Kensington Park Holdings Limited subdivision off Centreway Road, Orewa, council reference R61869.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       Applicant: Kensington Park Holdings Limited

          Site address: Centreway Road

          Council Reference: R61869

5.       The applicant, following a number of staged resource consents for the Kensington Park subdivision, wishes to name the roads that have recently been created.

 

Park Lane

6.       Park Lane is already being used for addressing purposes within the subdivision after confusion regarding the road naming process.  The applicant had been under the impression that the name had been previously approved, but finding that was not the case, now wishes to get the name legally recognized.  While there is a Park Lane in the Warkworth area, it has not been used for addressing purposes (i.e. it is a name given many years ago to a short cul de sac but properties have used the main road for their address). Since there is a reasonable distance between Orewa and Warkworth, and Park Lane, Orewa already appears on the Auckland Council records as existing in Kensington Park, no confusion should be caused.

7.       Park Lane is located within the stage that is known as Park Lane Homes.  The lane provides a connection between Fig Tree Park and The Orchard Park. The Orchard Park links to the wider parks within Kensington Park.  The name was therefore chosen to reflect the connectivity between reserves within Kensington Park and the surrounding environment.

 

Ocean View Terrace

8.       Ocean View Terrace is the highest street currently within Kensington Park.  The lane and the homes located on the lane will experience panoramic ocean views of Orewa Beach.

 

Plantation Terrace

9.       Plantation Terrace provides lane way access to the Plantation Terrace Homes.  With the homes along one side of the lane; the opposite side offers an area for extensive planting. This planting will be reflective of the plantation theme of Kensington Park and links it to the reserves in the wider area, with an extensive use of native plants.

 

Rewa Rewa Lane

10.     It is the developers understanding that Orewa Beach was named after the Rewa Rewa tree and that this significant  tree is located within the Alice Eaves Bush Reserve located next to Kensington Park.  Rewa Rewa Lane was chosen to continue the relationship between this significant reserve and the development.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     A decision is sought from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Maori impact statement

12.     The applicant has corresponded with Fiona McKenzie of the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust.  This Hapu has a vested interest in this area, have been consulted throughout the subdivision process.  The Iwi did not object to the use of the names.

 

Implementation

13.     Land Information New Zealand approves that the names meet requirements and are unique to the area.

14.     If and when the names are approved the developer will be advised and they are responsible for erecting the new road name sign.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

115

bView

Locality Plan

117

   

 

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Northern Resource Consents

Authorisers

Bonnie Lees – Team Manager, Northern Resource Consents

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

New Road Names - Harvest Avenue, Ascension Crescent, Tawa Place, Taraire Place

 

File No.: CP2014/15139

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval for four new road names in the Orewa Heights, Cappella Limited subdivision at 26, 34 and 46 Maire Road, Orewa.

Executive summary

2.       A condition of the subdivision consent required the applicant to suggest to council a name for the new roads within the subdivision which will vest in council.

3.       The applicant wishes to name the four roads within the 100 lot residential subdivision Harvest Avenue, Ascension Crescent, Tawa Place and Taraire Place.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 of Harvest Avenue, Ascension Crescent, Tawa Place and Taraire Place for the Orewa Heights Cappella Limited subdivision at 26, 34 and 46 Maire Road, Orewa, Council reference SLC-60752.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       Applicant: Orewa Heights Cappella Limited

          Site address: 26, 34 and 46 Maire Road, Orewa

          Council Reference: SLC - 60752

5.       This 100 residential lot development was approved in 2013.  As required by the resource consent, following consultation with Fiona McKenzie of the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust,  the applicant company has suggested that the new roads be named Harvest Avenue, Ascension Crescent, Tawa Place and Taraire Place.

6.       Harvest Avenue and Ascension Crescent relate to the history of the site which used to be cultivated and therefore harvested from, as well as the area being known for the wide range of natural resources that it provides.  Tawa Place and Taraire Place were both put forward to the developers by the local iwi involved, and were chosen as they are native trees that are prevalent in the area and should be recognized.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       A decision is sought from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to approve the new road name under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Maori impact statement

8.       The applicant has corresponded with Fiona McKenzie of the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust.  This Hapu has a vested interest in this area, and it was required that they be consulted throughout the subdivision process.

9.       A list of names were provided by the iwi to the developer due to their connection to the land and the developer chose two of these names to put forward to the local board.  The iwi do not oppose the two English names suggested.

Implementation

10.     Land Information New Zealand and the Land Information database confirm that there are no similar road names in the area and that these names are appropriate and unique.

11.     If and when the name is approved the developer will be advised and they are responsible for erecting the new road name sign.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

121

bView

Locality Map

123

    

 

Signatories

Author

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Northern Resource Consents

Authoriser

Bonnie Lees – Team Manager, Northern Resource Consents

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2014/14810

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Cr Wayne Walker and Cr John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Local Board Members Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/14811

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       This is an opportunity for local board members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the information.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

 

File No.: CP2014/14812

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on 4, 11 June  2014.  A copy of these workshop records is attached.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the records of the workshop meetings held on 4, 11 June 2014

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Record 6 June 2014

131

bView

Workshop Record 11 June 2014

133

    

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 


     

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

16 July 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Confidential - Special Housing Areas: Tranche 4

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

In particular, the report contains information which, if released, would potentially prejudice or disadvantage commercial activities..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.