I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 17 September 2014

4.30pm

Local Board Office
2 Glen Road
Browns Bay

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Sayers

 

Members

David Cooper

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gaye Harding-Kirikiri

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Lovisa Rasmussen

 

 

Lisa Whyte

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

11 September 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Portfolio

Description

Local Board Members

Local planning, policy and governance

Relationship with governing body, Chairs meeting, protocols, code of conduct, local area plans, structure plans, Unitary Plan, RUB, plan changes

Julia Parfitt –Chairperson
Greg Sayers - Deputy Chairperson

Arts and culture

Arts centres, art programmes

Greg Sayers – Lead
Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Events

General oversight of events programme
music in parks, movies in parks

Greg Sayers and Julia Parfitt

Community services and facilities

Community development and safety, grants and funding, community facilities, community houses, community leases, Youth Connections

Julia Parfitt –Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Youth

Local board Youth Forum, Youth Representative

Lovisa Rasmussen – Lead
Gaye Harding - Alternate

Libraries

 

Lisa Whyte –Lead
Gaye Harding - Alternate

Recreation services

Pools, multi-sport facilities

Gaye Harding – Lead
Lisa Whyte - Alternate

Parks

Reserve management plans, park usage, leasing on parks, liaison with parks staff on land owner approval

David Cooper –Lead
Julia Parfitt –Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen - Alternate

Built and natural environment

Heritage, infrastructure (including stormwater, wastewater, water), environmental programmes, conservation and biodiversity, biosecurity, waste minimisation

Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Economic Development

Economic development plans, developing ATEED relationship, broadband

Gary Holmes – Lead
Gaye Harding -Alternate

Street environment and town centres

Gateways and mainstreet upgrades, Urban design champion

David Cooper and Gary Holmes – Leads
Janet Fitzgerald -Alternate

Transport

 

David Cooper – Lead
Gary Holmes – Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Greg Sayers - Alternate

Regulatory, bylaws and compliance

Bylaw policy feedback

Gaye Harding -Lead

Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Resource consent applications

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Communications and engagement

Media, stakeholder and community engagement including iwi relationships, Hibiscus and Bays Youth Voice and YAP

Julia Parfitt – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen -Alternate

Finance

Budget overview, financial prudence and reporting, local board funding policy

Lisa Whyte – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Civil defence/ emergency management

 

David Cooper –Lead
Greg Sayers -Alternate

Urban Design Champion

 

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Shore to Shore 5km Fun Run/Walk 2014                                                           5

8.2     Browns Bay Bowling Club                                                                                  6

8.3     497A Whangaparaoa Road (Old Archers Block)                                              6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Summary of Weiti Wildlink Project 2013/2014 Financial Year                                  9

13        Allocation of 2014/2015 Environmental Management Programmes Budget        15

14        Assignment, renewal and variation of community lease to Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated, Freyberg Park, Browns Bay                                                               19

15        East Coast Bays Community Project Final Report 2013/2014 and Funding Agreement 2014/2015                                                                                                                      31

16        Hearing panel recommendations on review of local dog access rules                53

17        Smoke-free Policy Implementation- Hibiscus and Bays Local Board                   79

18        Review of Alcohol Control Bylaw - Proposed bylaw for local board feedback   85

19        Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, September 2014 119

20        Orewa Community Hall fees and charges variation delegation                           129

21        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January 2014 - 30 June 2014                                                                                                                    131

22        New Road Name - Sunshine Terrace                                                                      145

23        Deferral of 2014/2015 capital projects                                                                     151

24        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Scholarships                                                       161

25        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         163

26        Local Board Members Reports                                                                                165

27        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                167  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 20 August 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

8.1       Shore to Shore 5km Fun Run/Walk 2014

1.       Mr Tom Jackson the chairperson of the Shore to Shore Committee has requested a deputation to update local board members on the 2014 Shore to Shore 5km Fun Run/Walk.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Jackson for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Browns Bay Bowling Club

1.       Mr Graham Dorreen from Browns Bay Bowling Club will be in attendance to discuss the 2014 National Lawn Bowls Championships.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Dorreen for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       497A Whangaparaoa Road (Old Archers Block)

1.       Ms Kay Harrison from Equestrian 4 Everyone has requested a deputation to discuss the property at 497A Whangaparaoa Road, Whangaparaoa.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Harrison for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Summary of Weiti Wildlink Project 2013/2014 Financial Year

 

File No.: CP2014/16066

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a summary of the delivery of the environmental management projects budget ($104,824), assigned to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department (I and ES) for delivery in the 2013/2014 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocated budget in the 2013/2014 financial year to deliver on its aspiration for protecting and enhancing their natural environment with a particular focus on water quality in the local streams.

3.       The local board allocated the 2013/14 budget to the Weiti Wildlink project, to deliver amenity and water quality improvements in the Weiti River. This project was delivered in partnership with Conservation Volunteers New Zealand (CVNZ) and local businesses in the area.

 

Recommendation

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Summary of Weiti Wildlink Project 2013/2014  Financial Year report.

 

Comments

Weiti Wildlink project summary

4.       At its business meeting on 4 September 2013 the local board resolved to allocate $92,000 of the total environmental management budget to projects to deliver on its aspiration to protect and enhance the environment of the Weiti River.

5.       The Weiti WildLink project was initiated involving restoration of stream banks in the Silverdale area with native planting to provide amenity benefits and contribute towards water quality and biodiversity outcomes, improving bank stability and riparian and stream habitat. The project was delivered through a contract with Conservation Volunteers NZ (CVNZ) and involved engagement with the local community and businesses adjacent to the river. 

6.       As a result of this engagement and support for the project from Fulton Hogan Ltd, savings were made and the local board had a further approximately $36,500 to allocate to other projects.  These savings were allocated in February 2014 along with $13,000 of previously unallocated funds to projects outlined in the summary table below.

7.       A regionally funded stormwater unit contribution of approximately $60,000 enabled the riparian planting in Silverdale to be extended from Flexman Place Berm Reserve to encompass a total area of 12900 m2 between Tavern Road and downstream of Titan Place, and on the opposite bank at the end of Manga Road.  The restored riparian area is shown on the map below.

8.       Below is a summary of the projects and financial information as delivered in the 2013/2014 financial year for the Weiti WildLink project.

Project and Summary

Budget Spend

Cleanup Cruise held November 24, 2013 on the Weiti River

A clean up event was held by CVNZ with a full boat of 26 volunteers on board. On the day approximately 40kgs of rubbish was collected from the shores of the Weiti Estuary between Duck Creek and Stillwater South. 

Nil (resourced by CVNZ )

Weed control, site preparation and plants for riparian planting

Site preparation including rubbish removal, clearing and leveling the access track, pest plant control and procurement of native eco-sourced plants.

Weed spraying was carried out over several months by contractors to prepare the heavily weed infested riparian margins for planting.  Conservation Volunteers collected a further 8.5 tonnes of rubbish from the river banks.  Fulton Hogan donated time and machinery to level the area in preparation for work to begin on the access track.

Scrubgrowers provided 13,000 ecosourced native plants according to a planting plan approved by the Biodiversity team.

$49,236

(Local board and regional funding)

Access track formation

Materials and formation of a 2m wide gravel track through Flexman Place Berm Reserve (excludes value of materials and services donated by Fulton Hogan)

A basic gravel access track was created through Flexman Place Berm Reserve by CVNZ to enable access to assist planting day logistics and ongoing plant maintenance.  The track connects the end of Titan Place with Tavern Road where it links with an existing walkway between Tavern Road and the Silverdale shopping precinct. It has potential for upgrading at a later date and future connectivity with the proposed Fairhaven Walk (Silverdale to Arkles Bay). Gravel for the track was donated by Fulton Hogan and Atlas Concrete and spread by CVNZ volunteers. 

Enabling people to access and interact with the river is an important part of fostering a sense of guardianship for the river and supports opportunities for education and awareness raising. This was clearly seen at February’s Weiti River Festival, (see below) where guided walks along the river, using the access track, attracted large numbers.

 

$17,810

Weiti River Festival Day 23 February 2014

This was an educational family friendly event organised by CVNZ to publically launch the Weiti WildLink project.   It involved information displays and a range of activity stations where participants learnt about the flora and fauna that live on and in the river, and what they can do to help care for the river environment.

Over 400 people attended the event and 50 people registered their interest with CVNZ in volunteering their time toward the project.  Articles about the festival were published in the North Harbour News, Hibiscus Matters and Rodney Times newspapers.

$22,000

Community engagement, planting day coordination, education and awareness raising

CVNZ were contracted to engage local businesses, schools and community groups in the project and coordinate and promote a series of community planting days during winter 2014.

Three community planting days took place on 24 May, 21 June and 3 August 2014.  A planting day on July 12 2014 was cancelled due to adverse weather. At the three community days held to date, 2512 trees were planted by 86 volunteers, including local residents, members of local environmental, community and youth organisations, high school and tertiary students and members of Te Herenga Waka o Orewa marae. 

In addition to the weekend community planting days, mid-week planting days were organised for school and corporate groups who planted a further 960 trees. Two school groups have contributed 18 volunteer hours, five corporate groups contributed 198 volunteer hours. Unfortunately, inclement weather disrupted several groups who had shown interest from taking part.

The bulk of the planting has been carried out by CVNZ volunteers who have planted 8058 trees, mainly in the more difficult sites not suitable for community planting.  

The final community planting day is scheduled for 31st August when the remaining 1470 trees are expected to be planted.

Education and awareness raising

Participation in planting activities has been a key vehicle in fostering a greater appreciation for the Weiti River and advocacy for the Weiti WildLink initiative. CVNZ have played a pivotal role in engaging and educating participants.  In addition, educational activities have been provided through the Council Waicare programme at some planting days. 

A contact database has been developed by CVNZ to keep regular contact with supporters of the project in addition to using other communication mediums including social and print media.  The electronic Weiti WildLink newsletter has been developed by CVNZ with three issues sent to date. The newsletter includes project updates and opportunities for participation, stream care information, pollution prevention tips, pest plant and native plant information as well as recognition for local businesses and organisations supporting the project. It is also forwarded onto members of the Silverdale Business Association database extending its circulation.

Articles about the Weiti WildLink project and community planting days have been published in the Hibiscus Matters, Rodney Times, North Harbour News and Council’s Our Auckland.

$17,105

Industry pollution prevention programme

Wilkinson Environmental Ltd were engaged to deliver an industry pollution prevention programme in the Silverdale industrial area, targeting businesses who have stormwater connections to the Weiti River. Wilkinson Environmental visited 142 Silverdale businesses during May and June 2014. All 142 businesses approached accepted the offer of a free site audit and pollution prevention advice and were given information about the CVNZ planting programme. 

Actual or potential pollution issues were identified at approximately one third of the sites visited. These issues were brought to the attention of businesses in a report including recommended solutions.  Forty-two reports have been generated, containing more than 60 recommendations to improve practices.

One major pollution issue was identified and resolved where a drain had been plumbed into a container used for washing paint which allowed the paint to flow directly onto the ground, into the stormwater system and out into the river. This issue was resolved immediately thus averting on-going release of chemical contaminants into the river.

Three-quarters (75%) of the pollution issues identified have been resolved as a result of follow-up action undertaken by the businesses.  Twenty-three free spill kits (provided by the stormwater unit) were given out and 11 sites had their stormwater drains painted with “rain only - drains to the sea” stencils. 

An article about the pollution prevention programme was published in Hibiscus Matters newspaper.

$17,000

Silverdale reserve landscape plan

A landscape planner was engaged to deliver a community design process to integrate environmental, amenity and accessibility enhancements and develop a concept plan for a local reserve at 36 Hibiscus Coast Highway.  This land parcel has potential for future riparian enhancements as part of the Weiti Wildlink project.

$4,335

Total budget spend

$164,096

Estimated value of goods and services donated by local businesses

Conservation Volunteers gained the support of several local businesses and through the discounts and donations for goods and services and in-kind support leveraged significant added value for the Weiti Wildlink project.  Fulton Hogan Limited are a key supporter.

Included in this estimate is an $8,000 contribution from Bunnings towards the costs of plants for Flexman Place reserve in fulfillment of a resource consent condition

$44,323

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       This is a report prepared specifically to inform the local board about the delivery of budgets for the 2013/2014 financial year as allocated to the I and ES Department.

Maori impact statement

10.     While this report is for information only and does not require any decision making, it is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

11.     Members of Te Herenga Waka o Orewa marae have been involved in the Weiti WildLink project.

Implementation

12.     The activities detailed in this report have been delivered within budget.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

Signatories

Authors

Theresa Pearce - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Allocation of 2014/2015 Environmental Management Programmes Budget

 

File No.: CP2014/17038

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for allocation of the Environmental Management Programmes ($105,872 OPEX) budget to a number of projects for implementation by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department (I and ES).

Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board demonstrate their commitment to environmental enhancement and protection for waterways in the Hibiscus and Bays area in their local board agreement 2014/2015 with a focus on ‘improving the quality of our waterways by ensuring our riverbanks are replanted and maintained to prevent erosion and reduce sedimentation into our rivers, streams and coastal waters”.  

3.       In the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014/2015 the local board further identify protecting and enhancing the quality of waterways and native habitats as a key focus.

4.       This report seeks the approval of the Environmental Management Programmes budget for the 2014/2015 financial year to a number of projects for delivery by the I and ES department to achieve the local board’s aspirations in the environment.

 

Recommendations

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      agree to allocate the environmental management programmes budget 2014/2015 to the following projects:

Project

Estimated Cost ($)

Weiti Wildlink

25,000

Love Your Bays

45,000

North West Wildlink Prioritisation Report

15,000

North West Wildlink Assistance Programme

20,872

TOTAL

105,872

b)      request that any significant changes identified during programme delivery be brought back to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for approval.

 

Comments

5.       Officers from the environmental services unit, stormwater and local parks liaised to develop a coordinated approach to delivery of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board environmental management programmes budget 2014/2015 and to deliver on the local board plan aspirations.

6.       A suite of projects has been developed to achieve the outcomes sought by the local board in relation to water quality and amenity improvement in the waterways and native habitats within the local board area.

7.       On 30 June 2014 officers attended a workshop with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to present a suite of projects to the local board members and to seek input and endorsement for the allocation of the 2014/2015 financial year environmental management programmes budget.

8.       As with the delivery of the previous financial year’s budget, support will be sought through community delivery partners and from other funding sources to extend the project outcomes.

9.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members, at the 30 June 2014 workshop, expressed support for the recommendations from officers as outlined in the table below.

Project

Objective

Description

Estimated Cost

Weiti Wildlink

To maintain the Weiti River riparian planting implemented in the 2013/2014 financial year in the Silverdale area

Control weeds and maintain newly planted sites, photo point monitoring, involve community in pest plant and animal control.

$15,000

 Weiti Wildlink

To provide guidance for community groups working on restoration initiatives along the coastal margin of the Weiti estuary.

Develop a restoration plan for the public land between Stillwater (end of Duck Creek Road) and Okura (end of Haigh Access Rd) including Stillwater Spit.

$10,000

Love your Bays

To support better understanding of the natural processes creating odours in summer at stream mouths in the East Coast Bays.

Manufacture and install educational signage at stream mouths at Long Bay, Browns Bay, Rothesay Bay, Murrays Bay, and Mairangi Bay.

$10,000

Love your Bays

To foster awareness, and behaviour change that impact on stormwater quality and motivate the community to care for waterways.Improve riparian habitat in local board parks and reserves and educate the public about what can be done on private land.

Site preparation, native plants, coordination, and promotion, delivery of community events and educational presentations and activities at selected streamside locations.

$25,000

Love your Bays

To work with East Coast Bays schools to increase awareness and understanding of water quality and stormwater issues in local waterways and beaches.

Schools will be supported to undertake an action project to inform and educate their local community.

A new school programme will be set up and run with a maximum of three East Coast Bay schools. 

Funding will:

· Support schools to access Learning through Experience programmes (LTE) at Long Bay.

· Support student-lead action projects which might include: contracting a professional artist to work with the children to create a mural or signs to educate others about local streams and beaches or creating an exhibition or community event.

Facilitator support to schools with the development of action projects will be provided through regionally funded programmes such as Waicare and Education for Sustainability Outreach advisory service.

$10,000

North West Wildlink Prioritisation Report

Enhance the North-West Wildlink by identifying key areas for protection or restoration and potential expansion of ecological corridors across the Local Board area.

Report on the areas of significant ecological value on both public and private land with recommended priority targets for action.

$15,000

North West Wildlink Assistance Programme

Support initiatives enhancing the North West WildLink and facilitate biodiversity and water quality outcomes on private property. 

The focus of the assistance programme will be on stream protection and restoration, providing landowners with free on-site consultation, planting and weed guidance, one-off garden waste collection, some free eco sourced native plants, and follow up support.

The programme will build on the learnings and progress of the legacy North Shore City Council Streamside Assistance Programme.

The funding is for delivery to 60 urban sized properties.  Lifestyle properties can also be accommodated (eg treated as the equivalent of 4 houses).

Initially this programme will be targeted in the Weiti catchment and East Coast Bays area to complement the Weiti WildLink and Love Your Bays projects.

In future years this model could be employed to support landowner and community action at a broader scale along the North West WildLink corridor.

 

$20,872

TOTAL

 

 

$105,872

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.     Members of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board met with council officers at a workshop, held 30 June 2014, to discuss proposed projects for the 2014/2015 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board budget for environmental management programmes.

11.     Responsibility for decision making and allocation of this budget is the delegation of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

Maori impact statement

12.     This report provides information for anticipated environmental programmes.  It is recognised that the issue of water quality has integral links with the Mauri of waterways and harbours and concepts of Kaitiakitanga.

13.     Many of the identified activities are of interest to Mŕori and provisions for mana whenua participation, contribution, and consultation will be incorporated.

Implementation

14.     Implementation of the projects will be regularly reported to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in the quarterly update reports to the local board.  A more detailed report will be presented to the local board at the end of the financial year.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Theresa Pearce - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Assignment, renewal and variation of community lease to Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated, Freyberg Park, Browns Bay

 

File No.: CP2014/18568

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to the variation and assignment of the community lease for the site on Freyberg Park held by the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated.  Approval is also sought to renew the community lease subject to the public car park that currently sits within the leased area being surrendered and returned to Auckland Council.

Executive summary

2.       The Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated owns and operates the bowling club adjacent to Freyberg Park.  In 1961 it sold some of its land to the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated so that the women’s club could establish its own green (Attachment A).

3.       In 1975 the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club leased land from the former East Coast Bays Borough Council on which it erected a pavilion.  The site also provided car parking for the bowlers and other sports clubs on the site.  The current lease for this area was granted in 2004 for a period of ten years with one right of renewal for a further ten years.

4.       In 2005 the two bowling clubs amalgamated.  Council was not notified at the time but now has the opportunity to correctly document the changes by approving the assignment of the lease previously held by the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated.

5.       The car park adjacent to the pavilion whilst included in the lease is used by all reserve users and is considered to be a public carpark.  It is proposed that the club surrenders the car park and that the lease is varied to record this change.  This is in line with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where car parks are not generally included in the areas leased to community organisations (Attachment B).

6.       The land is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for that purpose. It is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

7.       This report recommends the approval of the variation of the original lease to the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated in order that it can be assigned to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated and then the renewal of the lease with a variation recording the surrender of the car park adjacent to the club pavilion (Attachment C).

8.       The club has agreed to the inclusion of a community outcomes plan in accordance with the terms of the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 (Attachment D).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approves:

a)      the variation and assignment of the agreement originally held by the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated executed on 2 November 2004 to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated.

b)      the renewal of the lease to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated for  Part Lot 4 DP 39141, Freyberg Park, Woodlands Crescent, Browns Bay subject to the following conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2014;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The surrender of the car park to the south of the clubrooms. The lease area, following the variation, will comprise the footprint of the pavilion and the small area of garden to the western side of the building;

iv)      The Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved being attached to the lease document.

c)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

 

Comments

 

9.       The Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated has owned and occupied the site adjacent to Freyberg Park since 1943.  In 1961 it sold some of its land to the Browns Bay Women’s Bowling Club Incorporated to establish its own green and facilities.

10.     The site of the pavilion together with the adjacent car park was later leased from the former East Coast Bays Borough Council.  The current lease for this area was granted in 2004 for a period of ten years with one right of renewal for a further ten years.

11.     In 2005 the two bowling clubs amalgamated.  Council was not notified at the time but now has the opportunity to correctly document the changes in the tenancy by granting approval to the assignment of the lease to the Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated.

12.     The car park adjacent to the pavilion is used by all reserve users and it is proposed that the club surrenders the car park and that the lease is varied to record this change.  This is in line with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where car parks are not generally leased to community organisations.

13.     The Browns Bay Bowling Club is one of the largest and most successful clubs on the North Shore.  It currently has 340 members who enjoy facilities that include one artificial green and three grass greens together with clubrooms and storage facilities on the site it owns.  The pavilion on council land has a lounge, office, kitchen, toilets, changing facilities and green keeper’s store.  All of the facilities and playing surfaces are kept to a high standard.

 14.    The pavilion is also used by Bowls North Harbour Umpires Association, Bowls North Harbour as a base for administration and tournament management and by the New Zealand Blind Bowling Association whose members play and hold tournaments on the site.  It is also used on a casual basis by a number of community groups and organisations including Probus, the New Zealand Wine Tasting Association, South African New Zealand Association, Vision Force, the Correlli School and the New Zealand Academic and Cultural Homestay programme.

15.     The club is to host two major tournaments in the next year.  The New Zealand National Bowls Championships are to be held this December and January and the Heartland Bank $20,000 will be an annual event from summer 2015 attracting players from New Zealand and Australia.  Bowls North Harbour, recognising the clubs role in hosting these events, has committed $10,000 to the refurbishment of the pavilion in the coming months as it will be used as the headquarters for both tournaments.  The club has already started upgrading the playing surfaces to accommodate to ensure the facilities are at their best.

16.     The Auckland Regional Bowls Strategy identifies the club as being strategically placed in terms of location and size and scores it highly in terms of the condition of the facilities and the greens.  In addition to having a stable and sizable membership the club also has a strong and forward thinking committee that recognises that it will in future need to work harder to attract and retain members and offer more flexible opportunities for people to become involved in the sport in the future.

17.     The land is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for that purpose.  It is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

18.     This report recommends approving the variation and assignment of lease originally granted to the women’s bowling club and then the renewal of the lease with a variation recording the surrender of the car park adjacent to the club pavilion.

19.     The club has agreed to the inclusion of a community outcomes plan in accordance with the terms of the Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     Council staff sought input from the Local Board Facilities and Reserves Committee on March 20 2014, no objections were raised.

21.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Maori impact statement

22.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori.

Implementation

23.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the significance policy.

24.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Browns Bay Bowling Club Site Plan

23

bView

Proposed Lease Area to Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporates

25

cView

Letter regarding surrender of carpark

27

dView

Browns Bay Bowling Club Incorporated Community Outcome Plan

29

     

Signatories

Authors

Maureen Buchanan - Community Lease Advisor North

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

East Coast Bays Community Project Final Report 2013/2014 and Funding Agreement 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/20224

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To present the East Coast Bays Community Project Inc. (the Project) report for 2013/2014 and to seek approval for the 2014/2015 funding agreement with the Project.

Executive summary

2.       East Coast Bays Community Project Inc. receives funding support from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for the position of a community coordinator to deliver a range of key programmes in the East Coast Bays area.

3.       The results demonstrated by the East Coast Bays Community Project against the objectives specified in the 2013/2014 funding agreement show that the key performance indicators have been met or exceeded.

4.       This report also presents the 2014/2015 funding agreement for the community coordinator work programme for approval by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This agreement proposes a payment of $70,647 which comprises:

·    $61,647 for the East Coast Bays Community Coordinator (from Community Development and Safety Budget)

·    $ 9,000 for the delivery of the Summer Fun Programme.

$5,000 from Community Development and Safety budget

$4,000 from Parks Sport and Recreation budget

5.       The local board approved the renewal of the funding agreement with the East Coast Bays Community Project to the value of $61,037 at its meeting 18 June 2014 - Resolution number HB/2014/96. This amount was the uninflated amount, which has since had the Consumer Price Index adjustment added.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the schedule for delivery from the East Coast Bays Community Project Inc. that forms Schedule 2 of the 2014/2015 funding agreement.

b)      approve the operational funding agreement for 2014/1015 of $70,647 for the East Coast Bays Community Project Incorporated.

 

 

Discussion

6.       The Project is a community organisation located in the East Coast Bays subdivision of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.  The Project employs a community coordinator and has received on-going support for this role for a number of years.  The Project provides two six monthly reports as part of its obligations and is seeking funding for the community coordinator role in the 2014/2015 financial year.

 

7.       The 2013/2014 funding agreement requires a final report to be received and accepted prior to the 2014/2015 funding being released.  This report is attached.

 

·    The Community Coordinator delivered a wide range of activities and services which connected people living in East Coast Bays and which build the resilience of the community. 

·    Over 15,000 people attended Summer Fun events in the East Coast Bays area.  In addition this year the Community Coordinator provided a pilot Summer Fun programme on the Whangaparaoa Peninsula which attracted 280 people. 

·    Other activities met the needs of older adults, new migrant communities and families with young children.  Several programmes were delivered to meet the needs of 10-18 year olds – defensive driving courses, babysitting skills courses as well as support for the lawn mowing social enterprise operated by Bays Youth Trust.

8.       Local board members and representatives of the Project have met and agreed to work together in the development of the work programme for the coming year.  The draft schedule was subsequently discussed and agreed at a further meeting and is attached as Attachment B.

9.       The proposed funding agreement aligns with the operational budget held by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for East Coast Bays Community Project for 2014/2015.  This year the operational funds for the delivery of the Summer Fun Programme have been included in the funding agreement as part of the community coordinator funding consolidation project.

10.     This agreement proposes a payment of $70,647 which comprises

·    $61,647 for the East Coast Bays Community Coordinator

·    $ 9,000 for the delivery of the Summer Fun Programme.

$5,000 from Community Development and Safety budget

$4,000 from Parks Sport and Recreation budget

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The local board approved the renewal of the funding agreement with the East Coast Bays Community Project to the value of $61,037 at its meeting 18 June 2014 - Resolution Number HB/2014/96.  This amount was the uninflated amount, which has since had the Consumer Price Index adjustment added.

Māori impact statement

12.     This community funding agreement is not specifically linked to council’s strategic priorities for Mŕori, and Mŕori organisations have not been engaged or consulted. However, funded organisations are strongly encouraged to consider their engagement with Mŕori and are required to report on their provision of programmes that meet Mŕori outcomes.

Implementation

13.     Once the funding agreement is confirmed, the Project will participate in a workshop with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in February 2015 to provide an update of the community coordinator’s progress.  The Project will also provide an annual formal report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at the completion of the funding period.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

ECBCP Schedule 2014-2015

35

bView

ECBCP Report to 30 June 2014

41

     

Signatories

Authors

Karen Johns - Manager Community Development and Partnerships North

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 







Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Hearing panel recommendations on review of local dog access rules

 

File No.: CP2014/17799

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To submit the hearing panel recommendations on the proposed changes to dog access rules in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Executive summary

1.       On 16 April 2014 the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted proposed changes to local dog access rules in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area for public consultation and appointed a hearing panel comprising of local board members Greg Sayers (chairperson), David Cooper, and Gaye Harding-Kirikiri (resolution HB/2014/47-50).

2.       The proposal was publicly notified with a submission period of 12 June 2014 to 23 July 2014.  At the close of submissions, 206 submissions had been received.

3.       The hearing panel heard from nine oral submitters on 21 August 2014 and held deliberations on 21 and 26 August 2014.

4.       The hearing panel notes that the proposal sought to clarify dog access rules on parks or reserves adjacent to beaches and did not relate to dog access rules on beaches themselves.  The hearing panel sought to apply a consistent approach between the Hibiscus Coast and East Coast Bays subdivisions and to achieve the appropriate balance between public safety and comfort, protection of wildlife, and the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

5.       Major recommendations (changes to the proposal) are as follows.  The full recommendations are stated from paragraph 10 and a copy of the decision report is contained in Attachment A.

·       Amend the proposal for Stanmore Bay Park to apply a time and season under control on-leash rule (under control off-leash at all other times) to the area between Stanmore Bay Beach and the open drainage channel to better protect public safety and comfort at high use times in summer (including children’s playground) in easily defined areas adjacent to the beach, and to provide for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.  Dogs would be allowed under control off-leash in all other areas, noting that region-wide prohibited and under control on-leash dog access rules apply to sports surfaces, car parks, and playgrounds.

·       Amend the proposal to apply a time and season under control on-leash rule (under control off-leash at all other times) to Red Beach Waterfront Reserve, Big Manly Beach – The Esplanade, Manly Park on the northern side of Laurence Street, Tindalls Beach – De Luen Avenue Beachfront Reserve, Matakatia Parade Beach Front Reserve and Arkles Bay Beach Front Reserve to appropriately provide for public safety and comfort during summer high use periods while providing for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

·       Amend the proposed dog access rules on grass strips next to beaches to apply an under control on-leash at all times rule on the grass strips next to Hatfields Beach and Little Manly Beach Reserve to appropriately provide for public safety and comfort and welfare of dogs in areas adjacent to busy roads.

·       Amend the proposal on Rothesay Bay Reserve to apply a time and season under control on-leash rule (under control off-leash at all other times) to better provide for public safety and comfort at high use times in summer and for consistency with similar rules in adjoining Browns Bay and Murrays Bay.

·       Amend the proposal to prohibit dogs on north Wairewa Beach at all times to better protect birdlife beyond the breeding season.

·       Amend the proposal to allow dogs under control on-leash in bush areas (under control off-leash in open grass areas) of Karaka Cove Reserve, Pacific Parade Reserve, and Matakatia Bush Reserve which form part of the North-West Wild link corridor for safe habitats.

·       Amend the proposal to apply under control on-leash dog access rules in bush areas of Centennial Park (under control off-leash in open grass areas) to better provide for public safety and comfort, protection of wildlife, and the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

·       Adopt all other aspects of the proposal as publicly notified in the proposal.

·       Direct staff to work closely with the Hibiscus Coast Dog Training Club to enable temporary use of the Orewa Estuary adjacent to Western Reserve associated with club events.

 

Recommendations

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive and adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Hearing Panel decision report titled “Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access Rules in Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area 2014” (Attachment A).

b)      adopt the amendments to the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 as contained in hearing panel decision report in (a) pursuant to section 10 of the Dog Control Act 1996 with a commencement date of 25 October 2014 (the Saturday of Labour Weekend).

c)      request the governing body to give effect to the amendments in (b) by making the necessary amendments to the Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2012 in accordance with section 10(6) of the Dog Control Act 1996.

d)      request the Manager Animal Management to report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board about the provision of animal management services in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

e)      authorise the Manager Policies and Bylaws in consultation with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board chairperson of the Hearing Panel to make any minor edits or amendments to (a) and (b) to correct any identified errors or typographical edits.

 

Comments

 

6.       On 16 April 2014 the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted proposed changes to local dog access rules in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area for public consultation and appointed a hearing panel comprising of local board members Greg Sayers (chairperson), David Cooper, and Gaye Harding-Kirikiri (resolution HB/2014/47-50).

7.       The proposal was publicly notified with a submission period of 12 June 2014 to 23 July 2014.  At the close of submissions, 206 submissions had been received.

8.       The hearing panel heard from nine oral submitters on 21 August 2014 and held deliberations on 21 and 26 August 2014.

9.       The hearing panel deliberations as contained in the decision report are provided below.  A full copy of the hearing panel’s decision report is contained in Attachment A and contains details of the proposal, public notification, decision-making considerations, matters raised in submissions, hearing panel deliberations, and schedule of amended dog access rules.

 

Submission Topic 1 – General submissions

10.     The hearing panel considers that the general concerns raised in submissions are adequately addressed by the previous decision of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in 2013 to amend the beach time and season dog access rule or by the hearing panel recommendations in relation to specific sites (e.g. Stanmore Bay Park).

11.     The hearing panel notes that the governing body has established a standard process to support the review of dog access rules on an annual basis if required, at the full discretion of local boards.  This allows for more a timely, robust and manageable discussion about specific parks and beaches.   This means any concerns about specific parks or beaches can be raised with the local board at any time for its consideration.

 

Submission Topic 2 – Protection of coastal wildlife

12.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed prohibition of dogs on north Wairewa Beach be amended to apply at all times.  The reasons include to better protect birdlife beyond the breeding season.

13.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed prohibition of dogs at all times from Waiwera Bird Lookout, Orewa Esturary, Weiti Estuary Chenier Spits, and Stillwater Walkway be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal.  The reasons for the recommendation includes replacing unclear general wildlife and bush rules with appropriate place specific rules to better protect wildlife.

14.     The hearing panel acknowledges submissions in relation to the use of Western Reserve by the Hibiscus Coast Dog Training Club and the desire to allow dogs to cool off in the adjacent Orewa Estuary following their two annual dog obedience and agility competitions.   The panel considers that those concerns are best addressed through the use of the temporary change provisions of the Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2012.  The hearing panel recommends that staff work closely with the club and implement temporary restrictions if required.

15.     In relation to submissions seeking to protect wildlife in other areas of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, the hearing panel recommends that it is appropriate to allow dogs under control on-leash in bush areas and under control off-leash in open grass areas of Karaka Cove Reserve (Red Beach), Pacific Parade Reserve (Army Bay), and Matakatia Bush Reserve which form part of the North-West Wild link corridor for safe habitats.

16.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed removal of reference to Gulf Islands be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal because the only island in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area (Tiritiri Matangi) is administered by the Department of Conservation and on which dogs are currently prohibited.

 

Submission Topic 3 – Orewa, Te Ara Tahuna and Stanmore Bay Park

17.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed under control on-leash dog access on Stanmore Bay Park be amended to retain the current under control off-leash dog access rule on most of the park.  The hearing panel also recommends that a time and season rule that allows dogs under control on-leash between 10am and 5pm Labour Weekend to 1 March and under control off-leash at all other times, be applied to the area of Stanmore Bay Park between Stanmore Bay Beach and the open drainage channel.  The reasons for the recommendation includes better protection of public safety and comfort at high use times in summer (including children’s playground) in easily defined areas adjacent to the beach, and to provide for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.  The hearing panel acknowledges that region-wide prohibited and under control on-leash dog access rules apply to sports surfaces, car parks, and playgrounds within Stanmore Bay Park.

18.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed dog access rules on park areas adjoining beaches in Orewa and on the Te Ara Tahuna estuary cycleway and walkway be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal.  The reasons for the recommendation includes improved certainty, better provision for public safety and comfort, and provision for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

19.     The hearing panel notes that Western Reserve is currently an under control off-leash area and that no changes were proposed or recommended.  See also paragraph 28 in relation to the Hibiscus Coast Dog Training Club.

 

Submission Topic 4 – Waiake, Browns, Rothesay, Churchill, Murrays, Mairangi and Campbells Bay

20.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed dog access rules on park areas adjoining beaches from Waiake to Campbells Bay be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal with amendments to Rothesay Bay Beach Reserve and Mairangi Bay.  The reasons include that the proposal (with the amendments in two areas) improves certainty, and appropriately provides for public safety and comfort and for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

21.     The hearing panel recommends that a time and season rule that allows dogs under control on-leash between 10am and 5pm Labour Weekend to 1 March and under control off-leash at all other times be applied to all of Rothesay Bay Beach Reserve.  The reasons include to better provide for public safety and comfort at high use times in summer and for consistency with similar rules in adjoining Browns Bay and Murrays Bay.

22.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed dog access rule on parks opposite Mairangi Bay Beach be amended to include all of the Montrose Terrace reserve land and Sidmouth Street Reserve land opposite Mairangi Bay Beach as contained in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan to acknowledge the future redevelopment of this area as a park.

23.     The hearing panel notes that the time and season dog access rule that applies from Murrays Bay to Campbells Bay beaches also apply to the wastewater pipeline between these two bays.

24.     The hearing panel notes that reference to Amarino Park adjacent to Amarino Beach is not necessary and appropriately covered by the general under control off-leash rule.

 

Submission Topic 5 - Grass strips next to beaches in Whangaparaoa

25.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed application of beach time and season dog access rules to grass strips next to beaches in Whangaparaoa be amended.

26.     The hearing panel recommends that dogs be allowed under control on-leash at all times on the grass strips next to Hatfields Beach and Little Manly Beach Reserve.  The reasons for the recommendation includes to appropriately provide for public safety and comfort and welfare of dogs in areas adjacent to busy roads while providing for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

27.     The hearing panel recommends that a time and season rule that allows dogs under control on-leash between 10am and 5pm Labour Weekend to 1 March and under control off-leash at all other times be applied to Red Beach Waterfront Reserve, Big Manly Beach – The Esplanade, Manly Park on the northern side of Laurence Street, Tindalls Beach – De Luen Avenue Beachfront Reserve, Matakatia Parade Beach Front Reserve and Arkles Bay Beach Front Reserve.  The reasons include to appropriately provide for public safety and comfort during summer high use periods while providing a consistent rule for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.


Submission Topic 6 – Picnic and fitness apparatus areas

28.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposal to replace general picnic and fitness apparatus dog access rules with specific place based rules be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal.  The reasons include improved certainty and the appropriateness of recommended time and season under control on-leash and under control on-leash at all times rules on specified high summer use beach front parks or due to the small size of park areas as shown in Attachment A.

 

Submission Topic 7 – Bush walks

29.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposal to replace general under control on-leash dog access rules in bush walks with specific place based rules be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal for Alice Eaves Scenic Reserve (Orewa), and that the bush areas of Centennial Park be included. Dogs would continue to be allowed under control off-leash in open grass areas of Centennial Park.  The reasons include to better provide for public safety and comfort, protection of wildlife, and for the needs of dogs and responsible dog owners.

 

Submission Topic 8 – Other Matters

30.     The hearing panel notes that many of these matters are outside of the jurisdiction of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. The hearing panel recommends that:

(i)      matters related to regional parks be referred to the Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee as part of its responsibility to review dog access rules in regional parks.

(ii)      it be noted that the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 recognises the freedom to choose whether to own a dog, and that the focus is on responsible dog ownership, appropriate dog access rules and compliance and enforcement of the Dog Control Act 1996.

(iii)     it be noted that the Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2012 appropriately defines control.

(iv)    it be noted that information on where people can take dogs is contained on the council’s website (www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz).

(v)     it be noted that signage will be updated in areas affected by this proposal.

(vi)    it be noted that the council’s animal management services provide patrols in parks and beaches and will increase patrols if there are particular issues/problems.

(vii)    the Manager Animal Management report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board about the provision of animal management services in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

31.     The hearing panel notes that no specific submissions were received in relation to other areas of access of the proposal, including the proposed on-leash rules to Cooper-Lea Reserve, beach time and season rules to Winstones Cove, off-leash access to Swann Beach Road – Hurdlow Place Esplanade Reserve or Fisherman's Rock Reserve, to reclassify the 12 dog exercise areas (parks) in the former Rodney District Council area as under control off-leash areas, or to identify the names of all beaches in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.  The hearing panel recommend that these proposed changes be adopted as publicly notified in the proposal.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

32.     No submissions were received from other local boards.

Maori impact statement

33.     Māori have been consulted through the development of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012, at two hui in 2013 to identify local concerns about dog access, and through this current process to identify and consider changes to local dog access rules.

Implementation

34.     Any decision that makes changes to dog access rules will require updates to signage and information, and training of animal management officers and park rangers.

35.     The administration and implementation of the changes to dog access rules will be provided for within existing budgets.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access Rules in Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area 2014

59

     

Signatories

Authors

Paul Wilson - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 




















Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Smoke-free Policy Implementation- Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/18608

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (‘the local board’) with recommendations on the implementation of the Auckland Council Smoke-free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) in its local board area.

Executive summary

2.       The Policy sets out a regional position on smoke-free public places and events. The exact detail of the implementation will be a matter for local board discretion, as local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities.

3.       Local boards can:

·    choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·    determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·    decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·    determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

 

4.       To assist local boards to progress the implementation of the Policy, staff have made recommendations pertaining to the extent of smoke-free public places, signage requirements, promotion activities and other matters. 

5.       In terms of signage for smoke-free public places, staff do not recommend smoke-free signage in all areas affected by the Policy. Instead, placing additional smoke-free signs in certain ‘high priority sites’ will bear greater benefits in promoting smoke-free public places.

6.       In April 2014, a workshop with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board was held to confirm high priority sites for the immediate installation of additional smoke-free signage. At this workshop, 13 high priority sites were confirmed. Staff recommend additional budget be allocated for the printing and installation of smoke-free signs in these sites. The cost of additional signage is estimated at $5,000-$6,300. These values are a high estimate and will vary once the actual number of signs have been confirmed.

7.       In order to promote the smoke-free status of these sites, staff recommend that the local board publicises smoke-free public places in their local board area as the local board deems appropriate.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      allocate budget for printing and installation of additional smoke-free signs in 13 high priority sites which include:

i)        Silverdale War Memorial Park

ii)       Stanmore Bay Park and Pool

iii)      Victor Eaves Park

iv)      Western Reserve

v)      Orewa Community Centre

vi)      Orewa Library

vii)     Orewa Beach Front (i.e. recreation reserve area- playground, recreation space and boat club)

viii)    Browns Bay Beach Reserve

ix)      Whangaparaoa Library

x)      East Coast Bays Library and Village Green

xi)      Freybreg Park

xii)     Mairangi Bay Playground

xiii)    Mairangi Bay Park

b)      promote the smoke-free status of smoke-free public places in Hibiscus and Bays as the local board deems appropriate.

 

Comments

 

8.       The Auckland Council Smoke Free Policy 2013 (‘the Policy’) sets out council’s position on smoke-free public places, events, tobacco control advocacy and workplace smoking cessation.

9.       As local boards have been allocated non-regulatory decision making responsibilities for local activities, the implementation of the Policy at a local level is a matter for local board discretion.

10.     Local boards can: 

·    choose to progress the implementation of smoke-free public places wider and faster than identified in the Policy

·    determine the exact signage requirements for promoting local smoke-free public places and any additional budget allocation for this

·    decide on promotion and communication activities for smoke-free public places in their local area

·    determine the extent of smoke-free messaging and promotion at local board events.

 

11.     According to the 2013 census, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (‘the local board) area has a smoking rate of 9.4 percent which is lower than the regional smoking rate (13 percent for the region).  Hibiscus and Bays ranks 17th for smoking rates in the region.

12.     However, Hibiscus and Bays ranks 12th in the region (five percent) for smoking rates among youth (15-24 age group).

13.     The Auckland Plan and the Policy has a goal of a Smoke-free Auckland by 2025.  This is a five percent smoking rate in the region by 2025.

Policy Implementation

Smoke-free Public Places

14.     Smoke-free in public places aims to discourage the community from smoking in certain public outdoor areas to de-normalise smoking behaviour.  As the Policy is non-regulatory, compliance is voluntary and relies on the public being well informed about these smoke-free areas. As such smoke-free signs need to communicate the smoke-free status of a space.

15.     However, the cost of installing smoke-free signage in all public places identified in the Policy outweighs its benefit.  Therefore, staff recommend placing smoke-free signs in certain areas where the smoke-free message will have the greatest impact.

16.     In order to identify these sites, staff developed a criteria based on the objectives and principles of the Policy.  The criteria focused on:

·    areas that are frequented by children and youth

·    council-owned facilities

·    areas that are well used and popular within their community

·    sites where several smoke-free public places are clustered in close proximity.

 

17.     Based on scores against the criteria, sites were then divided into four categories.  Smoke-free signage implementation varies according to the categories.  Sites that are scored highly are ‘Category A sites’ or high priority sites, where there is an opportunity for a higher level of smoke-free signage installation.  Table one summarises these categories and smoke-free signage installation.

Table 1             Site priority and level of signage installation

Category

Level of smoke-free signage installation

A

High priority sites

·      additional smoke-free signs +

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades occurs

B

Medium priority sites

·      temporary smoke-free stickers to be installed on existing signs, until signage replacement or upgrades

C

Low priority sites

·      smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they are replaced or upgraded

D

No priority sites

·      no smoke-free signage installation

 

18.     Staff had prepared recommendations on the high priority (Category A) and medium priority (Category B) sites within the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.  In April 2014, a workshop with the local board was held to gather feedback and confirm these high priority sites.

19.     Table two outlines the high priority smoke-free sites in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

Table 2            High priority smoke-free sites for Hibiscus and Bays local board area

Site Name

Rationale

Est sign cost

Silverdale War Memorial Park

·      Sports parks and sand field

·      Used frequently by children and youth sports and families

·      Used most times of the week- weekdays and weekends and all seasons

·      Approx. 3-4 wall mounted

·      Est. cost  $500

 

Stanmore Bay Park and Pool

·      A popular sports focused area – used for formal and informal recreation

·      Majority of users are children and youth

·      Pool is a visible council asset

·      Close to beach and playgrounds as well

·      Approx. 3-4 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $500

 

Victor Eaves Park

·      Popular sports park used by different sports codes

·      Also used for passive recreation (mainly dog walking)

·      Approx. 5-6 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $738

Western Reserve

·      Site contains hard courts, sports facilities and a large park

·      Used for formal and passive recreation

·      Approx. 4 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $500

Orewa Community Centre and Library

·      Community facilities adjacent to each other

·      Markets take place in Orewa square area

·      Approx. 2-3 wall mounted signs

·      Est.$370

Orewa Beach Front (recreation reserve)

·      Focus smoke-free signs at the recreation reserve

·      Recreation reserve site includes 3 play spaces, recreation sites, a venue for hire, seating and access to the beach

·      Beach front attracts  visitors from across the region

·      Approx. 4 (wall mounted) or 2 stand-alone)

·      Est. $500 (wall mounted)

·      Est. $700 (stand-alone)

 

Browns Bay Beach Reserve

·      Site contains playground, skate park, park used for passive recreation (dog walking and petanque)

·      Events frequently held here

·      Attracts users from across the region 

·      Approx. 5 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $615

 

Whangaparaoa Library

·      Library site important community asset

·      Frequented by children and young people

·      Has significant issues with smokers at present

·      Has existing stickers

·      Approx. 2-3 wall mounted

·      Est.  $370

East Coast Bays Library and Village Green

·      Several important council assets located on site- e.g. library, community centre, leisure centre

·      Diversity of users frequent the site

·      Used for passive recreation (e.g. tai chi)

·      Approx. 4-5 wall mounted signs

·      Est. cost $615

Freyberg Park

·      Site used frequently by sports clubs Well used throughout the day by different sports codes

·      Lots of youth use the site

·      Approx. 2-3 wall mounted signs

·      Est. cost $370

Mairangi Bay Playground

·      Destination playground that is heavily used

·      Fencing surrounds the playground 

·      Approx. 2-3 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $370

Mairangi Bay Park

·      Variety of sports codes located on site

·      Well used by sports clubs and community

·      Approx. 3-4 wall mounted

·      Est. cost $500

NB: these cost estimates are based on (300x150mm and 300x400mm) sizes from one supplier (Panda Visuals)

Smoke-free signage installation in other areas

20.     Sites that have scored moderately against the criteria, or ‘medium priority’ (Category B) sites will have temporary smoke-free sticker logo attached onto existing signs (in accordance with the council’s signage manual).  As signs are replaced and upgraded, the signs will incorporate the permanent smoke-free logo.

21.     For the Hibiscus and Bays local board area, the medium priority sites are:

·    Centennial Park

·    Sherwood Park

·    Christie Park

·    Alice Eves Bush

·    Mairangi Bay Beach front Reserve

·    Murrays Bay Beach front

·    Campbells Bay Beach front

·    Orewa Beach Esplanade

·    Manly Beach Esplanade

·    Waike Beach reserve

·    Stanmore Bay Beach

 

22.     ‘Low priority’ (Category C) sites will have the smoke-free logo incorporated onto signs as they due for upgrades or replacement. ‘ No priority’ (Category D) sites are areas that do not currently have any signage installed.

Smoke-free public places promotion

23.     As the Policy is non-regulatory, raising public awareness around the danger of smoking and the council’s position on achieving a smoke-free Auckland is important.

24.     To assist the local board in the promotion of the Policy staff suggest the following for consideration:

·    an article in the local paper or magazine when most of the smoke-free signs have been installed

·    a launch event at one of the high priority sites when most of the smoke-free signs have been installed

·    raise awareness through social media (i.e. local board Facebook page or a website).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

25.     Staff consulted with the local board throughout the development of the Policy in 2012-2013.

26.     In April 2014, staff attended a workshop with the local board to confirm the high and medium priority sites for the implementation of the Policy.  The local board was also provided with an indicative cost of introducing additional signage in the identified high priority sites. 

27.     At the workshop, the local board had made the following comments: 

·    it is supportive of smoke-free behavior and smoke-free public places

·    is keen to be keep updated with signage installation, i.e. exactly where the signs will be installed as well as input into smoke-free signage messaging

·    willing to examine smoke-free beaches in Phase one of the Policy

Mŕori impact statement

28.     The New Zealand Tobacco Use Survey (2009) found that the smoking rate amongst Maori (44 percent) is significantly higher than that of the non-Maori population (18 percent).

29.     Through the development of the Policy, many stakeholders highlighted the disparity between Maori and non-Maori smoking rates within the region as a cause for disproportionate health outcomes for Maori.

30.     The Policy aims to address Maori smoking rates through:

·    the creation of smoke-free public places

·    smoke-free signs to contain awareness based messages in Maori

·    focus on the Southern Initiative smoke-free work stream

Implementation

31.     There will be additional costs to the local board relating to the printing and installation of smoke-free signage in the high priority sites identified in the report.

32.     Staff recommend wall-mounted smoke-free signage as these are hard wearing, have a longer life span and minimises signage pollution.

33.     The approximate cost of additional smoke-free signs in the 13 identified sites (Table two) in Phase one is between $5,000 to $6,300. The exact costs will vary depending on:

·    the exact number of smoke-free signs required on each site

·    if there are many smoke-free messages (e.g. mass printing of one message is more cost effective)

·    the positioning and installation of the smoke-free signs

 

34.     These estimated costs are one off costs. Any ongoing costs will be covered within signage maintenance and renewal budgets.


 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jasmin Kaur - Policy Analyst

Michael Sinclair - Team Leader, Regionwide Social Policy

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Review of Alcohol Control Bylaw - Proposed bylaw for local board feedback

 

File No.: CP2014/19092

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide local boards with a copy of the proposed Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 and to request formal feedback by resolution.

2.       Local boards are also requested to appoint a review panel to make recommendations to the local board on the review of the local alcohol bans.

Executive summary

3.       On 22 July 2014, the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee recommended to the governing body to adopt the Statement of Proposal for the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (Attachment A) for public consultation (resolution number RBC/2014/27).  The governing body formally adopted the Statement of Proposal on 31 July 2014 (resolution number GB/2014/70).  Following this discussion, the council commenced public consultation (using the special consultative procedure), on 15 August 2014.

4.       In addition to the public consultation process, staff are seeking feedback from local boards on the proposed bylaw. 

5.       The proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 will establish the bylaw structure and delegation that will be used to make, review, amend or revoke alcohol bans.  Decisions on existing and new alcohol bans will be made by local boards after a new bylaw is adopted.  This ensures decisions meet the proposed new requirements in the bylaw.

6.       Regardless of the final form of the bylaw and delegations, local boards have an important role in the review of alcohol bans and the appointment of an alcohol ban review panel is sought.

7.       Details of the proposed bylaw are outlined in the report.

 

Recommendations

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback (by passing resolutions) on the proposed Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw to the hearing panel, including whether the local board wish to meet with the hearing panel.

b)      appoint a local alcohol ban review panel comprised of up to three local board members to make recommendations on the review of the alcohol bans in the local board area.

c)      appoint one member as a chairperson of the local alcohol ban review panel.

d)      delegate to the chairperson of the local board the power to make a replacement appointment to the review panel in the event that any member appointed by the local board under resolution (b) is unavailable.

 


Comments

Legislative Framework

8.       The Local Government (Auckland Transitional Provisions) Act 2010 requires the review of all seven legacy alcohol control bylaws (previously called liquor control bylaws) and associated alcohol bans (previously called liquor bans) by 31 October 2015.

9.       In December 2012, Parliament enacted the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. This in turn amended the Local Government Act 2002.  The requirements for making or continuing individual alcohol bans has changed significantly with the passing of the Local Government (Alcohol Reform) Amendment Act 2012 (the Act).

10.     The Act introduced a higher threshold to be met for alcohol bans to be made or continued.  The higher threshold requires that the council is satisfied that there is evidence to show a high level of crime or disorder is caused or made worse by the consumption of alcohol in that public place and that the alcohol ban is a reasonable restriction on people’s rights in light of that evidence.

11.     The process for making a bylaw under the Local Government Act 2002 requires that the council determine if a bylaw is the most appropriate response to a problem.  A bylaw must also be in the most appropriate form and must be consistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.   All bylaws must meet the legal requirements as set out in the Bylaws Act 1910, including not being unreasonable, providing rules that are proportionate to the issues being addressed and not being beyond the powers of the enabling legislation.

Current Auckland regulation

12.     Currently, there are seven legacy alcohol control bylaws and more than 1,600 individual alcohol ban areas across Auckland.  The legacy bylaws significantly differ in their drafting style and presentation.

13.     In general, all legacy bylaws provide the structure used to make alcohol bans.  Some legacy bylaws enable the making of alcohol bans by resolution while others require a change to the bylaw itself.  Making alcohol bans by resolution means the level of consultation is determined on a case by case basis and can result in more effective and efficient decisions compared to amending the bylaw.

14.     An assessment of the appropriateness of the legacy bylaws indicate that:

·        A single bylaw is necessary to enable the adoption of alcohol bans that prohibit or regulate or control the consumption or bringing into or possession of alcohol in public places.  The New Zealand Police consider that limiting the consumption of alcohol in public places may reduce alcohol related harm.

·        It is appropriate to delegate decisions on alcohol bans in local public places to local boards.

15.     Within an alcohol ban area the possession and consumption of alcohol is prohibited during the time the ban is operational.   Exceptions enable alcohol to be transported in an unopened container to and from licenced and private premises.

16.     Enforcement of the bylaw is the responsibility of the New Zealand Police.  The police have powers of search, seizure and arrest, and may issue a $250 infringement notice for breach of an alcohol ban.

Auckland Council’s proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw

The council’s decision to adopt the proposed Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw for public consultation

17.     On 22 July 2014, the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee recommended to the governing body the Statement of Proposal for the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw.

18.     On 31 July 2014, the governing body adopted the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw Statement of Proposal (Attachment A), which includes the proposed bylaw for public consultation (resolution number GB/2014/70).

19.     Following the decision, the council commenced the public consultation process (using the special consultative procedure), on 15 August 2014. The key consultation dates are summarised in the table below:

 

 

Table 1. Key consultation dates

Date

Milestone

15 August 2014

Written submission period opens

15 September 2014

Written submission period closes

September/October 2014

Staff will review and analyse all submissions in a report to the hearings panel

Report will include all formal feedback received from local boards

Early/Mid October 2014

Public hearings will be held by hearing panel

This will include an opportunity for local boards to meet with the hearings panel

End October 2014

Hearings panel will report back to governing body (final bylaw adopted)

18 December 2014

Bylaw commences

                                                                      

Summary of proposed alcohol control bylaw content

20.     This section of the report summarises the key proposals contained in the proposed bylaw.

21.     The purpose of the bylaw is to control the consumption or possession of alcohol in public places to reduce alcohol related harm.  This aligns to the section 147 (Power to make bylaws for alcohol control purposes) of the Local Government Act 2002.

22.     The bylaw proposes that local boards be delegated decisions on making, reviewing amending or revoking alcohol bans in local areas.  This supports previous feedback obtained by local boards requesting this delegation from the governing body.

23.     Alcohol bans of regional significance will remain the responsibility of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee.  This is consistent with the Auckland Council Long Term Plan where issues of a regional significance are the responsibility of a council committee.

24.     It is proposed within the bylaw that prior to making a new alcohol ban, the council be satisfied that the alcohol ban gives effect to the purpose of the bylaw and comply with criteria and decision making requirements Subpart 1 of Part 6 of the Local Governments Act 2002; and section 147B of Local Government Act 2002.  This includes that:

·        There is evidence that the area to which the bylaw applies (or will apply by virtue of the resolution) has experienced a high level of crime or disorder that can be shown to have been caused of made worse by alcohol consumption.

·        The alcohol ban is appropriate and proportionate in light of the evidence and can be justified as a reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms.

25.     Four different times are proposed in the bylaw for consideration of new alcohol ban areas:

·        24 hours, 7 days a week (at all times ban)

·        7pm – 7am daily (evening ban)

·        10pm – 7am daylight saving and 7pm – 7am outside daylight saving (night time ban)

·        7pm on the day before to 7am on the day after any weekend, public holiday or Christmas/New Year holiday period (weekend or holiday alcohol ban).

These times are a guide to improve consistency across Auckland. This recognises that in some instances the use of the times specified may be disproportionate to the evidence of the problem and therefore contrary to the statutory requirement that requires alcohol bans to be proportionate in light of the evidence. These times are generally consistent with a number of legacy council bylaws.

26.     Enforcement of alcohol bans is the responsibility of the New Zealand Police.  The penalty for breaching an alcohol ban is a $250 infringement under the Local Government (Alcohol Ban Breaches) Regulations 2013.

Review of local alcohol bans

27.     To ensure local board decision making on the existing alcohol bans is consistent with the new bylaw, local boards will be required to review all bans once the bylaw is adopted.  It is a statutory requirement these all be reviewed by 31 October 2015 otherwise the bans will lapse.

28.     Staff will support the local board review. The proposed alcohol ban review process is outlined in the table below:

Table 2. Proposed local board review process

Date

Milestone

September 2014

Local boards establish local alcohol ban review panels to review existing local alcohol bans

End October 2014

Final Alcohol Control Bylaw adopted by governing body

November 2014 – end February 2015

Staff to present information on local alcohol bans to each local alcohol ban review panel and  assist the panels in making recommendations on existing local alcohol bans

March 2015

Recommendations of the local alcohol review panels presented to local boards

April/May 2015

Public consultation on alcohol controls (if required by local boards)

June 2015

Alcohol bans adopted by local boards

October 2015

Legacy alcohol bans lapse.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

29.     The review of the legacy bylaws was discussed with local boards in the context of the significant other changes arising from new alcohol-related legislation.  In relation to alcohol bans, local boards sought clear decision-making criteria, some form of regional consistency in times while providing for local variation where necessary, provision for temporary changes, and local board delegations.

Māori impact statement

30.     Throughout the initial engagement phases of the review project, staff worked with the Community Policy and Planning team, Te Waka Angamua, policy advisors at the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) and Hapai Te Hauora Tapui to deliver a program for engaging with Māori on alcohol issues.

31.     As part of this, staff ran a workshop with rangatahi (youth), organised a rangatahi engagement session as part of the Atamira event and held a hui with mana whenua and mataa waka to discuss both the Local Alcohol Policy Project and the Alcohol Control Bylaw Project.

32.     There is broad support from the police iwi liaison officers, mana whenua and mataa waka in relation to protecting children and young people from the harms associated with alcohol consumption in public places.

Implementation

33.     If adopted as proposed local boards will be required to review all current alcohol bans after the bylaw is adopted by 31 October 2015.  This ensures that decisions on alcohol bans meet the proposed new requirement in the bylaw and the enabling legislation.

34.     The Policies and Bylaws Unit will assist local boards with this process.  Polices and Bylaws staff have been collating evidence from legacy council files, the Police and community safety audits and are working closing with Integrated Bylaw Review Implementation team to ensure practicality and ease in the implementation of the Auckland-wide bylaw.  As part of this process, the appointment of local board alcohol ban review panels is sought.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Statement of Proposal - Review of Alcohol Control Bylaws

91

bView

Proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw

107

     

Signatories

Authors

Kylie Hill - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 
















Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 













Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/20067

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities.

Executive summary

2.       The report provides an update on transport matters for the information of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and a register of transport issues in the local board’s area, as collated by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager North.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      resolve to proceed to detailed design, at a cost of approximately $10,000, for the provision of lighting along a section of Te Ara Tahuna walkway in Western Reserve, Orewa, based on a total rough cost estimate of $110,000 for the project, pending a favourable outcome of a report being considered by Auckland Council in September to allow Auckland Transport to carry out works in parks and reserves.  

 

 

Comments

 

Update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

 

3.       Construction of the following LBTCF projects nominated by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has now been completed:

 

·        Duck Creek Road, Stillwater – new footpath (Project 097);

·        201-246 Centreway Road, Orewa – new footpath (Project 100);

·        Titan Place to Silverdale Township, Silverdale – new footpath (Project 098);

·        East Coast Road (vicinity of Spencer Road), Pinehill – footpath upgrade (Project 094);

·        504 Beach Road, Murrays Bay – footpath upgrade (Project 099);

·        Grand Drive – Tauranga Place, Orewa – new walkway and footpath (Project 101);

·        St John’s School, Mairangi Bay – new footpath (Project 229).

 

4.       A consultant has provided a quote for the cost of a design for Project 090, Access to Matakatia Scenic Reserve, Whangaparaoa, and this has been forwarded to the local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads (TPLs).  The quote totaling $10,600 + GST included a topographical survey of the area, geotechnical investigation and report, and the provision of preliminary design details and costings for the proposed boardwalk/stairs.  A rough order of costs for the work is now being prepared and will be made available to the TPLs so that a decision can be made whether to proceed further with the project.

 

5.       A concept plan for Project 091, provision of a footpath with a higher than normal amenity value on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay, has been finalised in discussion with Auckland Council staff, AT staff and Members Parfitt and Cooper. Letters explaining the proposal were distributed to residents late in August. A firm cost estimate of the work is now being prepared.

 

6.         A design for safety improvements on Awaruku Road, Torbay (Project 096) is currently underway and a firm cost estimate will be provided on its completion. Providing the firm cost estimate meets with the local board’s approval, construction will be carried out by AT’s minor works contractor.

 

7.         Car parking adjacent to Stillwater Reserve (Project 209) will be provided on completion of a new community hall on the reserve. The design for the hall and car parking is being managed by the community hall project manager and a firm cost estimate will be provided once the design has been completed. It is anticipated that work will commence on the hall at the end of September 2014. Car parking along the southern side of Duck Creek Road must be completed no later than the end January 2015 to meet the conditions of resource consent.

 

 

8.       At its meeting on 20 August the local board resolved to proceed to detail design of the following projects based on the rough cost estimates shown:

 

·         Project 232 – New footpath on Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay, from Cedar Terrace to Scott Road (rough order of cost $94,000.00).

 

·         Project 236 – New footpath on Okura River Road, Okura, from 68 Okura River Road to Vaughans Road (rough order of cost $165,000). Approval will now be sought from AT’s LBTCF steering committee for a deviation from ATCOP standards for the option chosen, a loose metal path with an asphalt concrete top along the edge of the seal.

 

·         Project 240 – Safe Crossing Point on Tavern Road, Silverdale (rough order of cost $40,000).

 

9.         Detail designs for these projects will now be completed and firm cost estimates prepared for the local board’s further consideration.

 

10.      With respect to Project 233, provision of a new footpath on Ferry Road, Arkles Bay from the property at No. 41 Ferry Road to Wade River Road, for which a rough cost estimate of $196,000 has been provided, the local board has resolved to undertake a further site visit to determine whether the project can be delivered in a cost effective way and what potential there is for further linkages and connections in the immediate area. The site visit will be arranged by local board staff during September/October.

 

11.     With respect to Project 346, a rough cost estimate of $110,000 for the provision of lighting along a section of Te Ara Tahuna walkway in Western Reserve, Orewa, was made available to the local board’s TPLs on 21 August 2014.  This project comes under the umbrella of a report being considered by Auckland Council in September to allow AT to carry out works in parks and reserves.  The outcome of the Council’s decision will therefore influence whether or not the local board can proceed with the project.

 

12.     Should the decision made be favourable and the local board resolve that it wishes to proceed with the project, a design will be completed by a lighting consultant and the local board will then be provided with a firm cost estimate, following which two alternative quotes for the work will be sought, as requested by the local board.  The cost of this design will be approximately $10,000.

 

13.     The local board has decided not to proceed with the following project:

 

·        Project 238 – Lighting for new footpath on Flexman Place, Silverdale, to Titan Road (rough order of cost $140,000).

 

Hibiscus Coast New Network Review

 

14.     Feedback on changes to the public transport network for the Hibiscus Coast closed on 18 August 2014 with more than 800 submissions received, and more than 70% of people supporting or strongly supporting the changes proposed.

 

15.     The Hibiscus Coast is the second area of Auckland to have been consulted on as part of the move to the new public transport network, which will be implemented in phases across the whole Auckland region.

 

16.     Feedback was tremendously encouraging, as the Hibiscus Coast will be one of the first areas where the New Network will be implemented, with changes to be made in 2015.

 

17.     Proposals included extending the Northern Express bus service to Silverdale, and buses running more often between Orewa, Silverdale and Whangaparaoa.  Both proposals received strong support from residents in the survey. More than 70% said they wouldn’t mind transferring as part of their journey, in return for overall improved local services.

 

18.     Facilitating the New Network will be a new bus interchange at Silverdale, located at the Hibiscus Coast Busway Station, where the number of parking spaces will be increased from 100 to nearly 500. The interchange is planned to open in 2016.

 

19.     Staff are now in the process of analysing submissions in detail and all potential issues will be thoroughly investigated before final decisions are reached.  A consultation summary, including the final New Network for the Hibiscus Coast, will be available on Auckland Transport’s website by the end of the year.

 

20.     Further information on the Hibiscus Coast New Network review is available on: www.at.govt.nz.

 

 

Parking Discussion Document

 

21.     A late rush has seen around 4300 groups and individuals make submissions on a discussion document which will help shape the future of parking in the Auckland region.

 

22.     Auckland Transport consulted for two months on issues such as the cost of on and off-street parking, the provision of parking on main arterial roads, residential parking zones and permits, and park and ride facilities.

 

23.     Submissions are now being collated and analysed.  The next step will be to draw up a region-wide parking policy which will be based on information from those submissions.

 

24.     Key themes and possible policy responses are expected to be reported back to the board of Auckland Transport in September.

 

Consultations

 

25.     The local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads (TPLs) have been asked to provide feedback on the following proposal over the period 1 August – 1 September:

 

·        Installation of NSAAT restrictions on Hibiscus Coast Highway at Hilltop, Orewa, to prevent parked cars blocking access to/egress from driveways. Feedback requested prior to 5 September 2014.

 

·        Changes to restricted parking outside the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Offices at 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay.

 

 

Issues Update

 

26.     The following Issues Update comprises issues raised by Elected Members and Local Board Services staff to 1 September 2014:

 

Location

Issue

Status

 

1

Glen Road, Browns Bay

Request for changes to parking in Glen Road, Browns Bay.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chairperson asked at a meeting on 19 March 2014 that parking restrictions for six spaces in the vicinity of its offices in 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay, where people have been parking for extended periods of time, so that visitors to the offices are unable to find a car park, be reviewed and altered to reflect P180 parking restrictions. The local board was advised that Parking Design staff will undertake a review of the current unrestricted parking spaces opposite the Council’s Service Centre at 1 Glen Road, Browns Bay, together with those parking spaces adjacent to the Service Centre which are under Auckland Transport’s jurisdiction. This review will include consultation with affected residents and property owners, and the results will therefore not be available for some months. On 28 July the local board's TPLs were advised that the surveys have now been completed and a proposal is being finalised. Consultation on the proposed changes will be undertaken in mid-August. On 27 August the local board's TPLs were advised that the investigation and surveys have indeed shown that parking occupancy is high in this area and that parking controls are justified. A proposal to install P120 parking restrictions has been developed for some of the parking spaces located directly in front of the Auckland Council building and this will be circulated for internal feedback, including the local board, later this week/early next week, followed by public consultation later next week.

2

Constellation Busway Station, Albany

Incorrect real time information at Constellation Busway Station, Albany.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chair Julia Parfitt advised on 9 July 2014 that she had received complaints that the real time board information at the Constellation Busway Station is out of sync with the real situation. On 14 August 2014 the local board chairperson and TPLs were advised that earlier this year, Auckland Transport completed replacement of all on-bus GPS tracking equipment, with a modern and reliable solution.  This has seen an increase in the number of bus trips being tracked by the Real Time system as well as an increase in the accuracy of the tracking.  A working group from Auckland Transport’s Public Transport and Business Technology teams, with expertise in the Real Time system, continue to work with the bus operators, the Real Time system provider and integrating technology providers to address tracking issues identified following the upgrade of the on-bus equipment. Residents are encouraged to contact AT directly with sufficient detail (bus stop number, date and time, the estimated arrival shown on the real time sign versus the actual bus arrival time) to enable staff to investigate more thoroughly and identify the root cause of any issues.

3

733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay

Request for repairs to road surface outside 733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay.

Member Fitzgerald advised on 16 July 2014 that the road surface outside the property at 733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay, where new seal meets old seal, is so uneven, that cars are jolted as they traverse the area. She asked that repairs be carried out to improve the surface. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

4

Glenvar Road, Torbay

Request for update on the timing of the Glenvar Road/East Coast Road intersection upgrade.

Local board chairperson Julia Parfitt asked on 21 July 2014 for an update on the timing of the Glenvar Road/East Coast Road intersection upgrade. On 24 July 2014 the local board's TPLs were forwarded links to information available on the Long Bay Transport Programme, the East Coast Road/Glenvar Road/Lonely Track Road intersection upgrade, the new Glenvar Ridge Road, a proposed reconstruction of Okura River Road and Vaughans Road, major works on the intersection between the two and improvement works on the intersection between Okura River Road and East Coast Road. They were advised that the timing of each project is included in the information available on the website.

5

Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay

Request for installation of a left turning lane at the intersection of Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay.

On 4 August 2014 local board staff forwarded a request from a resident for the installation of a left turning lane at the intersection of Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay. On 25 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that the width between the traffic splitter island in Glenvar Road and the kerb line is sufficient for two cars to queue side-by-side in practice, but a little narrow for formalising into two conventional width traffic lanes that need to accommodate all vehicles types. However, to improve the situation for some, two very narrow traffic lanes will be painted for a short length within the intersection, as suggested. This will be sufficient to encourage right turning traffic to position themselves to the right, but will not accommodate two large vehicles side-by-side so, whilst a benefit for some traffic, it will not be a general benefit. The lines will be painted once the better summer weather arrives and monitored for any adverse effects, with the option that they will be removed if they prove problematic.The use of a splitter island is necessary in its current location to prohibit high-speed right-turns into Glenvar Road, while still allowing left turns into Glenvar Road for school buses; the splitter island will therefore not be relocated or removed.
A more comprehensive solution to this issue is already programmed as part of the East Coast Road upgrades over the next 5-7yrs with the new alignment for Glenvar Road and an intersection upgrade to improve traffic safety and capacity.

6

Okura River Road, Okura

Concerns regarding the condition of new surfacing on Okura River Road, Okura.

Board Chair Julia Parfitt requested an update on the deterioration of the new road surface on Okura River Road, Okura, on 4 August 2014, together with the area surrounding the bus stop and the finish between the old and new seal at the junction of Okura River Road and Vaughans Road. On 27 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised again that the finished road surface has not taken as well as hoped, mainly due to inclement weather during the work and a failure of contractor’s equipment, resulting in a first coat seal that was below standard. The contractor will be maintaining this surface at its own cost until the second coat seal is applied in the summer period. Testing undertaken proves the base is very good, there is no on-going deterioration of the road and the current patch work is no longer visible. AT has advised various residents of the condition of the road, sending letters in this regard. The bus stops are tied in with the road and there are no issues, though there is a section behind one where a cattle ramp has been damaged as a result of use by the farmer. The finish between the old and new seal at the junction of Okura River Road and Vaughans Road has also been addressed and there is no loose chip evident.

7

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Hatfields Beach

Requests for safety improvements on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Hatfields Beach.

On behalf of a resident, local board chairperson Julia Parfitt requested the following improvements on Hibiscus Cost Highway in the Hatfields Beach area - an extension of the 50km/h speed limit by approximately 1 km to the northern end of Hatfield's Beach to enhance pedestrian and cycle safety; a pedestrian crossing opposite the public toilets on Hatfield's Reserve to link the eastern communities through the Hatfield's Beach reserve to the beach itself and another on Orewa Hill to enable safe navigation of the existing footpaths; a single contiguous pedestrian/cycle route over the hill to Hatfield's Beach to make cycling and walking to shops and schools safe and a feasible and efficient alternatives to car trips. On 26 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that an engineer has visited the site and undertaken an initial review of the suggestion for pedestrian crossings. Further detailed investigation now needs to be undertaken to ensure a comprehensive review and this has been prioritised and programmed, with an expected completion date of early November 2014. The local board will be provided with the outcome of the investigation and resulting recommendations from the assessment at that time. On 27 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were further advised that that the speed limit on Hibiscus Coast Highway has been reviewed in accordance with the requirements of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2003, a central government regulation which governs how speed limits are set and seeks to achieve a consistent approach across the entire country. While the speed limit rule considers a large number of factors, the outcome is largely driven by the level of roadside development. In the case of Hibiscus Coast Highway in the area north of Orewa (over the hill and through Hatfields Beach) there is a mixture of developed and undeveloped road frontages, the result of a historic approach limiting access to the highway which has, in turn, resulted in many of these properties being developed with access via side streets and consolidated onto shared driveways, minimising the number of direct access points onto the highway. Consequently the area now rates as semi-rural development and the existing 70km/hr speed limit is correctly set under the rule. While the traffic volumes on Hibiscus Coast Highway have substantially decreased following the opening of the Puhoi toll road, the roadside development, road geometry and engineering is still consistent with a highway route and simply changing speed limit signs would not be expected to achieve lower operating speeds, as lower speed limits would not appear credible to drivers and therefore be poorly complied with. Potentially operating speeds could be reduced by substantial engineering changes; however, this would be expensive and require local board funding as it is unlikely to fall within AT's work programme. It should also be noted that the old highway remains the route for over dimensional loads which are unable to use the tunnels on the toll road and consequently there are limitations to the extent to which the existing road geometry could be altered.

8

376 Beach Road , Mairangi Bay

Sign facing wrong way at  376 Beach Road , Mairangi Bay

Member Cooper advised that a sign at a pedestrian refuge located at 376 Beach Road, Mairangi Bay, which warns that motorists have the right of way, faces towards motorists rather than pedestrians. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

9

246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay

Concerns that street lighting in the vicinity of 246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay, is inadequate.

Cr Wayne Walker's councillor support advisor advised that the resident at 246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay, considers that the street lighting in this area is inadequate, asking that this be investigated. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance – Street lighting.

10

246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay

Concerns that a bus stop at 246 Beach Road, Campbells Bay, restricts visibility for drivers.

Cr Walker's councillor support advisor advised on 13 August 2014 that the resident of 246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay, considers that the location of the bus stop immediately outside this property makes visibility difficult for drivers when buses are using the stop. On 25 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that there is sufficient road width for vehicles to pass safely if they are overtaking buses as they pick up or drop off patrons on the approach to the resident's driveway, with a central median that can be used if drivers need to swing wide to pass the bus. Given the short time buses remain at the bus stop, the resident does not have long to wait until they move off if he is concerned about visibility when exiting his driveway, especially when undertaking a right turn movement. The request to relocate the bus stop away from this location can therefore not be agreed to.

11

Seaton Road, Murrays Bay

Request for information about works on Seaton Road, Murrays Bay.

Local board chairperson Julia Parfitt asked on 20 August 2014 when the works underway on Seaton Road, Murrays Bay, between Westbourne and #2 Seaton Rd, would be completed, and which organisation was responsible for these. On 22 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that the work in Seaton Road is being carried out by Watercare, whose contractor, Hydrotech Ltd, is replacing wastewater pipes. Whilst the work appears to have stalled, AT's Road Corridor Access staff  have asked for an update on its programme/completion and an assurance that reinstatement will be to the correct standards.

12

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa

Cost of proposed work, Orewa South Bridge, Orewa.

At the August Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting the local board chairperson asked for information about the cost of safety improvements proposed on Hibiscus Coast Highway in the vicinity of the Orewa South Bridge. On 27 August 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that the total cost of the project is approximately $577,000, with the physical work costing approximately $300,000, with traffic control, establishment and contingency making up the total cost. Staff are currently awaiting receipt of a quote and offer of service for the work from the consultant and hope to proceed to construction in February 2015, or sooner if at all possible.

13

Whangaparaoa Road, Red Beach

Delays at Whangaparaoa/Red Beach Road intersection, Red Beach.

Member Harding advised at the local board's meeting on 20 August 2014 that there are long delays for traffic turning right from Whangaparaoa Road onto Red Beach Road, Red Beach, at morning peak times, causing delays to parents taking children to school. Referred to Road Corridor Operations for Investigation.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

27.     This report is for the local board’s information.

Māori impact statement

28.     No specific issues with regard to the Mŕori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

Implementation

29.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

30.     There are no implementation issues.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Ellen Barrett, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Orewa Community Hall fees and charges variation delegation

 

File No.: CP2014/20835

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To delegate any decisions needed on the waiver or adjustment of fees for the Orewa Community Hall to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Members Julia Parfitt and Janet Fitzgerald.

Executive summary

2.       A recently introduced new fee structure for council-managed community venues had raised issues within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. The Orewa Community Hall is the only hall in the area currently managed by Auckland Council. 

3.       The new fee structure has resulted in unexpected fee increases for a number of user groups.  Council staff and local board members are working together to resolve the issues.  It has become clear that a delegation is required to enable timely and appropriate decision making around any variation to the agreed fee structure. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to local board members Parfitt and Fitzgerald to make decisions on the waiver or adjustment of fees charged to groups using the Orewa Community Hall. 

b)      request that the community facilities team prepare a template form that will be used to seek a decision from the delegated local board members and keep a record of any variation made.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       Local boards were recently asked to consider the introduction of a new fee structure and increased fees for the hire of council-managed community venues, centres and arts facilities. A report came to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Business Meeting on 16 April 2014.

6.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board agreed to the proposed administrative changes to the fees and charges framework for the Orewa Community Hall. 

7.       The local board did not agree to an increase in the fees charged for 2014/2015 financial year. The local board were concerned they did not have enough information to make this decision and worried about potential impacts to community groups in the area. 

8.    The final resolution made was HB/2014/56. That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a) confirm the activity types eligible for priority discounts for hire of local council run

facilities as per amended attachment A dated 1 April 2014, to the agenda

report.

b) request that staff report back to the local board detailing usage statistics, asset

data and other relevant information to enable the local board to assess future

fees and charges in future financial years.

c) note the administrative changes to facilitate implementation.

9.       The new framework was implemented on 1 July 2014.  At around this time a number of users groups approached the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members and the media to express their concern about an apparent increase in their fees.  Further investigation revealed that a letter had been incorrectly sent to regular hall users advising that the hall hireage fees were to be increased.  This error was corrected by a subsequent letter sent to users advising that the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board had not agreed to increase fees.

10.     As issues continued to arise over the July and August period it became evident that a number of existing users of the hall had specially negotiated rates outside of the hireage framework.  This meant that although the fees had not been increased some user groups were in fact presented with charges higher than they had previously been paying. 

11.     A transition to the new fee structure has been proposed by the Community Development, Arts and Culture department.  Representatives from the department will continue to work with local board members to implement the changes. 

12.     It has been acknowledged through this process that there will be circumstances where variations to the agreed fee structure will be required.  As any variation to the fee structure affects the local board budget bottom line it is agreed that decisions of this nature should be made by local board members rather than council staff.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     A meeting was held in August between the local board community development portfolio holders and council officers from Community Development, Arts and Culture to understand the issues currently facing staff and the community with the new fee structure.

14.     In order to ensure appropriate and timely decisions are made around the waiver or variation of fees and charges for hall users going forward it was agreed that a delegation should be put in place to allow local board members to make decisions.  The purpose of this report is to put that delegation in place.

Māori impact statement

15.     Providing access to the use of Orewa Community Hall benefits the local community as a whole, including Maori.  The recommendation in this report is procedural and Maori residents within Hibiscus and Bays are not adversely impacted by this decision. 

Implementation

16.     Putting this delegation in place will simplify for council staff the process of allowing variations to the agreed fees structure.  Council staff will contact the delegated local board members to seek opinion and/or approval of any proposed variation.  The decision will be sought and recorded using a template form that will need to be developed by the community facilities team.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January 2014 - 30 June 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/20946

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board an overview Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 January 2014 to 30 June 2014.

Executive summary

2.       ACPL’s vision is to be a ‘centre of excellence’ that provides commercial expertise and value for money to the council in managing its property portfolio, acquisition and disposal activities, and the delivery of projects that implement council development initiatives.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six-months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent 2014 to 2017 and noted below.  Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

·        Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

·        Place-shaping projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

·        ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

·        Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

·        Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

·        Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

·        The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board six-monthly update 1 January 2014 to 30 June 2014.

 

 

 

Comments

 

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from January to June 2014 is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages all Auckland Council or AT owned non-service properties. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six-months and now totals 1185 properties, an increase of 90 since our February 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.   ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the quarter ending 30 June 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $1.9 ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $25.4m against budget of $23.5m.  During the quarter the average monthly collectable arrears rate and vacancies rate were respectively 2.1% and 2.4%.  Well under the SOI targets of 5% and 3%.

10.     A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

·        Current ACPL managed commercial and residential property within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

·             Each property’s classification or reason for retention

·        The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

·        The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported, e.g. regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.       ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.


Performance

13.     January to June 2014 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$12.3m disposal recommendations

$14.8m

These recommendations include $5.6m of sites that are identified for development projects

 

In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

 

 

14.     2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

These targets will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net sales

 

Process

15.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with; council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Maori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

16.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Hibiscus and Bays area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

East Coast Road, Dairy Flat, Sec 4 SO 387404

Stopped Road. Released by AT as not required by AT for infrastructure purposes. Progressed through the Rationalisation Process from August 2013 to April 2014 to evaluate future use requirements and considerations. Presented to the Governing Body in April 2014 and cleared for sale.

Pine Road, Orewa (multiple strips)

Multiple strips of land originally acquired for Stormwater/Sanitation. ACPL reviewing some sections of this strip for future use requirements and consideration with a view to sale to adjoining landowners. Subject to a reserve revocation process which is running concurrent to the Rationalisation Process. Workshop booked with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for 8 October to seek their views.

 


 

Place Shaping and Housing Initiatives

Overview

17.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into around 48 council-driven place-shaping and housing initiatives region wide. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $400k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL lead developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

18.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Action Plan Group, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects with an affordable housing component over three years which would encompass Community Housing Organisation involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

 

Local Activities

19.     20 Link Crescent: This legacy approved 2.0657 ha site has an intensive residential zoning. ACPL is progressing development plans for the site which is adjacent to a planned Family Centre facility supported by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. Detailed designs were reviewed in a workshop with the local board on 12 February 2014. Public and iwi consultation under the Local Government Act 2001 was undertaken in March 2014. Approval to progress sale and development of the land was granted in July 2014. Further site investigation and research will be undertaken to see that the master-plan includes the park, environmentally sustainable design and best practice urban design.

20.     Property Optimisation: An increasing focus for ACPL is property optimisation. In this we are keen to work with local boards on other development opportunities that facilitate upgrades within the service portfolio. For example a community facility upgrade or build may be funded by incorporating the facility into a mixed-use development that makes better use of the overall site. We welcome the opportunity to review any such opportunities that may be identified by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

Acquisitions

Overview

21.     ACPL continues to support Council and Auckland Transport programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved Council or Auckland Transport budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

22.     By the end of the financial year 2013 to 2014 two hundred and seven property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $132.4m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

 

Council Acquisitions

23.     Over the past six months 14 properties were acquired to meet council open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

 

 

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

102 Hobsonville Road, Hobsonville

City Transformation

City Transformation

Upper Harbour

Hobsonville Point Community Buildings (HQ & Sunderland Lounge)

City Transformation

City Transformation / Community

Upper Harbour

150 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe

Parks, Sports & Recreation

Open Space

Upper Harbour

139 Beach Road, Castor Bay

Community, Policy & Planning

Open Space

Devonport-Takapuna

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

24.     72 properties were also acquired over the past six-months on behalf of AT.  The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects such as AMETI (30 acquisitions) Dominion Road (7 acquisitions) Te Atatu Road (9 acquisitions) and City Rail Link (16 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

25.     ACPL manages eight business interests region wide on council’s behalf.  This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries.  There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     This report is for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

27.     The importance of effective communication and engagement with Maori on the subject of land is understood.   ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 listed Tamaki region mana whenua groups for our core business activities. 

28.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of waahi tapu or joint management relating to Treaty Settlements.  ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

29.     ACPL has additionally undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. The Improvement Planning Phase of this project is nearly complete. We anticipate finalising our MRP in September/October 2014.

Implementation

30.     There are no implementation issues.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

137

bView

Properties managed by ACPL in the local board area

139

cView

Property movement in the local board area

143

     

 

Signatories

Author

Caitlin Borgfeldt     Local Board Liaison

Authoriser

David Rankin    Chief Executive

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

New Road Name - Sunshine Terrace

 

File No.: CP2014/20754

 

  

 

 

Purpose

To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval for a new road name in the Kensington Park Holdings Limited subdivision off Centreway Road, Orewa.

Executive summary

I.        A condition of the subdivision consent required the applicant to suggest to Council names for the new roads within the subdivision.

3.       The applicant wishes to name this private way that will provide access to further stages of development, Sunshine Terrace, following the approval of other surrounding names last month.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name of Sunshine Terrace for the Kensington Park Holdings Limited subdivision off Centreway Road, Orewa, Council reference R61512.

 

 

Comments

 

Applicant: Kensington Park Holdings Limited

Site address: Centreway Road

Council Reference: R61512 and others.

 

4.       The applicant, following a number of staged resource consents for the Kensington Park subdivision, wishes to name a private way that has recently been created.

 

5.       The applicant originally put forward the name Sunrise Terrace.  However prior to the July local board meeting it was determined that this name was too similar to Sunrise Avenue in Murrays Bay.  The applicant has now put forward the name Sunshine Terrace.

 

6.       Sunshine Terrace is located on the hillside of Kensington Park.  The lane is positioned to capture the sunrise of Orewa for residents; therefore Sunshine Terrace is considered appropriate by the developers for the environment within which it sits.

 

7.       It is determined Sunshine Terrace is appropriate for this location as the closet similar name is Sunshine Boulevard in Waitakere.  It has been outlined by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) that since the amalgamation of the various Auckland territorial authorities to form Auckland Council an informal exception to the rule that a road name has to be unique within a territorial authority boundary regardless of road type, can be made.  LINZ will allow a road name to be duplicated, provided the road type is unique within Auckland territorial authority boundaries, the road name is unique within a close geographic area and the road name is unambiguous.  In this case it is determined that Sunshine Terrace is unique to the geographical area.  The only other Sunshine Terrace in New Zealand is in Arthurs Pass.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       A decision is sought from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to approve the new road name.

 

Māori impact statement

9.       Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust has a vested interest in this area, and has been consulted throughout the subdivision process.  The applicant has corresponded with Fiona McKenizie regarding road naming previously and overall she is comfortable with the direction the development is taking in regard to road naming for the development.

 

Implementation

10.     Land Information database confirms that the name is unique to the area.

11.     If and when the name is approved the developer will be advised and the developer is responsible for erecting the new road name sign.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

147

bView

Locality Map

149

     

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering Land Surveyor North Resource Consents

Authorisers

Julie Bevan – Team Manager, Northern Resource Consents

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Deferral of 2014/2015 capital projects

 

File No.: CP2014/19740

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek agreement from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to the list of capital projects outlined in Attachment A that are proposed for deferral from 2014/2015 to 2015/2016, prior to consideration by the Finance and Performance Committee on 18 September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Prior to decisions being made by the Finance and Performance Committee regarding a 2014/2015 capex deferral programme, engagement was undertaken with all local boards.

3.       Between 12 and 19 August 2014, staff attended 21 local board workshops to outline the capex deferral process and obtain feedback on proposed deferrals affecting each local board area.

4.       On 21 August 2014, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved that decisions on the deferral of local board capital projects from 2014/2015 to 2015/2016 be deferred until local boards have formally considered and responded to each project in full (FIN/2014/47).

5.       The list of capex projects proposed for deferral is outlined in Attachment A. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      formally consider and agree the deferral of capex projects outlined in Attachment A to 2015/2016.

b)      note that any projects where timing has been deferred, but project planning is underway, should be given high priority in the 2015/2016 capital programme.

 

 

Comments

 

Background

6.       As foreshadowed in the 2014/2015 Annual Plan and Long Term Plan (LTP) workshops, operating budgets for 2015/2016 (the first year of the LTP 2015-2025) would need to be reduced by about $90 million to achieve a 2.5 per cent average rates increase.

7.       It is not possible to reduce the average rates increase for 2015/2016 down to 2.5 per cent solely by reducing or deferring capex in that particular year.  The lagged impact of changes in the capital programme on operating budgets means that reducing or deferring capex in 2014/2015 will have a greater impact on rates for 2015/2016.

8.       Since amalgamation the quantum of planned projects each year has exceeded the council parent’s capacity to deliver. While delivery capacity is now increasing, a significant bow wave has built up.  This historical underspend is acknowledged in the Annual Plan and factored into council’s rates and debt projections by way of a $207 million assumed underspend.  However, the individual projects that will not be delivered are not explicitly identified in the Annual Plan as they had not yet been identified.

9.       Council staff have reviewed 2014/2015 capex budgets to identify work that must be completed this year as a matter of practical necessity, or where not doing the project in this timeframe would negatively impact existing service levels, external revenue or the realisation of efficiency savings.

10.     The specific categories used to develop the list of deferred projects and process undertaken is explained further in Attachment B which was circulated to local boards prior to the proposed capex projects for deferral being discussed at a recent workshop.

11.     In order to develop a realistic capex programme for 2014/2015 and contain pressure on rates in 2015/2016, staff recommend that the capex projects included in Attachment A for the council parent be explicitly deferred from 2014/2015 to 2015/2016, and be included as part of the LTP prioritisation process.

12.     Between 12 and 19 August 2014, staff attended workshops for all 21 local boards to obtain feedback on the proposed capital deferral schedules for 2014/2015. This engagement provided opportunity for local boards to ask questions, reinforce the reason for deferring capital funds and provide feedback on the status of projects in alignment to criteria used to assess proposed deferrals.

13.     Of the total proposed projects for deferral tabled at the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 August 2014, regional projects amounted to $80 million, local projects amounted to $35 million and CCO’s collectively deferred $109m.

14.     Staff reduced the total of local projects for deferral by approximately $7 million due to responding to the information provided through the recent workshops held with local boards. These reductions were due to corrections in applying the criteria used for identifying potential deferrals. Attachment A takes into account these reductions.

15.     Local boards also identified projects that are discretionary and could be deferred, but which are very important to their local community.  Rather than making decisions about removing any high-priority discretionary projects from the deferral list, staff included these comments in the schedule provided to the Finance and Performance Committee.

16.     The decisions being made are budget adjustments that represent timing changes only. Any decisions to drop or reprioritise projects should be made as part of the LTP process.

17.     Through September and October 2014 local boards, the governing body, CCOs and council staff will all contribute to the development of draft LTP 2015-2025 budgets in response to the Mayoral Proposal.  Decisions on discretionary local budgets will be made by local boards in October and decisions on regional activities and local asset based services will be made by the Budget Committee on 5-7 November 2014.

18.     Local board plans, along with the Auckland Plan and the agreed spatial priorities will help inform this prioritisation.  Final decisions on which projects are included in the LTP 2015-2025 will be made by 30 June 2015, following full public consultation.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

List of 2014/2015 projects porposed for deferral until 2015/2016 including Local Board Feedback

155

bView

Local Board memo distributed prior to the workshops on 7 August 2014

157

     

Signatories

Author

Taryn Crewe – Financial Planning Manager Council Parent

Authorisers

Matthew Walker – Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting,

Karen Lyons Manager Local Board Services

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 




Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Scholarships

 

File No.: CP2014/21000

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To confirm the process for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2014 Scholarships and seek confirmation of local board member appointees to the selection process.

Executive Summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has an allocated budget of $13,000 for the Secondary School Scholarships in the local board area.  Each school is allocated a scholarship for senior students, who have not only achieved academically, but have made a significant contribution to their school or wider community in the 2014 academic year.  The selection of the students is supported by the appointment of local board members, who in association with the school select the successful recipients. 

3.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has five secondary schools in the local board area who have historically been offered scholarships: Orewa College (2), Kingsway College (1), Wentworth College (1), Whangaparaoa College (2) and Long Bay College (1).

4.       The local board seeks to appoint local board members to assist the schools in the selection of the scholarship recipients. 

5.       The local board is required to top up the scholarship fund from its discretionary funding to increase the current allocation from $13,000 to $14,000.  While this funding sits regionally, the funding increase to deliver the intended scholarships has not occurred.  Requests have been made for the fund to be re-allocated to the local board to reflect the decision-making allocation.  This has still not occurred and it needs to be confirmed that this funding will be allocated within the locally driven initiative allocation as required by the Local Board Funding policy.

6.       In order for the funds to be released the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is required to pass a resolution authorising the Relationship Manager to release the scholarship funds to the schools after the recipients have been confirmed.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      confirm that $2,000 be allocated to the secondary schools in the Local Board area, namely: Wentworth (1), Whangaparaoa (2), Orewa (2), Kingsway (1) and Long Bay (1) colleges and instructs local board staff to advise the secondary schools of the 2014 scholarship process.

b)      request that $1,000 be re-allocated from the Local Board Discretionary Fund to top up the total scholarship fund to $14,000 for 2014.

c)      appoint the following local board members and delegate the authority to confirm the recipients of the scholarship(s) at:

§ Orewa College - xxxx

§ Kingsway College - xxxx

§ Wentworth College - xxxx

§ Whangaparaoa College - xxxx

§ Long Bay College - xxxx

d)      request that local board members confirm the details of the approved recipients to the Relationship Manager - Rodney and Hibiscus and Bays Local Boards and the Relationship Manager be authorise payment to the secondary schools in accordance with the decisions in (c).

e)      confirm that the scholarship funding ($13,000) has been identified as part of the local driven initiatives allocation from the regional budget to the local board as a matter of priority to ensure the funding can continue to be used for its intended purpose.

f)       note that the allocation of future scholarship funding will need to be reviewed as part of the future local board budget considerations.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2014/20174

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Cr Wayne Walker and Cr John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Local Board Members Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/20176

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       This is an opportunity for local board members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the information.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

 

File No.: CP2014/20178

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on and 5 and 13 August 2014.  A copy of these workshop records is attached.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the records of the workshop meetings held on 5 and 13 August 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Record of Workshop meeting of 5 August 2014

169

bView

Record of Workshop Meeting of 13 August 2014

171

    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

17 September 2014