I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

9.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ann Hartley, JP

 

Members

Dr Grant Gillon

 

 

John Gillon

 

 

Danielle Grant

 

 

Richard Hills

 

 

Lorene Pigg

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Bianca Wildish

Democracy Advisor

 

3 September 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 8856

Email: Bianca.Wildish@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board area

 

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board Members

 

 

Kay McIntyre QSM

Chairperson

Ph 09 484 8383

DDI 09 484 8987

Mobile 021 287 8844

kay.mcintyre@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Finance – lead

·      Planning, policy and governance – lead

·     Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – alternate

 

Ann Hartley JP

Deputy Chairperson

Mob 027 490 6909

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 483 7572

ann.hartley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Community Development and Facilities – lead

·      Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – lead

·      Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – alternate

·      Planning, policy and governance – alternate

·     Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – alternate

 

 

Danielle Grant

Local Board Member

Mob 021 835 724

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 442 1271

danielle.grant@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Arts, culture and events services – lead

·       Economic development – lead

·       Natural environment – alternate

 

 

Grant Gillon MPP, PhD

Local Board Member

Mob 027 476 4679

Office 09 484 8383

grant.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Natural environment – lead

·      Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – lead

·     Libraries – alternate

 

John Gillon

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 2288

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 443 1683

john.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Libraries – lead

·       Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – lead

·       Civil defence and emergency management – alternate

 

Lindsay Waugh

Local Board Member

Mob 021 287 1155

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 418 1620

lindsay.waugh@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – lead

·      Arts, culture and events services – alternate

·      Transport and infrastructure – alternate

 

 

Lorene Pigg

Local Board Member

Mob 021 839 375

Office 09 484 8383

lorene.pigg@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Civil defence and emergency management – lead

·       Finance – alternate

·       Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – alternate

 

 

Richard Hills

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 4411

Office 09 484 8383

richard.hills@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Transport and infrastructure – lead

·       Community Development and Facilities – alternate

·       Economic development – alternate

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

12        Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 13 August 2014                                                                                                                                         9

13        Deferral of 2014/2015 capital projects                                                                       25

14        Hearing panel recommendations on review of local dog access rules                33

15        Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre Renewal Budget                                               49

16        136 Birkdale Road - report on initial public consultation                                       59

17        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards                                         73

18        Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in August 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board                                                                                                                           111

19        Hato Petera Community Access Agreement 2014/2015                                        125

20        Psychoactive substances – draft Local Approved Product Policy                     129

21        Review of Alcohol Control Bylaws - Proposed bylaw for local board feedback 161

22        Monthly Local Board Services Report - September 2014                                     195

23        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014                                                                                                                             217

24        Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14                             233

25        Submissions on the Kaipātiki Draft Local Board Plan                                          259

26        Members' Reports                                                                                                     295

27        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                         297

28        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops, Wednesday, 13 August 2014, Wednesday, 20 August 2014 and Wednesday, 27 August 2014                           299

29        Record of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in August 2014         307

30        Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987                                                                                        319  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

32        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               323

30        Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

a.      37 Telstar Place, Beach Haven                                                                       323

b.      82 Island Bay Road, Beach Haven                                                                 323

c.      2 Berne Place, Birkenhead                                                                              323  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 13 August 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/19126

 

  

 

Purpose

The open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipatiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014, are attached at item 12 of the Agenda for the information of the Board only.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipātiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014 are attached at Item 12 of the agenda for the information of the board only, and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipatiki Local Board 13 August 2014 Minutes

11

      

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Deferral of 2014/2015 capital projects

 

File No.: CP2014/19680

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek agreement from the Kaipātiki Local Board to the list of capital projects outlined in Attachment A that are proposed for deferral from 2014/2015, prior to consideration by the Finance and Performance Committee on 18 September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Prior to decisions being made by the Finance and Performance Committee regarding a 2014/2015 capex deferral programme, engagement was held with all local boards.

3.       Between 12 and 19 August 2014, staff attended 21 local board workshops to outline the capex deferral process and obtain feedback on proposed deferrals affecting each local board area.

4.       On 21 August 2014, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved that decisions on the deferral of local board capital projects from 2014/2015 to 2015/2016 be deferred until local boards have formally considered and responded to each project in full (FIN/2014/47).

5.       The list of capex projects proposed for deferral is outlined in Attachment A

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      formally consider and agree the deferral of capex projects outlined in Attachment A to 2015/2016.

b)      note that any projects where timing has been deferred, but project planning is underway, should be given high priority in the 2015/2016 capital programme.

 

Comments

Background

6.       As foreshadowed in the 2014/2015 Annual Plan and Long-term Plan (LTP) workshops, operating budgets for 2015/2016 (the first year of the LTP 2015-2025) would need to be reduced by about $90 million to achieve a 2.5 per cent average rates increase.

7.       It is not possible to reduce the average rates increase for 2015/2016 down to 2.5 per cent solely by reducing or deferring capex in that particular year. The lagged impact of changes in the capital programme on operating budgets means that reducing or deferring capex in 2014/2015 will have a greater impact on rates for 2015/2016.

8.       Since amalgamation the quantum of planned projects each year has exceeded council’s capacity to deliver. While delivery capacity is now increasing, a significant bow wave has built up. This historical underspend is acknowledged in the Annual Plan and factored into council’s rates and debt projections by way of a $207 million assumed underspend. However, the individual projects that will not be delivered are not explicitly identified in the Annual Plan as they had not yet been identified.

9.       Council staff have reviewed 2014/2015 capex budgets to identify work that must be completed this year as a matter of practical necessity, or where not doing the project in this timeframe would negatively impact existing service levels, external revenue or the realisation of efficiency savings.

10.     The specific categories used to develop the list of deferred projects and process undertaken is explained further in Attachment B, which was circulated to local boards prior to the proposed capex projects for deferral being discussed at a recent workshop.

11.     In order to develop a realistic capex programme for 2014/2015 and contain pressure on rates in 2015/2016, staff recommend that the capex projects included in Attachment A be explicitly deferred from 2014/2015 to 2015/2016, and be included as part of the LTP prioritisation process.

12.     Between 12 and 19 August, staff attended workshops for all 21 local boards to obtain feedback on the proposed capital deferral schedules for 2014/2015. This engagement provided opportunity for local boards to ask questions, reinforce the reason for deferring capital funds and provide feedback on the status of projects in alignment to criteria used to assess proposed deferrals.

13.     Of the total proposed projects for deferral tabled at the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 August 2014, regional projects amounted to $80 million; local projects amounted to $35 million and CCO’s collectively deferred $109 million.

14.     Staff reduced the total of local projects for deferral by approximately $7 million due to responding to the information provided through the recent workshops held with local boards. These reductions were due to corrections in applying the criteria used for identifying potential deferrals. Attachment A takes into account these reductions.

15.     Local boards also identified projects that are discretionary and could be deferred, but which are very important to their local community. Rather than making decisions about removing any high-priority discretionary projects from the deferral list, staff included these comments in the schedule provided to the Finance and Performance Committee.

16.     The decisions being made are budget adjustments that represent timing changes only. Any decisions to drop or reprioritise projects should be made as part of the LTP process.

17.     Through September and October local boards, the governing body, CCOs and council staff will all contribute to the development of draft LTP 2015-2025 budgets in response to the Mayoral Proposal. Decisions on discretionary local budgets will be made by local boards in October, and decisions on regional activities and local asset based services will be made by the Budget Committee on 5-7 November.

18.     Local board plans, along with the Auckland Plan and the agreed spatial priorities, will help inform this prioritisation. Final decisions on which projects are included in the LTP 2015-2025 will be made by 30 June 2015, following full public consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

List of 2014/2015 projects proposed for deferral until 2015/2016 including local board feedback

27

bView

Local board memo distributed prior to the workshops on 7 August 2014

29

     

Signatories

Authors

Taryn  Crewe - Financial Planning Manager - Council Parent

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Hearing panel recommendations on review of local dog access rules

 

File No.: CP2014/18952

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To receive the hearing panel recommendations on proposed changes to dog access rules in the Kaipatiki Local Board area.

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipatiki Local Board adopted proposed changes to local dog access rules in the local board area for public consultation, and appointed the hearing panel (Kay Mcintyre (Chair), Ann Hartley, John Gillon and Lorene Pigg) to hear and deliberate on submissions and other relevant information and recommend changes to the proposal to the board (KT/2014/49 and KT/2014/113).

3.       The hearing panel has considered more than 140 submissions, of which 77 per cent were estimated to be from Kaipatiki residents. Major recommendations are as follows. The full recommendations are stated in paragraph 19:

·        To amend the daytime dog access rule for the beaches during summer from prohibited to under control on-leash.

·        To amend the start and finish times of the time and season rules from daylight savings to starting on the Saturday of Labour Weekend and finishing on 1 March.

·        To create a new 24/7 under control off-leash beach at Manuka Road foreshore.

·        To amend the dog access rules within the bush of Smiths Bush Reserve to under control on-leash.

·        To prohibit dogs within the foreshore of Tuff Crater.

·        To apply an under control on-leash rule to Tuff Crater Reserve, Chatswood Reserve and Le Roys Bush Reserve

·        To apply an under control on-leash rule to the salt water marsh to the north of Kauri Point Domain.

·        To remove general under control on-leash in picnic and fitness apparatus rule and replace it with under control on-leash for the high use areas of Little Shoal Bay Reserve, Hinemoa Park and the raised barbeque area of Hilders Park.

·        To remove the 20 metre time and season rule from council parks abutting the foreshore.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive and adopt the Kaipatiki Hearing Panel decision report titled “Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access Rules in the Kaipatiki Local Board Area 2014”.

b)      adopt the amendments to the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 as contained in hearing panel decision report in (a) pursuant to section 10 of the Dog Control Act 1996 with a commencement date of 25 October 2014 (the Saturday of Labour Weekend).

c)      request the governing body to give effect to the amendments in (b) by making the necessary amendments to the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 pursuant to section 10 of the Dog Control Act 1996 and Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2012 in accordance with section 10(6) of the Dog Control Act 1996.

d)      authorise the Manager Policies and Bylaws in consultation with the Kaipatiki Local Board Chair of the Hearing Panel to make any minor edits or amendments to (a) and (b) to correct any identified errors or typographical edits.

 

Comments

4.       The Kaipatiki Local Board adopted proposed changes to local dog access rules in the local board area for public consultation, and appointed the hearing panel (Kay Mcintyre (Chair), Ann Hartley, John Gillon and Lorene Pigg) to hear and deliberate on submissions and other relevant information and recommend changes to the proposal to the board (resolutions KT/2014/49 and KT/2014/113).

5.       The proposal was publicly notified with a submission period of 12 June 2014 to 23 July 2014. 

6.       At the close of the submissions period, 141 submissions had been received. The majority of submissions (approximately 70 per cent) were from dog owners with 77 per cent estimated to be from Kaipatiki residents.

7.       A total of 12 submitters wished to be heard at the hearing. Hearings provide an opportunity for submitters to speak in support of their submissions and for members of the hearing panel to ask questions to better understand the views of the submitters.

8.       The hearing panel deliberations as contained in the decision report are provided below. A copy of the hearing panel’s decision report is contained in Attachment A and contains details of the proposal, public notification, decision-making considerations, matters raised in submissions and hearing panel deliberations.

Submission Topic 1 – Chelsea Bay, Fitzpatrick Bay and Manuka Road foreshore

9.       The hearings panel recommends that the proposed 24/7 under control off-leash beaches of Fitzpatrick Bay, Chelsea Bay, and Manuka Road foreshore be adopted as publicly notified.

10.     The hearings panel recommends that under control on-leash dog access be applied to the bushwalk within the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and Telephone Road Reserve from the corner of Inkster Street and Rawene Road to the open grass area of Telephone Road Reserve and from the open grass area of Telephone Road Reserve to the Chelsea Bay Sugar Refinery car park. The hearings panel recommends that under control off-leash dog access be retained for the open grassed area within Telephone Road Reserve, and the portion of the path running directly between the open grassed area and Chelsea Bay beach.

11.     The hearing panel recommends that a gate be erected at the entrance to the track at the south western corner of Telephone Road Reserve.

12.     Reasons for the recommendation include that the proposed rule together with the time and season rules on the other beaches and the current rule on the remainder of Hellyers Creek are the most appropriate way to protect public safety and comfort, protect wildlife and to provide for the needs of dogs and their owners.

Submission Topic 2 – Time in Season

13.     The hearings panel recommends that the proposed time and season dog access rules on beaches from Little Shoal Bay to Chelsea Bay, from Chelsea Bay to Fitzpatrick Bay and from Fitzpatrick Bay to Beach Haven Beach be adopted as publicly notified. Reasons for the recommendation include that the proposed rules are the most appropriate way to protect public safety and comfort and to provide for the needs of dogs and their owners on the inner harbour beaches of Kaipatiki.

14.     The hearing panel recommendation is considered to meet council’s overriding statutory requirement to provide for public safety and comfort in the Kaipatiki Local Board area, and to achieve the overall objective and policy statements of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 to keep dogs as a positive part of Auckland life, and to provide dog access in a way that is safe for everyone. That said, the hearing panel has identified that the recommendation is inconsistent with the standard summer beach times in Policy Method 3A(f) of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 by using by using 6.30pm instead of 5pm during summer.

15.     The hearing panel recommends that the governing body amend the policy on dogs to accommodate the recommendation of the hearing panel in accordance with section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002 and sections 10 and 20 of the Dog Control Act 1996 and comments as follows:

(i)      The governing body in its decisions to adopt the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 adopted a region-wide standard summer beach time and season, but retained the current beach time and season rules pending review by local boards recognising “that regional consistency and local needs need to be carefully balanced depending on the unique circumstances for each area” (resolution number GB/2012/157).

(ii)      The recommended summer times of 10am and 6.30pm better meets council’s overriding statutory requirement to provide for public safety and comfort in the local circumstances of the Kaipatiki Local Board area, and is consistent with the overall objective and policy statements of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012.

Submission Topic 3 – Replacement of 20 metre time and season and picnic and fitness apparatus dog access rules and with specific controls around high use areas

16.     The hearing panel recommends that the 20 metre time and season dog access rule and picnic areas and fitness apparatus rules be replaced by under control on-leash rules in high use areas within Little Shoal Bay, Hinemoa Park, and Hilders Park as publicly notified, with a minor amendment to clarify the under control on-leash areas within Little Shoal Bay and Hinemoa Park.

17.     Reasons for the recommendation include that within the Kaipātiki local board area the majority of beaches are backed by cliff with no usable reserve, the existing rules are difficult to enforce and have unintended consequences regarding some intertidal areas that would not typically be considered to be beaches. Furthermore, the designated picnic areas and fitness equipment rules are considered to be unnecessary with the high uses areas proposed to be identified as under control on-leash areas.

Submission Topic 4 – Saltwater marsh north of Kauri Point Domain

18.     The hearing panel recommends that the salt water marsh between Kauri Point Domain and 78 Island Bay Road (identified as SEA-M1-59 within the Unitary Plan) be reclassified as under control on-leash as publicly notified. Reasons for the recommendation include that the salt water marsh is an important habitat for shore birds that are vulnerable to dogs. Under control on-leash dog access allows for dog-owners and their dogs to traverse the estuary to get to Fitzpatrick Bay whilst still protecting the wildlife in the adjacent wetland.

Submission Topic 5 – Smiths Bush

19.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed dog access rules within the bush of Smiths Bush be amended to allow under control on-leash dog access in bush areas and to retain under control off-leash access dog access in the more open areas of the reserve. Reasons for the recommendation include the protection of public safety and comfort and wildlife.

Submission Topic 6 – Tuff Crater

20.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed prohibited dog access on foreshore and mangrove areas and under control on-leash dog access on parkland surrounding the reserve within Tuff Crater and foreshore be adopted as publicly notified. Reasons for the recommendation include that Tuff Crater is an important habitat for shore birds that are vulnerable to dogs. Under control on-leash dog access in the park but not the crater will allow access on the walkway around the crater while protecting wildlife and the public safety and comfort of the users of Tuff Crater. 

Submission Topic 7 – Chatswood and Le Roys Bush Reserves

21.     The hearing panel recommends that the proposed under control on-leash dog access rules on Chatswood and Le Roys Bush Reserves be adopted as publicly notified. Reasons for the recommendation include public safety and comfort, ecological protection, and the prevention of the spread of kauri dieback disease.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Hearing Panel Report on Dog Access Rules in the Kaipatiki Local Board Area 2014

37

     

Signatories

Authors

Kay McIntyre – Chairperson, Kaipātiki Local Board Dog Hearings Panel

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 












Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre Renewal Budget

 

File No.: CP2014/19628

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks a decision on the allocation of capital budget for the 2014 – 2015 renewal work programme

Executive summary

2.       The Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre has experienced ongoing issues with maintaining warm pool water and adequate heating/ventilation to the pool hall. There have been many occasions in the past two years when the pool water has not been able to operate at its set temperatures, and on occasion the pool has had to close as the temperature has been too cold to swim in.  The plant is 29 years old and is no longer fit for purpose.

3.       The lack of a reliable HVAC system has had significant impacts on the customer, which has ultimately affected the current and future financial position. The proposed solution is to change the current system of heating and ventilation to that of a gas boiler and standard Air Handler units. This will address the reliability issues and ensure compliance with current standards. There will also be significant ongoing energy efficiencies associated with this change. 

4.       The cost of the new system is in the region of $995k. The total renewal budget (including deferrals from 2013/2014) available to the Kaipatiki Local Board in 2014/20155 is $1,178k; however there are a number of other projects identified for funding from this budget that are deemed essential. It is the reprioritisation of these remaining projects that needs to be decided upon.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the proposed solution as outlined in Attachment A.

b)      approve minor scope changes through the tender proposal negotiations to ensure the project cost is with a budget envelope of $800,000.

c)      approve the reallocation of the following renewal and deferred projects to fund the $479,000 shortfall for the HVAC proposal:

i)        Beach Haven Sports Centre Gut & refit bathrooms & changing rooms $50,000

ii)       Rec Equipment Renewal project $110,000

iii)      Glenfield - Lobby Entry Renewal $64,546

iv)      Glenfield - Spa Pool $24,871

v)      Glenfield - CCTV upgrade $24,755

vi)      Birkenhead- Heating, ventilation and insulation work $185,000

vii)     Beach Haven Recreation Building Renewal $20,000.

 

 

Comments

Background

The Plant – technical background

5.       The existing pool water and pool hall air heating system is 29 years old and in very poor condition. The system uses large industrial heat pumps to provide heating for the main pool and pool hall area. These heat pumps have a normal life of 10 to 15 years. Currently refrigerant is being lost from leaks causing freezing at the evaporator coils. The air control dampers have been failing, and fans are showing signs of imminent failure. There are leaks in the fresh air ducting allowing dirty air from under the building foundations to be pulled into the system. 

6.       The plant is old technology which is appropriate to its age, but does not incorporate current technology or energy efficiency practices. It only supplies 60% of the recommended ventilation rate and struggles to flush out chloramines from the pool hall, and to control humidity and condensation in the pool hall with resulting increase in maintenance work. It also struggles to maintain pool water temperature in winter and is prone to failure from freeze-up. Maintenance costs are high, and major expenditure will be required to upgrade it.

7.       Short term measures to keep the plant running have been to keep adding refrigerant to the compressors, repairs to the dampers, recycling some pool hall exhaust air back into the fresh air to reduce freezing at the evaporator coils at the expense of reduced fresh air into the pool hall and some odour recirculation. At times of extreme cold on frosty days, an access door from the plant room has been opened to also warm the air onto the coil. The coils have been gently cleaned, but thorough cleaning has not been possible due to the condition of the coils. The leaks in the fresh air duct have been repaired, and the dampers have been freed up. These are improving the air circulation to a minor level, but the fans still need repair work or replacement. Half of the leaking heat exchangers have been replaced. 

8.       It is important to note the existing plant uses R22 refrigerant which is banned from 2015, after which minimal quantities may be available at high cost, but equipment replacements will not be available.

Customer Impact

9.       Customer feedback regarding the pool temperature has been received via verbal comments with staff, customer feedback forms and official complaints logged with Auckland Council.

10.     As expected there has been a large increase of customer complaints, which have come from long standing customers and casual users alike. The majority of customer frustration comes from the fact that they have had to deal with the cold pool during the winter months for the past 2 years.

11.     During the winter months, the water temperature was well below the set point of 28 degrees and on two days reached 24.8 degrees - at which point the aquatic centre did not charge an entry fee as the water was too cold.  This has had a significant impact on aquatic visits when compared to 2013.  In June the facility experienced a 31% decline (6,771) in aquatic visits, and in July the decline was 25%. (5,800).

12.     Children have been greatly affected by the drop in pool temperature, and having the pool temperature as low as 24 degrees caused lessons to be cancelled and parents withdrawing their children from the programme. Over the recent winter months 112 swimming lessons have been cancelled due to the pool being too cold to teach. Overall registrants in the swim school are 102 participants lower than the same period last year.

13.     Facility memberships have also been affected by the drop in pool temperature. In July 2014 216 members cancelled their memberships, which was 40 members higher than usual. The majority of people cited poor pool maintenance as the reason for leaving.

Financial impact

14.     Through reduced visits and memberships over the winter months the Glenfield Leisure Centre has lost in the region of $90k, which is made up from:

·        2,593 fewer casual adult swimmers in June and July 2014 - $17,373

·        60 facility memberships lost over June and July - $53,350

·        102 fewer Swim School enrolments - $12,750

·        112 cancelled swimming lessons - $7,000.

15.     The impact of the poor heating and ventilation system will have implications for future year’s revenue, due to the customers’ experience of a cold pool over winter.

Staff impact

16.     Feedback from recent eNPS surveys for Glenfield Pool and Leisure staff indicate that Lifeguards and Customer Service staff are becoming dissatisfied in their work environment.  The comments received pertain to the volume of poor maintenance complaints the staff are fielding, and being held directly or indirectly responsible for the state of the facility. The Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre cannot afford to lose good staff due to the pressure of customer complaints regarding this issue. 

Auckland Council’s reputation

17.     The reputational damage to Auckland Council and specifically Glenfield Pool and Leisure centre is high. The heating and ventilation problem has been evident for the past couple of years (particularly over the winter months), and the customers have seen no improvement giving the impression that council is unable to maintain its own facilities and, in turn, are not catering for community needs. The fitness industry is extremely competitive, and within the Glenfield area there are six other fitness centres all competing for members. One of the unique selling points for the Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre is the aquatic aspects on offer. With the pool water temperature unreliable it is increasingly difficult to compete for membership with local gyms.

Solutions

18.     A new plant is recommended, based on hot water heating with a pair of water boilers and a packaged air handling unit. Each component of the new plant incorporates the latest current international technologies, which have been proven in use and are used in the majority of pool heating plants throughout the North Island. 

19.     This plant is reliable, energy efficient, and regularly has an economic life in excess of 30 years. It will meet current code ventilation and heating requirements and will maximise heat recovery and totally eliminate any issues of winter freeze-ups. The new plant will also improve the control of the pool hall environment and incorporate the latest proven features in its control system.  The Leisure Centre would need to be closed for 6-8 weeks for installation of the new plant. It is recommended this would take place in April/May of 2015 to enable the plant to be in place prior to winter 2015.

20.     Total running costs will be at least 15% ($40k) lower than would be needed for the current plant if it was rebuilt to meet the ventilation codes. Maintenance costs that currently sit around $215k per year will also be reduced and the reliance on the R22 refrigerant, the supply of which will be discontinued from 2015, will be removed.

21.     In the long term this solution assures the financial viability of the Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre.  A reliable, fit for purpose heating and ventilation system will provide staff the infrastructure through which they can confidently sell and deliver services for the community, and one which the users will be assured will be reliable.

The Budget

22.     The total cost for the proposed solution is $995,507 (refer Attachment A).

23.     The combined renewal and deferral budgets for aquatic and leisure facilities for the Kaipatiki Local Board totals $1,178,003.

24.     Within this budget there is $378,379 worth of projects council officers deem essential:

·     Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre Replace Retaining Wall & drainage - $50k

·     Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre Steam room boiler replacement - $30k

·     Glenfield - Fitness Flooring - $88k

·     Glenfield Fitness Equipment renewal - $210k.

25.     The Glenfield projects in particular are recommended to be completed at the same time as the necessary 6-8 week shutdown to replace the plant.

26.     It is proposed the balance of renewal and deferral projects are reallocated to fund the proposed solution addressing the HVAC.

Budget

2014-2015 Renewal budget

2013-2014 Deferred Budget

Total

 

Aquatic facility building renewals

$45,057

 

 

 

Aquatic facility equipment renewals

$382,465

 

 

 

Recreational facilities building renewals

$44,734

 

 

 

Recreational facilities equipment renewals

$87,779

 

 

 

 

$560,035

$617,968

$1,178,003

Essential projects

Renewal

Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre Replace Retaining Wall & drainage

$50,000

 

 

Renewal

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre Steam room boiler replacement

$30,000

 

 

Deferral

Glenfield - Fitness Flooring

 

$88,549

 

Deferral

Glenfield Fitness Equipment renewal

 

$210,247

 

Budget Balance (Budget less essential projects)

 

 

$480,035

$319,172

$799,207

 

 

 

 

 

HVAC proposal

$995,507

 

 

Shortfall

$196,335

 

 

 

 

 

Projects to reallocate to make up the budget

Renewal

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre HVAC installation

$320,000

 

 

Renewal

Beach Haven Sports Centre Gut & refit bathrooms & changing rooms

$50,000

 

 

Renewal

Rec Equipment Renewal project 1

$110,000

 

 

Deferral

Glenfield - Lobby Entry Renewal

 

$64,546

 

Deferral

Glenfield - Spa Pool

 

$24,871

 

Deferral

Glenfield - CCTV upgrade

 

$24,755

 

Deferral

Birkenhead- Heating, ventilation and insulation work

 

$185,000

 

Deferral

Beach Haven Recreation Building Renewal

 

$20,000

 

 

 

$480,035

$319,172

$799,207

 

Future CAPEX work lists

27.     Any projects that are reprioritized from this year’s renewal and deferral list, along with other significant capital work projects, would need to be reconsidered alongside the new LTP capex budget that is allocated to the local board.  Projects for consideration are:                

Project description

Approx cost

Glenfield - Spa Pool (remove 2 and replace with 1)

$400,000

Glenfield - Changing room upgrade

$300,000

Glenfield - Lobby Entry Renewal (Café, Merchandising, Physio)

$200,000

Glenfield – Crèche extension

$130,000

Rec and fitness equipment  renewal

$100,000

Glenfield – Solar Pool water heating

$120,000

Glenfield – Pool Covers

$30,000

Glenfield - CCTV upgrade

$25,000

Glenfield – Hydro Slide Variable Speed drives

$10,000

Beach Haven Sports Centre Gut & refit bathrooms & changing rooms

$150,000

Beach Haven Recreation Roof renewal

$120,000

Beach Haven Recreation Building Renewal

$20,000

Birkenhead- Heating, ventilation and insulation work

$185,000

Consideration

Local board views and implications

28.     The attached proposed solution was tabled at the Kaipatiki Local Board workshop on 10th August.  The issues the Glenfield Leisure Centre are currently experiencing were discussed as was the proposed solution.  The local board was supportive of the proposal, but requested details of the capital expenditure budget and associated work list so they could make an informed decision on securing funding.

Māori impact statement

29.     Maori, along with the wider community, will greatly benefit through the replacement of the HVAC system to one which is more reliable.  There are no proposed deferred projects that would adversely impact on the Maori community.

Implementation

30.     It is anticipated a six month lead time would be required to complete the tender process and order the plant.  Installation is expected to take 6 - 8 weeks, during which time the aquatic facility would be closed.  It is proposed this closure would start on the 20th April 2015 immediately following the school holidays.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Glenfield HVAC

55

     

Signatories

Authors

Michael Groom - Group Manager Eastern Region

Authorisers

Rob McGee - Manager Leisure – Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Glenfield Pool and Leisure

 

Long Term Fix for the Heating and Ventilation of the Aquatic area

 

Estimates to replace the existing heating plant with new air handling units sized in accordance with the NZS recommended flow rates, and with LPHW heating sized at the common capacity ratios based on many other pools is as follows:

 

Demolition, permits, builders work etc                      101,000

AHUs, ducting, sprinkler rework etc                          191,000

Boilers pumps and piping                                          246,500

Electrical and BMS                                                    240,000

Design and project management                              100,232

15% Contingencies                                                   116,775

Total                                                                       $ 995,507

 A description of the above categories is:

Demolition costs are to safely remove the existing heat pumps and their refrigerants, to dismantle and remove the existing air handling units and the ducting connections within the plant room which feed to and from the pool hall (including fresh air supply and exhaust air from the building) , and to prepare the area for the installation of the new plant. Building and resource permits are for the new boiler house outside the building. Builders work includes the construction of the new boiler house where the existing gas heater pad is located, and for removing the access doors into the plant room to get the old plant out and the new plant in, to keep the access secure during the work, and to reinstate the doors on completion.

AHUs etc includes the new air handling units to replace the old rotten one, with heating provided by the new hot water boilers and heat recovery from the exhaust air to the fresh air supply. There is no chance of freezing of coils in this arrangement as no refrigeration plant is involved. This is the arrangement used in most pools both in Auckland and throughout most of the North Island. The units will be designed to provide the amount of air to the pool hall which is recommended in the standards, and found from experience to give proper conditions in the pool hall with good control of both temperature and humidity. The ducting connects both fresh air and return air to the air handling units and then connects to the pool hall supply air and exhaust air ducts at the walls of the plant room. Costs are included to blank off and then later to reinstate the fire sprinkler system in parts of the plant room and to the new boiler house.

Boilers etc includes new hot water boilers sized for the installed capacity requirements based on the average loads and rules of thumb for other pool and leisure centres in Auckland and through the North Island. The boiler capacity and pumps are divided between two boilers to give capability to keep the plant running at a reasonable (but slightly lesser) capacity in the event of a problem with either unit. Pumps and piping provide hot water to heat exchangers for the learner’s pool, the main pool, to domestic hot water for showers, and to the heating coil in the main air handling unit.

Electrical and BMS includes the new electrical switchboards in the plant room and the boiler house, electrical reticulation to the new plant, and for a new building management system to control all of the equipment and the display units to present the data, including water treatment status and pool water control. The main BMS display control point is in the plant room, with repeaters in the manager’s office and at Auckland Council Takapuna office. It will have capability to dial out alarms to the relevant people including service personnel in the event of any issues.

Design and project management includes design fees to verify the performance requirements, design the plant, call tenders as required and provide project management services for the coordination, installation and commissioning of the plant, and to organise operating and maintenance manuals.

The 15% contingency sum is to cover unforeseen issues which may arise during the project. This sum may not be spent unless there are complications (for example, we don’t know if the ducting from the plant room to the pool hall and then to exhaust are in good condition or may need extra repair work).

 

The costs will be spent during the six month period up to and including the pool shut to allow the work to be carried out, both demolition and new construction. Some early payments may be required for the preliminary work but the total sum is expected to be spent within the one financial year (depending on the date for the shut).

 

The benefits of the project are to increase reliability, particularly during the winter period, to reduce the level of complaints from both pool users and pool staff, to upgrade the heating plant to best current practice and to give energy cost savings in operation of the pools.

 

Other recommended energy saving measures to reduce operating costs not included:

Pool covers for main pool                        TBA, about $60,000?

VSD for hydroslide                                   $10,000

Solar pool water heating                          $120,000

All of the above are ballpark estimates and are not expected to be exceeded. Detailed design and costings are expected to reduce these estimates to some extent. We estimate the down-time to do the rebuild at about 6 weeks. Lead time is about 6 months to commencement of the on-site work.

 Some possible areas for reductions in the estimates are:

Reduce the airflow to the pool hall from 5 air-changes per hour to 4 air-changes per hour

Change from twin boilers to a single boiler

Remove the pool water and filtration from the BMS

 

I have spoken to EECA about possible funding, but they would only consider part funding for energy saving opportunities. Their funding budget is in a state of flux and dependant on the general election outcomes. They are happy to talk to us once we have more detailed options on the table.

 

 

Ivan Fraser
CPEng, IntPE, MIPENZ, BE (Mech), FIHRACE, FIMC, MASHRAE, MCASANZ, CMVP.
EMANZ EnergyMasters Accredited Energy Auditor,
EMANZ EnergyMasters Accredited CAS Auditor
EMANZ EnergyMasters Accredited Process Heat Specialist
Certified Measurement & Verification Professional
EECA Business Programme Partner

 

Consulting Engineer
(Thermal & Environmental Engineering)

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

136 Birkdale Road - report on initial public consultation

 

File No.: CP2014/19502

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to update the local board on the initial public consultation held on the future of 136 Birkdale Road and consider next steps.

Executive summary

2.       Following advocacy from Kaipātiki Local Board, Auckland Council acquired the former church building at 136 Birkdale Road in January 2014. The Kaipātiki Local Board then initiated a public consultation exercise in August 2014 in order to begin a conversation with the local community on its future use.

3.       This report sets out the findings of that initial consultation and makes recommendations for next steps to ensure the development of the site for community use.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the feedback from the initial public consultation and thank the Birkdale community for their participation and involvement in the open days.

b)      request Local Board Services staff work with relevant staff to bring a report back to the board detailing suggested next steps to progress the project.

 

 

Comments

4.       The purchase of 136 Birkdale Road by Auckland Council in January 2014 was in response to advocacy from the local board. The board advocated for the purchase due to perceptions of a lack of open space within the Birkdale community, alongside recognition of the strategic location of the site adjacent to the Birkdale Community House. The site consists of a hall with smaller room, toilets and kitchen, land to the rear and side and car parking at the front of the property. The property is situated between Birkenhead College on one side and the Birkdale Community House and Early Learning Centre on the other.

Public consultation

5.       The plan for public consultation was reported to the board at the meeting on 9 July 2014. The proposal was to initiate public consultation by way of two open days at the property. This would enable local people to come along and view both the property and the land surrounding it before making comments and suggestions as to its future use. There was deliberately no survey or set questions to answer, but an opportunity to openly share ideas and view the written comments made by others.

6.       In advance of the open days, several meetings were held with a small group of key stakeholders in the area, including local residents, Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT), Birkdale Primary School, Birkenhead College and the Beach Haven Birkdale Community Project (BBCP). The purpose of these meetings was to ensure the input of this group into planning for the consultation and promotion through local networks, including school newsletters / noticeboards and social media.

7.       The open days took place on Friday 1 and Saturday 2 August and were advertised via the North Shore Times (advertisement and article), the board’s e-newsletter and Facebook page, signage outside the property, a flyer drop to the older people’s housing units and the stakeholder channels described above.

8.       Over the two days approximately one hundred people visited the property to share their views. Alongside local residents there were representatives of local groups and organisations, as well as a group of students from Birkdale Primary School and the after-school club at the Birkdale Community House. Over four hundred separate comments were recorded over the course of the two days, with all comments displayed around the inside of the building for others to see.

9.       These comments are presented as Attachment A to this report and are broadly grouped into the following categories:

·        Environmental

·        Community

·        Youth

·        Play

·        Parking

·        Connection to Birkdale Community House

·        Provision for specific groups

·        Inside space

·        Outside space

·        Specific examples of other community facilities and parks in Auckland

·        More detailed comments

·        Feedback from Birkdale Primary School

·        Feedback from Birkdale Community House after school club

·        Responses to pictures of play equipment and seating (included to stimulate ideas).

Environmental

10.     Under the environmentally themed comments, the idea of a community garden was mentioned a number of times, alongside some people tying this in with promoting healthy eating and cooking, and educating people about food production. A couple of comments also mention the possibility of utilising the site for teaching / promoting sustainable practices, such as composting and recycling.

Community

11.     Amongst the comments made relating to community were calls to ensure that the property was used as a community focal point or hub in Birkdale, both in terms of the land surrounding the property and making it an inviting space, and the potential for the building to be used for a variety of community uses to bring people together. Several people mentioned the potential for the community to work collectively to create a hub / focal point, and the need to ensure community buy-in and involvement in the future shape of the site.

Youth

12.     A number of comments were made around the potential of the site for youth provision. Alongside more general comments around its potential as a ‘safe space’ for young people, some had clearer ideas around a homework centre, place for youth programmes (such as self-defence classes) and youth club activities. A couple of comments saw the site as a place that could enable youth work experience, through utilisation of the land as a nursery or the building as a coffee shop. 


 

Play

13.     There were a series of comments made around the potential for a play area on the site, with a couple suggesting a fenced off play area for 2+ year olds. Another couple of comments visualising a play area at the front of the site, with the parking moved around the back of the site to facilitate this. Specific suggestions were made around a maze and a spider climbing frame, whilst others suggested an area for all ages and abilities. One commenter suggested a ‘senior playground’ was needed, but it was not clear whether this referred to older children or adults / older people.

Parking

14.     On the issue of parking a number of differing views were expressed. A couple of comments reflected that if the facility is a community hub, then people are likely to be visiting from the local area and should be encouraged to walk, with limited parking available. One person wanted the current parking at the front of the building to be retained in order to have a peaceful park to the rear of the building. Another felt that relocating parking to the back of the building would mean utilising land to construct a driveway. One suggestion was to remove the car park entirely, whilst another suggested angled parking on the road to serve both the property and the needs of the adjacent community house.

Connection to Birkdale Community House

15.     Several comments were made around the connection of the property to the Birkdale Community House. One suggested aesthetic changes to the building to ensure it was in keeping with the villa look of the community house. Another suggested that arts and crafts markets be held on site to support the community house, whilst another felt that the property could offer a good extension to the house and early learning centre.

Provision for specific groups

16.     Some comments were made around the property’s use by specific groups in the community, with one person seeing it as a good space for multi-cultural gatherings. Two comments mentioned older people, including one suggesting an intergenerational toddlers and older people session.  One comment made reference to current use of the hall as a hire facility and asked for the Tongan Community Group to be given continued access.

Inside space

17.     There were several comments made supporting the retention of the property for use / hire for community groups and organisations to gather, as well as suggestions that it be used as an educational and teaching space.  Some people made comments around its use for specific activities, such as holiday / after school programmes, arts and crafts and exhibition space. Other comments concerned general use of the building for activities to bring the community together, whilst on person suggested employing an administrator to coordinate bookings and promote activities.

Outside space

18.     Comments around the use of the outside space suggested a desire to develop a space that could be enjoyed by the community, with suggestions around seating, water stations, a noticeboard and creating a mural on the front of the property. One person suggested a skate park whilst another felt a basketball court would be a good use of space. Several people suggested holding a farmers market on the site. One person commented that there could be barbeque installed in the empty concrete structure at the rear of the property, whilst another commenter suggested inclusion of a hangi area.

Specific examples of other facilities and parks

19.     Several people made suggestions about other parks and facilities in Auckland that they thought were good examples of how the site could be developed, including Wainoni Park, Grey Lynn Community Centre and the playground at Lake Town Green.


 

Detailed feedback

20.     More detailed feedback was received from several people and included consideration and ideas for the inside and outside of the property, joining 134 and 136 Birkdale Road and parking. Feedback was also received from Birkdale Primary School students and the after school club from the community house sharing ideas for play elements, outside space and inside the property. There were also a number of comments made in response to pictures displayed at the open day of seating and play equipment, displayed to stimulate ideas. All of these comments are detailed in Attachment A.

Next steps

21.     The feedback received from the initial public consultation shows that there is support for developing the site as open space and a community hub, with a number of suggestions as to how both elements of the site could be developed.

22.     As the site is currently managed by Community Facilities, it is suggested that Local Board Services staff work to discuss further with CDAC (Community Facilities and Community Development) and Parks in order to determine the next steps in developing both the open space and community facility aspects of the project.

23.     Given the feedback from the community and the interest shown in being involved in the development of the project, it is proposed that Local Board Services staff work with the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) to ensure that placemaking activity is considered in the development of the next steps in the project.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.     Local board views are sought via this report.

Māori impact statement

25.     There are no specific impacts on Māori arising from this report; however, the ongoing development of the property provides a good opportunity to engage with Māori residents and enhance Māori outcomes in the board area.

Implementation

26.     There are no implementation issues identified in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Feedback from initial public consultation

63

     

Signatories

Authors

Hannah Bailey - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

136 Birkdale Road

Feedback from initial two-day public consultation

 

Environmental

Teaching sustainability – composting with on-site systems

Would love to have a playground with a native NZ theme, e.g. native plants, wooden structures (not plastic), old tyres could be used (upcycling)

Teaching space – healthy eating

Gardens and enviro round back

Community garden for all to enjoy

Community garden

Community vege garden / allotments

Community vege gardens – a chance to meet others in neighbourhood

Teaching – gardening – veges – natives

Community vege garden

Can we make a garden?

Environmental education – schools, pre-schools

Teaching gardens – growing food, natives, veges

Environment delivery local

Relocate environmental roles to here

Recycling location for community

Learning to grow a garden or two – visual space

Community gardens

 

Community

A lovely spot amongst trees to stop and have lunch

Create a safe, fun space which will draw people into the area

A focal point for community

Landscaping so that it’s an inviting space for families – outdoor areas

Focal point for the community – nice café on site? (in addition to community centre)

Community space where classes can run in the evenings – yoga, mum and baby groups, after-school programmes, dance classes

Make sure you involve the community to build or create it to ensure buy-in

Base the Community Coordinator here

It would be nice to have a site that provides a community focal point in Birkdale

Welcoming and vibrant

Work in with local schools to support community

Warm and welcoming – family

Hub of Birkdale – sharing into community events etc

Kept as a community space

Collective community effort – wellbeing

Building partnership with Birkdale

Local life 4 local growth – action

 

 

Youth

Community garden / create nursery – trees, plants, composting and young people for community work / job experience

Run things like a local coffee shop that gives local youth a job (prefer youth who struggle to get a job) kids on FACs doing community work also

Homework centre

Children and youth consideration

A safe space for teenagers x 3

Homework centre

Drop in centre for teenagers x 2

Youth centre

Place for young people to congregate safely

Teenagers social club – after school games – fusball / table tennis / chess / computer games / outside volleyball – hang out!

Teenagers council – they come up with the ideas and are responsible under supervision of adult(s)

Outdoor / indoor movie nights for teenagers?

Youth study area and other youth uses

Space for youth programmes e.g. self-defence

 

 

Play

Fenced playground for ages 2+ - kindergarten and play centres are full – there are a lot of little kids around here

Don’t make it all flat, have hills / mounds to climb and roll down

Multi-sense play, e.g. musical instruments, things that move / sparkle, water pipes, sand / gravel pit

Childs play

Fenced playground at the front, car park at the back

Playground around the front

Can we make a playground?

Logs – children can move around – love it!

A maze for children and adults

How big will the maze be?

Senior playground please because all others are for small children

Spider web climbing frame – much loved at Tui Park

Safe fenced in play areas for 2 – 5 year olds

Interactive – all ages and abilities

 

Parking

Don’t waste the land on a driveway. Have the car parking at the front or on the road

Car park should be at the front of the building (as it is now) and park should be at the back – more peaceful and quiet away from traffic noise

Do we need a focus on car parking? As a community facility is walking appropriate and it is well connected with public transport

In out parking – less, better parking so people walk

Will the College allow the use of parking spaces at the College?

Remove carpark

Parking front angle across the two sites

 

Connection to 134 Birkdale Road

Clad front of the building to match the House – local art project

Arts / craft markets – support Community House

Extension of Birkdale Community House and after school care

 

Provision for specific groups

Space for multicultural gatherings x2

Day centre for the elderly – socialise together and carer support

Tongan community group would like continued permanent use

Elderly and toddlers together – watch them play / read to them / interact, etc – either in the hall or outside – once a week

Space to have social nights (for church groups)

 

Inside space

Re-do the hall, renovate the space for community usage

Develop a hall space for community groups to use – just a big hall with kitchen

Library outreach

Cost of booking the hall is currently too high

Having a space for local organisations to utilise which won’t make a huge dent in their budget – local youth groups

Low cost holiday programmes

Free or low cost after school care for the under-privileged

Saturday evening disco / social club – holidays – camp – cooking – movie nights

Art exhibition for local artists

Monthly craft / farmers market

Free use of facilities for neighbourhood support groups please

Pin boards and dividers for art shows / photography exhibition

Classes – arts / exercise

Meeting place – coffee groups etc

Have a larger kitchen maybe using the smaller room out back and where toilets are

Community classes – IT, budgeting etc

Dinner and dances – bring the community back together – I agree

Create one toilet block for both genders

Really good idea to have toilets (x2)

Have KLB meetings in here

An administrator to coordinate bookings and promote what is happening – liaising with the community

Can you build on top of the building? Office spaces for admin, leave the bottom for gatherings

Teaching space – weaving flax

Group meeting place for HIPPY (community based education program)

Could the hall be provisioned to provide low cost / free community education to replace scrapped adult education?

Creative space – somewhere to do arts and crafts

No ‘hire’ facility – must have a key wellbeing role 2020

Good coffee to attract people

Badminton in evenings – table tennis nights – walking group meeting place

 

 

Outside space

Space for a community market / stalls to sell home produce

BBQ in concrete block area

Include entrance into hall space – deck outside

Space for occasional farmers market / second hand stalls during summer

Can we have a free farm place?

Something that reflects historic orchard / production in the area

Love seat

Gazebo

Farmers market on weekends!

Big mural on front

Good size billboard for notices etc

Front part into park, swings, seats etc, parking at back – classes at hall?

A hangi area

Farmers market

Street food festival along Birkdale

A butterfly bench and seats

Go up not out – we can utilise the land for kids / elderly / sitting garden

Disabled ramp? Disabilities

Remove fences – engage wood to people

Water stations for dog walkers and people walking / running would be good as there are a lot of people using Birkdale Road for this purpose

Skate park

Basketball court

 

Specific examples of other community facilities and parks in Auckland

Orchard at Wainoni Park has lovely trees

Good examples – Wainoni, the new park on Jutland Road near Hauraki Corner and the big rocket in Mt Albert

Grey Lynn community centre is a great example of what this could be – great playground, lots of events

Space for community market, similar to Grey Lynn or even the one down in Birkenhead Point


Can we sell naming rights to fund development?

Salisbury Road footpaths – wider and not half-arsed repairs!

Inwards Reserve – new signage (inviting)

 

More detailed feedback / flipcharts

The grounds at the front are under-utilised – something needs to be done here to better use the space – diagonal parking across both properties? I think the obvious thing is that we have a problem for youth and teenagers in this area and the property if situated next to a College. Can you get major input from the students? The other thing is we have a problem with vandalism and graffiti – this is due to lack of things for teenagers to do. We need to do more for them so they are not bored and roaming the streets.

 

Thank you for inviting members of the community to view 136 Birkdale Road and give their views on what should happen to 136 Birkdale Road. I would move buildings on 138 to be used by the community elsewhere. Move building on 136 to the corner of the current section then build a community hall to incorporate all sections of the community

 

 

Inside –

·    Move toilet block to kitchen

·    Create a large kitchen for teaching in where toilets and small room are

·    Better lighting and heating

·    Replicate outside to match Community House

·    Dinner and dances – bringing the fun community back

·    Winter – movies for children / babysitting nights

·    Teaching us

·    Letting us be creative

·    Bare basics teaching

·    How to grow – food

·    How to create – gardens, clothing, arts and crafts, flax weaving

·    How to cook – food!

·    $ gold coin donations – affordable!

·    Open up to outside with doors and large windows

 

Outside

·    Buy College driveway for angled car parking

·    Utilise front of community house to create a large space for all generations i.e. pergola

·    Summer house / gazebo

·    Cottage garden – flowers galore!

·    Wandering paths – concrete hand prints, pavers

·    Scented garden

·    Herb garden for all to use / help themselves

·    Love seat to swing in

·    Outdoor venue suitable for wedding hire?

·    Tea, coffee and cake for Sunday Devonshire tea

·    Picket fence in front of the Community House and maybe in front of the hall or security fence instead

·    Play equipment suitable for children of all ages to challenge and stimulate and most of all – fun and learning!

·    A place to come and eat your lunch using the shops down the road to support our community cause

·    BBQ?

 

Joining 134 and 136 –

·    Across the front

·    White picket fences

·    Car park at the back of 136

·    Entrance to ELC at back with car park

·    Needed for safety reasons

Garden @134 –

·    Open space / playground towards middle @ 136

·    Heritage look

·    Orienteering type

·    Exploring

 

Inside space –

·    After school (homework?) / youth

·    Study room – free hot spot plug-ins - Wi-Fi

·    Arts and crafts – creative communities funding

·    Movie nights – older teens type (12 – 15 years)

·    Hang-out space – drop down screen

·    Non-denominational – remove the cross

·    Open windows – looking onto park space

·    Engage community / sponsorship for ‘doing it up’

·    Colour-in accessories / canvasses

 

Outside –

·    Angled parking out the front?

·    Fencing across

·    Community garden

·    Water feature

·    Art exhibits

·    Sculpture garden

·    Outdoor seating

·    Cottage look

·    Playground

·    No fence here [between 134 and 136]

 

Arts and crafts!

·    Kaipatiki Art Gallery

·    Classes

·    Share

·    Learn

·    Anything goes

·    Special needs – outings / to get creative

·    Exhibitions

·    Community focussed

 

 

Birkdale Primary School

 

Play elements

Senior playground

Colourful playground – sandpit

Flying fox – wheels track – garden

Challenging obstacles

Rock climbing

Tyre wall – theme like a monster area, zoo, etc

Wheels track – with design

Octopus swing ride

Cool entrance – like slide at zoo – big blue

Zip-line flying fox

Rock climbing wall

Confidence course

Cool swings / slide

A slide through the park

Ping pong table

Obstacle course

Colourful park

Musical

Monkey bars

A fire dragon slide - the fire is the slide

Uneven ground that moves

Balance board

Tree house

Sandpit – gated off

A fortress

Trampoline

Flying fox

Fort / tree house

Basketball court

Bouncy castle

Netball hoop / court

Flying fox

Basketball hoop and a chain net

Big skate park

Stationary bike

Stationary bikes that move from side to side – for balance

Monkey bars

Sumo wrestling

Inflatable slide / ladder

Roller skates

Rock climbing (clip and climb)

 

Outside space

Wishing well x 2

Benches for parents (cool designs)

Maze

Swing seats

Bird bath

Butterfly table for eating

Outdoor stage for night time performances

Remove shed

Outdoor seats for lunch

Toilets

Garden

We need footpaths

Seats for mums and dads – benches

Social spot

Soft ground

Tree house

Hut in recycled plastic forest

Riding through a bush

Big truck as the centre piece

Keep the trees for a maze or a course

Stage

A tunnel to crawl – maze

Creative gardens

Relaxing spot

Quiet place

 

Inside space

Creative place for arts and crafts

Homework centre

Ping pong table

Local theatre for community performances

Indoor play area

Arts and crafts

Tuck shop – hot / cold food

 

Parking

No car park – make car park a playground

 

General comments

Affordable!

Colourful

 

Birkdale Community House after school club

 

Play elements

Heaps of swings

Obstacle course

Awesome stuff

Built in swings

Sandpit

Jump! (Indoor trampoline)

Pop out hoops

Playground with swings

Tree swing

Playground

League / rugby field

Sandpit

Obstacle course

Flying fox

Zip-line / flying fox

Flying fox big and small

Swings for youth (teens)

Rope swing with a tree house

Parkour

Parkour

Trampoline

Tree swings

Tree playground

Sumo wrestling

Skate park

Skate park

Ping pong

Flying fox

Playground

Big climbing frame with high ropes

A water park

Sandpit

A mini camping ground

Giant sandpit

Older kids stuff, e.g. 9 / 10 +

Playground – trapeze, swings, slides

Ball to play with

Making things – toys

Trampoline

Sandpit

Games

Bouncy castle

Go cart course – obstacle course

Flying fox

 

Outside space

Trees

Seating spot

Playground

Maze

Bush walk

Maze made of fruit trees

A big field for running around on

Petting zoo

Tree house

Bridge with pond underneath

Community planting!

Tree hut

Mural

Campfire

Fruit trees

Edible gardens

Shot-put field

Rugby field

Trees to breathe

Field

Campfire area

Giant outside chess / checkers / dominoes

Rugby field

Bird house

Pond with a garden

Big park

Big tower

Big swing

Field

River

Skateboard park

Swinging chairs

Tennis court

 

Inside space

Movie stand with a dairy – popcorn – a spa / sandpit – a pool – a private pool – a rock climbing wall – bean bags

Dairy – spa – sandpit – pool – private pool – bean bags – rock climbing wall

Dairy – movie centre

Electronic and science centre

Pool and spa

Movies with popcorn

Fish and chips

Arts and crafts centre (also so you get to make a community mural)

Build a spa pool

Having a movie night

Big inside heated pool

Shops

Heated pools

Mall

Pet shop

Fish and chips

Mall

Pool or basketball court

Museum

Swimming

The church can be a big trampoline place

Indoor rock climbing

Movie centre with lollies and popcorn

A loom band shop where you can buy loom bands please

Swimming pool

A big trampoline place

Rock climbing wall

A big heated indoor swimming pool

A big kitchen so people can have cooking classes

A place where you can do circus things, silks, gymnastics, etc

Spa pool

Build a big pet shop

Breakdown everything and build

Bean bags

Burger King

Sky Tower

Sky Tower 2.0

McDonalds

Aquarium

Twin towers NZ

 

Responses to images

Water, sand or stones – love this very much! [pic response - drainpipes]

Love use of water play [pic response - drainpipes]

My son would love this! [pic response – wooden tractor]

Role playing brilliant, love these [pic response – castle]

Brilliant ideas [pic response – castle]

Slides are too hot but this is fab [pic response – wooden tractor slide]

Can we make a slide? [pic response – wooden tractor slide]

Love this / same here [pic response – wooden tractor slide]

Can we have a bridge? [pic response – bridge across stones]

Role playing – this is great! [pic response – wooden car]

7 year old says ‘please to this one!’ [pic response – wooden swing bridge]

Love this natural element – could have stepping stones too [pic response – toadstool table and chairs]

Love this [pic response – sandpit]

Love this nature play [pic response – tree stump stepping stones]

Would be great for teenagers [pic response – table tennis table]

This one definitely please! [pic response – benches / fire pit]

Or a smaller version please 1 – 2 seats [pic response – benches / fire pit]

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

 

File No.: CP2014/19035

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months April – June 2014 and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months July – September 2014.

 

2.       Attachments include:

·        A – Auckland Transport activities

·        A1 – Travelwise Schools activities

·        B – Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

·        C – Report against local board advocacy issues

·        D – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards report.

 

 

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Key Agency Initiatives

 

SMART (South Western Multimodal Airport Rapid Transit) Project

3.       Investigation into protecting a rail (rapid transit) corridor from Onehunga to the Auckland airport then connecting back to the main trunk line at Puhinui forming a rail loop.

4.       As part of planning for the future public transport network, Auckland Transport has been in discussion with Auckland Airport about making provision for a potential rapid transit corridor in its master plan. Rail has been identified as the best long term public transport option for improving transport in Auckland’s airport and south western area. Auckland Airport has allowed for a rail corridor and station at the terminal as part of its latest master plan. There are no confirmed alignments for rapid transit links outside the airport property yet and further work is required to confirm this and the timing of any construction. The project is currently in the development phase and public consultation will be carried out when there is more certainty on feasible alignments and station locations.

East West Link

5.       The primary objective of the project is to provide an improved freight connection between SH20/Onehunga and the Southdown (MetroPort) and adjoining SH1 inland port. It is expected that there will be growth of freight transport via this corridor. Safety, amenity and service upgrades will also be considered. At the moment, AT is investigating what can be provided within the current road reserve; however, some land purchase may be required.

6.       The project team has started the process for procurement of a professional services contract for the production of the Detailed Business Case in 2014/2015, subject to approval of funding. The contract will be led by the Transport Agency, as principal.  Indicatively, the construction is scheduled to start by 2016/2017 with forecast completion by 2019/2020.

 


PT Development

City Rail Link

7.       The CRL is a 3.5km double track underground electrified rail line running under Auckland City centre from Britomart Station to the Western Line near the existing Mt Eden Station. Britomart would become a through station and provide for 3 intermediate stations in the Aotea, Karangahape Road and Newton areas. Following AT confirmation of the designated route recommended by the Independent Planning Commission, appeals were received from 6 parties and the Project Team is currently working with those appellants to work through matters raised.

Distributed Stabling – Detailed Design

8.       The project entails the development of out stabling facilities which support rail services throughout the region. These facilities are located in the South, CBD and West and comprise facilities for overnight stabling of trains and staff facilities. Installation of Transdev staff facilities at The Strand will be completed over the next 4 months.

Electrification Safety Works

9.       This project will identify and address safety risks arising from the introduction of overhead electrified traction infrastructure to the Auckland rail network. The scope of work includes implementation of recommendations from a series of risk reviews into public trespass/climbability risk at stations, investigation into possible platform-train interface and trip hazard issues between new EMUs and existing platforms. Fencing additions have been completed.  Anti-climb roller barriers are to be installed by the end of July.

Newmarket Crossing

10.     Upgrade a level crossing in Newmarket that constrains train movements into/out of Newmarket Station and inhibits planned increases in timetable frequencies. The preferred option has now been selected as the Cowie Street Linkway to Laxon Terrace.  Community group meetings commenced late February 2014, with the next meeting scheduled for early August 2014.  The design tender has been awarded and concept design is underway.

Upgrade Downtown Ferry Terminals

11.     The waiting area on pier 2 is now complete and handed over.

12.     The design for the new Pier 4 Pontoon has been completed and scoping and initiation works are under development in coordination with the Harbour Edge Programme.

PT Operations

Highlights for the quarter (April-June 2014)

13.     Total patronage achieved a record 72.4 million annual passenger trips to end June 2014, with a +5.6% growth.

14.     Rail patronage achieved a record 11.4 million annual passenger trips to end June 2014, with a +13.9% growth.

15.     The Northern Express rapid transit Northern Busway bus service achieved a record 2.4 million annual passenger trips to end June 2014, with a +6.5% growth.

16.     Other bus services achieved a record 53.4 million annual passenger trips to end June 2014, with a +4.2% growth.

17.     Ferry services for the year to end June 2014 carried 5.1 million annual passenger trips, with an annual growth of +3.1%.

18.     An Auckland milestone was achieved on Monday 28 April at 05:46 from Onehunga with the first new electric train (EMU) operating a revenue service between Onehunga and Britomart.

19.     Green Bay / Titirangi New Bus Network Review and public consultation has been completed and the new service will be implemented in August.

20.     Wi-Fi on the PT network is now available at rail and busway stations and some ferry wharves.

21.     AT HOP integrated ticketing rollout has been completed across all bus, rail and ferry services.

22.     50 AT HOP retailers are available across Auckland, with 10 Customer Service Centres.

23.     The AT HOP Day Pass was implemented on 1st July 2014 and offers travel for $16 across two zones, A and B, or $22 across three zones, A, B and C across rail, bus and inner harbour ferries.  The pass can be loaded on to an AT HOP card at AT Customer Service Centres, AT HOP ticket machines, ticket offices and AT HOP retailers.  The paper-based Discovery Day Pass is to be withdrawn at the end July.

Future outlook

24.     The business case for integrated fares under a 5 concentric ring zonal model, including product and pricing scenarios, is progressing through to final recommendation.

25.     The bus Public Transport Operating Model (PTOM) new draft contract has been finalised and will be distributed to incumbent bus operators for feedback in July. The bus PTOM Procurement strategy has been completed and NZTA approval will be sought in August.  The target is to tender the new South Auckland bus network in September, with a target go-live for services in the third quarter of 2015.

26.     Work continues on developing the new PT journey planner.  This will deliver a step-change in the customer experience through improved functionality, putting more power in the hands of the customer.    

27.     The revenue service progressive launch of new electric trains on to the Eastern Line is anticipated in August.

28.     Planning is also underway for the delivery of the trial to equip Transdev Ticket Inspectors with personal CCTV cameras and the ability to issue Trespass Notices to those repeatedly travelling without a valid ticket.

Key Deliverables

29.     Focus continues on the eight key strategic priorities on the rolling three-year business growth plan for Auckland public transport of:

·        Integrated ticketing and fares

·        Procurement and regulatory reform (PTOM – Public Transport Operating Model)

·        Rail electrification

·        Ferry improvements

·        New connected Network

·        On-time performance

·        First and Final Leg

·        Customer experience.

Road Design and Development

Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Scheme Cycle Way

30.     Provision of an off road cycle highway from Glen Innes Rail Station to Tamaki Drive.

31.     This project is being delivered jointly with NZTA. Route options have been selected and the process of refining these (considering constructability issues) is underway.


 

Tamaki Drive Corridor upgrade

32.     This project will consider Tamaki Drive from Quay Street through to St Heliers and will be looking at present and future land uses and how they impact on the function of the road, future traffic growth (improving traffic flows) and the provision of improved public transport. Initial assessment of Ngapipi Bridge and benchmarking of modal use is underway.

Quay Street - Seawall Seismic Upgrade

33.     This project deals with the proposed upgrade to Quay Street to give effect to the aspirations of the City Centre Master Plan for the severance between sea and city to be minimised and to provide priority to pedestrians and cyclists over other travel modes. Further objectives are to improve the interface between the public transport facilities that are concentrated in the Lower Queen Street area. The project also deals with associated enabling works that include the seismic upgrade of the Quay Street seawall.

34.     Two primary solution methodologies have been identified and reviewed. The procurement strategy is being prepared and this will assess Early Contractor Involvement and Design & Construct with a recommendation for a preferred option for AT Board approval.

Waterview Cycle Way connection

35.     The Waterview Walking and Cycling project is required as a condition of the decision of the Waterview Connection SH20-16 Motorway Board of Inquiry decision to mitigate adverse social effects resulting from the loss of open space and reserves. The condition requires the provision of the shared path between and including the proposed Alford Street Bridge and the proposed Soljak Place Bridge, a length of approximately 3.4km. The new facility will provide a missing link in the existing Auckland Regional Cycle Network. AT is required to prepare a design sufficient to submit as part of the Notice of Requirement and Resource Consent documentation and obtain the necessary land owner and statutory approvals for the shared path. The land purchase process will be managed by AT. The preferred route option has been identified, although some negotiations are still underway with some landowners. Public consultation is planned for 23 and 24 July.

Community Transport

School Transport Programme and Road Safety Education

36.     The number of schools signed onto the Travelwise Programme has now reached 401.

37.     The Mayoral Travelwise celebration and the Walking School Bus Megastar event were undertaken in June to congratulate the schools and volunteers for their hard work and results achieved.

38.     Key activities that were undertaken with the schools included Road Safety Week activities, Safety at the School Gate parking enforcement, speed enforcement campaigns undertaken with the NZ Police, cycle training, scooter training, school leadership programme for intermediate and high school students and school curriculum transport related activities targeted at road safety and school travel options.

39.     Walking School Buses now number 387 in the region with a continued programme of recruitment and recognition for the volunteers who accompany the buses. 

40.     Demand for cycle training is still strong from schools and greater partnerships with the NZ Police, Sports Trusts and Bike NZ have been developed to deliver cycle training and cycle safety. 

41.     The following regional road safety education campaigns are being delivered over the coming six months: 

·        Local speed  campaign – focused at all road users

·        Sober Driver campaign – focused at Sports Clubs and bars

·        Cycle safety- winter campaign focused on be bright be seen

·        Back to school speed campaign  - focused on targeting drivers speed around schools

Travel Planning and Cycle and Walking

42.     Commute travel planning packages and personal journey plans are being delivered across the region targeting business, communities, business associations and tertiary institutions.

43.     The development of the Auckland Cycle network continues with priority being placed on working with the NZTA on Grafton Gully and Waterview, working with Local Board Greenway proposals, Beach Road, Great South Road, Puhinui Road and the New Zealand Cycle Trail network expansion programme of the Airport to City route.

Road Corridor Access

Corridor Access Request Applications

44.     1,207 CAR applications were approved in June, with 82% processed within 5 working days and 94% processed within 15 working days of lodgement.

45.     In the last 3 months to the end of June 2014 there have been 3,801 CAR applications approved to carry out work on the road network. 

Ultra-Fast Broadband Rollout

46.     The Year 3 (2013/2014) build has now been completed and the cabinets passed to Crown Fibre Holdings.  There is still some outstanding reinstatement work associated with the Year 3 build which will be completed over the next few months.

47.     The Year 4 (2014/1205) build has commenced with CAR applications approved for 64 of the Year 4 cabinet areas with 28 of these already under construction.

48.     The Year 4 build comprises 451 cabinet areas of which at least 25% will have some overhead deployment utilising existing power poles.

Watercare Hunua 4 Bulk Watermain

49.     Watercare currently has three crews working at Tidal Road, Pah Road and Mountain Road in Mangere Bridge.  A fourth crew will be commencing work shortly in Victoria Street in Onehunga between Neilson Street and Church Street.

50.     The work on Tidal Road will be finishing shortly and will then progress into Massey Road where it will proceed westwards until it reaches George Bolt Memorial Drive.  The work on Massey Road will require road closures and will be restricted to mid-block with full reinstatement required before a move to the next block.  There has been extensive consultation with PT, the Heavy Haulage Association and other key stakeholders to lessen the impact of these closures.

Overweight Permits

51.     179 overweight permit applications were approved in June 2014.  Of these, 168 (94%) were processed within the target timeframes of 3 days for single trip, multi travel and continuous renewal permits and 5 working days for continuous and area permits. 

52.     In the last 3 months to the end of June there have been 532 overweight permit applications approved for travel on the AT road network.

Road Corridor Maintenance

North

53.     The remaining pavement renewal projects on Okura River Road and Ngarahana Road have been completed.

54.     The first section of the seal extension project on Matakana Valley Road has been completed.

55.     The remediation work on the Victoria Road retaining wall is now complete.

56.     Bridge renewal work has been completed on Hiki Culvert, Remiger Bridge, Rangitopuni Bridge and Rosemount Bridge.

57.     The three new road maintenance contracts for the northern area commenced on 1 July 2014.  The respective contractors are Downer New Zealand (Rural North), Fulton Hogan Limited (Urban East) and Transfield Services Limited (Urban West).

Central

58.     The clean-up work on Great Barrier Island following the storm on 10 June 2014 will continue through the winter months as further loose material is washed down onto roads.  At this stage it is estimated that the total cost of the remedial work will be in excess of $6 million.

59.     The pavement renewal projects on Carlton Gore Road, Aranui Road and Elstree Avenue were completed in June.

60.     35.7 km of AC resurfacing and 33.3 km of chipsealing were completed this year.

West

61.     15.1 km of AC resurfacing and 38.6 km of chipsealing were completed this year.  Projects were added to the programme in the last quarter.

62.     6.0 km of pavement renewals were completed with projects completed on Great North Road, Portage Road, Margan Avenue, Kinross Street, Birdwood Road, Henderson Valley Road, Nikau Street, View Road, Kervil Avenue, Rimu Street (2), West Coast Road and at the Great North Road/Titirangi Road intersection.

63.     Retaining walls have been constructed at a number of sites including Titirangi Road, Titirangi Beach Road (3), Candia Road, Laingholm Drive, Crows Road, Sunnyvale Road, South Titirangi Road and Bethells Road.

64.     Physical work has commenced on the major slip repair at 597 South Titirangi Road.  It is expected that work will be finished by early September.

65.     17.6 km of footpaths were either resurfaced or replaced this financial year. 

South

66.     The remaining pavement renewal project on Waiuku Road has been completed.

67.     The investigation and design for the pavement renewal projects in the 2014/15 programme are underway so as to enable an early start to construction in the upcoming summer months.

68.     There has been 24.7 km of AC resurfacing and 170.1 km of chipsealing completed this year.  The AC resurfacing programme was increased in length from 21.5 km to 24.7 km in the last quarter.

69.     36.8 km of footpaths were either resurfaced or replaced this year.

70.     17.7 km of pavement renewals were completed this year with projects completed on Te Irirangi Drive (2 sections), Great South Road (5 sections), Ti Rakau Drive (2 sections), Prince Regent Drive, Cook Street (Howick), Princes Street (Otahuhu), Massey Road,  Carruth Rd (Papatoetoe), Great South Road (4 sections), Mahia Road, Roscommon Road, Hill Road, Sheehan Avenue, Hunua Road (2 sections), Whitford-Maraetai Road, Takinini-Clevedon Road, Ponga Road, Ararimu Road, Pukeoware Road, Costello Road, Edinburgh Street/Massey Avenue roundabout (Pukekohe), King Street/West Street roundabout (Pukekohe), East Street (Pukekohe), Queen Street (Pukekohe), Sommerville Road, Rogers Road, Ostrich Farm Road, Stan Wright Road and Waiuku Road.

Streetlights

71.     New street lights are being installed in conjunction with the undergrounding of overhead power lines at the Mt Smart Road/Mays Road intersection and on Bassett Road in Remuera.

72.     There has been 4,237 luminaires and 696 street light poles replaced this year

Road Corridor Operations

Route Optimisation: Investigation and analysis

73.     The planned route optimisation for 2013/2014 has been completed including the Central City routes.

74.     Changes to the operation of the Traffic Signals have been made to improve performance on the following routes:

Quay St

Lower Hobson St

Solent St

Customs St

Lower Hobson St

The Strand

The Strand

Quay St

Alten Rd

Wellesley St

Hobson

Grafton Rd

Albert St

Quay St

Wellesley

Queen St

Quay St

Newton Rd

Wellington/Union

Karangahape Rd

Franklin Rd

Mayoral Dr/Cook St

Wellesley St W

Wellseley St E

Nelson St

SH1

Fanshawe St

Hobson St

Quay St

SH1

Karangahape Rd

Ponsonby Rd

Grafton Rd

Symonds St

Mt Eden

Customs

Grafton Road

Khyber Pass

Symonds St

Victoria St

Hobson St

Stanley St

Fanshawe St

Hobson St

Beaumont St

Higbrook Dr

SH1

Te Irirangi Dr

Jervois Rd

Wharf St

Beaumont St

Ponsonby Rd

Khyber Pass

College Hill Rd

Rosebank Rd

Great North Rd

Patiki Rd

Neilson St

SH20

Church St

75.     The effect of these changes is being monitored and there has already been positive feedback. Reports are being completed to summarise the work, analysis and results.

76.     Physical Works Programme (other routes across the region:

·        24 projects are at the scheme design stage

·        4 projects are at the detailed design stage

·        8 construction projects are in progress.

Network Safety & Operations Improvement Programme

Safety Around Schools Programme (part of the region wide School Travel Planning process)

77.     The 2013/2014 Safety engineering programme of $8,482,695 delivered 86 projects across 25 schools including:

·        15 projects completed in the Central area

·        50 projects completed in the South area

·        5 projects completed in the North area

·        16 projects completed in the West area

·        2014/15 Safety engineering programme developed for 20 schools.

 

 

Minor Safety Improvements Programme

78.     98% of the 2013/2014 Minor Safety Improvements Programme has been completed with 2% still in construction or procurement.

Regional Safety Programme

79.     75% of the 2013/2014 Regional Safety Programme is completed with 25% of projects still in construction for completion in 2014/2015

Urban Kiwi RAP and Red Light Camera Programmes

Urban Risk Mapping

80.     The Urban KiwiRAP star-rating contract awarded in late June.  The contractor is anticipating start up in August pending work visa approval. A procurement plan is being prepared to engage a Project Manager.

Red Light Cameras

81.     Roll out of five additional Auckland RLC sites is planned. Site selection review by key stakeholders is taking place in July with procurement processes underway for installation of sites using existing technology. No further sites are being considered until finalisation of new technology by NZ Police later this year.

Parking and Enforcement

Fanshawe Street Bus Lane

82.     Enforcement of the new bus lane on Fanshawe Street was implemented. The warnings period was extended to four weeks due to the high volumes of traffic.  A week’s stand-down followed before live enforcement commenced. To date there has been very good compliance, with 130 infringements being issued since live launch on 4 June. This represents an average of just 14 enforcements per day across all enforcement zones on Fanshawe Street. This can be compared to Onewa Rd which has been live for several years and where there are 20 enforcements per day on average.

Kingsland Paid Parking Zone

83.     Consultation was carried out in December 2013 on changes to the parking in the Kingsland town centre. The purpose of the changes was to improve the parking availability and give customers flexibility on their length of stay. Currently there are mostly 60 minute time restrictions in Kingsland and parking is near capacity during the middle of the day, evenings and weekends. The project proposes using pay and display parking with no time limits, a 10 minute grace period and demand responsive pricing. Prices will be set to achieve a target occupancy range of 70-90% at peak times. There was over 50% support for the proposal and the Kingsland Business Association supports the proposal. The parking changes will go live on 14 July and there will be advisory signs in Kingsland for two weeks prior.

Newmarket Paid Parking Zone

84.     Consultation was carried out in December 2013 on changes to the parking in the Newmarket. The purpose of the changes was to improve the parking availability and give customers flexibility on their length of stay. Currently there is a wide range of parking restrictions in Newmarket which create confusion for customers. Parking is near capacity on certain streets which creates increased levels of congestion as cars circle to find parking. The project proposes using pay and display parking with no time limits, a 10 minute grace period and demand responsive pricing. Prices will be set to achieve a target occupancy range of 70-90% at peak times. Most streets in Newmarket already have pay and display; however, some streets will be converted from time restrictions to pay and display. There was over 50% support for the proposal and the Newmarket Business Association supports the proposal. The parking changes will go live in early August.

Auckland Parking Discussion Document

85.     The parking discussion document was released in May 2014. The document provides commentary on key parking challenges and invites the public to send feedback and ideas on how we manage parking into the future. We’ve made suggestions on how AT might approach various parking challenges and asked the public what they think on themes such as removal of parking on arterial roads, management of parking within the city centre and other town centres, and extension of park and rides. The document has attracted a lot of media attention and over 350 submissions have been received so far. Consultation closes on 31 July 2014.

 

Change attachment text A,A1,B,C,D.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the fourth quarter (2013/14) ending 30 June 2014 and forward works programme for the first quarter (2014/15) ending 30 September 2014

83

ViewA1

Travelwise Schools activities broken down by Local Board

103

B

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

105

C

Local Board Advocacy Report

107

D

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

109

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in August 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/19083

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on transport related issues raised by local board members during August 2014. It also includes general information about matters of interest to the local board and Attachment A the Schedule of Issues raised in August 2014, as well as Attachment B Wharehouse Way parking and Attachment C rough order of costs for Warehouse Way parking.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in August 2014 for the Kaipatiki Local Board

 

 

Local Board Auckland Transport Capital Fund Projects

2.       The Kaipatiki Local Board has identified projects they wish to have assessed to consider progressing through this fund. They are currently being assessed and will be brought back to a future meeting of the local board with more detail, costs and recommendations. The current list of projects is attached to the latest quarterly report.

3.       The Local Board Capital Fund was established after transition to enable local boards to progress projects within their areas that have particular importance, and to construct those projects that may not rank highly enough for implementation in Auckland Transport’s plans. This fund is Auckland Transport capex but allocated to individual local boards.

4.       Chartwell/Chivalry Intersection - The proposed improvements at the intersection of Chartwell Road and Chivalry Road is a legacy North Shore City Council project with all the land purchases and design work completed

5.       The Kaipatiki Local Board resolved this intersection improvement for consideration as an Auckland Transport Local Board Capital Fund candidate project, as it had slipped out of the AT Capital Programme as NZTA funding for this project was unable to be secured.

6.       With the indication from the local board that it was prepared to fund what would have been the NZTA subsidy, AT has now brought this back into the Draft Plan (not yet completed) for the balance of funding for future construction.

7.       A workshop was held with the local board on 20 August 2014 to update members on the proposed intersection design and expected benefits of the project. Advice was given on the current congestion during peak periods and the upgrade of the traffic signals that the project will also address.

8.       The project will add: new pram crossings and tactiles, new signals and phasing, creation of a new pocket park, new wider footpaths, renew driveway accesses, bus stop relocation, undergrounding of visually intrusive power lines at the intersection, a clearway on Chartwell and will generally improve safety at the intersection.

9.       This intersection is in close proximity to Glenfield Primary School and Glenfield Intermediate School, which are both participants in the AT Travel Wise Programme. AT’s Community Transport Team will be working with the two schools to utilise the benefits provided if the project goes ahead.

10.     If the project is progressed, AT will be able to come back to the board with more detailed costs, as the dollar value of the local board contribution will be based on a percentage of the actual construction costs. Tenders for construction cannot be issued until funding has been secured.

11.     The current total project cost estimate is $1.3 million (based on 2012 rates). Based on this estimate, the 53% Local Board Capital Fund contribution (to replace the NZTA contribution) is $689k. Auckland Transport would contribute 47% which equates to $611k, and this sum has been included in the current proposed 2014/15 Capital Programme.

12.     If the funding from the Local Board Capital Fund is not confirmed, the priority of this project within the 2014/15 AT Capital Programme will be reduced and it is likely that the project will be pushed out to the latter years of the 10 year Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) due to other priorities in the 30 year AT Integrated Transport Programme (ITP). However, this can only be confirmed when the ITP prioritisation process is completed prior to the RLTP refresh process in early 2015.

13.     Parking in Warehouse Way – The board has resolved to ask for the creation of parking at Warehouse Way to facilitate access to the tracks at Tuff Crater.

14.     AT investigated the area and identified where additional parking would be able to be created within the existing road reserve. A rough order of costs to create 10 angle carparks is $102k. If the actual construction costs are less, the cost against the Local Board Capital Fund will be reduced accordingly - if the board wishes to have a larger number of carparks established, extra cost would be then added.

15.     There are a few constraints that were considered, as the existing footpath will need to be relocated. There are streetlight poles and street trees as well, and it was felt best to fit the carparks around these rather than removing/relocating them. The outside curve of the road was considered preferable so that visibility is not compromised.

16.     The board will need to resolve on this if it wishes to progress this project.

Local Board Engagement Plan

17.     Auckland Transport has finalised the main elements of the Local Board Engagement Plan, which documents how AT will engage with each local board.  The standard approach will apply unless specific requests for changes have been made.

18.     The plan comprises several elements:

·        The substantive document – This sets out the principles which underlie the way in which AT seeks to work with local boards.

·        Annex 1 – Three-year Work Programme: This is consistent with the 2013 programme and will be finalised with the 14/15 Annual Plan.

·        Annex 2 – Advocacy Initiatives: This lists the local board’s advocacy initiatives. It will be produced when local boards have finalised their new advocacy initiatives through the local board plan process.

·        Annex 3 – Engagement Process Guidelines: This document has been individualised for each local board from their input over the last few months.  It sets out specific processes applying to engagement on a wide range of AT initiatives. This Annex can be adapted at local board request to meet their own internal processes (for example, one local board may have delegated the provision of feedback on an initiative to their Transport Portfolio Lead, where another local board may require a workshop to discuss a similar initiative). Alternatively, AT may seek to adjust its form of engagement for specific circumstances differently to that in the enclosed schedule. In either case, AT will discuss the concerns with the local board and seek to find an agreed way forward.

19.     This new approach will take a little while for both local boards and AT departments to work together efficiently. AT welcomes feedback as to any difficulties that arise and how this process could be improved.

Auckland Transport News

Northcote Safe Cycle Route

20.     Auckland Transport was seeking feedback on the proposed Northcote Safe Cycle Route until Friday 29 August.

21.     The Northcote Safe Cycle Route is 5.2km of proposed walking and cycling improvements along Northcote Road, Lake Road and Queen Street from Taharoto Road/Northcote Road intersection (near Smales Farm) to Northcote Point Ferry Terminal.

22.     These changes, which will include both on-road and off-road walking and cycle facilities, will improve the safety for pedestrians and cyclists using this route.

Savings on the City Rail Link

23.     A significant design change to the City Rail Link (CRL) will save over $150 million, improve the reliability and journey time of train services, minimize construction disruption in Symonds Street and reduce property purchase requirements.

24.     Auckland Transport (AT) has decided to redevelop the existing Mt Eden Station and connect it to the CRL, rather than build a new underground station at Newton.

25.     Since the CRL concept design was developed two years ago, there has been concerted effort to optimize the design and drive value for money. The change that has resulted from this focus will reduce costs by removing the very deep Newton Station, which will also reduce construction disruption in upper Symonds Street by 12 to 18 months.

26.     The improved design will connect passengers at Mt Eden Station to the CRL, which previously by passed them and improve operation reliability through the provision of a separated east-west junction so train lines will not need to cross over each other.

Parking Discussion Submissions Closed

27.     Submissions on the Draft Parking Discussion document have now closed after widespread public interest.

28.     More than 4300 submissions have been received. There have also been a large number of face to face briefings with organisations throughout the region.

29.     The draft document identifies parking problems affecting the entire region and it discusses positive ways to fix them. This is the first time all aspects of parking in Auckland have been reviewed.

30.     The parking discussion document looked at the use of Park n Rides, residential parking zones, managing on and off street parking in the central city and on arterial roads and parking in town centres.

31.     Submissions will now be categorized and grouped to identify key themes. Proposed responses will be developed ready for consideration and review by Auckland Transport’s Board. Once the review is completed, a high level parking strategy for the region will be developed.

32.     Starting next year, detailed consultation with local boards, councillors, communities and business groups will be undertaken on localised changes.

Public Transport use at Record levels

33.     At the halfway point in 2014, indications are showing that Auckland is heading for a record year for the number of people using public transport in Auckland.

34.     Patronage totaled 72,396,155 for the twelve months to June, which is an increase of 5.6% on the previous year.

35.     More than six million people used the buses, trains and ferries in June, a rise of just under 7% on June last year. Rail is continuing to be a big performer up to 14% for the June year. Rail patronage totaled 11,435,085 passengers for the 12 months.

36.     Bus services have also had a strong year; the Northern Express services have carried 6.5% more passengers year on year. Other bus services saw and increase of 4.2%.

37.     Ferry trips totaled 5,109,947, which is an increase of 3.1% over the previous year.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

38.     This report is for the local board’s information.

Māori impact statement

39.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

40.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation

41.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of Issues raised in August 2014

117

bView

Warehouse Way Carparks

121

cView

Rough order of costs for Warehouse Way parking

123

     

Signatories

Authors

Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Hato Petera Community Access Agreement 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/18826

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board to enter into a further one year operational agreement with Hato Petera College (the College) for 2014/2015 to enable community use of their sports fields.

Executive summary

2.       Hato Petera College has historically made their sports fields available for wider community use through an agreement with council. The current agreement expired on 30 June 2014 and enables community use of the five sports fields in return for an operational grant of $30,000 per annum, as well as council undertaking all sports field maintenance. The College has met the objectives of the 2013/2014 agreement.

3.       Auckland Council has inherited various funded relationship approaches, and these have been operating under an interim community funding approach since amalgamation. A new community grants policy will not be operative until 1 July 2015; therefore, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee resolved to continue existing funding arrangements for the 2014/2015 financial year (resolution REG/2014/36).

4.       A review of the sport and recreation funded relationships has been completed by Longdill and Associates. The purpose of the review is to provide regional consistency across the agreements. The review recommends the agreement with the College is continued for 2014/2015; however, it outlines that it is anomalous with other levels of support provided to non-council owned field provision in Auckland.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the continuation of the current funding agreement with Hato Petera College for 2014/2015 for $30,000.

b)      note the review on sport and recreation funded relationships by Longdill and Associates outlines that the Hato Petera College agreement, which includes provision of a grant in addition to undertaking field maintenance, is anomalous with other levels of support provided to non-council owned field provision in Auckland.

 

Comments

5.       Hato Petera College (the College) is a co-educational school that is integrated into the State education system. The College has an agreement with the Catholic Diocese of Auckland, the property owner, to occupy the property on which they are situated.

6.       The College has historically made their sports fields available for wider community use through an agreement with council. Auckland Council has continued the agreement on an annual basis since amalgamation, operating under an interim community funding approach.

7.       The five sports fields at the College are treated as part of council's sports field network. Council covers the maintenance costs and manages bookings alongside council owned sports fields. An annual grant of $30,000 is also provided to the College that covers costs incurred from the increased use of the facilities.

8.       Northern Football Federation, North Harbour Rugby Union and College Sport regularly use the fields in the winter. In summer, Auckland Cricket, Takapuna Cricket Club, North Harbour Touch and Gold Guns Baseball regularly use the fields. Community use in 2013/14 totalled 3,240 hours.

9.       The Regional Strategy and Policy Committee have endorsed the draft community grants policy for formal consultation. Public feedback was due by 11 August 2014, and the draft policy is to be adopted by the governing body in November 2014. The new grants programme is expected to be implemented from 1 July 2015 and will replace all existing grants schemes.

10.     With the community grants policy not expected to be operative until 1 July 2015, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee has resolved to continue the interim community funding programme:

REG/2014/36

That the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee:

b) endorse existing funding arrangements and grants schemes being rolled over for the 2014 /2015 financial year.

CARRIED

11.     A review of the sport and recreation funded relationships administered by council's sport and recreation partnerships team has been completed by Longdill and Associates. The purpose of the review is to provide regional consistency amongst the agreements.

12.     The following recommendations provided in the Longdill report relate to the funded relationship with Hato Petera College:

·        Continue to fund for a further year (2014/15) until the Sports Field Capacity Development Programme Review is completed and current and projected capacity shortfalls are identified.

·        Recognise that the Hato Petera grant is anomalous with other levels of support provided to non-council owned field provision in Auckland, and work with the Kaipatiki Local Board to consider alternative grant allocation.

·        Work with Local and Sports Parks to address the current anomalous scenarios in the provision of maintenance and renovation services and / or operational funding to private sports field providers, including sports field lease holders and other sports field providers.  This should include developing a set of guiding principles to aid decision making, including such factors as:

a.      The need for additional sports field capacity in the area - winter and summer

b.      The suitability of the site for the proposed sports use, e.g. size, proximity to neighbours etc.

c.      The capacity hours that would be available for community use in winter and in summer

d.      The suitability of the site for community use, e.g. access through the site to the field

e.      Provision of, or access to, necessary ancillary infrastructure e.g. toilets, change rooms

f.       Existing relationships between the field owner and likely club / code users

g.      The likely dollar cost per hour of community access.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     The Kaipatiki Local Board has allocated the required funding in their local board budget to continue the current arrangement with the College for 2014/2015. This report seeks approval from the Kaipatiki Local Board to continue the interim approach endorsed by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.

Māori impact statement

14.     The Māori Plan has a key direction to "improve quality of life" with a focus on health and wellness. Having access to facilities that enable participation in sporting opportunities can have a significant positive impact on improving quality of life.

15.     This partnership is an example of Auckland Council working alongside a school that promotes tikanga Māori values. The vision of Hato Petera College is 'To be the Māori Catholic College of first choice based on excellence'.

Implementation

There are no implementation issues identified and the operational grant is allocated within the Long-Term Plan (LTP) and local board budget.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Paul Edwards - Recreation Partnership Projects Leader

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Psychoactive substances – draft Local Approved Product Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/16231

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek local board feedback on the proposed option for the draft Local Approved Product Policy (LAPP).

Executive summary

2.       On 6 March 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved a work plan for the development of Auckland Council’s LAPP (REG/2014/34).  The LAPP will set rules regarding where retail outlets of psychoactive substances may operate.  The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 provides that a policy may regulate the location of retail outlets by reference to broad areas within a district, proximity to other premises selling approved products and/or distance from certain types of premises such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities.

3.       On 3 July the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee considered a report setting out the proposed content for the draft Local Approved Product Policy.  The committee agreed the following recommendations (REG/2014/86).

a)      endorse the proposed draft Local Approved Product Policy that will prevent the sale of approved psychoactive substances in the following areas:

·     high deprivation areas as defined by the Ministry of Health’s Deprivation Index score of 8, 9 or 10 indicating areas that fall in the bottom 30% of deprivation scores

·     neighbourhood centers as defined by the unitary plan

·     within 300m of a high school

·     within 100m of a primary school

·     within 300m of the mental health or addiction treatment center

·     within 500m of an existing psychoactive substance retail licence

b)      forward a copy of this report to local boards to be considered on their agendas

c)      note that once all the local board feedback has been analysed, a final draft Local Approved Product Policy (LAPP) will be presented to the committee on 9 October 2014 to be approved for public notification via the special consultative procedure

d)      note the special consultative procedure will begin in November 2014 with the expected final adoption of the policy in March 2015.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Local Approved Product Policy option set out in attachment A of the report entitled “Psychoactive substances – draft Local Approved Product Policy”.

 

 

Comments

4.       On 6 March 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved a work plan for the development of Auckland Council’s LAPP (REG/2014/34).  On 3 July the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee endorsed a preferred option for the LAPP (REG/2014/86).

5.       The LAPP will set rules regarding where retail outlets of psychoactive substances may operate.  The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 provides that a policy may regulate the location of retail outlets by reference to broad areas within a district, proximity to other premises selling approved products and/or distance from certain types of premises such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities.

6.       Six options were considered for the LAPP.  Three options were rejected prior to consultation as not being able to achieve the outcomes for a successful LAPP.  The remaining three options were discussed with local boards, external stakeholders and council staff.  After consideration of feedback and relevant research a preferred option was developed.

7.       The preferred option for the LAPP would prevent licences being granted in areas of high deprivation, near high schools and near addiction and mental health treatment centres.  It would also limit how close to an existing shop a new shop could open.  This option would reduce the availability of these substances in areas where their presence is likely to have the greatest potential for harm.  The prevention of harm is achieved while maintaining the intent of the government to allow a regulated sale of these substances.

8.       Further details on the rationale for the preferred option for the LAPP are set out in the report that went to the Regional Policy and Strategy Committee on 3 July (attachment A). Local board feedback on this option is being sought through this report. Local board feedback on this preferred option will inform the final draft of the LAPP which will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 9 October. Local boards will an opportunity to provide feedback on the final draft in November 2014 – February 2015.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       Local board views on the draft LAPP option are being sought via this report.  Local boards have previously provided feedback on possible options.  Workshops on the proposed options were held with all of the local boards except for Great Barrier, Waiheke and Orakei local boards who declined to be involved in the process.  Of the remaining 18 local boards Whau declined to attend the workshop and did not provide any feedback. 

10.     Of the 17 local boards who took part in the LAPP workshops 13 endorsed the specified place option as their preferred option.  Four boards that for local reasons preferred either the town centre or industrial option as they felt it provided tighter restrictions in their areas.  All of these local boards also provided the specified areas as their second option acknowledging that it was unlikely that all local boards would opt for their preferred option.  The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board declined to provide a preferred option.  All local board feedback was considered in the selection and development of the option presented for feedback in the current report.

Maori impact statement

11.     Māori are over represented amongst the groups of vulnerable people likely to be affected by using approved psychoactive substances.  This over representation has two effects.  Firstly getting the right option for the LAPP to maximize harm reduction will be more effective for Māori.  Secondly, any solutions need to be designed in close collaboration with Māori to ensure they are workable and support wider initiatives aimed at improving Māori outcomes.

12.     A workshop has been undertaken with representatives from Hapai Te Hauora Tapui an agency representing Māori health providers in the Auckland region.  Council staff will be working with the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Hapai Te Hauora Tapui to set up hui for iwi feedback.  Information from the workshop and hui will be central to the development of the LAPP.

Implementation

Step

Estimated timeframe

1. Local board and stakeholder engagement on draft option

Officers will seek feedback from local boards, internal, external and political stakeholders on the approved draft LAPP option.

July – September 2014

2. Final draft LAPP for special consultative procedure

Officers will then present a final draft policy to RSPC for approval for consultation.

9 October

3. Special consultative procedure

Officers will follow the special consultative procedure set out in section 83 of Local Government Act 2002. This will include public submissions and hearings.

November 2014

4. Local board feedback of final draft

Officers will seek formal feedback from local boards on the final draft policy.

November 2014 – February 2015

4. Adopt final policy

Following the hearings the draft will be finalised and presented to RSPC for adoption.

March 2015

5. Implementation and review

A copy will be sent to Ministry of Health after it has been completed. The LAPP will then be reviewed every five years in accordance with section 69 of the Act. 

Ongoing

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Psychoactive Substances Draft Local Approved Products Policy

133

     

Signatories

Authors

Callum Thorpe - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 



















Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Review of Alcohol Control Bylaws - Proposed bylaw for local board feedback

 

File No.: CP2014/19056

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to provide local boards with a copy of the proposed Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 and to request formal feedback by resolution.

2.       Local boards are also requested to appoint a review panel to make recommendations to the local board on the review of the local alcohol bans.

Executive summary

3.       On 22 July 2014, the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee recommended to the governing body to adopt the Statement of Proposal for the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (refer Attachment A) for public consultation (resolution number RBC/2014/27). The governing body formally adopted the Statement of Proposal on 31 July 2014 (resolution number GB/2014/70). Following this discussion, council commenced public consultation using the special consultative procedure on 15 August 2014.

4.       In addition to the public consultation process, staff are seeking feedback from local boards on the proposed bylaw. 

5.       The proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 will establish the bylaw structure and delegation that will be used to make, review, amend or revoke alcohol bans. Decisions on existing and new alcohol bans will be made by local boards after a new bylaw is adopted. This ensures decisions meet the proposed new requirements in the bylaw.

6.       Regardless of the final form of the bylaw and delegations, local boards have an important role in the review of alcohol bans and the appointment of an alcohol ban review panel is sought.

7.       Details of the proposed bylaw are outlined in the report.

 

Recommendations

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback by way of resolution on the proposed Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw to the hearing panel, including whether the local board wish to meet with the hearing panel.

b)      appoint a local alcohol ban review panel comprised of up to three local board members to make recommendations on the review of the alcohol bans in the local board area.

c)      appoint one member as a chairperson of the local alcohol ban review panel.

d)      delegate to the Chairperson the power to make a replacement appointment to the review panel in the event that any member appointed by the local board under resolution (b) is unavailable.

 

Comments

Legislative Framework

8.       The Local Government (Auckland Transitional Provisions) Act 2010 requires the review of all seven legacy alcohol control bylaws (previously called liquor control bylaws) and associated alcohol bans (previously called liquor bans) by 31 October 2015.

9.       In December 2012, central government enacted the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, which in turn amended the Local Government Act 2002. The requirements for making or continuing individual alcohol bans has changed significantly with the passing of the Local Government (Alcohol Reform) Amendment Act 2012 (the Act).

10.     The Act introduced a higher threshold to be met for alcohol bans to be made or continued.  The higher threshold requires that council is satisfied that there is evidence to show a high level of crime or disorder is caused or made worse by the consumption of alcohol in that public place, and that the alcohol ban is a reasonable restriction on people’s rights in light of that evidence.

11.     The process for making a bylaw under the Local Government Act 2002 requires that council determine if a bylaw is the most appropriate response to a problem. A bylaw must also be in the most appropriate form and must be consistent with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.  All bylaws must meet the legal requirements as set out in the Bylaws Act 1910, including not being unreasonable, providing rules that are proportionate to the issues being addressed and not being beyond the powers of the enabling legislation.

Current Auckland regulation

12.     There are currently seven legacy alcohol control bylaws and more than 1600 individual alcohol ban areas across Auckland.  The legacy bylaws significantly differ in their drafting style and presentation.

13.     In general, all legacy bylaws provide the structure used to make alcohol bans. Some legacy bylaws enable the making of alcohol bans by resolution, while others require a change to the bylaw itself. Making alcohol bans by resolution means the level of consultation is determined on a case by case basis, and can result in more effective and efficient decisions compared to amending the bylaw.

14.     An assessment of the appropriateness of the legacy bylaws indicate that:

·        A single bylaw is necessary to enable the adoption of alcohol bans that prohibit or regulate or control the consumption or bringing into or possession of alcohol in public places. The New Zealand Police consider that limiting the consumption of alcohol in public places may reduce alcohol related harm.

·        It is appropriate to delegate decisions on alcohol bans in local public places to local boards.

15.     Within an alcohol ban area, the possession and consumption of alcohol is prohibited during the time the ban is operational.  Exceptions enable alcohol to be transported in an unopened container to and from licenced and private premises.

16.     Enforcement of the bylaw is the responsibility of the New Zealand Police. The police have powers of search, seizure and arrest, and may issue a $250 infringement notice for breach of an alcohol ban.

Auckland Council’s proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw

17.     On 22 July 2014, the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee recommended to the governing body the Statement of Proposal for the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw.

18.     On 31 July 2014, the governing body adopted the proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw Statement of Proposal (refer Attachment A), which includes the proposed bylaw for public consultation (resolution number GB/2014/70).

19.     Following the decision, council commenced the public consultation process (using the special consultative procedure), on 15 August 2014. The key consultation dates are summarised in the table below:

Table 1. Key consultation dates

Date

Milestone

15 August 2014

Written submission period opens

15 September 2014

Written submission period closes

September/October 2014

Staff will review and analyse all submissions in a report to the hearings panel

Report will include all formal feedback received from local boards

Early/Mid October 2014

Public hearings will be held by hearing panel

This will include an opportunity for local boards to meet with the hearings panel

End October 2014

Hearings panel will report back to governing body (final bylaw adopted)

18 December 2014

Bylaw commences

 

Summary of proposed alcohol control bylaw content

20.     The purpose of the bylaw is to control the consumption or possession of alcohol in public places to reduce alcohol related harm. This aligns to section 147 (Power to make bylaws for alcohol control purposes) of the Local Government Act 2002.

21.     The bylaw proposes that local boards be delegated decisions on making, reviewing amending or revoking alcohol bans in local areas. This supports previous feedback obtained by local boards requesting this delegation from the governing body.

22.     Alcohol bans of regional significance will remain the responsibility of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee. This is consistent with the Auckland Council Long Term Plan, where issues of a regional significance are the responsibility of a council committee.

23.     It is proposed within the bylaw that prior to making a new alcohol ban, council be satisfied that the alcohol ban gives effect to the purpose of the bylaw and comply with criteria and decision making requirements Subpart 1 of Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002; and section 147B of Local Government Act 2002. This includes that:

·        There is evidence that the area to which the bylaw applies (or will apply by virtue of the resolution) has experienced a high level of crime or disorder that can be shown to have been caused or made worse by alcohol consumption.

·        The alcohol ban is appropriate and proportionate in light of the evidence and can be justified as a reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms.

24.     Four different times are proposed in the bylaw for consideration of new alcohol ban areas:

·        24 hours, 7 days a week (at all times ban)

·        7pm – 7am daily (evening ban)

·        10pm – 7am daylight saving and 7pm – 7am outside daylight saving (night time ban)

·        7pm on the day before to 7am on the day after any weekend, public holiday or Christmas/New Year holiday period (weekend or holiday alcohol ban).

These times are a guide to improve consistency across Auckland. This recognises that, in some instances, the use of the times specified may be disproportionate to the evidence of the problem and therefore contrary to the statutory requirement that requires alcohol bans to be proportionate in light of the evidence. of legacy council bylaws.

25.     Enforcement of alcohol bans is the responsibility of the New Zealand Police. The penalty for breaching an alcohol ban is a $250 infringement under the Local Government (Alcohol Ban Breaches) Regulations 2013.

Review of local alcohol bans

26.     To ensure local board decision making on the existing alcohol bans is consistent with the new bylaw, local boards will be required to review all bans once the bylaw is adopted. It is a statutory requirement these all be reviewed by 31 October 2015, otherwise the bans will lapse.

27.     Staff will support the local board review. The proposed alcohol ban review process is outlined in the table below:

Table 2. Proposed local board review process

Date

Milestone

September 2014

Local boards establish local alcohol ban review panels to review existing local alcohol bans

End October 2014

Final Alcohol Control Bylaw adopted by governing body

November 2014 – end February 2015

Staff to present information on local alcohol bans to each local alcohol ban review panel and assist the panels in making recommendations on existing local alcohol bans

March 2015

Recommendations of the local alcohol review panels presented to local boards

April/May 2015

Public consultation on alcohol controls (if required by local boards)

June 2015

Alcohol bans adopted by local boards

October 2015

Legacy alcohol bans lapse.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

28.     The review of the legacy bylaws was discussed with local boards in the context of the significant other changes arising from new alcohol-related legislation.  In relation to alcohol bans, local boards sought clear decision-making criteria, some form of regional consistency in times while providing for local variation where necessary, provision for temporary changes, and local board delegations.

Māori impact statement

29.     Throughout the initial engagement phases of the review project, staff worked with the Community Policy and Planning team, Te Waka Angamua, policy advisors at the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) and Hapai Te Hauora Tapui to deliver a program for engaging with Māori on alcohol issues.

30.     As part of this, staff ran a workshop with rangatahi (youth), organised a rangatahi engagement session as part of the Atamira event and held a hui with mana whenua and mataawaka to discuss both the Local Alcohol Policy Project and the Alcohol Control Bylaw Project.

31.     There is broad support from police iwi liaison officers, mana whenua and mataawaka in relation to protecting children and young people from the harms associated with alcohol consumption in public places.

Implementation

32.     If adopted as proposed, local boards will be required to review all current alcohol bans after the bylaw is adopted by 31 October 2015. This ensures that decisions on alcohol bans meet the proposed new requirement in the bylaw and the enabling legislation.

33.     The Policies and Bylaws Unit will assist local boards with this process. Polices and Bylaws staff have been collating evidence from legacy council files, the Police and community safety audits and are working closing with Integrated Bylaw Review Implementation team to ensure practicality and ease in the implementation of the Auckland-wide bylaw. As part of this process, the appointment of local board alcohol ban review panels is sought.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Statement of Proposal - Review of Alcohol Control Bylaws

167

bView

Proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw

183

     

Signatories

Authors

Kylie Hill - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 
















Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 













Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Monthly Local Board Services Report - September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/19598

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The updates in this report relate to the following:

·             Town centre transformation

·        Parks and sportsfield upgrades

·             Transport

·             Strategic planning and finance

2.       The next quarterly local board services report in October will provide an overview of all of the board’s strategic priorities (utilising the red, amber, green status update system).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the proposed Kaipatiki Play Space Renewals Programme 2014/2015 as per the attached summary in Attachment A

b)      approve the Manuka Park Dog Play Space project as per Attachment B to proceed to the physical works stage

 

Comments

Workshops and portfolio briefings

3.       A number of Kaipātiki Local Board workshops and portfolio briefings were held in August. Records of all of these meetings are attached to separate reports on this agenda.

4.       The following regional and sub-regional briefings took place in July:

·     Special Housing Areas Tranche 4 workshop (local board chairs and Auckland Development Committee) – 6 August

·     Budget Committee workshop - Parks, Community and Lifestyle Activities and Budget review for LTP (local board chairs and Budget Committee) – 8 August

·     City Rail Link Briefing – 11 August

·     Local board briefing on the LTP financial policies – 18 August

·     Commercial Sponsorship – local board briefing – 22 August.

 

5.       The workshop on 17 September is scheduled to cover the following items:

·        Parks Projects Concepts and Designs

·        AT - Constrained Financial Environment

·        Heritage Incentives Policy Engagement

·        Site proposed for divestment in the Kaipatiki Local Board area

·        Funding Round – Community discretionary grants

·        Alcohol Bans.

6.       The workshop on 24 September is scheduled to cover the following items:

·     Local Board Plan

·     Long-term Plan.

Strategic Updates

7.       The following updates are provided in this report:

Town Centre transformation

Birkenhead

8.       Work is ongoing to plan for public consultation on the Birkenhead town centre projects. It is proposed to offer an online survey supplemented with two open days in the town centre itself, with the potential to offer guided walkovers of the proposed upgrades. This will enable members of the public to discuss the proposals in more detail as we seek their feedback.

9.       The consultation will be advertised via our usual channels (Facebook, e-newsletter and the North Shore Times) and we would also seek the support of key stakeholders (the Birkenhead Town Centre Association and Birkenhead Residents Association) to promote the consultation amongst their networks. Public consultation is currently proposed to take place in late October. These timeframes are yet to be confirmed.

10.     Members are reminded that consultation is a spectrum running from ‘inform’ through to ‘empower’, and any consultation activity should be planned with the level of public participation in mind. In order to fully plan for the consultation and ensure its effectiveness, direction will be needed from the board as to which specific elements they wish to seek feedback from the public on and how that will influence decision making.

11.     It is proposed to continue working on the consultation plan over the coming weeks and bring a more detailed plan back to the board.

Parks and sportsfield upgrades

12.     The work programme for 2014/2015 is now being worked on, following approval at the board’s meeting on 9 July.

13.     There are seven play spaces that have been approved as part of the 2014/15 renewal programme that require a full renewal.  These have been prioritised and an individual approach recommended in the summary in Attachment A

14.     The final design of the Manuka Park dog place space includes equipment provided by the Men’s Shed in Glenfield, a water fountain including a dog bowl in the area of the public convenience, two seats and signage.  Details are provided in Attachment B.

15.     An option of including a fenced area was raised during the consultation process and details are included in Attachment B for possible funding in the future. 

Transport

16.     At its meeting on 13 August, the board delegated providing feedback on the Northcote Safe Cycle Route to the whole board. The final feedback submitted is attached to this report at Attachment C. This feedback was produced following a workshop session with Auckland Transport on 20 August and a community drop in session organised by the local board together with Auckland Transport on 26 August.

17.     At its meeting on 13 August, the board delegated providing feedback on the Auckland Transport proposed bus shelter designs to the transport portfolio holders and the Chairperson. The final feedback submitted is attached to this report at Attachment D.

18.     A separate report on this agenda provides further updates on Auckland Transport matters.


 

Strategic planning and finance

19.     The board’s hearings on the draft local board plan took place on 2 September. A separate report on this agenda provides a more detailed analysis of the submissions for the board to review in preparation for finalising the plan. A final draft of the plan will be presented to the board at its meeting on 8 October.

20.     Work on council’s Long-term Plan 2015-2025 continues. Following the release of the Mayor’s Proposal on 28 August a workshop for all elected members was held on 1 September. Further opportunities for feedback and local decision-making are scheduled for the coming months, the early stages of which align with the sign off of the final local board plan in October.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     Local board views are sought via this report.

Maori impact statement

22.     There are no specific impacts on Māori arising from this report.

Implementation

23.     There are no implementation issues identified in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipatiki Playspace Renewals Programme 2014/2015

199

bView

Manuka Reserve Dog Play Space

201

cView

Northcote Safe Cycle Route Feedback

211

dView

Auckland Transport Bus Shelters feedback

213

     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Broad - Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 










Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Northcote Safe Cycle Route Consultation

Kaipātiki Local Board Feedback (please note, not all parts of this feedback are unanimously supported by the board)

The Kaipātiki Local Board (the board) supports the development of walking and cycling infrastructure across the region and is in principle in support of developments which encourage walking and cycling as a transport option in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

The board supports that the proposed Northcote Safe Cycle Route provides for safe cycling and walking between key facilities and locations within and beyond the Kaipātiki Local Board area including several schools, local and town centres and sports facilities.

The board supports the utilisation of off-road shared paths where possible along the route, as well as the inclusion of a cycle lane on the inside of car parking where possible and appropriate.

However, the board raises some specific comments (laid out below) about certain parts of the route. The comments at 1 and 2 below in particular must be addressed before Auckland Transport finalise the design for the scheme.

(1)     Queen Street parking (sections 3D, 3E, 3F, 3G, 4A, 4B, 4C and 4D)

The proposal indicates a significant reduction in parking along the western side of Queen Street. If this proposal were to go ahead in its current form the loss of this parking would have a significant impact on the area including on businesses and residents. The board understands that the parking survey that AT completed as part of the preparation of this scheme looked at parking capacity on a weekday and a Sunday but did not review parking on a Saturday or weekday evening when parking is in high demand. The scheme as currently proposed for Queen Street is therefore unacceptable to the local board and needs to be addressed by Auckland Transport in the further development of the plans.

(2)     Queen Street/Rodney Road/Stafford Road intersection (section 3F)

Another project is investigating intersection/pedestrian improvements at Queen Street/Rodney Road/Stafford Road. The board requests that the two projects are aligned.

(3)     Queen Street/Onewa Road/Lake Road intersection (section 3C)

The proposal indicates removal of the inside lane on the approach to Onewa Road from Bellevue Avenue on Queen Street. This would mean that all traffic which currently uses this left hand lane in the morning peak will need to merge with that in the outside lane which we anticipate will have a very significant effect on the wait time for cars joining Onewa Road from Queen Street. This needs to be addressed by Auckland Transport in the further development of the scheme.

(4)     16-20 Lake Road school drop-off (section 3A)

The cycle lane on the western side of Lake Road removes the school drop off option outside no.16-20. The board requests that this is reviewed with a view to retaining the school drop-off.

(5)     Lake Road proposed T3 Lane (sections 2F, 2G, 2H)

The board supports the extension of the Lake Road southbound T3 lane to the Raleigh Road roundabout as indicated in this scheme.

(6)     Raleigh Road/Lake Road/Exmouth Road roundabout (section 2E)

The board suggests that the wide berms in the vicinity of this roundabout are utilised for an off road shared paths where possible, particularly on the western side of Lake Road.

(7)     Pedestrian Crossing on Lake Road (section 1I)

The board suggests that as part of the scheme the pedestrian crossing is moved to be closer to the roundabout to improve pedestrian safety.

(8)     Northcote Road/Onewa Domain (section 1E)

The board suggests that the off-road section adjacent to the Netball Centre’s car park is lengthened to allow additional space for the drop off zone for the Netball Centre.

(9)     Northcote Road over-bridge (section 1C)

The board specifically supports the widening of the motorway over-bridge Northcote Road as it is currently very narrow and therefore dangerous for cyclists.

The board wishes to note its concerns relating to the consultation process for this project:

·    The board was not briefed on the detail of the proposal prior to the consultation details being finalised. If the board had been briefed, the specific concerns outlined at point 1 in particular above would have been raised at that point.

·    The communications surrounding the consultation were misleading and have led members of the community to see the project as definitely going ahead in its current form. The board has since been assured that this is not the case. The status of the project and the purpose of the consultation should have been clearer to the community from the outset of the consultation process.

·    The board requests that the next design stage is presented to the board prior to being finalised for the board’s review and further feedback.


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 




Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/19490

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Kaipatiki Local Board an overview of Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months, 1 January to 30 June, 2014.

Executive summary

2.       ACPL’s vision is to be a ‘centre of excellence’ that provides commercial expertise and value for money to council in managing its property portfolio, acquisition and disposal activities, and the delivery of projects that implement council development initiatives.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six-months that contribute to our seven key outcomes, as outlined in our Statement of Intent 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

·        Properties managed for council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

·        Place-shaping projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

·        ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

·        Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

·        Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

·        Properties are disposed of for council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

·        Council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      recieve the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014.

 

Comments

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Kaipatiki Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from January to June 2014 is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio rationalisation process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages all Auckland Council or AT owned non-service properties. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six-months and now totals 1185 properties, an increase of 90 since the February 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the quarter ending 30 June 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $1.9m ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $25.4m against a budget of $23.5m. During the quarter, the average monthly collectable arrears rate and vacancies rate were respectively 2.1% and 2.4%, which is well under the SOI targets of 5% and 3%.

10.     A properties managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

·        current ACPL managed commercial and residential property within the Kaipatiki Local Board;

·        each property’s classification or reason for retention;

·        the nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place; and

·        the budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported, e.g. regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by providing council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

13.     January to June 2014 targets:

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$12.3m disposal recommendations

$14.8m

These recommendations include $5.6m of sites that are identified for development projects.

 

14.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

 

 

 

15.     2014/2015 targets:

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

These targets will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects.

Development & Disposals

$30 net sales

 

Process

16.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with the local board and the Independent Maori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

17.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the rationalisation process in the Kaipatiki area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

25A Verran Road, Birkenhead

Vacant residential site. Cleared as surplus by the Governing Body in April 2014. The site is under evaluation by ACPL’s development team with a view to optimising its residential development potential.

1A Mulberry Place, Glenfield

This site was acquired for a legacy NSCC slip stabilisation project that has now been completed. In August 2013 the Kaipatiki Local Board raised concern that there may be on-going slip concerns on this site. This concern was noted and investigated. A mitigation strategy has been provided by Riley Consultants and will be built into the sales process should the property be cleared as surplus. Progressing through rationalisation process.

 

Place Shaping and Housing Initiatives

Overview

18.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into around 48 council-driven place-shaping and housing initiatives region wide. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $400k to in excess of $100m. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL-led developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

19.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Action Plan Group, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects with an affordable housing component over three years which would encompass CHO involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.


Local Activities

20.     A high level update on place-shaping and housing initiative and proposal activities in the Kaipatiki area is outlined in points below.

21.     Northcote Town Centre: This place-shaping project is subject to the Northcote Town Centre Plan as endorsed by the former North Shore City Council in September 2010. Council is a stakeholder as owner of the freehold interest of the Northcote Town Centre and community facilities. The land holdings are subject to perpetual ground leases to private parties and are managed by ACPL. City Transformation has been leading this work-stream, which includes upgrades to public toilets, lighting and parking facilities. ACPL will review the centre and provide a Strategic Development Plan and Property Plan proposal to determine the practicality of implementing the remainder of the Northcote Town Centre Plan. ACPL will work closely with the Kaipatiki Local Board in reviewing any proposals.

22.     Highbury Viewing Platform: This is a North Shore City Council legacy project. A retail property was purchased in 2004. It is proposed that a viewing platform be constructed with the possibility of creating a type of food retailing improvement on the platform.

23.     City Transformation has taken responsibility for this project and approached ACPL for advice on the commercial viability of the proposed food retail element of the project. ACPL has completed a rental assessment and viability appraisal. Further advice was provided on construction costs, property management and operating costs. It was concluded that the best outcome for the site will be to retain it within the service portfolio, but develop a commercial food retail element within the site that will be managed by ACPL as a commercial tenancy.

24.     Concept designs have been completed for a potential staged development, incorporating a café. On-going meetings are occurring with City Transformation.

25.     25A Verran Road, Birkdale: This vacant residential site has been cleared by the governing body as surplus to service requirements. It is currently under evaluation by ACPL’s development team with a view to optimising its residential development potential.

26.     Property Optimisation: An increasing focus for ACPL is property optimisation. ACPL is keen to work with local boards on development opportunities that facilitate upgrades within the service portfolio. For example a community facility upgrade may be funded by incorporating the facility into a mixed-use development that makes better use of the overall site. We welcome the opportunity to review any such opportunities that may be identified by the Kaipatiki Local Board.

Acquisitions

Overview

27.     ACPL continues to support council and Auckland Transport programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved council or Auckland Transport budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

28.     By the end of the financial year 2013 to 2014, 207 property purchases were completed for tcouncil and AT to the value of $132.4m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

29.     Over the past six months, 14 properties were acquired to meet council open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Kaipatiki Local Board area:

 

 

 

 

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

136 Birkdale Road, Birkdale

Community, Policy & Planning

Open Space

Kaipatiki

20 Park Avenue, Birkenhead

Parks, Sports & Recreation

Open Space

Kaipatiki

102 Hobsonville Road, Hobsonville

City Transformation

City Transformation

Upper Harbour

Hobsonville Point Community Buildings (HQ & Sunderland Lounge) Buckley Ave, Hobsonville

City Transformation

Community

Upper Harbour

150 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe

Parks, Sports & Recreation

Open Space

Upper Harbour

139 Beach Road, Castor Bay

Community, Policy & Planning

Open Space

Devonport-Takapuna

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

30.     72 properties were also acquired over the past six-months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects such as AMETI (30 acquisitions), Dominion Road (7 acquisitions), Te Atatu Road (9 acquisitions) and City Rail Link (16 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

31.     ACPL manages eight business interests region wide on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Kaipatiki Local Board area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

32.     This report is for the Kaipatiki Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

33.     The importance of effective communication and engagement with Maori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 listed Tamaki Makaurau region mana whenua groups for our core business activities. 

34.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of waahi tapu or joint management relating to Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Kaipatiki Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

35.     ACPL has additionally undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. The improvement planning phase of this project is nearly complete. We anticipate finalising our MRP in September/October 2014.

Implementation

36.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

223

bView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the Local Board area

225

cView

Property movement in the Local Board area

231

     

Signatories

Author

Caitlin Borgfeldt - Local Board Liaison

Authoriser

David Rankin - Chief Executive

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14

 

File No.: CP2014/19871

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide local board members with the Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14 so that all members are well briefed in regard to RFA activities and developments.

Executive summary

2.       For the information of the board, Attachment A is the Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14 and Attachment B is a summary of key points from this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2013-14

235

bView

Summary of Key Points

257

     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Submissions on the Kaipātiki Draft Local Board Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/19783

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents a more detailed analysis of the submissions received to the Kaipātiki Local Board Draft Local Board Plan (the draft plan).

Executive summary

2.       The consultation period for the Kaipātiki Draft Local Board Plan ended on 6 August 2014.

3.       238 submissions were received to the Draft Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2014. Of these, 44 were proforma based submissions relating to smokefree issues, Thirty five of the submissions received were made to all draft local board plans.

4.       30 submitters requested the opportunity to speak in support of their submission at a public hearing.

5.       A high level summary of the submissions received was presented in the ‘Summary of submissions to the Draft Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2014’ report that the board considered when hearing oral submissions.

6.       This report provides a more detailed level of analysis of the submissions received along with the analysis set out in that earlier report.

7.       The majority of submitters largely supported the draft plan.  There were however a large number of refinements suggested by submitters.  A more detailed analysis of the submissions received on the draft plan is attached as Attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the analysis of submissions regarding the Kaipātiki  Draft Local Board Plan.

b)      agree the areas of potential changes to the Kaipātiki Draft Local Board Plan.

c)      delegate portfolio holders the authority to provide further comments to the Local Board Advisor as the final plan is drafted for adoption.

d)      adopt the Kaipatiki Local Board Plan 2014-2017 at its meeting on 8 October 2014.

 

 

Comments

8.       All submissions received have been entered into the Feedback Management System (FMS) and coded to the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives set out in the draft plan.

9.       The coding structure contained in the FMS was tailored to the content of the draft plan, with separate codes being created for each outcome, objective and key initiative.  This structure has enabled detailed analysis of the comments made on differing aspects of the draft plan. 

10.     Notwithstanding this detailed structure, coding is not a precise science.  For example, many submitters responding on the pro-forma submission form contained in the summary document, responded to question four, which asked if there were any items missing from the draft plan.  Many of the responses made to this question made comment on issues that were in fact included in the full draft plan, but which had not been included in the summary document. 

11.     Due to the largely hierarchical structure of the draft plan into outcome areas, objectives and key initiatives, it is also possible in most cases to code the same response to more than one element of the draft plan.

12.     In addition to considering the analyses set out in the attachment to this report, board members should also refer to the detailed submissions when considering recommended changes they may wish progress. 

Consideration

Local Board Views

13.     The Kaipātiki Local Board will consider its final Draft Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2014 at the Local Board Plan 2014 hearing meeting on Tuesday 14 October.

Maori Impact Statement

14.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has given consideration to Māori outcomes throughout the development of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan; consequently the implementation of the plan has the potential to contribute to positive outcomes for Māori.

15.     The Kaipātiki Local Board invited mana whenua and mataawaka to meet with them during the early stages of the development of the local board plan.  Views expressed by mana whenua and mataawaka during these hui have been considered and helped inform the development of the plan.

16.     The outcomes, objectives and initiatives included in the plan will support the delivery of the Auckland Plan.  The entirety of the plan will benefit Māori as part of the board’s community.  As part of the draft plan the board intends to work closely with mana whenua on a number of initiatives such as those focusing directly on issues of importance to Māori such as improving and maintaining the natural environment e.g. improving stream water quality or town centre projects.  The board also intends to improve the ability of mataawaka to input into board decision making through the creation of a local Māori network.  Other areas of the draft plan such as its initiatives focusing on youth (employment, cultural and recreational) or public transport initiatives will particularly benefit Māori due to the Māori community’s demographic and socio-economic characteristics.

Implementation Issues

17.     Implementation issues on the various matters raised in submissions will be considered when making decisions at decision-making meetings on the Draft Kaipātiki Local Board Plan on 14 October 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Analysis of submissions made to the Kaipātiki Draft Local Board Plan

261

     

Signatories

Authors

Andy Roche - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/19128

 

  

 

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive any verbal reports of members.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

 

File No.: CP2014/19129

 

  

 

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for Governing Body Members to update the board on Governing Body issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Members’ verbal updates.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops, Wednesday, 13 August 2014, Wednesday, 20 August 2014 and Wednesday, 27 August 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/19130

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014, Wednesday, 20 August 2014 and Wednesday, 27 August 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board had a briefing on:

·        Capex Review

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 20 August 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board had a briefing on:

·        Birkenhead Transformation Programme

·        Chivalry/Dianna/Chartwell project

·        Northcote Safe Cycle Route Consultation

·        Glenfield Leisure Centre

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 27 August 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board had a briefing on:

·        Parks Projects Concepts and Designs

·        Economic Development work programme 2014/2015 – proposed projects

·        Community Facilities Network Plan

·        Draft Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan

·        Birkenhead Transformation Programme

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the records for the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday, 13 August 2014, Wednesday, 20 August 2014 and Wednesday, 27 August 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipatiki Local Board August Workshop Records

301

    

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Record of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in August 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/19134

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       In August 2014, the Kaipātiki Local Board held the following Portfolio Briefings:

·        Transport – Wednesday, 6 August 2014

·        Built Environment – Wednesday, 6 August 2014

·        Finance – Monday, 11 August 2014

·        Parks (passive) – Tuesday, 12 August 2014

·        Community Development and Facilities – Wednesday, 13 August 2014

·        Sports and Recreation (Pools and Leisure) – Thursday, 14 August 2014

·        Events – Thursday, 14 August 2014

·        Economic Development – Friday, 15 August 2014

·        Parks (passive) – Tuesday, 26 August 2014

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the record of Kaipatiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in August 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipatiki Local Board August 2014 Portfolio Briefing Records

309

     

Signatories

Authors

Bianca Wildish - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987

 

File No.: CP2014/19320

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present to the Kaipatiki Local Board three applications for special exemptions from several of the requirements of the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 (the Act).

Executive summary

2.       The local board must conduct a hearing and consider each of the applications for special exemption.  The board must resolve to decline, grant or grant subject to conditions the exemptions sought.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption report.

b)      receive the applications from:

i)        A Withrington & J Brooke – 37 Telstar Place, Beach Haven

ii)       Ellie McQuaid – 82 Island Bay Road, Beach Haven

iii)      Stella Brennan – 2 Berne Place, Birkenhead

c)      grant the following applications for special exemption, subject to ongoing compliance with NZS8500-2006 Section 3.10 at all times:  

i)        A Withrington & J Brooke – 37 Telstar Place, Beach Haven

ii)       Stella Brennan – 2 Berne Place, Birkenhead

d)      grant the following application for special exemption, subject to ongoing compliance with NZS8500-2006 Section 3.10 at all times and that the vegetation is kept trimmed to a low level.

i)        Ellie McQuaid – 82 Island Bay Road, Beach Haven

 

Discussion

3.       Each property, which is the subject of an application before the local board, has been inspected by Auckland Council pool inspectors.  In each case, the swimming/spa pool fencing does not comply with the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 (the Act).  The details of non-compliance in each case vary and are specified in the attachments to this report. Each applicant has chosen to seek a special exemption from the requirements of the Act.

4.       The purpose of the Act is stated to be “to promote the safety of young children by requiring the fencing of … swimming pools”.

5.       The Act requires pool owners to fence their pool with a fence.  Specific detail on the means of achieving compliance with the Act is contained in the schedule to the Act.  If a pool is not fenced with a complying fence it is an offence under the Act, unless exempt.

6.       An exemption can only be granted by the local board after consideration of the particular characteristics of the property and the pool, other relevant circumstances and taking into account any conditions it may impose.  Then, only if satisfied that an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children, can an exemption be granted.

7.       Defining the immediate pool area will be relevant to considerations concerning the property and the pool. The immediate pool area means the land in or on which the pool is situated, and as much of the surrounding area that is used for activities or purposes related to the use of the pool.  The Act provides that the fence should be situated to prevent children moving directly to the pool from the house, other buildings, garden paths and other areas of the property that would normally be available to young children.

8.       Another common consideration for local boards in exemption applications will be instances where a building forms part of the pool fence.  Where doors from a building open into the pool area, the Territorial Authority may grant an exemption from compliance with clauses 8 to 10 of the schedule to the Act.  It may exempt if it is satisfied that compliance with the Act is impossible, unreasonable or in breach of any other Act, regulation or bylaw, and the door is fitted with a locking device that when properly operated prevents the door from being readily opened by children under the age of 6 years. If the local bis satisfied that a door within a wall in a building meets that test, the board must also be satisfied that an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children.

9.       When granting a special exemption, the board may impose such other conditions relating to the property or the pool as are reasonable in the circumstances (section 6(2) of the Act).  Issues to be considered include:

a)      Will the exemption be personal to the applicant so that on a sale of the property a new owner will need to apply for a new exemption?  This might be appropriate where the personal circumstances of the applicant have been considered as a relevant circumstance and had a bearing on the exercise of the discretion.

b)      Will the exemption be granted for a fixed term and irrespective of changes of ownership so that the exemption runs with the property?

c)      Are there any other conditions which should be imposed, repairs to existing fencing, or a requirement for more frequent inspection of the pool (currently pools are inspected every three years).

10.     Any exemption granted or condition imposed may be amended or revoked by the local board by resolution.  The rules of natural justice would however dictate that this action should not be taken without prior notice to the pool owner and allowing the pool owner an opportunity to be heard.

Consideration

11.     The recommendations contained within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority.

12.     The Act enables an exemption to be granted from clauses 8 to 10 of the Act (doors in walls of buildings) if the board is satisfied that compliance with the Act is impossible, unreasonable or in breach of any other Act, regulation or bylaw and the door is fitted with a locking device that when properly operated prevents the door from being readily opened by children under the age of 6 years.

13.     The overarching consideration in terms of the Act is that a resolution to grant an exemption may only be made after having regard to the particular characteristics of the property and the pool, any other relevant circumstances and any conditions it may impose, and only if it is satisfied that such an exemption would not significantly increase the danger to young children.

14.     The local board may resolve to grant, grant subject to conditions, or decline an application for special exemption.

15.     If an application is declined the applicant will be required to fence their pool in accordance with the Act.

16.     The exemption hearing process under the Act does not trigger the significance policy but it is an important statutory function.

17.     Council is committed to ensuring that Auckland is a safe place for children to live and play in.  Pool fencing issues have a strong relationship with council’s strategic priorities for community safety.

Local board views and implications

18.     The local board is the decision maker in relation to exemption applications under the Act.

Maori impact statement

19.     This report does not raise issues of particular significance for Maori.

General

20.     Compliance with the Act is a mandatory requirement for all pool owners unless exempt.

21.     Council’s pools inspectors have consulted with the applicants in each case.  Applicants have been made aware of council’s requirements to ensure fencing is compliant with the Act.  The applicants have elected to seek a special exemption for individual reasons.

Implementation

22.     The decision must be made by resolution and contain conditions (if any).

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

37 Telstar Place, Beach Haven - Confidential

 

bView

82 Island Bay Road, Beach Haven - Confidential

 

cView

2 Berne Place, Birkenhead - Confidential

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Phillip Curtis - Senior Swimming Pool Specialist

Authorisers

Barry Smedts - Manager Compliance

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

10 September 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

30        Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 - Attachment a - 37 Telstar Place, Beach Haven

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

30        Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 - Attachment b - 82 Island Bay Road, Beach Haven

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

30        Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption – Special Exemption (Section 6) Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 - Attachment c - 2 Berne Place, Birkenhead

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.