I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland Development Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 October 2014

9.30am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Auckland Development Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Chris Darby

 

Members

Cr Anae Arthur Anae

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Cr Cameron Brewer

Cr Dick Quax

 

Mayor Len Brown, JP

Member Josie Smith

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr Penny Webster

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr George Wood, CNZM

 

Cr Denise Krum

 

 

Cr Mike Lee

 

 

Member Liane Ngamane

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Tam White

Democracy Advisor

 

9 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: 09 307 7253

Email: tam.white@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee will lead the implementation of the Auckland Plan, including the integration of economic, social, environmental and cultural objectives for Auckland for the next 30 years.  It will guide the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use planning, housing and the appropriate provision of infrastructure and strategic projects associated with these activities.  Key responsibilities include:

 

·         Unitary Plan

·         Plan changes to operative plans

·         Designation of Special Housing Areas

·         Housing policy and projects including Papakainga housing

·         Spatial Plans including Area Plans

·         City centre development (incl reporting of CBD advisory board) and city transformation projects

·         Tamaki regeneration projects

·         Built Heritage

·         Urban design

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the committee’s responsibility is explicitly limited to making a recommendation only

(ii)      Approval of a submission to an external body

(iii)     Powers belonging to another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iv)    Power to establish subcommittees.

 

 

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          5  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    5

5.1     Ben Ross                                                                                                               5

5.2     Ms Marjia Batistich, Bell Gully, representing the Southern Gateway Consortium : Proposed Plan Change 35 (Puhinui                                                                   6

5.3     Milford Residents Association : Plan Change 34 – Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay – Auckland Council District Plan, North Shore         6

5.4     Avondale Committee Action group                                                                   6

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

9          Update on the Puhinui Structure Plan                                                                        9

10        Mangere Gateway - Rennie Homestead Future Use                                               33

11        Adoption of the Pukekohe Area Plan                                                                        77

12        Approval of Private Plan Change 34 - Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay - Auckland Council District Plan, North Shore Section                                            81  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

An apology from Member Josie Smith has been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 September 2014 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 9 October 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Ben Ross

Purpose

1.       Mr Ben Ross wishes to address the committee on the following topics:

i)       where to with Auckland's City Building Post Election

ii)       the City Rail Link and a funding mechanism not being explored in Auckland that would fund both the CRL and kick start development in the City Centre area (this also ties in with points one and three)

iii)      reaction to the Finance and Performance Committee's decision to sell land in Manukau City Centre and what alternative could have been taken for Manukau's development with the Land (as it will have consequences to other Auckland Development projects on Council land across the City).

Recommendation

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      receive and thank Mr Ben Ross for his presentation.

 

 

 

5.2       Ms Marjia Batistich, Bell Gully, representing the Southern Gateway Consortium : Proposed Plan Change 35 (Puhinui)

Purpose

1.       Ms Marjia Batistich, Bell Gully, representing the Southern Gateway Consortium will address the Committee regarding the Proposed Plan Change 35 (Puhinui).

Recommendation

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from Ms Marjia Batistich, representing the Southern Gateway Consortium.

 

 

5.3       Milford Residents Association : Plan Change 34 – Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay – Auckland Council District Plan, North Shore

Purpose

1.       Ms Marry Bott and Ms Debbbie Dunsford, representatives of Milford Residents Association wish to address the committee regarding the approval of Plan Change 34 – Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay – Auckland Council District Plan, North Shore.

2.       The Milford Residents Association (MRA) worked very closely with council on the PC34 Appeal and they wish to express their thanks to the staff for the way they supported MRA. The Milford community also benefited from Local Board funding for a community-led visioning project for Milford which led to a more informed outcome on PC34.  MRA also want to advise the committee about the substantial costs borne by the community, some of which are still outstanding.

Recommendation

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      receive and thank the representatives of Milford Residents Association for their presentation.

 

 

5.4       Avondale Committee Action group

Purpose

1.       Silvia Spieksma, Avondale Community Action group, will address the committee in relation to lots of public land that is currently being sold off in Avondale to meet the increase in demand for housing. As a community, Avondale Community Action are concerned that the current and future needs of their community, with an increasing population, are not being met.

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      thank Silvia Spieksma, representing the Avondale Community Action group, for her presentation.

 


 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

Ms Lydia Sosene, Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board chair will speak at item 10: Mangere Gateway - Rennie Homestead Future Use.

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Update on the Puhinui Structure Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/23657

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the Puhinui structure plan as per resolution no. AUC/2014/28 of this committee. 

2.       To seek confirmation that council will not initiate a change to the Metropolitan Urban Limits (MUL) as identified in the Operative Auckland Regional Policy Statement (ARPS) in response to Private Plan Change 35 (Puhinui Gateway) to the Auckland Council District Plan (Manukau Section) and that the matter of urban expansion is to be addressed as part of the hearings on the submissions to the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP).

Executive summary

3.       The Puhinui structure plan area consists of approximately 1100 hectares of land, located east of the Auckland International Airport (see Attachments A). It is located outside the current Metropolitan Urban Limits (MUL) and the proposed Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) as identified in the PAUP. The area has significant natural and cultural values and is subject to a range of environmental and infrastructure constraints. A private district plan change request from the Southern Gateway Consortium to rezone part (150ha) of the Structure Plan area for urban activities (business) is at the pre-hearing stage. The plan change applicant also requested the Council to promulgate an extension to the MUL to include the private plan change area.

4.       The Auckland Development Committee (ADC) at its meeting in February 2014 approved the preparation of a structure plan for the Puhinui area to inform the council position on the future land use and development framework for the whole of the structure plan area. The ADC also agreed that any decision regarding a change to the MUL in response to PPC35 will not occur until the structure planning process is completed. The Committee requested an update on the Puhinui structure plan before the end of 2014.

5.       This report provides an update on the findings of the latest technical investigations which focussed on infrastructure services and highlights the following:

·     Watercare has confirmed that there is some, though limited, capacity to service the Puhinui structure plan area through the South-western Interceptor.

·     The stormwater management strategy for the Puhinui structure plan is based on the principles of retention of all permanent and intermittent streams and their riparian margins, using water sensitive design and targeted approach to contaminant management.

·     Traffic modelling of the preliminary strategic roading network shows that the development of the core structure plan area (south of Waokauri Creek) will result in significant increases in traffic and delays over the wide area of the transport network.

·     The estimated cost of strategic roading infrastructure upgrade is estimated around $120 million for which there is currently no funding. Even with such investment, significant delays in travel times (congestion) across the network is still predicted.

·     Further investigations are required to confirm a feasible staged transport network and infrastructure funding agreement to enable staged development of the structure plan area.

6.       Based on all the investigations to date, this report recommends that certain areas within the structure plan should be included within the RUB (see Attachment D).

 

 

Recommendations

That the Auckland Development Committee endorse the following principles/approach to advance planning for future development in the Puhinui Structure Plan area:

a)      parts of the Puhinui Structure Plan area can be urbanised, subject to development control conditions regarding the nature, scale and location of development to protect significant environmental, ecological, archaeological, landscape and cultural values being in place

b)      future development of the Puhinui Structure Plan area is contingent upon resolution of significant issues around the availability, costs, timing and staging of major capital investments, particularly in upgrades and new links to the strategic and local transport network; and infrastructure funding agreements between asset providers and developers being in place

c)      the matters of determination of location of the Rural Urban Boundary, appropriate zoning and development controls can be most efficiently addressed through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan hearing process

d)      Auckland Council will not promulgate a change to the operative Auckland Regional Policy Statement to move the Metropolitan Urban Limits to provide for urbanisation of the Puhinui Structure Plan area, but will propose extending the Rural Urban Boundary to include parts of the Puhinui Structure Plan area as identified in Appendix D of the report through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan hearing process

e)      future development of the Puhinui Structure Plan area will need to be staged and Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Watercare Services Ltd, Iwi, the Southern gateway Consortium, other landowners/developers will continue to work collaboratively to address and resolve outstanding matters relating to feasibility, timing, sequencing and funding of infrastructure services, with particular attention to finding solutions, including temporary works to enable staged land development.

Comments

Background

7.       The Auckland Plan has not identified the Puhinui structure plan area for urban growth up to 2040. It is zoned Rural Production under the Proposed Auckland PAUP. A Mangere Puhinui Precinct is applied to this area to recognise its special qualities, including the rural character, high quality soils, areas of high landscape values and significant natural and/or cultural values. The structure plan area also contains large parcels of open space zoned areas, including Pukaki Crater, Portage Road Reserve, Colin Dale Park and Puhinui Reserve.

8.       The following summarises the background to the Puhinui structure planning process:

·    14 March 2013: council accepted for public notification a Private Plan Change Request (PPC35) from the Southern Gateway Consortium to rezone 150 hectares of land from rural zoning to business zoning (see Attachment A). With respect to the shift of the MUL to incorporate the PPC35 area, council deferred its decision to promulgate a change to the ARPS, until a masterplanning process for the Puhinui study area is undertaken to ensure an integrated planning approach for the Puhinui area as a whole.

·    13 February 2014: The Auckland Development Committee (ADC) approved the preparation of a structure plan for the Puhinui study area to inform the council position on the future land use and development framework for this area. ADC also requested that an update on the Puhinui structure plan be reported back before the end of 2014.

 

 

9.       In accordance with the resolution of the ADC, the preparation of the Puhinui structure plan was initiated in February 2014. A structure plan establishes the spatial development pattern of land use and the transport and services network within a defined area.  It provides for detailed examination of the opportunities and constraints relating to the land to ensure that the effects of development are addressed in advance of the development occurring. This report provides an update on the findings of the latest technical investigations which focus on infrastructure services.

Wastewater Servicing

10.     Wastewater in the southern area is serviced by the Southern Interceptor and the South-western Interceptor. At present, the southern wastewater servicing strategy is based on the Auckland Council’s RUB in the PAUP. The Puhinui structure plan area is outside the service area given the current rural zoning and position outside of the RUB. In November 2013 Watercare advised council that the South-western Interceptor, which runs within the Puhinui structure plan area, is at capacity and is unable to accommodate additional growth. Watercare also advised that the Southern Interceptor has very limited capacity. The South-western interceptor was not able to receive increased flows as any additional capacity was allocated to other southern growth areas and Special Housing Areas.

11.     Watercare has undertaken further modelling work in 2014 to help inform the wastewater servicing strategy for the wider southern area, including the Puhinui structure plan area. This work involved examining the whole of the southern wastewater area (incorporating all the new southern RUB areas identified in the PAUP).

12.     As a result of this modelling work, and confirmation of likely flows from the PPC35 area, Watercare has confirmed that there is some capacity (though limited) to service the Puhinui structure plan area through the South-western Interceptor. As the Puhinui structure plan area sits outside the MUL and the RUB, there is no funding allocated in Watercare’s 2012-2022 Asset Management Plan. The developers would need to fund the cost of new water and wastewater transmission pipes along Puhinui Road, all Infrastructure Growth Charges and the cost of local reticulation.

Transport Network

13.     The only road access to the southern half of the Puhinui structure plan (south of Waokauri Creek), is via State Highway 20B (Puhinui Road), which serves as a key strategic access to the Auckland International Airport from the east. Auckland Transport (AT), New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and Auckland International Airport Limited have indicated that there are significant capacity issues associated with Puhinui Road given the lack of other transport links.

14.     One of the core components of the Puhinui structure plan is the integration of land use and local and strategic transport network. This involves the identification of the proposed roading network and hierarchy, to support multi modal transport and accessibility that is interconnected and ensures a number of access points to and from the structure plan area. 

15.     Engagement with the key stakeholders has highlighted the following as the key transport issues for the Puhinui structure plan:

·    SH20B (Puhinui Road) is a key strategic route to the airport and the efficiency of this corridor must be protected. Access will therefore be limited to a few key points.

·    An appropriate local roading network needs to be developed to allow access to the peninsula without relying solely on the State Highway network.

·    Any network developed needs to provide opportunities for walking, cycling and public transport.

·    The proposed SMART rail corridor alignment should be protected.

 

·    Any network must integrate with planning in the surrounding area – notably the Airport Masterplan and East West study.

·    Any network must give consideration to cultural and environment constraints. 

16.     In partnership with AT, a conceptual roading network has been developed for the Puhinui structure plan area (see attachment B). These possible transport links into the structure plan area are identified for modelling purposes to provide for network resilience and take pressure off the State Highway network in the area. It is noted that these options are currently at investigation phase only, and preliminary traffic modelling has been undertaken to determine which links are necessary. The possible transport links are:

·    Creation of a new road link connecting McLaughlins Road with Kiwi Tamaki Road.

·    Construction of a new bridge across State Highway 20, connecting to Noel Burnside Road.

17.     Each of the links identified above have their own challenges, and has not been assessed from a feasibility point of view (other than from an engineering perspective). For example, the Wilco Road extension traverses land that is designated by the Ministry of Justice, who may or may not support such a proposal. Their impact on the Southern Consortium development proposals is yet to be investigated. Further discussions with the affected parties are necessary prior to the finalisation of the transport strategy. 

18.     NZTA has raised concerns regarding the predicted significant travel time delays, many of which will directly affect SH20 and SH20A/B. NZTA is also concerned about the impact of such traffic generation on the interchanges to the State Highway Network. It is noted that further consultation is also required with the representatives of Auckland International Airport to understand their concerns.

19.     The increased traffic generation would require, at a minimum, the construction of the two new roading links into the structure plan area, four lane arterial roads, a new interchange on SH20B and likely further upgrades to SH20 and SH20A/B with respect to further lane capacity. The estimated cost of this infrastructure upgrading is estimated around $120 million. This does not include additional costs to NZTA for State Highway improvements, for example the cost of the new interchange close to Campana Road is estimated to be in excess of $120 million. 

20.     The initial costings information shows that significant investment in roading infrastructure will be needed to enable the development of the Puhinui structure plan area to occur. The financial investment required would need to be funded by multiple parties, including AT and NZTA. None of the required funding is currently budgeted for by either AT or NZTA. Discussions regarding developing a funding agreement are yet to commence.

21.     The strategy of the structure plan is to determine the overarching conceptual roading network to ensure that the future development of the area is not compromised. Having established this, it is possible to enable staged development which feeds into this network. AT will continue to work with the key stakeholders to develop a staging plan for the transport network which is linked to staged development within the structure plan area, and in particular, for the Southern Gateway Consortium development area.

Stormwater Management Strategy

22.     The Puhinui structure plan area adjoins the Manukau Harbour with Pukaki, Waokauri and Puhinui Creeks flowing into it. Manukau Harbour and these creeks are identified as Significant Ecological Areas (SEA) in the PAUP in recognition of its high habitat values. The part of the Manukau Harbour adjoining Puhinui Reserve and Puhinui Creek support thousands of international migratory birds and New Zealand endemic wading birds. Part of the area is a wildlife refuge. Pukaki-Waokauri Creek is a Tangata Whenua Management Area.

 

23.     Given the presence of SEA and a Tangata Whenua Management Area, it is important that there is a high level of certainty that the future development of the Puhinui structure plan area will not adversely affect water quality, and ecological and cultural values associated the stream network and the sensitive receiving environment.

24.     A stormwater management plan is being considered as part of the Puhinui structure plan process to identify comprehensive stormwater solutions, recognising that stormwater runoff is a major factor in the quality and health of urban coastal and freshwater systems. A comprehensive stream survey has been undertaken to identify the different classifications of streams present within the Puhinui structure plan area. The draft Streams Assessment Survey maps the location of streams and natural wetland and classifies streams or rivers into three categories: permanent, intermittent or ephemeral outreaches.  

25.     In line with the PAUP guidance, the stormwater management strategy for the Puhinui structure plan incorporates the following principles:

·    Retention of all permanent and intermittent streams to retain natural water systems.

·    Protect and enhance riparian margins.

·    Set aside adequate flood plains from development.

·    Incorporation of water sensitive design

·    Hydrology (for stream health) – retain the first 10mm of runoff (on site) and detain the remainder of the 95th percentile event.

·    Targeted approach to contaminant management (e.g. control of high contaminant generating roofing materials) and treatment of high contaminant sources (e.g. roads and carparks).

·    Hybrid of an on-site and off-site flow and quality controls using treatment train approach.  This provides certainty of contaminant management, minimise size of wetlands (ideally locate these within the 100 year flood plains) and accommodate on-site retention within landscaped area requirement.

26.     Based on the above high level principles, Attachment C illustrates the location of permanent and intermittent streams, natural wetland and the extent of riparian margin areas. It also shows the indicative locations and sizes of the catchment scale wetland swale systems. Catchment-scale wetland-swale systems will exist downstream of the piped network, prior to discharge to the stream. These assets will provide the residual detention required by the Unitary Plan (approximately 25 mm of additional rainfall), as well as additional water quality polishing and spill containment. 

27.     The finalisation of the stormwater management strategy is dependent on the confirmation of the proposed roading pattern. There is also on-going work to discuss and seek agreement regarding the Southern Gateway Consortium’s stormwater management proposal and network discharge consent application. 

RUB Movement Investigations

28.     One of the core objectives of the Puhinui structure plan is to inform the council position on whether the subject area should be urbanised or not. If it is to be urbanised, then consideration needs to be given to whether or not a “live zone” chosen from the PAUP suite of zones can be applied to the subject area, or whether the area should be zoned Future Urban. Areas given a live zone are regarded as stage 1 development areas.

29.     The analysis to date shows that the Puhinui structure plan area can be divided into three distinct portions as shown in Attachment D. Area A consists of the northern portion of the structure plan area, generally east and west of the Pukaki Crater. The area along Pukaki Road is dominated by market gardening. It also contains the Pukaki Marae and papakainga housing.

 

30.     It is considered that Area A should remain outside the RUB and retain its current rural zoning for the following reasons:

·    It contains Class 1 soils, being the most versatile and productive of all soil classes.

·    Parts of the area are within the High and Moderate Aircraft Noise Contours, in close proximity of the Auckland International Airport, both under the operative provisions and the new contours detailed in the submission by the Auckland International Airport to the PAUP.

·    A significant portion of this area is within the 57dBA noise area, which is affected by aircraft engine testing, hence creating a noisy environment. It would not be appropriate to introduce more people to this noisy environment, as it has the potential to generate reverse sensitivity issues for the operational requirements for the Auckland International Airport.

·    The rural zoning enables the retention of an open character between Pukaki Crater and Crater Hill area.

31.     Area B consists of the middle portion of the Puhinui structure plan area, with Waokauri Creek forming its southern and western boundaries. This area generally contains the Crater Hill geological feature and its margins. Crater Hill is listed as being of national significance in the New Zealand Geopreservation Inventory. It contains the Self Crater and Underground Press lava caves, which are also of national significance. A significant portion of this area is identified as an Outstanding Natural Feature (ONF) in the PAUP (see Map 1 in Attachment E). The Te Akitai Waiohua Cultural Heritage Assessment identifies the whole of area B as being a site of cultural significance. The archaeological survey report for the Puhinui structure plan area identifies a significant portion of Crater Hill area as an “archaeological landscape” of exceptional significance, containing 56 individual archaeological sites (see Map 2 in Attachment E). “Archaeological landscapes” are areas where there is a high probability of further archaeological sites being present, given the past known occupation. 

32.     While it is acknowledged that Area B is special given the cultural, geological and archaeological values present within this area, it is recommended that this area be included within the RUB on the basis that the precinct provisions to be applied to this area will ensure that these important values are not compromised. Any partial movements of the RUB in this location will not ensure the defensibility of the RUB line, which is only able to be secured by moving the line to the coast.

33.     Area B includes two sub-areas. The first is the most northern block, located immediately east of Tidal Road (identified as Tam’s site in Map 3 in Attachment E). This area is excluded from the ONF area and archaeological landscape area identified for Crater Hill. However, it is within the cultural site of significance to Te Akitai Waiohua. The majority of this site is within the Moderate Aircraft Noise Contours as submitted by the Auckland International Airport in its submission to the PAUP, and therefore, new residential development is not considered appropriate in this location. Recognising that this block is contiguous with the adjoining business uses, and given the need to increase the supply of business land in the region, it is recommended that this area be included within the RUB, and given a live zone as part of stage 1 of the release of land. It is important that precinct provisions be developed for this site to address appropriate interface treatment issues between this site and the adjoining Crater Hill area. 

34.     The challenge for the Crater Hill area is to determine the most appropriate land use for this area recognising that the important geological, cultural, archaeological and natural values associated with this area are not compromised. The matter of the detailed precinct plan and the appropriate zoning to be applied to this site is to be further discussed with the key stakeholders and the landowner in the future.

35.     One of the key issues for consideration for Crater Hill area is how to balance the aspirations of the landowner seeking residential development versus the long term protection of the significant values associated with the Crater for the wider public benefit. As part of the structure plan exercise, Crater Hill site was assessed to determine whether any portion of the site is able to be developed in light of the constraints present on the site. This investigation has identified that the area proposed to be zoned to Quarry under the PAUP should be further investigated to enable some form of residential development. The landowner has commissioned a land contamination report and a geotechnical report to assist council in understanding the feasibility of this option. It is noted that while this may be an option for consideration, this is not supported by Te Akitai Waiohua, nor council’s own landscape expert (Mr Stephen Brown - see Attachment F for his comments). In summary, Mr Brown is of the view that development on the quarry portion would disrupt the integrity of the crater as a landform and geological feature, obstruct views into the crater from SH20 and adversely affect the Manukau Memorial Gardens.

36.     Area C consists of all of the land south of Waokauri Creek. A significant portion of this area is located within the High and Moderate Airport Noise Contours, and is not an appropriate location for new residential development. This area also contains other key provisions relating to the operational requirement of the Auckland International Airport, such as Runway End Protection Areas, Obstacle Limitation Surfaces, Specifications to Discharges to Air with the Approach Path.

37.     Due to its strategic location beside the Auckland International Airport and adjacent urban uses, Area C has potential for development and faces significant pressure for urbanisation. The Auckland Plan and Economic Development Strategy have identified strategic issues related to business land demand and have made clear the business land targets the region will need to work towards over the next 30 years. The provision of new business land is an explicit part of the Auckland Plan’s development strategy, and it is expected that up to 1400 hectares of new business land could be required over the 30 year horizon of the Auckland Plan. This is split between 1000 hectares for industrial activities and 400 hectares for commercial activities.

38.     It has been highlighted that land to meet industrial growth is the most pressing given it needs to be well located, highly serviced including good transport connections, and be of sufficient size to accommodate the nature of industrial activities. Land must also have adequate separation from sensitive activities such as residential uses that can be negatively affected by noise, other discharges, traffic and other impacts from industrial activities.

39.     It is recommended that Area C be included within the RUB provided that all the infrastructure, cultural heritage and funding issues are addressed, for the following reasons:

·    It is strategically located beside the Auckland International Airport to meet the business needs of the region.

·    It provides for a contiguous block of approximately 400 hectares for business uses, consisting of large land parcels.

·    A significant portion of the area is located within the High and Moderate Aircraft Noise Contours, making it an ideal location for business activities, as residential development is not desirable in this location.

·    It is located beside the Wiri Industrial Area, and therefore, provides for the contiguous extension of the existing industrial areas.

·    SH20 acts as a significant buffer and provides separation from established residential areas to the east, therefore, significantly reducing negative future impacts of business development on surrounding residential uses.

Timing of MUL Shift vs RUB

40.     At its February 2014 meeting, the ADC agreed that any decision to initiate a change to the MUL in response to PPC35 should not occur until the Puhinui structure planning process is completed. As discussed in the previous sections, parts of the structure plan area can be urbanised. However, the policy context for an MUL shift is predicated on certainty regarding infrastructure services and associated funding agreements. For the structure plan area, there are still outstanding infrastructure servicing issues to be worked through. On this basis, an MUL shift at this time cannot be supported.

41.     Council has received a number of submissions to the PAUP seeking that the Puhinui structure plan area be incorporated within the RUB. The Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearing Panel has released the provisional hearing schedule, which states that the hearings on the Regional Policy Statement part of the Unitary Plan, seeking changes to the RUB in the southern area will be heard in February 2015.

42.     Even if the outstanding infrastructure servicing matters as part of an MUL shift are to be addressed and agreement reached urgently, any gains in terms of time frames are not significant (see table below). Furthermore, promulgating an MUL shift alongside the PAUP hearing process is not an efficient use of resources and is therefore not recommended.

Option A – initiate MUL shift

Option B – Follow the PAUP Process

Now to February 2015

Finalise outstanding infrastructure servicing issues and prepare change to ARPS

Now to December 2014

January 2015

Attend pre-hearing meetings, prepare evidence for PAUP hearing

 

Prepare rebuttal evidence

February 2015

Notify MUL shift, with supporting information

February 2015

Hearings on Regional Policy Statement matters relating to submissions on southern RUB matters

March - April 2015

Summarise submissions and notify further submissions

March 2015 onwards

 

 


     

Work on submissions on rezoning and precincts

 

 


May – July 2015

Complete further submissions and prepare Planner Report for hearing

August 2015

Hearing

October 2015

Decision

November 2015 onwards

Appeals and Environment Court process

February 2016

Final Decision

 

 

Sometime in 2016

Hearings on Precinct provisions

 

 

August 2016

PAUP Decisions

Consideration

Local board views and implications

43.     The Puhinui structure plan area is within the boundaries of the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board and the Mangere Otahuhu Local Board. Council staff have met with the Chairs of both of these Local Boards to provide them with an update on the matters outlined in this report. Further updates to the Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards were held on 29th of September and the on 6th of October respectively. The Local Boards were also invited to a Puhinui structure plan workshop held on 8 August 2014. 

Māori impact statement

44.     The rohe of Puhinui is a place of deep cultural and spiritual significance to Te Akitai Waiohua. The policy framework of the PAUP seeks to enable Mana Whenua to identify, articulate and integrate their values in the resource management processes affecting ancestral lands.

45.     Consultation has been undertaken with Te Akitai Waiohua to understand their position on the matter of the RUB movement as it applies to the Puhinui structure plan area. While Te Akitai Waiohua is appreciative of the growth pressures facing the Puhinui area, it is strongly opposed to any RUB movement without understanding the impacts of future development on their cultural heritage values.

46.     Te Akitai Waiohua has prepared a cultural heritage assessment for the Puhinui peninsula to inform the structure planning process. The report highlights a series of key sites of significance that connect the people of Te Akitai Waiohua to the Puhinui peninsula. Most of these sites are located either within the structure plan area or in close proximity to it. Sites of significance include: Pukaki Crater; Wiri and McLaughlins Mountains; Crater Hill and Kohuora Park; Wiroa Island; Waokauri, Otaimako, Tautauroa and Puhinui Creeks; headland pa sites; and Pukaki Chapel.

47.     The Cultural Heritage Assessment Report has been very useful in informing the strategic direction of the Puhinui structure plan, in particular:

·    The stormwater management strategy seeks to ensure that the permanent and intermittent stream network within the structure plan area is retained and enhanced. This recognises the importance of these waterways to the iwi. 

·    Part 30 of this report states that the area around the Pukaki Marae and Pukaki Crater should not be included within the RUB. This recognises that many of the sites of significance to Te Akitai Waiohua are located within this area and retaining this area outside the RUB will ensure that the existing cultural heritage values are not compromised.

·    The cultural values associated with Crater Hill are recognised and the structure plan will seek to ensure that these values are not compromised. However, it is acknowledged that this is a challenging issue given that the crater is in private ownership, and council has to consider alternatives to the holistic protection of the site. Te Akitai Waiohua’s strong objection to this approach is noted.

·    Part 39 of this report recommends that the bulk of the area below Waiokauri Creek be included within the RUB. A number of sites of significance are located within the area between Waokauri Creek and Puhinui Road. This area requires further consideration in terms of detailed precinct provisions to specifically address cultural heritage matters.

48.     All the other iwi that have an interest in the Puhinui structure plan area were invited to a key stakeholder workshop held on 8 August 2014 to enable information sharing on the project. Along with Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngati Tamaoho Trust and Huakina Development Trust attended the workshop. 

Implementation

49.     Significant investment in new and upgrades to existing infrastructure, especially the transport network, is required to service future development of the Puhinui structure plan area. There is currently no funding provision for such capital investments, nor is a funding agreement in place. The infrastructure funding issue requires further collaborative work.

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Map of Puhinui Structure Plan Area

19

bView

Conceptual Roading Network for the Puhinui Structure Plan

21

cView

Overview of Stream / Stormwater Management Strategy

23

dView

Recommendations Relating to the RUB Movement

25

eView

Crater Hill Area

27

fView

Preliminary Landscape Analysis of Crater Hill Development Proposal

29

      

Signatories

Authors

Sukhdeep Singh - Principal Planner

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

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Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Mangere Gateway - Rennie Homestead Future Use

 

File No.: CP2014/21998

 

Purpose

1.       The report is to update the Auckland Development Committee on the potential use of the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site as a visitors centre as part of the Māngere Gateway Programme (MGP).

Executive summary

2.       In July 2014, the Auckland Development Committee (ADC) endorsed the investigation into the use of Rennie Homestead and adjoining land as an alternative location for the Māngere Gateway and Visitor Centre and Visitor Experience. The Rennie Homestead was identified as a potential alternative to the originally proposed Otuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve as the latter was considered to be a culturally sensitive site.

3.       In particular, the ADC instructed staff to investigate the physical and financial viability of using the property as a visitor centre  and this has been undertaken based on:

·    The potential tourism generating uses that could be developed at the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site

·    The ability to adapt the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site for these uses 

·    The high-level costs for implementing the above

·    Iwi views on these proposals

4.       Staff have examined the Business Case developed to support the previously proposed visitor centre at the Otuataua Stonefields site as this provides a consistent basis for assessing the potential of Rennie Homestead. The tourist activities, supporting infrastructure and financial assumptions within the Business Case are outlined in the report below and in more detail within the appendices of this report.

5.       Having considered the potential visitor attractions, the appropriateness of the Rennie Homestead, the viability of the proposed centre, the financial requirements and iwi’s uncertainty about the Homestead as a preferred location, it is not considered Rennie Homestead can be supported as a location for the Visitor Centre in the context of the financial constraints faced by Auckland Council under the proposed Long Term Plan.

Recommendations

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      note that staff have investigated the potential use of Rennie Homestead as a visitor centre based on tourist activities, supporting infrastructure and financial assumptions that are consistent with those previously proposed on the Otuataua Stonefields site

b)      note the investigations have indicated that the use of Rennie Homestead and surrounding site as an alternative visitor centre location require a substantial capital budget ($3.6m) and operational (a minimum of $971,000) funding subsidy from council across a range of financial years

c)      note budget requirements assume the Centre achieves 100,000 visitors and 45,000 paying visitors a year

d)      note Rennie Homestead is not considered entirely suitable as a location to receive 100,000 visitors a year

e)      note that whilst the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and local iwi are supportive of the development of a visitor centre, further discussions would be required with one iwi group to agree that the Rennie Homestead is a suitable location

f)       note that the visitor centre project does not lie within any of the councils emerging Spatial Priority areas

g)      resolve that council does not proceed with the Māngere Gateway Programme visitor centre on the basis of the points outlined above within the financial constraints of the proposed Long-term Plan (2015-2025).

Comments

          Background and Context

 

6.       Since 1994 the Māngere Gateway Programme (MGP) has been a regional initiative that seeks to harness tourism as a driver of economic development for the benefit of the local community and the wider Auckland region.  The MGP seeks to build on the cultural, built and natural heritage within the area to potentially create a sustainable eco-tourism and heritage destination. The MGP links with objectives set out within the Auckland Plan, (including The Southern Initiative) and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Area Plan. A more detailed historical background is attached as Appendix 1, a strategic policy context attached as Appendix 1.1 and a map illustrating the extent of the area attached as Appendix 1.2.

7.       Central to the MGP is the development of a visitor centre to provide a base from which a range of visitor services and experiences can be delivered. In 2012 the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDO/2012/35,36,37,38,39) supported the construction of a visitor centre at the Otuataua Stonefields site. A budget of $3.6m was allocated to the project within the in Council’s current LTP (2012-2022). 

8.       A further recommendation was made to the Strategy & Finance Committee that operational funding of $971,000, for the first 5 years of operation of the visitor centre, be included in the LTP.  The Business case supporting the visitor centre indicted an initial operating loss with a possible breakeven within 5 years.

9.       More recently, a report was presented to the ADC on 10th July 2014, which endorsed the investigation of options for the use of the Rennie Homestead as an alternative location for the Māngere Gateway Visitor Centre and Visitor Experience. Further to this, the physical and financial viability of using the property as a visitor centre has been undertaken, based on:

·    The potential tourism generating uses that could be developed at the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site

·    The ability to adapt the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site for these uses 

·    The high-level costs for implementing the above

·    Iwi views on these proposals

The Rennie Homestead

10.     The Rennie Homestead, owned by Council and now proposed as the location for the Māngere Gateway visitor centre, has 8.9 hectares of adjoining land which presents opportunities for a range of potential visitor initiatives.  These initiatives would need to be developed incrementally over a number of year dependent upon visitor demand and potential interest from stakeholders and partners.  It is anticipated that local iwi would run the visitors centre with Council’s role in the development evolving into one of facilitation rather than being the direct provider of the visitor offering. More information on this range of options is outlined below. A location plan of the Rennie Homestead is attached as Appendices 1.3.

11.     Work is currently being undertaken to the property to ensure basic health and safety repairs (e.g. roof repair) are completed. This work is being managed and funded by Auckland Council Properties Limited (ACPL). Beyond this, the Rennie Homestead requires significant repair and maintenance work (internal and external alterations to make the property weatherproof) estimated to cost around $800k. 

12.     There is currently no budget allocation for the latter work. This expenditure therefore would need to be met from the $3.6m deferred to FY 2015/6 with the balance of the funding used to develop the Rennie Homestead and surrounding site.

13.     The Rennie Homestead is currently managed by ACPL as a “non-service” property. The Homestead has been occupied as a privately leased residential property over the last few years (although it is currently vacant as the essential repairs are carried out). Going forward, staff will work with ACPL to determine a future use for the property. In the meantime, it is envisaged that the property will continue to be used for residential purposes as this will provide an active and secure use.

Proposed Visitor Offer at Rennie Homestead

14.     The visitor offer proposed at Rennie Homestead, as outlined below, is consistent with the tourism activities, infrastructure and assumptions as outlined within the Business Case to support the previous Otuataua Stonefields project. As such, it is considered that assessing the potential of Rennie Homestead and surrounding site to deliver a substantially similar offer is a basis for making a decision on whether or not to proceed with the project.

15.     Details of the visitor offer Stage 1 still need further detail but could comprise the following within Rennie Homestead:

·    Guided tours:  General, Extended, Exclusive (+ Workshop) and Schools (including Otuataua Stonefields accessed from Rennie Homestead)

·    Audio tours

·    Special events

·    Interpretive displays

·    Wider Māngere Gateway Information

·    Visitor Toilets

·    Small café (wharekai)

·    Retail space

·    A hub and central booking point for Māngere Gateway experiences (existing and proposed) e.g. Marae-based activities, fishing/boat trips, cycling, horse-riding etc.

16.     The Rennie Homestead is a scheduled heritage resource. Whist this does not prevent interior alterations, the heritage status reflects the building’s historical importance - which is represented by the interior as well as the external appearance. An existing floor plan of the Rennie Homestead is attached as Appendix 1.4.

17.     Further to this, it is considered that in order to make the building suitable as a tourist facility, significant works to the interior would need to be undertaken in order to accommodate additional (including disabled) bathrooms, disabled access, fireproofing and a more open plan layout. This would also include a kitchen, café, interpretive displays, visitor information and retail space.

18.     In addition to internal works, the surrounding site would also need to be developed to provide the facilities, infrastructure and buildings for further income generating activities.

19.     Externally, it is therefore proposed the following buildings and infrastructure would be required:

·    Car / Coach Parking area – to provide 50 car parking spaces and 2 coach parking spaces (based on previous proposals at Otuataua Stonefields) 

·    Associated landscaping, services and pedestrian / vehicular access

·    A stand-alone building (to house a carving school, for example)

 

20.     In brief:

·    Whilst there is the potential for visitor activities, the details of these still need to be worked through;

·    It is questionable whether Rennie Homestead would be able to cope with the requisite visitor numbers without alteration and/or additional facilities provided on the surrounding land.

Anticipated costs to Auckland Council

21.     Capex funding of $3.6m for the construction of a visitor centre was previously allocated within Council’s LTP (2012-2022). This funding has been recently deferred to the next financial year (2015/16).  No funding is allocated for the repair and maintenance required to make Rennie Homestead weatherproof. This cost could be met from reallocating $800K of the above funding.

22.     In terms of timing, this repair and maintenance could be undertaken in the next (FY 15/16) financial year.  Further detailed design work and construction would then require the balance of the capex budget to be deferred across FY 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 (three financial years). Detailed design work would be undertaken in consultation with partners including the Māngere - Ōtāhuhu Local Board and mana whenua.

23.     In terms of post-construction operation, estimates undertaken by the previous Manukau City Council, and based on the proposal at the Otuataua Stonefields, have suggested that visitor numbers of 100,000 per annum, of which 45,000 would be paying an entry fee, would be required for the centre to break-even. As such the visitor centre would require additional funding support ($194,200 per FY) over at least the first five years until the visitor numbers outlined are achieved. Accordingly, a minimum of $971,000 opex funding would be required in financial year 2015/16 to support operational requirements. The range of assumptions and estimates are outlined in Appendix 1.5. 

24.     Beyond this, estimates in the Business Case suggest the centre could potentially become financially self-sufficient (“breakeven”) through income generating community/tourism activities. Again, the tourism generating activities would require more detail and need to be developed on the wider site. It is also anticipated that the presence of a major partner (such as a carving school for example) could also assist with visitor numbers. Such an activity would require an external standalone building to accommodate such an operation/offer.

25.     It should be noted that previous tourism ventures undertaken by Council (e.g. The Pa Homestead at Monte Cecilia Park), have required additional Council subsidy beyond what was originally anticipated.

26.     Discussions with Council’s Regional Parks team have indicated that a standalone, basic “barn like” facility is likely to cost approx. $1m. The remaining $1.3m capex budget could then be utilised to construct a car and coach parking area, any remaining internal works, along with the external landscaping, servicing and access works.

27.     The activity and associated works to Rennie Homestead and the surrounding site would require Resource Consent under the current Auckland Council District Plan Operative Manukau Section (2002). Under the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, the proposals would again be considered a discretionary activity and require resource consent.  Both plans aim to ensure a rural / faming character is maintained within this area.

 

 

 

 

 

28.     An indicative summary of costs and timing is outlined below and a more detailed financial assessment is attached as appendix 1.5.

Financial  Year

Stage of work

Anticipated cost

2014/15

Essential repair and maintenance in order to make the building Health and Safety compliant (undertaken by ACPL)

$200,000 (from ACPL budget and not subject to budget proposals outlined in this report)

2015/16

Complete Repair and Maintenance (external fabric, interior and prevent future deterioration) to make weatherproof.

Start initial consultation and design work (focus on external landscaping, car parking area and stand-alone building)

$800,000

2016/17

Complete Planning, Design and Engineering, consultation and consent work.

Start construction on external work.

Complete visitor centre specific fit out  infrastructure (e.g. café fit toilets electrical work)

$500,000

2017/18

Complete construction of external landscaping, access, car / bus parking and standalone building)

$2,300,000

 

Total Capex

$3,600,000

2017/18-onwards (over five years minimum)

Operational expenditure

$971,000

29.     Having considered all the information above and the attached Business Case, the Rennie Homestead could have the potential to be used as a visitor centre, but would require the following budgets:

·    Capex allocation of $3.6m across 3 years within the proposed LTP (2015-2025)

·    Opex allocation of $194,200 to cover operational loss in at least first five years 9a minimum of $971,000 in total) within the proposed LTP (2015-2025)

30.     Within the context of the proposed LTP, which seeks to prioritise general rate funded capital projects, it should be noted that the proposed visitor centre does not lie within any of Councils emerging Spatial Priority areas. These Spatial Priority areas will be a significant factor in determining future Council investment.

 

 

31.     In brief

·    The financial viability of the Visitor Centre is reliant on the centre achieving 100,000 visitors per annum, of which 45,000 would be fee paying and there appears to be no certainty that these figures will be achieved.

·    Even assuming these figures are achieved, the Visitor Centre would still require $3.6 million capex budget and $971,000 opex budget to subsidise the centre for the first 5 years until visitor numbers could be built up.

32.     Given:

·    budget constraints faced by the Council over the next Long Term Plan;

·    the potential need for additional budget;

·    the uncertainties surrounding visitor numbers and viability;

·    the question about the suitability of the Rennie Homestead as a location;

·    the continued uncertainty about whether it is the preferred option for iwi (referred to below),

the Visitor Centre is not supported in this location.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

33.     Extensive discussions have taken place with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board which has been committed to the MGP Mangere Gateway programme for the last 10 years.  The Board strongly supports the use of the Rennie Homestead site as an alternative visitor centre. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board presented views for ADC consideration at the July 10th meeting and it is understood the Local Board will again present at this meeting.

34.     In addition, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has taken an active role in liaison with mana whenua (Waiohua) – see below.

Māori impact statement

35.     The Māngere Gateway Programme delivers on Māori outcomes and on The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau.  

36.     Discussions, led by the Local Board, have taken place with Waiohua – Te Akitai and  Te Ahiwaru.  The views of the two mana whenua iwi groups are summarised below by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

Te Ahiwaru (of Makaurau Marae) at a hui held on 9th September 2014:

a)   Te Ahiwaru support the intention to locate the visitors centre at Rennie Homestead - provided Makaurau Marae are consulted with in a meaningful way and the centre is relevant in encapsulating their views. 

b)   The visitors centre can tell the History of Early Maori but also Early European settlers.  It is a unique piece of Auckland, New Zealand and has great potential for Economic Development. 

c)   The MGP needs to be focused on Marae in Mangere and the relationship with other iwi hapu, not just a focus on Rennie Homestead, but this could be the flagship project with direct benefit to not only Maori, but Tourists and the greater Auckland.

d)   Te Ahiwaru are keen to ensure that the ADC understand that the MGP is not just about the visitor centre, it is about the history, heritage, and all the area has to offer. People – visitors and locals – must know, understand and learn about the place, experience the area and location through a walk-about, paddling, and a hangi. The history needs to be retold somehow as Auckland Council is responsible for helping mana whenua restore and allow the lands at Ihumatao to be healed moving forward. 

e)   The officer report must reflect the nature of the vision and not focus on the Rennie homestead alone; the stories or narratives are critical and also about who speaks to them. The story and passion for the local heritage and history is not quite conveyed in officer language or reports

f)    That the MGP is not about negative stories or images but the variety of cultural practices and buildings in the area help to bridge connections with the whare representing a place for learning Te Ahiwaru are well placed to speak about the area and its history. Te Ahiwaru also have connections to other iwi

g)   The MGP is not limited to the Stonefields. Te Ahiwaru are building a relationship with the airport to progress on project ideas. Council needs to support the resource / funding of the MGP through a range of options and Te Ahiwaru wish to work under a collaborative framework, a network that brings in other iwi groups too – e.g. Robinson Road Marae

 

Te Akitai (of Pukaki Marae) at a hui held on 14th August 2014

 

a)   This project is not about Rennie Homestead alone. There is concern with focusing on this single option.

b)   Pukaki Marae are mana whenua of Mangere. Te Akitai agree with the intention to provide a visitor centre but Council should present a range of options.

c)   Te Akitai support retention of budget for implementing projects within the area.

d)   Otuataua Stonefields is waahi tapu land and not suitable for this MGP Visitors Centre.

e)   However, a Cultural Impact Assessment should be prepared, as the site of Otuataua Stonefields needs to be preserved and protected according to Māori traditions.

f)    Rennie homestead is the first part of a much wider programme and, should support planned growth and address TSI outcomes such as employment, tourism and economic development.

g)   There are broader implications if this opportunity is missed – as the programme is of benefit to the region, there is a role for ATEED and stakeholders like the airport to play in bringing in resources

h)   The report should reflect the dual history of the place

i)    There is a perception that this is a council project and that needs to change – must be owned by a wide range of stakeholders

j)    That conversations with the two iwi show that there is room for many players to contribute.

k)   Council must re-build the connections with external stakeholders

Implementation

37.     Details relating to implementation are outlined above.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

1.0 Māngere Gateway Programme and Visitor Experience

41

bView

1.1 Māngere International Gateway Area

57

cView

1.2 Māngere Gateway - Strategic Context

59

dView

1.3 Rennie Homestead Location Plan and Information

65

eView

1.4 Rennie Homestead Floor Plan

69

fView

1.5 Financial Performance

71

     

 

 

Signatories

Authors

John Dunshea - Manager City Transformation

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Appendix 1

MĀNGERE GATEWAY PROGRAMME

VISITOR CENTRE AND VISITOR EXPERIENCE

 

1                CONTEXT

 

Appendix 1.1 indicates the area known as Māngere- International Gateway.

The core purpose of the Mangere Gateway Programme is to harness tourism for local economic development for the benefit of the community and indigenous people.

Lifting the economic performance of South Auckland is essential to the Auckland region and to New Zealand as a whole.  Creating Māngere Gateway as a globally significant international visitor destination could drive social and economic benefit to Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, the area of The Southern Initiative (TSI) and the regional economy.  The Programme delivers specifically on Māori outcomes presenting opportunities for meaningful employment and entrepreneurial initiatives.  The Programme meets the gap in Auckland’s visitor market for greater representation of Māori and Pasifika visitor experiences (ATEED Visitor Plan).

 

The Māngere Gateway Programme is a regional programme that links directly with the Auckland Plan and with The Southern Initiative -International Gateway & Destination workstream as well as the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Area Plan and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan, Council’s Economic Development Strategy, the ATEED Visitor Plan and the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (see appendix 1.2).  

 

International tourism is New Zealand’s largest export industry after dairy and continues to grow with ambitious targets to double visitor numbers by 2025.  Tourism directly employs 5.7 per cent of the workforce nationwide and, indirectly, a further 3.1 per cent.  Tourism produces a net financial benefit to central government and is argued as cost neutral to local government (Dwyer and Forsyth - 2007) 

 

The potential economic benefits to the region of the Māngere Gateway Programme have been estimated at $40m per annum in additional GDP (Berl, 2008) and with the potential to create 700 jobs per annum. 

 

Estimates completed in respect of Manukau suggested that a 10% increase in visitor numbers would result in around $600k of additional business rates and $1.05m increase in residential rates (Covec 2010).

 

The visitor destination allows an economy to grow beyond the constraints of the resident population.  It becomes a catalyst for private sector development, stimulates community pride and engagement and creates a range of employment opportunities which will bring diversity into the environs of the airport and The Southern Initiative.

 

In terms of the existing LTP and current Council activities, the Māngere Gateway Programme comprises of three areas of activity: 

·              Māngere Gateway operational funding for support, development and facilitation   (including Māori and Pasifika initiatives);

·              Māngere Gateway Avenue Route capex funding which potentially is funding for initiatives such as the internal interpretation of King Tawhiao’s Cottage, development of the visitor experience at Mangere Mountain Education Centre (a CCO), walking routes, signage, landscape interventions etc

·              Capex funding (see below) for the Māngere  Gateway visitor centre/visitor experience.

The visitor centre is intended as the base for the Māngere Gateway visitor experience and delivery of a range of visitor experiences across the area.  It is an important component of the Programme which will generate increased visitation and new markets, acting as a catalyst for other community initiatives and private investment. 

 

The Otuataua Stonefields was originally chosen for the visitor centre.  In 2012 the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDO/2012/35,36,37,38,39) supported the Māngere Gateway Programme, under the umbrella of The Southern Initiative, and agreed on the proposed site for Stage 1 of the visitor centre including funding of $3.6m in Council’s LTP (2012-2022). 

(Stage 2 of the visitor centre, estimated now at $5m+, is unfunded.  This comprised an underground space for taonga, additional space for visitor experience and a viewing platform out to the Manukau Harbour).

 

The Regional Development and Operations Committee also made a further recommendation to the Strategy & Finance Committee that operational funding of $971k, for the first 5 years of operation of the visitor centre, be included in the 2012-2022 LTP.  The financial model (appendix 1.4) indicated that a near breakeven point could be achieved within 5 years.  This opex funding has since been diverted to other priorities as the visitor centre was not progressed as anticipated.

 

A report was presented to the Auckland Development Committee on 10th July proposing investigation of the Rennie Homestead an alternative base for the Māngere Gateway visitor centre and visitor experience.

The recommendations of the Committee were:

a)         note the previous Regional development & Operations Committee (March 2012 Resolutions RDO/2012/37, RDO/2012/38) endorsing the Otuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve as the location for the visitor centre and visitor experience

 

b)         note, on the basis of discussion with partners, that staff consider that the decision to locate the visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve should be revisited

 

c)         approve the investigation of the Rennie Homestead and adjoining land as an alternative location for the Māngere Gateway Visitor Centre & Visitor Experience

 

d)         request staff to prepare a report outlining options for use of the Rennie Homestead and adjoining land as the base for the visitor centre and visitor experience for a future meeting of the Auckland Development Committee and within 3 months of the date of this report.

 

Council owns the Rennie Homestead immediately adjacent to the Otuataua Stonefields (appendix 1.3).  This property requires significant repair and maintenance work estimated to be around $800k.  It is suggested that this expenditure, along with some further capital expenditure for development, could be funded from the $3.6m currently identified for Stage 1 of the visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields.  The repair and maintenance work on the Rennie Homestead, together with alterations to accommodate use as a visitor centre, could be completed in time for the international  visitor season commencing around October 2015.

 

The Rennie Homestead, now proposed as the location for the Māngere Gateway visitor centre, has 8.9 hectares of adjoining land which presents opportunities for a broad range of visitor initiatives. These could be developed incrementally over a number of years, according to visitor demand and interest from potential stakeholders and partners.  Council’s role should evolve into one of facilitation rather than necessarily being the direct provider of the visitor offering.

 

The visitor centre should be considered as one component of a wider strategic plan to grow the regional economy, to deliver Māori outcomes and within the wider context of the The Southern Initiative, the aspirations of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, Tangata Whenua and initiatives such as Te Papa, the development of Puketutu Island as a regional park and, potentially, World Heritage Status for the Auckland volcanic plain. 

 

Consideration should also be given to the opportunities created by projected growth in visitor numbers through Auckland International Airport (almost doubling from 2.7m in 2013 to 5.2m by 2025). Other complementary initiatives include Te Araroa, the long distance pathway and the National Cycleway, both of which traverse the area and other initiatives such as the Watercare Coastal Walkway and Council’s Greenways and Cycleways Strategies. 

 

 


 

2.               BACKGROUND

 

The Māngere Gateway programme is a collaborative initiative across Council, together with external stakeholders, notably Te Waiohua, AIAL, ATEED, to develop a visitor destination based on an area north of the airport to Kiwi Esplanade at Māngere Bridge and west of George Bolt Memorial Drive, including the coastal area of the Manukau Harbour (see appendix 1.1 for map).  It builds on the extraordinary wealth of cultural, built and natural heritage within the Māngere Gateway area to potentially create a major eco-tourism and heritage destination for the Auckland region, attracting international visitors and visitor spend.

 

The area depicted on the map (appendix 1.1) is the cultural heart of the Gateway.  Longer term it has been proposed that the visitor destination could embrace a wider area to the south and to the east. The amalgamation of separate local authorities of the Auckland region now creates a greater opportunity to extend across the Manukau Harbour to embrace Awhitu, the Waitakeres and Onehunga. 

 

The Programme comprises implementation projects and programmes around the Otuataua Stonefields, Māngere Mountain and the Māngere Mountain Education Centre, visitor information, interpretation, and proposals for cycleways, walkways, and driving routes which link key points of interest.  It incorporates landscape, streetscape, environment and re-vegetation initiatives to enhance the overall amenity values of the area for the community and visitors.

 

Central to the programme is the visitor centre as a base for the visitor experience(s).  The visitor centre is critical to unlocking the economic potential of the area and will put a ‘stake in the ground’ establishing a clear message that the Māngere Gateway is valued and that its character should be preserved.   Increasing the number of visitors to the area will provide impetus to other community and private sector initiatives.  Specifically it will create new opportunities for the Māngere Mountain Education Centre (MMEC).  Currently MMEC delivers mainly to the non-profitable education market and, consequently, struggles to be sustainable.

 

The aim is to create a flagship international visitor destination incorporating best practice principles of sustainability across all four well-beings (social, cultural, environmental and economic), to deliver a better place for people to live and to work; and to create diverse opportunities for employment and entrepreneurial initiatives in the environs of the airport.  The programme contributes to Auckland becoming the World’s most liveable city and to meeting the gap in Auckland’s market for Māori and Pasifka visitor offering.

 

The values of the programme are based on the principles of Responsible Tourism which seeks to:

 

·           Minimise negative environmental, social and cultural impacts;

·           Generate greater economic benefits for local people and enhance the wellbeing of host communities by improving working conditions and access to the tourism industry;

·           Involve local people in decisions that affect their lives and life chances;

·           Make positive contributions to the conservation of natural and cultural heritage and to the maintenance of the world’s diversity;

·           Provide more enjoyable experiences for tourists through more meaningful connections with local people, and a greater understanding of local cultural and environmental issues;

·           Provide access for physically challenged people;

·           Be culturally sensitive engendering respect between tourists and hosts.

Responsible Tourism Declaration – Kerala 2008

 

The Programme aligns with, or overlays the work of, main other units/departments of Council, especially The Southern Initiative and therefore requires a coordinated and collaborative delivery of multiple projects, programmes and business-as usual-activities.

 

3                MĀNGERE GATEWAY VISITOR DESTINATION

 

Over recent years Māngere Gateway has grown as a visitor destination.  On Sundays, the area is very well used by cyclists.  Māngere Bridge which, at one time, seemed to be losing business to the out of town shopping precincts, is now well supported by its community and attracting visitors to its pavement cafes and its vibrant kiwi and pacific ambience.  Ambury Regional Park attracts very significant visitor numbers (350,000 per annum).  Many visitors to the Park are local and regional but domestic and international visitation has grown.

 

Māngere Gateway is a cultural heritage landscape of deep significance to Auckland, to New Zealand and internationally.  It can tell the stories of human occupation and land use over at least the last 8 centuries and through 30 generations.  Ihumātao was the birthplace of the Kingitanga movement.    In May 1857 a large hui of Tainui and other rangatira, and missionaries, including Bishop George Selwyn, was held at Ihumātao.  The meeting lasted several days leading to a request to Pōtatau Te Wherowhero that he should be King. Thus Ihumātao retains a special place in the history of the Tainui people because of its direct association with Te Wherowhero and the foundation of Kingitanga.  

 

Te Wherowhero reigned for just over 2 years and was then succeeded by his son, King Tawhiao whose cottage is now located next to the Māngere Mountain Education Centre.  King Tawhiao reigned through the tumultuous years of the Land Wars.  External restoration of the cottage is complete but the cottage cannot be opened to the public, by King Tuheitia, until such time as the internal interpretation is completed from the Mangere Gateway Avenue Route funding.

 

Tangata Whenua are crucial to the Māngere Gateway destination programme.  Waiohua and Te Kawerau o Maki have engaged and supported the Programme over the years. The stated intention of the Programme is to work with Tangata Whenua to build and support development of capacity and capability and to meet the aspirations of Tangata Whenua for meaningful employment and opportunities to develop their own entrepreneurial activities and sustain their culture.

 

3.1      Key existing attractions and features of Māngere Gateway are:

 

·              Otuataua Stonefields – NZHPT Grade II listed site.  Evidence of Māori occupation, farming etc, finest remaining example of 19c Māori mission station complex in the Auckland region.

·              Puketapapa -  Auckland’s smallest volcano

·              Māngere Mountain –  Auckland’s best preserved volcanic cone

·              King Tawhiao’s Cottage –  once home of the 2nd Maori king

·              Marae – Makaurau, Pukaki, Te Puea, Te Manukanuka ō Hotorua

·              Māngere Mountain Education Centre

·              Ambury Regional Park

·              Kiwi Esplanade – lava flows and new  boat ramp giving access to the harbour – Awhitu, Waitakeres, Onehunga etc

·              Petrified kauri forest  -  Ihumatao

·              Te Araroa – long distance pathway,

·              Nga Tapuwae ō Mataoho (Māngere Gateway heritage route)

·              Watercare Coastal walkway

·              National cycleway  - proposed route

·              Puketutu Island – one of the sites of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi

·              Built Heritage – Rennie Homestead, St James’ Church etc

·              Māngere Bridge Town Centre

·              Old Māngere Bridge,

·              Villa Maria Vineyard Estate & Conference Centre

·              Airport Environs:  Abbeville Estate, Treasure Island Golf, JK’s World of Golf, Butterfly Creek, Bike track and Bike hire depot

·              Other volcanic features in the area including Puketutu Island, Mangere Lagoon, the Wiri Lava caves, Pukaki Lagoon, McLaughlin’s Mountain, Maungataketake.

 

As well as cultural and historical significance, this area has significant geological interest being a major, and contiguous, part of the Auckland volcanic field.   Māngere Mountain (Te Pane ō Mataoho) is probably Auckland’s best preserved volcano.  The Otuataua Stonefields, a 100 hectare lava field, is the largest remaining area of what was once the 8,000 hectares of the Auckland volcanic field.  Puketapapa (or Pukeiti), Auckland’s smallest volcano. is located on the Otuataua Stonefields and Puketutu Island is being developed as a regional park.

 

Māngere Gateway has archaeological, cultural, historical, scientific, technological and educational value and, over the years the area has attracted ecologists, geologists, archaeologists, artists, photographers and poets.  It holds the opportunity to tell the science around the geological landscape of Auckland, the pre-colonial, settlement and urban development, intertwined with the Māori legends and stories of Waiohua and of Mataoho, the god of volcanoes. 

 

Council’s vision of the International Gateway & Destination requires coordination and leadership to develop Māngere Gateway as a unique, differentiated, destination which will deliver the social and economic benefit to this area of South Auckland but also across the region by way of increased visitation.

 

4          MĀNGERE GATEWAY VISITOR EXPERIENCE

 

4.1       Strategic Intent

 

The strategic intent is to achieve a standard of quality and uniqueness in visitor experience that is recognised as ‘world class‘ delivering:

 

·              An authentic experience of Māori heritage and culture and interpretation of the unique landscape of the Māngere Gateway area and its significance within the Auckland Volcanic Field

 

·              An understanding of the indigenous settlement of Auckland, European settlement and urbanisation

 

·              An opportunity for  iwi to develop their visitor products and services which can sustain their cultural heritage and support their papakainga

 

·              A multi-disciplinary showcase of Auckland’s pacific culture, art and commitment to sustainable practices

 

·              A ‘must do’ experience contributing to Auckland’s reputation as one of the world’s top visitor destinations

 

 

4.2     The Visitor Centre

 

The visitor centre is a base and conduit for delivery of the Māngere Gateway visitor experience.  The visitor experience is the guided and self-guided walks across the Otuataua Stonefields.  Within the visitor centre there would be interpretive displays and activities such as storytelling, together with a small café and retail space.

 

In 2012 the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDO/2012/35,36,37,38,39) endorsed a site on the Otuataua Stonefields for Stage 1 of the proposed visitor centre, approving the capex funding of $3.6m and recommending opex funding of $971k over the first 5 years, after which the financial model indicated that a near breakeven point would be achieved.  This opex funding was approved by the Strategy & Finance Committee and incorporated into the 2012-2022 LTP but has subsequently been diverted to other priorities.

 

Stage 2 of the proposed visitor centre incorporated a subterranean room which could be used for the display of taonga.  The cost of this second stage was estimated at $5m but was not incorporated into Council’s 2012-2022 LTP.   A decision to proceed with Stage 2 was predicated on demonstrating that Stage 1 was financially sustainable.  

 

A number of factors now prompt a review of the location for the proposed visitor centre as proposed by the Auckland Development Committee (AUC/2014/81). 

 

Firstly, the Otuataua Stonefields site had always been contentious and there are differing views within Waiohua as to the suitability of the Otuataua Stonefields for the proposed visitor centre and to the specific site currently identified. 

 

Secondly, Council now owns the adjacent Rennie Homestead (appendix 1.3), a double fronted early 19th century bay villa.  This heritage property was purchased in 2010, after a several years of extensive negotiation, by the former Manukau City Council, with a view to incorporating it into the Māngere Gateway visitor offering and into the open space network.   For the last 4 years the property has been managed as a tenancy by ACPL.

 

A building survey in 2012 indicated that the property required quite extensive repair and maintenance work estimated at approximately $1m.  ACPL have recently undertaken around $200k of this expenditure to bring the property up to a level where it can be tenanted again. 

 

Further expenditure of approximately $800k remains.  Council’s 2012-2022 LTP does not incorporate funding for this work.  Consequently it is proposed that this work could be funded from the $3.6m identified for the proposed visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields and that the visitor centre could be relocated to the Rennie Homestead.  The property has 8.9 hectares of adjoining land which could be used to extend the visitor offering and to create opportunities for additional revenue streams.

 

 

The main advantages of the Rennie Homestead and adjoining land, as the main visitor centre are:

 

·           The land is not culturally sensitive to the same extent as the Otuataua Stonefields and therefore more flexible use is possible.

·           The Rennie Homestead is fronted by a public highway and offers increased accessible for visitors

·           The site has direct, Council owned access onto the Otuataua Stonefields

·           The 8.9 hectares of adjoining land provides opportunity to develop additional infrastructure and buildings required.

·           There are potential opportunities for partnerships and access to external funding.

 

The main disadvantages are:

 

·              As with the Otuataua Stonefields, differences also exist within Waiohua as to the suitability of the Rennie Homestead as the location for the visitor centre.

 

·              The visitor centre would not be embedded to the same extent, within the cultural landscape of the Otuataua Stonefields although the Māngere Gateway area as a whole is part of an extensive and contiguous cultural landscape.

 

·              Pedestrian access to the Otuataua Stonefields is not as convenient for visitors although, during the main visitor season, a small transportable building could act as a meeting point/ticket office at the main entrance to the Otuataua Stonefields.

 

 

4.2.1      The Rennie Homestead Visitor Centre

 

The Rennie Homestead, with the adjoining land and potential to widen the visitor experience and create additional revenue streams, offers considerable advantage.  A further benefit is the ability to develop incrementally and to use farm-type buildings for external covered space.   The use of standardised buildings rather than purpose-built, would enable greater flexibility as small businesses developed and moved off site.  Additionally, the mix and flexibility offered by the site may open up opportunities for partnerships and access to other funding sources.

 

 

4.2.2      Rennie Homestead Visitor Centre – Capital Costs

 

Capex funding of $3.6m for the Visitor Centre/Experience is currently within Council’s LTP (2012-2022). 

 

No capex funding is allocated currently to the essential repair and maintenance required for the Rennie Homestead.  It is proposed that this cost could be met from the above funding, together with adaptation of the Rennie Homestead to a visitor centre and, potentially, provision of some external accommodation.  Indicative costs and timing are:

4.2.3     Rennie Homestead - Stage 1

 

At 211 square meters, the Rennie Homestead property itself is not considered to be large enough to house all the necessary facilities and operations to support the Stage 1 (see below) development of a visitor centre. As such, additional buildings will need to be constructed.

 

This visitor offering (Stage 1) would be similar to that proposed for the visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields and could comprise of the following within Rennie Homestead itself:

 

·           Guided tours:  General, Extended, Exclusive (+ Workshop) and Schools (including Otuataua Stonefields accessed from Rennie Homestead)

·           Audio tours

·           Special events

·           Interpretive displays

·           Wider Māngere Gateway Information

·           Visitor Toilets

·           Small café (wharekai) (potential to use locally grown produce)

·           Retail space (potential for sale of locally produced offerings)

·           A hub and central booking point for Māngere Gateway eco and cultural tourism experiences which contribute to the existing and potential future destination portfolio – e.g. Marae-based activities, fishing/boat trips, cycling, horse-riding etc.

 

Externally, it is proposed the following buildings and infrastructure would be required:

 

·           Car / Coach Parking area – to provide 50 car parking spaces and 2 coach parking spaces (based on previous proposals at Otuataua Stonefields) 

·           Associated landscaping, services and pedestrian / vehicular access

·           A stand-alone building (to house a carving school, for example)

 

Financial  Year

Stage of work

Anticipated cost

2014/15

Essential repair and maintenance in order to make the building Health and Safety compliant (undertaken by ACPL)

$200,000 (from ACPL budget and not subject to budget proposals outlined in this report)

2015/16

Complete Repair and Maintenance (external fabric, interior and prevent future deterioration) to make weatherproof.

Start initial consultation and design work (focus on external landscaping, car parking area and stand-alone building)

$800,000

2016/17

Complete Planning, Design and Engineering, consultation and consent work.

Start construction on external work.

Complete visitor centre specific fit out  infrastructure (e.g. café fit toilets electrical work)

$500,000

2017/18

Complete construction of external landscaping, access, car / bus parking and standalone building)

$2,300,000

 

Total Capex

$3,600,000

2017/18-onwards (over five years minimum)

Operational expenditure

$971,000

 

A hub and central booking point for Māngere Gateway eco and cultural tourism experiences which contribute to the destination portfolio – eg. Marae-based activities, fishing/boat trips, cycling, horse-riding etc.

The above visitor offering is based on that proposed for the Otuataua Stonefields.  The capex expenditure for repair and maintenance of the Rennie Homestead, together with its conversion to a visitor centre, can be met from the $3.6m currently in Council’s LTP (2012-2012).

The operational expenditure, estimated at $971k over the first 5 years of operation, before achieving breakeven, would need to be re-instated into Council’s LTP (2015-2025).

Guided tours will be delivered by tangata whenua who will ensure the protection of the waahi tapu located on the Otuataua Stonefields. The guides will incorporate lessons about tikanga and explanations as to its relevance today.   They will give visitors a deeper understanding of the Otuataua Stonefields and its significance as waahi taonga.   This will become a rich part of the visitor experience as international visitors in particular are fascinated with how traditional maturanga (knowledge) and tikanga are incorporated into contemporary Māori life

The business model for Stage 1 is currently based on the direct employment of guiding services.  However, a key objective is to facilitate development of the cultural guided tours as a stand-alone business managed and operated by iwi and, to this end, funding for the Haere Whakamua programme has been provided through the Māngere Gateway Programme.

The Haere Whakamua programme, led by Community Arts & Development in conjunction with the University of Auckland, has been working with Waiohua (Te Ahiwaru) over the past year to develop the entrepreneurial skills required to enable iwi to develop, manage and operate their own guided walks.

Iwi have the potential to develop other visitor activities such as horse riding, fishing and marae-based activities.  The most successful Māori visitor experiences are not dissimilar from other visitor activities but when operated and managed by Māori, with a Māori dimension, values and storytelling have added appeal, particularly in the international market.

 

 

4.2.4         Rennie Homestead - Stage 2

Stage 2 of development of the Rennie Homestead would be to expand the range of the visitor offering.  This can be done incrementally over a number of years subject to potential partners and the availability of funding sources which might also come through external partnerships, grants etc. 

Activities inside the homestead might be extended to include traditional Māori healing and massage – romiromi / mirimiri and an expanded range of workshops but further expansion of the visitor offering is likely to be based on the adjoining land. 

Therefore, the external space allows a variety of opportunities to be considered which showcase Māori and Pacific culture, arts and crafts etc. 

Such initiatives might include:

 

·           Individual workshops for indigenous arts and crafts

 

·           Carving & Waka building

 

·           Horse riding / horse whispering etc

 

·           Small spaces for social enterprise/innovation

 

·           Events & Performances

 

·           Camping/overnight accommodation

 

·           Bicycle hire

·           Cultivation / Food forest / Farming– potentially with apprenticeships and programmes for schools to teach children about growing their own vegetables and healthy eating - Initiatives such as this may receive external funding.

·                ‘Artist in Residence’

In the main, it is envisaged that Council’s role would be facilitation rather than that of being a direct provider.  Funding for the above Stage 2 initiatives might be through partnerships, private investment, grants etc.  Some Council investment in infrastructure might be required but this would depend on the economic viability and on social, cultural and environmental benefits.

 

The criteria, by which a potential visitor offering will be evaluated, would include:

 

·           The extent to which it supports development The Southern Initiative – International Gateway & Destination

 

·           The contribution to Māngere Gateway as an eco-tourism and cultural heritage visitor destination

 

·           The visitor appeal and projected visitor numbers

 

·           The mix in the visitor offering

 

·           The extent to which it can become self-financing

Small tourism ventures suffer from an imbalance between delivering the experience and managing the administration and marketing of their activity.  Therefore, it is suggested that these activities could be delivered collaboratively and that providers of visitor products and services could  ‘buy-in’ to these services.

 

4.2.5     Carving School

The Māngere Gateway Programme has previously incorporated proposals for a carving school. This would be a significant visitor attraction but also a working school sustaining traditional crafts and training apprentices.  The former Manukau City Council entered into discussions with Te Puia (Maori Arts & Crafts Institute), Rotorua which, at that time, was looking to develop a satellite facility. Unfortunately, these discussions did not come to fruition.  Te Puia in Rotorua hosts around 450,000 visitors annually which is indicative of the visitor appeal.  It is anticipated that if such a visitor attraction was developed in the Auckland region then it would attract significant business from the cruise ship and conference market where time constraints limit opportunities for longer distances.

A collective of six pan-tribal Auckland carvers, Nga Whaotapu o Tāmaki Makarau, the Sacred Chisels, came together earlier this year.  (The collective, Nga Whaotapu o Tāmaki Makarau, the Sacred Chisels are currently carving the lintel for the doorway of the new Auckland Council building on Albert Street).  Their purpose is to develop the next generation of carvers through an apprenticeship programme, to sustain their craft and to produce carving for the Auckland region to build a strong, visual Māori identity for the region. 

Currently eighty per cent of carving sited in the Auckland region has been done outside the region.  The youngest active carver in the Auckland region is 38 and young people are not coming into the craft.  

Very informal exploratory discussions have taken place with Rewi Spraggon, who formed Nga Whaotapu o Tāmaki Makarau, the Sacred Chisels, earlier this year.  It is understood that there is  interest in developing a carving school and workshop at the Rennie Homestead.  This would, potentially, increase visitor numbers by 20-30 per cent and consequently have a positive impact on revenue streams. 

 

4.3.           VISITOR CENTRE OPERATIONS

 

 

4.3.1         Commercial Goals

 

The commercial goals are to:

 

·           Consistently attract over 100,000 visitors to the Visitor Centre from the fifth year of operations onwards

 

·           Have 45% of all visitors take a paid guided tour of the Otuataua Stonefields by the fifth year of operation -  rising to a target of consistently above 50,000 paying visitors pa

 

·           Facilitate opportunities for iwi, and other providers, to operate sustainable visitor products and services

 

·           Optimise performance with the aim of achieve break-even EBITDA in year five of operations

 

·           Keep the offerings fresh to sustain revenue streams – primarily through renewing operating assets, displays and interpretation every four years.

 

4.3.2         Visitor Centre Opening Hours

To build Māngere Gateway as an international visitor destination it will be important to deliver a 7 day operation to meet the expectation of the casual visitor.  It is anticipated therefore that the opening hours of the visitor centre would be 10am to 4pm over a 7 day period with some adjustment for seasonal demand and the number of visitors.

4.3.3         Operational Staff

 

Staffing resources, including a management position, are as below.  These requirements were originally calculated in respect of the visitor centre being on the Otuataua Stonefields but no substantive change is envisaged with relocation the visitor centre to the Rennie Homestead.

 

The figures have been extensively reviewed both internally and externally and are comparable with the Botanic Gardens.

 

The total FTE number is proposed as 4.5 at start up increasing, as shown, to 6 by Year 5.

 

 

 

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

FTE

4.5

5

5.5

5.5

6

Total personnel costs (includes on-costs) ($‘000’s)

$295

$327

$353

$353

$379

 

 

Employment of part-time staff, up to the FTE equivalent, would give more flexibility and the ability to better adapt to visitor demand.  It is also proposed that there will be an overlap of personnel with the Māngere Mountain Education Centre (a CCO of Council) and opportunities for collaboration with Ambury Regional Park should be considered.  Longer term, personnel requirements for Puketutu Island could be factored in. 

 

As visitor numbers increase it is anticipated that on-site providers could undertake some unpaid staffing duties against either payment of commissions or site rental etc.  Some volunteering can also be expected which would be particularly useful to handle peak volumes.  Similarly there will be opportunities to attract WWOOFers (Worldwide Workers On Organic Farms).  Opportunities would also exist for student and training placements, especially through links with Manukau Institute of Technology. None of these additional resources have been factored in but is typical of the support found at Auckland’s historical and cultural visitor attractions.

 

5              MARKETING

5.1             Overall market size

 

Somewhere in the range 90,000 to 450,000 visitors to Auckland region annually are interested in some form of heritage and cultural experience, with museums and galleries being the main attraction.  This figure of 450,000 visitors interested in some form of heritage/ cultural experiences matches the visitor numbers at Te Puia in Rotorua.

 

Auckland Airport is continually developing capacity and services to ensure it will sustainably cope with an anticipated 24 million passengers a year by 2025 and the 40 million visitors expected by 2044, reflecting New Zealand’s growing popularity as one of the world’s leading tourism destinations. 

 

 

5.2             Competitive environment

 

In the Auckland region, there is an absence of Māori product for the international and the domestic visitor market.    This is identified in the Auckland Visitor Plan (2012) which highlights the need for more attractors, especially those with a Māori and Pacific presence (appendix 1.2)

 

·              Auckland War Memorial Museum offers daily Māori kapa haka concerts in the Māori Gallery.  These are priced at $25 per adult with a tour of the Māori section of the museum at $10.  Children are $12.50 and $5 respectively.  Attendance is understood to be in the range 100,000 to 150,000 visitors a year annually.

 

·              Tamaki Hikoi offers a 1 hour guided tour of the Auckland Domain and a 3 hour that includes the Museum concert.  There is also a 3 hour guided tour operating on Maungawhau – Mt Eden but without the benefit and opportunities of a nearby papakainga and without the supporting infrastructure of the wider heritage destination.   The 1 hour walk is priced at Adult $40 and Child $20.  The 3 hour walk/tour is priced at Adult $95 and Child $40 Around 8,000 visitors take these comprehensive tours annually.

 

·              Arataki Visitor Centre.  Free entrance.  Walks are self managing and free.  Visitor numbers average around 150,000pa.  The majority of visitors are New Zealanders. 

 

·              Te Hana is a traditional experience, whereas the Māngere Gateway experience will be an archaeological  and cultural heritage experience combined with history and the present day life of the local iwi.   Therefore the Māngere Gateway experience is significantly different.  Located north of the city Te Hana it is difficult for international visitors to access without their own transportation. 

 

·              Māngere Mountain Education Centre (MMEC) is part of the Māngere Gateway product mix and programmes and activities across the Rennie Homestead and MMEC will be coordinated and complementary.

 

·              Marae Precinct, Puketutu Island  This venture will be multi-tribal between Waikato Tainui, Makaurau marae and Te Kawerau o Maki.   It is understood from iwi that this will be more along the lines of a venue which can be pre-booked for functions and meetings. 

 

The key point of difference with the Māngere Gateway Visitor Centre and visitor experience is that this venture will be one of only a few in the entire country where the site has been in continual Māori occupation by its people from the time of their arrival in the country through to the present day.  This lends credibility to Māngere Gateway, and particularly Ihumātao  as having a significant cultural history, as well as its obvious volcanic history.

 

International visitors seek authenticity.   Nothing can be more authentic than interpretations of a landscape and social history told by people whose children are the thirtieth generation to be born on this land.  Throughout New Zealand there are only a handful of Māori tourism ventures that introduce visitors to contemporary Māori life.  Most ventures focus solely on recreating a traditional type experience.

 

The location of the proposed venture, close to the airport, will be a significant factor in attracting visitors.  A significant number of visitors arrive into Auckland, then move on to visit only the South Island where there is only a handful of Māori tourism experience.   These factors, and the airport location, will ensure that the Māngere Gateway Visitor Centre, and the associated attractions and facilities within the heritage destination of Māngere Gateway, gain a significant share of the international tourism market.

 

The aim of the Visitor Centre and the visitor offering is not to compete with the long established (and internationally recognised) Māori tourism centre, Te Piua at Rotorua.   The intention is to offer an alternative, complementary experience that provides both a truly spectacular historic site in the form of the Otuataua Stonefields and to introduce visitors to contemporary Māori life.

 

There is undoubtedly space in the Auckland marketplace for more Māori tourism product, especially where there is strong heritage values and archaeological significance with linkages to the ‘living village’ or papakainga.  

 

 

5.3             Projected Demand

 

Primary product

 

Between 90,000 to 450,000 visitors to Auckland region annually are interested in some form of heritage and cultural experience.  It is accepted that this is a wide bracket.  What is evident is that experiences with a cultural overlay attract more visitors than a stand-alone cultural experience. 

 

It is quite realistic to attract up to 100,000 paying visitors per annum in the $5 to $20 price offer range to effective visitor sites and attractions.  International visitors will pay for Māori related experiences, especially those which are authentic, experiential and where there is inter-action with indigenous people.  

 

·           Attracting 8,000 to 10,000 paying international visitors to high end tours is quite achievable and visitors will pay between $40 and $100 for a good quality tour with an capable guide

 

·           New Zealanders will take a guided tour but it may need to be a lower cost- option. 

 

·           Schools will pay between $2 and $7 per child for a relevant programme and are avid users of curricular aligned offerings

 

It is suggested that total visitor numbers should grow relatively rapidly from 35,000 to 100,000 per annum over five years and that 45% of these will purchase guided tours by year 5.  

 

The financial model uses the following growth and demand model.   There is a sizeable increase in visitors projected from Year 1 to Year 2 based on the experience of other attractions.

 

 

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

Annual visitors

35,000

80,000

90,000

100,000

100,000

Visitors taking tours

33%

36%

39%

42%

45%

Total visitors taking tours

11,550

28,000

34,200

37,800

45,000

 

The business case remains cautious, as even in year 5 of the forecast, only 9000, or 20% of the 45,000 overall visitors are predicted to take the high-end Exclusive  Experience tours – still comfortably within the band of 8,000 to 10,000 customers predicted market size.

 

While the school tours market is essentially a different market from the visitor market, both are included in the overall numbers. 

 

Therefore the ‘product’ mix of those paying for tours, as used in the financial forecasts, is as follows:

 

Type of Tour

Percentage of the total taking tours

Adult walk with audio

25%

Child with audio

10%

School

30%

Group - Adult guided

14%

Group - Child guided

1%

Experiential Tour and Workshop

12%

Exclusive Experience Tour Workshop

8%

 

The above analysis suggests that, provided the experience is done well and kept current, the total market potential could be above the 100,000 annual visitor count that this business plan is predicated on.  

 

5.4       Expressed Interest from Agents, Wholesalers and Visitors

 

Feedback from agents and wholesalers was sought in 2012 in relation to the proposed visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields and the programme of associated visitor experiences.  Whilst the location of the visitor centre is now proposed as the Rennie Homestead, the programme will be similar although it will include a wider Māngere Gateway experience and therefore appeal to a wider range of markets. 

 

We consider that the feedback is still relevant.  Sample comments received from agents and wholesalers were:

 

·              “I think this would be a very interesting experience for all of our clients and sounds like exactly the kind of programme they´re generally looking for!!!” German FIT Travel Agent

 

·              “I think this would be a good option to include as part of a half or full day tour.  You mention that there is a 2-hour tour with a workshop – I think this option would be more appealing for most clients – the ability to join in the activities instead of just hearing about them.” Australian FIT Travel Agent

 

·              “We are keen to see new itineraries and products developed, and are happy to offer these to our clients/agents.  In particular, experiences with a cultural aspect are always high on the ‘must do’ list for more and more consumers, and so this type of product could potentially be a good fit.” US Wholesaler Product Manager (High end clientele & FIT)

 

Agents and wholesalers also mentioned the need for a more centrally based Māori product as Te Hana is perceived to be too far for some to travel and some visitors do not have the time or inclination to visit Te Puia at Rotorua.  One of the criticisms levelled at  Te Puia is its  commercial nature.

 

A pilot guided walk was tested in January 2012 with international FIT visitors from Dominican Republic, Germany, USA and UK.  When asked to indicate what they would pay for the tour, the visitor responses were between $45 and $95, confirming that the proposed pricing strategy is in line with the market.

 

Visitors were also asked to rate the quality of their experience across a range of criteria (1 being the lowest and 5 being the highest):  authenticity, personal interaction, guiding, service, quality, location.  The rating was consistently either 4 or 5. 

 

The following comments were received from the visitor pilot group.

 

·           “Good tour!  The combination of a warm welcome, walk and food was perfect.  Most important for international visitors is the authentic interaction with your people.”  German visitor)

 

·           Felt very welcome.  Very lovely people.  Very much liked the atmosphere and traditional greeting.”  (German visitor)

 

·           “The best part of the tour for me was the walk through the Stonefields and the interaction with the maori guides.  They are friendly and hospitable people and I hope they can keep telling their stories and history.”  (US visitor)

 

·           “Wonderful, magical !”  (US visitor)

 

·           “This was very special – loved the guide’s sincerity, knowledge, warmth, sensitivity and storytelling.”  (Domestic visitor)

 

 

 

6          MANAGEMENT

Management, operations and the visitor offering will be coordinated with the Māngere Mountain Education Trust (a CCO of Council).  It is anticipated that there will be some form of joint management. 

 

Council may operate the visitor centre itself or seek an external partner, although a management contract may involve additional costs over and above Council operating the facility itself.  However, it is understood that the Manukau Institute of Technology – Faculty of Business and Information Technology – may have some interest in a management contract.   An arrangement such as this could provide training opportunities for students but could also provide access to a wide range of management skills.

It is imperative that management personnel have experience of delivering a tourism venture aimed at the international marketplace and have the appropriate experience in marketing such a venture.   The visitor centre manager will have a hands-on role having experience in the tourism sector, marketing, entrepreneurial spirit and business acumen together with cultural alignment.  

 

Ideally the manager will have experience in providing advice to small businesses working in, or seeking to enter, the tourism market.

 

7.         GOVERNANCE

 

Because of the diverse stakeholder interests in its success, it is likely that there will be an advisory board or committee to assist with governance and direction of the venture.  As the venture matures, the advisory board could be formalised into a special purposes trust settled by Auckland Council.  The board could possibly incorporate a governance role in relation to the Māngere Mountain Education Centre or the role of the existing Māngere Mountain Education Trust, a CCO of Council, could be extended.   This might be a reason for retaining the Māngere Mountain Education Centre within the Regional Parks portfolio rather than transferring it back to Local Sports Parks.

 

Consideration will need to be given to the relationship with the Maunga Authority in managing Māngere Mountain and also governance arrangements in respect of Puketutu Island.

 

8.         FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

 

The intention is that Stage 1 of the visitor centre should become self-funding within 5 years.  Self-funding is likely to be achieved earlier once a major attractor, such as a carving school, is progressed.  With a projected increase of 20-30 percent in visitor numbers, self-funding could be achieved between years 3 and 4.

 

The financial model for the proposed visitor centre on the Otuataua Stonefields was based on achieving this target.  Advice has been sought and, other than any difference in interest costs, the income / expenditure model would remain the same for the Rennie Homestead.  Therefore, the financial performance, and move towards a break-even point, is considered attainable.  The model has been extensively reviewed both internally and externally and is considered robust.

 

Stage 2 of the proposed Rennie Homestead visitor centre will enable a wider mix of visitor offering appealing to a wider market, including the regional and domestic market.  Consequently it will attract greater visitation, additional revenue streams and support financial sustainability.  Until proposals for Stage 2 are developed it is not realistic to progress a comprehensive financial model.

 

A graphical representation of Stage 1 (annual paying and non-paying visitors) for tours; annual deficits (EBITDA) follows.  It demonstrates that a near break-even will be achieved at Year 5.  An earlier break-even might be expected if a major attractor, such as a carving school, were included in the mix.

 

The detailed financial breakdown is attached as Appendix 1. 4. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rennie Homestead Visitor Centre

 Annual Visitors and Financial Info at a Glance

Annual

 
Stonefields Base Case Summary_update 2012 02 23_Page_1

 

 



Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 



Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

 

MĀNGERE INTERNATIONAL GATEWAY  -  A REGIONAL VISITOR DESTINATION

Strategic Alignments

 

Auckland Plan – Transformational Shifts

Dramatically accelerate the prospects of Auckland’s children and young people

Strongly commit to environmental action and green growth

Move to outstanding public transport within one network

Radically improve the quality of urban living

Substantially raise living standards for all Aucklanders and focus on those most in need

Significantly lift Maori social and economic wellbeing

 

Southern Initiative

within 5 years

Early, strong family attachment and learning opportunities that set children up for success at school and in life

Clear pathway and support for further education, training or employment for every young person leaving school

Create an outstanding international gateway and destination area

Economic development and jobs for local people

Housing development in Mangere and Manurewa

Increased services and use of Public Transport

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Area Plan

Key Moves

Revitalise and celebrate the unique Māori and multi-cultural character and history of the Māngere - Ōtāhuhu centres

 

Provide for rail to the airport

Improve the water quality and access to and around the Manukau Harbour

Promote Airport and Māngere Gateway as a local and regional employment, tourism and recreation destination

Progressively enhance Māngere

residential areas through comprehensive planning and redevelopment

 

 

 

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Area Plan Framework 2042

Uses a range of environments to show how Māngere – Ōtāhuhu could develop over the next 30 years and informed by the three theme-based outcomes

Three theme-based outcomes

Economic and Community Development

Transport and Network Infrastructure

Natural Heritage and Character

The Māori identity of Māngere – Ōtāhuhu is recognised, enhanced and protected

An integrated transport network

Recognise, protect and manage the high landscape, heritage and ecological values

Residents and visitors have access to safe, high-quality social infrastructure

Ease of freight movement

Important historic heritage is identified, protected, celebrated, and made a focus for community

A regionally significant employment area and continues to experience business growth, providing more local job opportunities

Offers a choice of walking and cycling routes

The quality of the natural environment is restored, protected and valued by the community

Improved road and highway network to meet future demand

The volcanic, natural and built landscape treasures are recognised, protected and valued

A variety of high quality and safe public open spaces and linkages providing coastal and recreational opportunities

Improved infrastructure systems for better water quality in the Manukau Harbour and Tāmaki Estauary

A quality and built environment with green spaces, connected neighbourhoods, sustainable buildings and vibrant centres

Infrastructure networks accommodate Māngere – Ōtāhuhu’s growth

 

 

MĀNGERE INTERNATIONAL GATEWAY  -  A REGIONAL VISITOR DESTINATION

 

Economic Development Strategy

 

The Māngere Gateway Visitor Destination Programme directly contributes to the Auckland Council’s Economic Development Strategy by delivery of an international visitor destination.  Tourism is a key export industry for New Zealand, second only to dairy in terms of its contribution to GDP.  Visitors enable Auckland to grow beyond the constraints imposed by the size and spending power of its resident population.  Visitor spend more than residents.  Furthermore, they do not need the same level of infrastructure.  Estimates by Berl suggest that the Māngere Gateway Visitor Destination, fully developed, could contribute an additional $45m per annum to the local economy and create an additional 7,000 new jobs over 10 years.

 

Specifically the Māngere Gateway Programme contributes to:

 

ACTION 3.1  BUILD UP THE INTERNATIONAL CAPABILITYOF BUSIENSS TO MAXIMISE GLOBAL GROWTH OPPORTUNITES

3.1.5     Work in partnership with iwi to identify and support international commercial opportunities from the Māori asset base in Auckland and support the innovative      and entrepreneurial capacity of iwi / Māori

3.1.6     Work in partnership to develop international commercial opportunities in the Pacific and leverage Auckland as the gateway to the Pacific, and support the innovative and entrepreneurial capacity of Pacific peoples

ACTION 4.1  CHAMPION EDUCATION, SKILLS AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT IN AUCKLAND

4.1.2     Work with local boards to support education, skills and employment in their communities

4.2.3     Facilitate targeted interventions to improve skills outcomes for Māori

4.2.4     Facilitate targeted interventions to improve skills outcomes for Pacific peoples

ACTION 5.1  AUCKLAND IS NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNISED AS HAVING EXCEPTIONAL VISITOR AND EVENT EXPERIENCES

5.1.1     Significantly grow Auckland’s visitor economy through growing demand for Auckland and enhancing the visitor proposition (see Auckland Visitor Plan)

5.1.3    Deliver destination marketing into key international markets that promotes Auckland’s event, retain and visitor offerings

5.1.5    Promote the city centre as a focus for cultural institutions and develop a diverse supporting network of cultural programmes across Auckland

ACTION 5.2  PROMOTE MĀORI CULTURE TO CREATE A UNIQUE VISITOR, TALENT AND INVESTIMENT PROPOSITION

 

5.2.1     Support iwi / Māori to explore the potential of establishing Māori to explore the potential of establishing Māori entrepreneurship initiatives and points of        difference for Auckland that build on rich cultural heritage

 

5.2.3     Provide partnership opportunities for authorised Māori tourism ventures to accentuate Auckland’s point of difference through utilisation of waai tapu and             cultural sites of significance, and deployment of signage in Te Reo

ACTION 5.3  PROMOTE PACIFIC AND MIGRANT CULTURES TO CREATE A UNIQUE VISITOR, TALENT AND INVESTMENT PROPOSITION

5.3.1     Support Pacific peoples’ entrepreneurship initiatives that build on rich cultural heritage and connections to countries of origin, and create cultural innovation for commercialisation

5.3.2     Support migrant entrepreneurship initiatives that leverage talent, international connections and cultural capacity

 

 

MĀNGERE INTERNATIONAL GATEWAY  -  A REGIONAL VISITOR DESTINATION

 

Auckland Visitor Plan

The Auckland Visitor Plan clearly identifies New Zealand’s Māori culture and heritage as its key point of difference and recognises that there is a shortfall of authentic Māori attractors, products and services.  A further need is identified for the development of Pacific attractors, products and services.

 

Māngere Gateway has significant potential to meet this gap in the marketplace and specifically contribute to:

 

Strategic Goal 5:  Develop attractors

Identify and develop four economic and four social anchor events for Auckland

Facilitate the sustainable development of an anchor cultural attraction in a prominent City

Explore the feasibility of a regular cultural welcome ceremony for visitors

Strategic Goal 6:  Enhance Auckland’s Fabric

Advocate for greater Māori & Pacific presence in Auckland’s attractions, public spaces and frontline visitor services

Support and influence initiatives that have the potential to enhance the visitor experience

 

 

The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:  Te Pai me te Whai Rawa o Tāmaki Māori:  Healty & Prosperous Tāmaki Māori

 

The Māngere Gateway Visitor Destination Programme directly contributes to The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau.  It seeks to celebrate and value and future-proof the sustainability of māori culture and heritage, to provide meaningful employment and build prosperous and strong communities. 

 

Specifically the Māngere Gateway Programme contributes to:

 

WHANAUNGATANGA  - DEVELOP VIBRANT COMMUNITIES

A city / region that caters for diverse Māori lifestyles and experiences

Māori communities and culturally vibrant across Tāmaki Makaurau

Māori have the skills to realise economic opportunities

RANGATIRATANGA - ENHANCE LEADERSHIP & PARTICIPATION

People engaged in their communities

Māori are active across all sectors of the economic community

Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

MANAAKITANGA - IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

Satisfaction with our environments and standard of living

Māori are earning income and returns that fulfil their lifestyle expectations

The mauri of te talao in Tāmaki Makaura is enhanced and restored for all people

WAIRUATANGA - PROMOTE DISTINCTIVE IDENTITY

Recognised sense of identity, uniqueness and belonging

Māori heritage of Tāmaki Makaurau is valued and protected

Māori businesses are uniquely identifiable, visible and prosperous

KAITIAKITANGA - ENSURE SUSTAINABLE FUTURES

Intergenerational reciprocity

Māori cultural wellbeing is future-proofed

Whānau wellbeing and resilience is strengthened

Māori businesses are improving and enhancing the quality of their people, asset and resource base

Māori are kaitiaki of the environment

 

 

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Rennie Homestead

The house known as Rennie Homestead, on a site of 8.9 hectares, is described in the Cultural Heritage Inventory (No. 2356) as a :…particularly well kept and unaltered Bay Villa” with the main reasons for scheduling being the “…two bays at right angles to each other and the decorations around the verandah…”  Built in 1905 for Thomas Morton Rennie by Jack Camplin, the house was sited on the Rennie farm in Ihumatao Road and was constructed of Kauri weatherboards and iron roofing.  The exterior is scheduled in the Auckland Council District Plan (Manukau Section), identification number 73. 

 

 

 

619 Oruarangi Road, Mangere

 

 

 

Legal Description

ALLOT 177 PARISH OF MANUREWA

Ward

Manukau

Local Board

Mangere-Otahuhu

Current Use

Residential House on large park

Business Owner

Auckland Council – Regional and Local Planning

Zone

Mangere Puhinui Rural Zone

Market Value

$2,740,000

Area

8.9031 Hectares

 

 

 

 

 

Rennie Homestead

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Appendix 1.4

 

Financial Performance

 

The summary Income and Expenditure forecast result are as follows.  It should be noted that the figures relating to financial performance are based on those for the Otuataua Stonefields visitor centre but have been reviewed in relation to the Rennie Homestead and no substantive change is envisaged. 

 

SUMMARY INCOME STATEMENT (‘000’s)

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

TOTAL REVENUE

$322

$765

$918

$1,064

$1,154

TOTAL DIRECT COSTS

$308

$468

$537

$559

$614

GROSS MARGIN

$14

$298

$381

$505

$540

TOTAL OTHER COSTS

$454

$529

$559

$575

$592

SURPLUS / (DEFICIT) EBITDA

-$440

-$231

-$178

-$70

-$52

Depreciation

$213

$213

$213

$213

$213

Interest expense

$228

$213

$197

$163

$204

SURPLUS / (DEFICIT) EBT

-$880

-$656

-$588

-$446

-$468

 

 

The financial position is forecast as follows:

 

FINANCIAL POSITION (‘000’s)

Y0

Y1

Y2

Y3

Y4

Y5

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visitor Centre Bldg

$3,000

$2,940

$2,880

$2,820

$2,760

$2,700

Operating Assets

$610

$458

$305

$153

$610

$458

Current Assets

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

TOTAL ASSETS

$3,610

$3,398

$3,185

$2,973

$3,370

$3,158

FUNDING

 

 

 

 

 

 

External Loan (by Council)

$3,610

$3,358

$3,105

$2,853

$3,210

$2,958

Retained earnings (After Depr  / Interest)

$0

-$880

-$1,536

-$2,124

-$2,570

-$3,038

Council funded shortfall (or Equity)

$0

$928

$737

$705

$604

$664

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL FUNDING

$3,610

$3,398

$3,185

$2,973

$3,370

$3,158

 

 

Operating assets are comprised as follows, written off over four years, and renewed at the fourth year at same estimated values.  Displays and fit-out are for an adequate (but not top end of the range) presentation. 

 

Indoor interpretation display

 

 

       120,000

Outdoor interpretation

 

 

         90,000

Fixtures and fittings fit out (info desk, display, café)

       200,000

Web development

 

 

 

         50,000

Server/ WiFi/ ICT

 

 

 

         50,000

Audi: i-phone/ i-pad audio program/ content development

       100,000

Total operating assets

 

 

 

 $     610,000

 

The immediate objective of the commercial activity of the Visitor Centre tour offerings and retail trading activity is to reach breakeven by about the 5th year, before considering depreciation and interest costs of funding.  This is considered a reasonable reflection of the balance between funding the private good and the public good objectives and risks.   At year 5 the forecast delivers an operating deficit of -$52,000 before depreciation and interest - close but not quite achieving breakeven.  Cumulative EBITDA for the 5 years is -$971,000.  Five year cumulative Net Deficit after depreciation and loan interest, is $-3.0m.

 

The forecasts are considered a ‘best fit’ set of assumptions and expectations.  Sensitivity analysis at the 5th year of operation is as follows:

 

·      Assume only 40% of year 5 visitors take a tour (vs.  45% in base case).  EBITDA deficit increases to -$72,000 (vs.  -$52,000 in base case)

 

·      Assume 50% take tours in the 5th year (vs.  45% in base case).  EBITDA deficit reduces to -$24,000 (vs.  -$52,000 in base case).

 

These two options suggest the rate of tour uptake is somewhat but not highly sensitive to an approximately 10% variance in tours uptake by the 5th year.

 

·      Assume visitors in the 5th year increase to 110,000 (base case 100,000) and those taking tours increase to 50% (base case 45%).  This results in an EBITDA surplus of $44,000 (base case-$52,000) and shows the combined benefit of increased tours and retail sales to increased visitors.  The assumption also demonstrates that breakeven is within 10% of additional arrivals participation at year 5.

 

·      Assume there is no retail activity (café, merchandise sales and booking fees).  In year 5 the EBITDA will be a deficit of -$319,000 (base case -$52,000).  This demonstrates the high importance on retail and tours working together to give the customer experience and commercial viability.  It must be noted that this scenario includes assumptions that if thee is no retail offering visitors will reduce by 20% (80,000 vs.  base case of 100,000) and tours by 10% (41% vs.  base case of 45%) if there is no retail offering.

 

The key assumptions used in the financial and business forecasts are given in below.  The figures have been calculated by Morrison Low & Associates based on the proposed asset, funding, volumes, pricing, services, pricing, timing and cost structures.  

 

Stonefields Base Case Summary_update 2012 02 23_Page_2Stonefields Base Case Summary_update 2012 02 23_Page_3

Summary Income Statement

 

 

 

Detailed Assumptions

 

 
 


Stonefields Base Case Summary_update 2012 02 23_Page_5

 

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Adoption of the Pukekohe Area Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/19286

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Auckland Development Committee for Auckland Council to adopt the Pukekohe Area Plan.

Executive summary

2.       In February 2012 the Auckland Future Vision Committee endorsed the sequence and co governance approach for the preparation of area plans. The first two area plans to be prepared were for Mangere-Otahuhu and for the Hibiscus and Bays. The second round comprises Otara-Papatoetoe and Devonport –Takapuna.

3.      The Franklin Area Plan is not currently scheduled to be prepared until later in the programme. Pukekohe is however identified within the Auckland Plan as one of two satellite towns that will accommodate some of Auckland’s growth over the next 30 years. Having regard to the need to shape and influence the extent of this growth, work commenced in late 2012 to prepare a Plan for Pukekohe and its surrounding hinterland (as distinct from the whole of the local board area). The plan area was largely determined by the extent of the proposed areas of growth / Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) set out in the draft (March 2013) Unitary Plan.

4.       In March 2013 a working group was established comprising the local Councillor and the Franklin Local Board to oversee the development of the Pukekohe Area Plan. Phase 1 identified a series of ‘influencers to growth’ which informed the initial phase of engagement. This took place in June/July 2013 and sought the community’s views on these influencers, together with some suggested changes to the proposed Unitary Plan zonings within the town. Views were also sought on the location of the RUB. Following this, nine key moves were developed together with initial proposals for the distribution and phasing of development within the Future Urban Zone (FUZ). A further round of engagement on these proposals took place in March/April of this year.

5.       Feedback from these two rounds of engagement informed the preparation of the draft area plan which contains key moves and actions to support delivery of the future growth in a planned way. The last phase of engagement was held in late July this year to inform the finalisation of the area plan. The Board agreed to a number of changes that were made following final engagement.

6.       Approval is sought from the Auckland Development Committee to adopt the final Pukekohe Area Plan included as Attachment A.

Recommendation

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      approves the adoption of the Pukekohe Area Plan.

Comments

7.       In February 2012 the Auckland Future Vision Committee endorsed the sequencing of area plans and also endorsed a co-governance approach to their development. The first two area plans to be prepared were for Mangere-Otahuhu and for the Hibiscus and Bays. The second round comprises Otara-Papatoetoe and Devonport–Takapuna.


8.       The Franklin Area Plan is not currently scheduled to be prepared until later in the Area Plan programme. Pukekohe is however identified within the Auckland Plan as one of two regional satellite towns that will accommodate a considerable amount of Auckland’s growth over the next 30 years. Its population is projected to double, rising from 21,000 in 2013 to 50,000 by 2040. There is predicted to be a consequential increase in employment opportunities, with an additional 9000 jobs being created.

9.       Having regard to the growth pressures and the need to shape the future development of the area, work commenced in late 2012 on a plan for Pukekohe and its surrounding hinterland including the adjacent settlements of Paerata, and Buckland. Unlike other area plans which are based upon local board boundaries, the plan area was set with reference to the extent of the proposed area of Future Urban Zone (FUZ) as provided for by the RUB, the area of land identified within the Unitary Plan for development within the next 30 years.

10.     In March 2013 a working group was established comprising the local Councillor and the local board to oversee the development of the Pukekohe Area Plan. The board agreed on a number of principles to guide growth:

·     Pukekohe to remain as a separate satellite town with a distinct identity to Auckland

·     Pukekohe’s western elite soils should be protected from growth

·     Support growth around one town centre and a number of local centres

·     Pukekohe needs a self-sustaining employment base to offer its residents job choice

·     Future employment focus should relate to new growth areas e.g south east Pukekohe and Paerata

·     Include Waikato as part of the growth and infrastructure planning

·     Respect cultural values and landscapes.

11.     The first phase of formal engagement in June/July 2013 sought feedback on the above principles, the key constraints that influenced the work and areas to be included within the RUB. Details were also provided of proposed Pukekohe Town Centre zonings, and heights as well as uses and conceptual proposals for other areas for development. The feedback from phase one was used to inform the priorities for growth, the notified UP zoning for the town, together with the line of the notified RUB.

12.    A series of key moves were subsequently developed and agreed with the local board in November 2013. These informed the second phase of engagement, which took place in March/April of this year. As part of this phase the opportunity was taken to consider potential land uses within the future urban zone. The last phase of engagement was held in late July this year to inform the finalisation of the area plan.

 

Key components of the Area Plan

 

13.     Area plans are driven by the Auckland Plan and are one mechanism used to implement its development strategy. The area plan seeks to deliver the Auckland Plan at a local level. It sets out a high level strategy for the staging and zoning of future growth areas around the town, what transport and infrastructure is required to enable this growth, how the local economy can be grown, how living standards can be improved for the people of Pukekohe and how the environment and places of significance can be protected. 


 

Key Moves

 

14.     The area plan promotes nine key moves. Key moves are outcomes that have a physical or spatial aspect and when realised will make a transformational contribution to making the area of Pukekohe and its surrounding areas a great place to live, work and visit. These contribute to achieving the vision for Auckland to be the world’s most liveable city. The key moves are detailed in Part B of the area plan and are summarised below:

 

·        Provide for growth in the Future Urban Zone

·        Enable at least 100ha of new business land

·        Electrification of the rail line from Papakura to Pukekohe (with a potential station at Paerata)

·        Improve accessibility and connectivity throughout Pukekohe and Paerata

·        Support land development around Pukekohe Train Station

·        Investigate tertiary education opportunities

·        Protect and enjoy Pukekohe Hill, Paerata Bluff and Pukekohe East Crater

·        Maintain and improve Pukekohe environmental quality and special ecological areas, including the Tutaenui and Whangapouri streams

·        Develop Town Centre Character Guidelines.

 

Prioritisation 

 

15.     The delivery of the key moves is supported by a project prioritisation schedule which is set out in the last section of the document. These projects will help transform Pukekohe over the next 30 years. The plan shows where work will be focussed and will support ongoing alignment between the Auckland Plan, Long Term Plan (LTP), Unitary Plan and projects of other infrastructure investors.

 

Community Engagement

 

16.     Three rounds of public engagement have been held to inform and shape the area plan. During the first phase of consultation approximately 600 people were engaged with at three evening events for stakeholders/directly affected landowners, two Saturday market events, three public open day events as well as meetings with CCOs. Ninety-six written responses were received. Approximately 100 people attended the March/April 2014 drop sessions with 34 written responses received. A similar number attended a drop in session during the last phase of engagement in late July this year. Changes to the area plan following the last round of engagement were agreed with the local board prior to the area plan’s finalisation. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     The area plan has been developed collaboratively with the local ward Councillor and the Franklin Local Board. The working group met on a regular basis to discuss aspirations, develop the influencers to growth and to establish and agree the key moves together with the way that the area plan can help to deliver on the outcomes and directions of the Auckland Plan. Key actions within the area plan have been aligned with those in the emerging local board plan.

 

18.     On 17 June 2014, the Franklin Local Board approved the draft area plan for final community engagement and delegated the authority to make final changes to the Chair and Deputy Chair prior to submission of the area plan to the Auckland Development Committee for adoption. 

Māori impact statement

19.     In developing the Pukekohe Area Plan, the team has engaged with representatives of Ngati Tamaoho, Ngati Te Ata, Te Akitai o Waiohua, the Huakina Development Trust and representatives of the Nga Hau e Wha marae. Input was also sought from Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki and Ngati Paoa. A series of engagements have been held as part of the development of the plan, including a number of individual hui in 2013 and 2014, a workshop at Nga Hau e Wha marae and an innovative approach where a hui was held on Pukekohe Hill with local iwi representatives. 

Implementation

20.     Area plans are a key mechanism to implement the Auckland Plan and enable greater level of detail in terms of outcomes and aspirations expected across the region. Area plans complement local board plans by providing a long term, comprehensive and integrated look at the local board area or a specific area - such as Pukekohe. The Pukekohe Area Plan aligns with the Unitary Plan and with the emerging local board plan and will inform future long term plans where facilities and items for capital investment may be required. The implementation and prioritisation actions in the area plan will inform and help to shape the forward work programmes for the council, council controlled organisations and other key delivery partners.

21.     The recommendation to adopt the final draft of the Pukekohe Area Plan is consistent with the council’s policies and strategies and does not trigger the significance policy. 

22.     The implementation of the actions contained within the area plan will require collaboration with other parts of council and council controlled organisations. This will require ongoing resource and staff commitment to integrate planning approaches and project management to coordinate activities. A number of delivery actions are currently unfunded and will need to compete with other projects in terms of prioritisation within the Long Term Plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pukekohe Area Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Craig Cairncross - Principal Planner

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014

 

Approval of Private Plan Change 34 - Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay - Auckland Council District Plan, North Shore Section

 

File No.: CP2014/22629

 

Purpose

1.       To seek a resolution approving Private Plan Change 34, Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay, enabling it to become operative.

Executive summary

2.       Private Plan Change 34 – Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay (PPC 34)  – has completed its statutory process and is ready for approval and operative status thereafter.

3.       PPC 34 is an ‘overlay’ of controls (to the Business Suburban 2 zone) which enable consent to be applied for (as a restricted discretionary activity) for up to 250 residential units in apartment and townhouse forms, in eight defined ‘footprints’ and to varying heights, around the Milford shopping mall site. The notification of any application is to be determined on a case by case basis under Section 95D of the Resource Management Act 1991.

4.       The private plan change request was first lodged in 2008, but then put on hold until 2010, and renotified in 2011. The Council hearing was in 2012, and the commissioners declined the request in February 2013. The applicant, Milford Centre Ltd, appealed this decision. The Environment Court subsequently adopted the plan change, but in a modified form, reducing the heights of the three tallest building ‘envelopes’ and making various other text changes. This outcome was similar to an alternative the Council had put forward, one which the Court commended the Council for proposing. In its final decision, the Court awarded nominal costs in favour of the Council and the Milford Residents’ Association.

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      approves Private Plan Change 34 to the North Shore section of the Auckland Council District Plan – Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay – pursuant to Clause 17 of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991.

b)      delegates to the Manager North West Planning the authority to complete the process to make Private Plan Change 34 to the North Shore section of the Auckland Council District Plan operative pursuant to Clauses 17 and 20 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

Comments

5.       PPC 34 enables more intensive forms of residential development to be developed on the Milford shopping mall site, in eight defined building footprints and to varying heights around the perimeter of the site (refer to Attachment A, and “Appendix 15P” at the end of the attachment).

6.       PPC 34 is an ‘overlay’ to the operative Business Suburban 2 zone, incorporating ‘Appendix 15P’ defining the building footprints and specifying maximum heights for apartment structures, and introducing new policies, rules and detailed assessment criteria. The overlay enables consent to be applied for (as a restricted discretionary activity) for up to 250 residential units in apartment and townhouse forms, to be built around the Milford shopping mall site, largely in the site’s existing parking areas. The notification of an application is to be determined on a case by case basis under Section 95D of the Resource Management Act 1991.

7.       The Environment Court, on appeal, adopted the plan change after making some key changes to the notified version of the plan change. These altered the allowable heights of the three tallest ‘building envelopes’ on the site. Envelope 1 (near Omana Road) was reduced from a height of RL63 to RL45, a reduction of approximately 6 storeys, to 10 or 11 storeys; Envelope 5 (near Milford Road) was reduced from RL59 to RL45, a reduction of approximately 5 storeys, to 8 storeys; and Envelope 3 (Omana near the roundabout) was reduced from RL38 to RL33, a reduction of approximately two floors to 6 or 7 storeys.

8.       The Court in its decision complemented the Council (and the Milford Residents’ Association in support) for putting forward a feasible ‘alternative’ to the appellant’s plan change (interim decision, para 127) – “We commend the Council’s leadership in developing the alternative”. It also commented that it “essentially reached the same decision as the Council Commissioners on the applicant’s proposal for much the same reasons”. But the Court noted that the commissioners “had no developed alternative to consider which could have led to a different outcome as it has for {the Court’s} decision”.

9.       The Court made what it described as ‘very small and nominal’ costs awards in favour of the Auckland Council and the Milford Residents’ Association, of $20,000 and $5,000 respectively. This arose because the appellant’s urban design experts lodged lengthy statements of evidence which the Court found to be unnecessary and unrelated to the key issues.

10.     PPC 34 was initially lodged with the North Shore City Council in 2008. When notified, it attracted a large number of submissions in opposition, and then went on hold awaiting further information. It was reactivated in 2010 and renotified in September 2011. A hearing commenced in July 2012 and was completed in October. The Council’s hearing commissioners rejected the plan change by a decision publicly notified on 28 February 2013. The applicant, Milford Centre Ltd, then appealed the decision to the Environment Court and various affected (section 274) parties joined the proceedings. The Court hearing occurred in November 2013, and the Court’s interim decision, adopting the plan change in a modified form, was issued on 12 February 2014. The final Court decision as to wording changes and costs is dated 1 May 2014. There was then some dialogue between the applicant and the Council as to the wording of the amended notification rules, but no further wording changes were requested of the Court as a result of these discussions.

11.     All steps in the statutory process have now been completed, and the plan change can be approved, enabling it to become operative. It will become operative on a date coinciding with the publication of the amended District Plan pages. This final administrative step is delegated to the relevant manager.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     There is no provision within the Act for local boards to have any role at this final stage of processing a plan change.

Māori impact statement

13.     This report addresses a procedural matter, the final step in the Resource Management Act’s plan change approval process. The following iwi groups were notified, and no submissions were received during the period: Ngati Paoa Whanau Trust; Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority Te Runanga O Ngati Whatua, Ngati Whatua O Orakei Maori Trust Board; Hauraki Maori Trust Board Te Hao O Ngati Whatua; Te Tinana O Ngati Whatua.

Implementation

14.     The plan change will become operative at the time other District Plan pages are updated and published, within a few weeks of the resolution.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

PPC 34 Milford Intensive Residential Development Overlay - Final

85

     

Signatories

Authors

Ewen Patience - Principal Planner, Area Planning and Policy North

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Roger Blakeley - Chief Planning Officer

 


Auckland Development Committee

16 October 2014