I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Great Barrier Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                  

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 8 October 2014

10.00am

Claris Conference Centre
19 Whangaparapara Road
Claris
Great Barrier Island

 

Great Barrier Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Izzy Fordham

 

Deputy Chairperson

Susan Daly

 

Members

Jeff Cleave

 

 

Judy Gilbert

 

 

Christina Spence

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Guia Nonoy

Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

 

30 September 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6218

Email: Guia.Nonoy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                        5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                      5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                              5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                              5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                         5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                   5

7          Petitions                                                                                                     5

8          Deputations                                                                                                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                            5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                      6

12        Adoption of the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2014                7

13        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                     59

14        Central Facility Partnerships Committee                                              77

15        Draft Community Grants Policy                                                             79

16        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)                                                                                           89

17        Auckland Transport Report – October 2014 – Great Barrier Island   93

18        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                     153

19        Chairperson's report                                                                             163

20        Board Members' Reports                                                                      171

21        Reports Requested/Pending                                                                189

22        Correspondence                                                                                    193

23        Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Proceedings                           197  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairperson IM Fordham will welcome everyone in attendance. Member JC Cleave will lead a karakia.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to speak had been received.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Adoption of the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22605

 

  

Purpose

1.      To adopt the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.      Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

3.      The Aotea Great Barrier draft Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014.  The Great Barrier Local Board considered the submissions from the Special Consultative Procedure at its deliberations meeting in September.

4.      The Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan is attached to this agenda.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      adopts the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan

b)      delegates to the Chair to approve any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

 

Comments

Background

5.      The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

6.      Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·        makes decisions on local activities and projects

·        provides input into regional strategies and policies

·        works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

7.      The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

8.      The local board is required to use the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP) to consult on the draft local board plan. The SCP was held from 7 July to 6 August 2014. There were 77 submissions on the draft local board plan and nine submitters attended the plan hearing held on 28 August 2014.

Consideration

9.      The local board plan has been developed by considering local issues as well as a range of strategic issues and regional strategies and policies.  Advice from subject matters experts, community views and public submissions has also been important in developing the plan.

10.    The local board deliberated on the SCP at its meeting on 28 August 2014 and noted that there had been very strong support for the direction the board had signaled in its draft plan, as reflected both in submissions and other informal feedback from the community.

11.    The changes from the draft plan are relatively minor and in some cases reflect further information that has come to light since the draft was written. Another factor has been the funding constraints which are being considered as Auckland Council develops its 10-year budget and the need for the board to review some of its proposed projects and programme to ensure it is realistic.

12.    We think that this approach is the key to addressing the issues we face in living and working here such as health, housing, education, communications, connectivity, funding, assisting our youth in going forward and addressing the needs of our elderly. Everyone needs to work together if we are to succeed. We will also work closely with the Ngati Rehua Ngatiwai ki Aotea Trust Board on the aspirations we hold in common. The Department of Conservation is also a key partner in our island’s future.

13.    The plan is attached to this agenda.

Local board views and implications

14.    The local board’s views have driven the development of the plan attached to this report.

Māori impact statement

15.    The local board plan contributes to improving wellbeing in Māori communities, as well as the community in general.

16.    In developing its plan, the Great Barrier Local Board placed considerable emphasis on its relationship with Aotea mana whenua Ngati Rehua Ngatiwai ki Aotea, its aspirations for Aotea Great Barrier and areas where the local board and Ngati Rehua Ngatiwai ki Aotea shared common views and aspirations. The local board plan reflects this approach and signals the intent for both parties to work closely together.

Implementation

17.    The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities. The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan

9

 

Signatories

Author

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 



















































Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/22603

 

  

Purpose

1.      This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.      Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.      The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.      The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.      The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.      The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.      The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      determine if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

Consideration

Significance

8.      This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Local board views and implications

9.      The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.    The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.    There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

61

     

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

















Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Central Facility Partnerships Committee

 

File No.: CP2014/22905

 

  

This report was not available at the time the agenda was sent to print and will be circulated prior to the meeting.

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Draft Community Grants Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/22064

 

  

Purpose

1.      To seek local board feedback on the draft Community Grants Policy (Attachment A) and provide an overview of public feedback on the policy for members’ consideration. The report also briefly outlines the key components of the draft policy, proposes a transitional approach to establishing a multi-board grants programme, and discusses the budgetary implications of the policy.

Executive summary

2.      On 3 July 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) endorsed a new draft Community Grants Policy (CGP) for local board engagement and public consultation.

3.      The draft CGP has been developed to guide the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders. It covers grants for community development, arts and culture, events, sport and recreation, environment and heritage.

4.      The draft CGP proposes a new community grants programme aligned to Auckland Council’s governance structure, with:

a)      a local component (21 local grants programmes and a ‘multi-board’ grants programme, governed by local boards and aligned with local board plans), and

b)      a regional component (six regional grants programmes aligned to strategic directions in the Auckland Plan, with governing body decision-making).

5.      Community grants are a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and the council’s core regional strategies, policies and plans. The draft CGP provides a regional framework for grant-making by Auckland Council, while ensuring flexibility for local boards to shape their own grants programme to respond to the specific needs and priorities of their communities. To reflect this, and give effect to local boards’ decision-making role in relation to local grants, staff propose that each local board be supported to develop an individual schedule to the CGP that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

6.      The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. However to achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff propose that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year. Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same.

7.      Once adopted, the CGP will replace an interim community funding programme that has operated since amalgamation, consisting of more than 50 local and legacy ‘city-wide’ grants schemes and a small number of regional grants schemes. The community grants budgets inherited from the legacy councils are currently over-subscribed, especially at the regional level. To fully implement the CGP and deliver on the transformational shifts, staff propose additional investment of $2 million p.a. be considered through the Long-term Plan process 2015-2025. This will increase the amount of funding for regional grants to a more viable level, without reducing the existing funding envelope for local and multi-board grants.

8.      Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October. Public feedback on the CGP was invited between 14 July and 11 August, and a summary of this input is provided as Attachments B.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Endorses the Community Grants Policy as a regional framework for the Auckland Council community grants programme, noting that the local board will be supported to develop an individual schedule to the policy that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

b)      Provides feedback on any policy provisions of specific interest or concern to the local board, for consideration during the review and finalisation of the Community Grants Policy.

c)      Indicate whether they have an interest in participating in a ‘multi-board cluster’ with other local boards to consider jointly supporting projects and activities of mutual benefit, noting that if this is agreed:

i)        staff will work with the local board to explore and agree possible cluster options;

ii)       staff would then work with participating local boards to agree funding priorities and terms of reference for the cluster;

iii)      participating local boards will continue to hold their funds separately within the cluster, and can choose whether or not to allocate funds towards individual grant applications on a case-by-case basis.

Comments

Background

9.      A discussion paper outlining the key elements, issues and options for a new Community Grants Policy (CGP) was work-shopped with local boards during March and April 2014. Workshops were also held to test draft approaches with the governing body and key stakeholders in May. A summary of the feedback received is provided as Attachment D.

10.    Feedback on the discussion paper informed the preparation of a draft CGP, which was reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) on 3 July 2014. The Committee endorsed the draft CGP for local board engagement and public consultation.

11.    Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October.

Summary of draft Community Grants Policy approach

12.    The draft Community Grants Policy proposes a framework for a new Auckland Council community grants programme with two main components: a local grants programme (incorporating multi-board grants) and a regional grants programme.

Local grants programme

13.    Local grants are a key tool local boards can use to implement the vision set out in their local board plans, and provide a direct, tangible way of supporting local community aspirations and responding to local needs and opportunities.

14.    At the local level the CGP is not intended to be prescriptive, but rather to provide a framework and guidelines that will assist local boards to deliver best practice in grant-making. This approach responds directly to feedback received from local boards during consultation on the draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012.

15.    The draft CGP proposes that each local board is supported to operate their own local grants programme under the broader umbrella of the CGP, and can award grants to groups and organisations, projects, services, events and activities that benefit residents in their local board area. Boards will be supported to develop specific funding priorities for their grants programme, drawing on the priorities set out in their local board plans.

16.    Two grant schemes are proposed to operate through the local grants programme:

a)      Fast Response Local Grants (up to $1,000)

Applicants for Fast Response Local Grants will complete simplified application and accountability processes. Funding rounds are proposed to be held more regularly, and timeframes for decision-making and payment will be kept as short as possible to ensure responsiveness to the community.

b)      Local Grants (over $1,000)

Local Grants are for larger amounts and are proposed to be distributed only once or twice per year, to enable the local board to consider how best to allocate their limited grants budget to deliver the local outcomes they are seeking. Applicants for Local Grants will complete application and accountability processes proportionate to the size of the grant they are seeking. Grants can be ‘one-off’ awards, or a commitment to fund over multiple years (up to a full political term).

Local board grants programme schedule

17.    A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June 2014 to provide an overview of the proposed policy and discuss next steps ahead of reporting to the Committee.

18.    At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Although the policy does provide sufficient flexibility for local boards to exercise this decision-making, it was felt this authority needed to be made more explicit. Following further discussion, it was agreed that this could be achieved by working with local boards to shape the structure and intent of their individual local grants programmes. Once the local board has agreed and adopted their programme, this can become a schedule to the policy. This approach was endorsed by local board chairs at the Chairs Forum on 28 July.

19.    Each individual local board grants programme schedule could include:

a)      Outcomes sought through the local grants programme (driven by local board plans) Any specific local funding priorities

b)      The types of funding opportunities available through the local grants programme

c)       Any specific eligibility criteria or exclusions that are additional to the baseline provisions of the CGP

d)      Any other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

20.    Staff will work with local boards between February and April 2015 to develop and adopt their local grants programme schedules, and an implementation plan will be prepared for each local board to sit alongside the schedule (outlining key operational aspects such as the number and timing of funding rounds).

21.    Local boards will be able to review and update their schedules over time as strategic priorities and budgets change.

Proposed multi-board grants programme

22.    The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. These clusters will invite applications from, and award grants to organisations, services, projects, events and activities that benefit residents across their combined areas. Local boards could participate in more than one cluster.

23.    Multi-board clusters may be:

a)      Groups of local boards with contiguous boundaries, for example southern local boards wanting to support events in the Southern Initiative area

b)      Local boards that share a common characteristic or interest, for example high populations of older people, or bordering the Hauraki Gulf

c)       Local boards that want to address a common issue, for example by supporting employment programmes targeting marginalised young people.

24.    Staff will engage with local boards to scope and establish appropriate clusters, which may be in response to a need or opportunity identified by their communities, or to deliver strategic outcomes they have mutually identified in their local board plans. Once local boards have instigated (or agreed to participate in) a multi-board cluster, council staff will work with the participating boards to understand the outcomes sought, and design a grants programme to deliver these.

25.    Applicants seeking support from a multi-board cluster will make one combined application to all participating local boards in the cluster, will receive a single decision notification and grant award, and will submit one accountability report when their funded activities have been completed.

Implementation of the multi-board grants programme

26.    To achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff proposed that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year.

27.    Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same. Participating local boards would agree new funding priorities and terms of reference with the other local boards in that cluster, have discretion over the amount of their local funding to set aside for considering multi-board applications, and support applications on a case-by-case basis.

28.    This phased approach would enable a multi-board grants programme to launch in 2015 alongside the new local grants programmes with minimum additional preparation, given that the joint funding committees and subcommittees have some existing structure in place that could be used as a guide (e.g. delegated local board representatives, approximate schedule of funding rounds, and an existing pool of applicants). Staff could work with these existing multi-board clusters to develop appropriate funding priorities for the transitional year. This approach would be a good test for the model and enable refinements to the process to be agreed with local boards, while minimising any initial impact on community organisations.

29.    The current geographical clusters of local boards (i.e. the joint funding committees aligned to the former city and district council areas in the Auckland region) are:

a)      Northern cluster: Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipatiki, Upper Harbour (Northern Metro Subcommittee) Hibiscus and Bays, Rodney (Former RDC Subcommittee)

b)      Southern cluster: Franklin, Howick, Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe, Papakura (note that suitable arrangements would need to be developed with the southern local boards, as they have not been operating as a cluster)

c)       Western cluster: Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

d)      Central cluster: Albert-Eden, Great Barrier (optional), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke, Waitemata

30.    In addition, if boards wish to establish and resource other clusters, this could also be supported where feasible.

31.    If this approach is agreed, the transitional arrangements would be reviewed prior to the financial year commencing 1 July 2016. At this time, the clusters could either continue, or additional and/or alternative clusters could be established.

Regional grants programme

32.    It is proposed that the governing body of Auckland Council, through its various committees, will award grants to regionally significant organisations, services, events and activities that benefit residents across Auckland. At the regional level the CGP proposes six activity-focused grants programmes aligned to strategic directions outlined in the Auckland Plan.

33.    The proposed regional grants programmes are:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme

b)      Regional Community Development Grants Programme

c)       Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme

d)      Regional Events Grants Programme

e)      Regional Historic Heritage Grants Programme

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

34.    Each of the proposed regional grants programmes is conceived and will be promoted as a key mechanism to implement the relevant regional strategy, policy or plan (e.g. the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme will support the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan). These regional strategies enable – or will enable – the council to determine where it will target its resources in the medium to long term.

35.    The draft CGP proposes that most of the regional grants programmes provide for two distinct grant types: single-year project grants, for standalone initiatives, and multi-year strategic relationship grants. Project grants of varying size will be awarded through a contestable process at least once per year, while the strategic relationship grants will enable the council to enter multi-year funding relationships with a small number of organisations operating at the regional level. The majority of organisations receiving strategic relationship grants will have an existing relationship with Auckland Council and be able to demonstrate a clear track record of achievement at this level.

36.    To be considered eligible for regional grants, applicants must be able to show that their service, project or activity:

a)      Primarily addresses regionally determined priorities, and it would therefore be unreasonable to expect local boards to meet the cost, and is:

b)      Regional in terms of scale and/or significance, and/or is

c)       Regional in terms of impact and/or reach.

37.    The regional grants programmes are described in schedules to the Draft Community Grants Policy, as it is anticipated these schedules may be reviewed and updated over time as strategic priorities change.

Feedback from public consultation

38.    Public consultation on the CGP was undertaken from 14 July – 17 August 2014 and included:

a)      provision of accessible and easy-read versions of the policy summary document

b)      distribution of information packs and fliers at all Auckland Council service centres, community centres, local board offices and libraries

c)       provision of information via ‘Shape Auckland’ and a dedicated webpage on the Auckland Council website

d)      advertisement in ‘Our Auckland’

e)      advertisement through community and ethnic newspapers

f)       promotion via Council’s social media channels (e.g. Facebook)

g)      provision of a dedicated community assistance email account to allow people to make enquiries and submit feedback

h)      distribution of online survey to the following audiences:

·        those who provided feedback during previous consultations

·        all community grant applicants since amalgamation

·        community networks via Council’s advisory teams (CDAC, PSR, IE)

·        other stakeholder networks as appropriate

i)        provision of hard copy consultation material and submission forms by request

j)        five public workshops (Rodney, north, central, west and south)

k)       local board public workshops as requested (Orakei and Maungakiekie-Tamaki)

l)        two Mataawaka hui (west and south)

m)     presentations at southern and northern mana whenua hui and a regional environmental sector hui.

39.    At the regional local board briefing on 30 June, some members expressed interest in seeing feedback from their communities prior to providing their own feedback on the policy. To enable this staff agreed to extend formal reporting to local boards so that a summary of public input could be provided.  This is now attached for the local board’s consideration (Attachments B).

Financial implications of the CGP

40.    The CGP will be a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and core regional strategies, policies and plans, and it is important that there is sufficient funding to effectively resource the new programme for this purpose.

41.    The legacy grants budgets inherited at amalgamation (or created subsequently) total c. $8.3 million p.a., or around $6 per head of population, with the majority supporting groups and activities that are either local or multi-board (via the legacy ‘city-wide’ funds). These funds are already oversubscribed – on average the value of requests is three times the available budget, and in some cases considerably more.

42.    Of the total community grants budget, c. $2.4 million is currently targeting regional groups and activities. Current baseline funding for each of the regional grants programmes is as follows:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture grants programme (c. $650,000)

b)      Regional Community Development grants programme (No regional budget: all current grant schemes for this activity are administered by local boards, with some regional groups receiving interim allocations via the Annual Plan)

c)       Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants programme (up to $545,000)

d)      Regional Events grants programme ($400,000)

e)      Regional Historic Heritage grants programme (up to $345,000)

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme (c. $500,000)

43.    The existing grants programmes at this level are not able to meet current demand, and in some cases include funding tagged to specific recipients, or funding for regional outcomes that is being provided through local grants schemes. While contestability will be introduced for all funding schemes, there is little ‘headroom’ to support new applicants or address emerging priorities. For example, there is an expectation that a number of major events dropped from ATEED’s portfolio will now need to be funded through the Regional Events Fund from 2015/16, at an additional cost of $170,000 against the existing budget of $400,000.

44.    Many regional organisations have been waiting for implementation of the new CGP to access regional funding, and in some cases their need has become so urgent that the governing body has allocated emergency funding through the annual plan as an interim measure.

45.    Additional investment in the regional grants programme of $2 million p.a. is proposed as an option for governing body consideration through the LTP process 2015-2025. Staff considers a minimum of between $600,000 and $800,000 is required for each regional grants programme if the CGP is to support meaningful progress against the council’s stated priorities in these activity areas and deliver on the transformational shifts. The level of investment requested will support an average fund size of $750,000 (the exact distribution of budget between the six programmes would be proposed alongside the final policy).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

46.    The design of the new grants programme proposed in the CGP has been strongly influenced by local board feedback received during consultation on the first draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012, and during more recent engagement.

47.    A discussion paper on the new CGP was prepared in February 2014 and discussed in specially convened local board cluster workshops in March 2014, which were attended by representatives of all local boards. The paper outlined the basic elements of the proposed grants programme and sought feedback on specific policy issues. A summary of the feedback received during the cluster workshops and how this has been reflected in the draft CGP is provided as Attachment D.

48.    A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June to provide a further overview of the proposed policy and to discuss next steps.  At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Staff met with local board chairs on 28 July and agreed a process to address this concern (see ‘Local board grants programme schedule’ paras 16-20).

49.    Staff attended workshops with local boards during July and August 2014 to discuss the draft policy and support the provision of formal local board feedback requested via this report.

Māori impact statement

50.    Community grants have the potential to make a significant impact on Māori through supporting the outcomes in the Māori Plan. Under the proposed principles for the CGP, all grants programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing, as outlined in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and regional strategies, policies and plans, by providing grants to organisations delivering Māori outcomes locally and regionally.

51.    There is already some dedicated funding for Māori outcomes at the regional level, currently focused on papakainga and marae development across Auckland. Te Waka Angamua will be working with mana whenua and mataawaka to explore how best to target this and/or other funding allocated for Māori outcomes in future, e.g. determining eligibility criteria and the most appropriate forums for priority-setting and decision-making.

52.    During workshops in March/April 2014, staff discussed options with local boards for creating dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level, or embedding Māori outcomes as a ‘standing priority’ across all proposed grants programmes at the local and regional level. Local boards expressed interest in dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level if regional funding was made available to them for this purpose, but otherwise felt it was more appropriate for any targeted spending to be at each local board’s discretion, driven by local board plan priorities. The CGP’s intent to align grant-making to strategic priorities should ensure funding is allocated to groups and projects delivering Māori outcomes.

53.    The current interim funding programme includes one grants scheme dedicated to Māori outcomes (the Marae Development Fund in the former Manukau City area), and this particular scheme, along with all others operating through the interim programme, will cease to operate once a new CGP is adopted. Regional marae development funding may provide some capacity to meet this need going forward, and Te Waka Angamua will release details of the application and decision-making process for that funding for the next financial year.

54.    However local boards also have full discretion to provide grants for any purpose that benefits their local communities, and this is likely to include supporting marae especially where grants have been provided for this purpose in the past. The draft CGP provides flexibility for decision-makers to award grants to community groups that are not formally constituted charitable organisations, where appropriate, and staff understand this should increase access to funding for some Māori organisations, such as marae, who may not previously have been eligible.

Implementation

Budget alignment

55.    Existing funding arrangements and grants schemes were rolled over for the 2014/2015 financial year. If adopted, implementation of the CGP will begin from 1 July 2015 to align with the new LTP 2015-2025 and implementation of the Local Board Funding Policy (LBFP). This will enable the finalised budget structures to be implemented alongside the policy.

56.    Existing grants budgets categorised as ‘local’ will form part of the overall locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget allocated to local boards through the LBFP formula. Local boards will then set aside a budget to support their local grants programme from their LDI funding envelope through the Local Board Agreement process.

57.    Staff will propose an overall budget structure for the new grants programme when the final policy is tabled with the committee in November 2014, outlining the treatment of any inherited (and new) community grants budgets and funding arrangements that will support the CGP going forward. This should enable staff to take into account the outcome of LTP deliberations in the second half of 2014 and present budget structure options accordingly.

Operationalisation of the CGP

58.    The draft CGP has been developed with substantial input from the relevant operational departments to ensure that it is able to be delivered.

59.    The proposed implementation timeframe should provide operational teams with adequate time to design supporting systems and business processes, and to produce public-facing collateral that outlines the structure and requirements of the new grants programmes in detail. This will include:

a)      Working with all decision-makers to schedule an annual calendar of funding rounds for each level of the programme

b)      Working with local boards to assist them in developing their local board grants programme schedules

c)       Producing new promotional materials for the council website, marketing and promotion through media channels and to support public information sessions

d)      Designing new online application forms and guidelines for prospective applicants

e)      Ensuring support will be available for prospective applicants requiring assistance or capacity building to access the grants programmes, working with specialist colleagues where appropriate

f)       Developing business processes and templates to enable consistent assessment and reporting to elected members, and to support their decision-making

g)      Updating funding agreements, accountability forms and other legal documentation to ensure they are fit-for-purpose, and developing processes to deal with any grant recipients in breach of their agreements

h)      Ensuring payments processes and associated financial controls are robust, efficient and fit-for-purpose.

60.    If the CGP is adopted on schedule towards the end of 2014, grant applicants / recipients will also have more than six months to prepare for the changeover to the new policy and manage any implications. Staff will work with previously funded organisations to support them to access the new grants programmes during subsequent years, and provide advice to elected members if there is a need to consider transitional arrangements in individual cases.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Community Grants Policy (Under Separate Cover)

 

bView

Summary of feedback from public consultation (Under Separate Cover)

 

cView

Key feedback provided during political engagement (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Author

Rebekah Lauren - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22636

 

  

Purpose

1.      To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.      The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.      Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.      A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.      Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.      There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.      However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.      As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.      The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.    The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      Note that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

Comments

Local board feedback

11.    To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.    Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.    Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·        Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·        Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·        Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·        Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·        Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·        More public art outside the city centre

·        Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·        Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·        Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.    The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.    Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.    A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.    A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.    Key themes from the public consultation were:

·        The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·        Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·        Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·        Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·        A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.    Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.    Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.    The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.    As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·      The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·      The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.    Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.    The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

Next steps

25.    Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.    The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.    Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.    One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.    Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board feedback summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

bView

Submissions report (Under Separate Cover)

 

cView

Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan - full plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebecca Kruse - Strategy Analyst

Maree Mills - Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Report – October 2014 – Great Barrier Island

 

File No.: CP2014/22478

 

  

Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to respond to local board requests on transport–related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive summary

2.           This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Great Barrier Island Local Board and its community, matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector, and relevant Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the board and community.

3.           In particular, this report provides and update on;

·     Local Board Transport Capital Fund

·     Public Transport Funding

·     Local Board Transport Capital Fund - changes

·     Dust Suppressant

·     Three-year Work Programme Workshops

·     Up-date on previous Resolutions

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      receives the Auckland Transport Report – October 2014

Comments

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

4.           At the Local Board meeting on the 12 March 2014 the Board were provided with a list of potential Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects.

5.           The below table outlines an up-date as to decisions by the Board and on the progress of the projects. 

Table 1: Great Barrier Local Board project update for Board approval:

Resolution # GBI/2013/234 (2013)

Resolution # GBI/2014/20 (April 2014)

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

221

Mulberry Grove School Footpath

Shoal Bay Rd

·      ROC estimated Option A at $83,000

·      ROC estimated Option B at $64,000

 

There are two options as there is a boundary issue along the school frontage.

·      Option “A” is to build a path that would encroach onto the school property, requiring an easement from Ministry of Ed

·      Option “B” is a new footpath within the road reserve of which would require widening on the north side

 

Board has instructed this project is now not required, as the pedestrians are now routed behind the school.

However AT safety team is implementing speed calming device’s either side of the school at no cost to the Board.

 

211

Hector Sanderson Road

Broken the 1.7km into sections, “A” to “K”

·      “A” ROC estimated at $24,000

·      “B” ROC estimated at $6,000

·      “C” ROC estimated at $41,000

·      “D” ROC estimated at $63,000

·      “E” ROC estimated at $4,700

·      “F” ROC estimated at $36,000

·      “G”ROC estimated at $3,500

·      “H”ROC estimated at $58,000

·      “I”  ROC estimated at $13,000

·      “J” ROC estimated at $59,000

·      “K”ROC estimated at $53,000

·      Total ROC for project estimated at $361,200

 

1.7km stretch of Footpaths

The ROC does not include;

·      Resource, tree and building consent costs

·      Cost fluctuations

·      Land Purchase/lease agreements

 

Board approved in principle, working with SLIP’s and frame Group on design.

 

Resolution GBI/2014/63 (15 May 2014)

“The design element of the project will be led by the Local Parks and SLIP’s project team”

 

Awaiting direction from SLIP team

222

Fitzroy Wharf parking

·      ROC – Unable to determine at present

 

Auckland Transport is still looking at options; every option investigated to date suggests huge costs for the benefit of a few cars.

The area is very short of available space.

 

4 Parking spaces were identified, however the wall above these spaces slipped, forcing a reconsideration of location

 

This car park extension has been put on hold until the slip have been repaired, there are rubbish bins currently occupying the proposed new car park spaces and these will be relocated once slip work carried out.

Note: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost)

Public Transport Funding

Resolution # GBI/2014/62 (15 May 2014)

6.      At the Local Board meeting on the 15 May 2014, the Board made a resolution in that, “it request that Auckland Transport consider airline and ferry services to Great Barrier being made part of the wider Public Transport system which is considered to be included in the public transport operating model (PTOM), with these services being included in subsidies similar to those afforded to passengers on the isthmus, to address the prohibitive costs of travel for island residents”.

7.      Air transportation is not included as part of the Land Transport Management Acts 2003 definition of the land transport system and is specifically excluded from the definition of public transport.

8.      As Auckland Transport’s purpose is to “….contribute to an effective, efficient and safe Auckland land transport system in the public interest” it is concluded that Auckland Transport has no ability to intervene as regards to air travel.

9.      Regarding ferry services, the existing regular ferry service provided by Sealink travel group is an exempt service. It is operated fully commercially with no subsidy support.

10.    Due to this there is no contractual relationship between Sealink and Auckland Transport and, the service has not been identified in the Regional Public Transport Plan as being integral to the Auckland public transport network, therefore Auckland Transport is unable to fund an exempt service.

11.    Given that a commercial service is available and that Auckland Transport is unable to fund or regulate an exempt service, Auckland Transport is unable to provide for fare reduction for Great Barrier residents.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund – Changes

12.    The Auckland Council Infrastructure Committee has agreed to changes proposed by Auckland Council and Auckland Transport relating to the eligibility of projects funded under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

13.    Up until now the eligibility of projects has been guided by a March 2013 decision of the former Strategy and Finance Committee, which specifically precluded Auckland Transport from using the LBTCF to undertake works outside the road corridor.

14.    A number of local boards felt that this rule created unnecessary rigidity in the use of the fund.

15.    Earlier this year the Budget Committee re-examined the issue and referred it to the Infrastructure Committee for a decision.

16.    On 3 September 2014, the Infrastructure Committee resolved to allow works funded by the LBTCF to be undertaken on Council or CCO controlled land outside the road corridor, providing the body controlling the land was also in agreement with the proposal.

17.    This is expected to have the greatest application on land controlled by Auckland Council parks, where in particular walking and cycling infrastructure that connects with the Auckland Cycle network or local Board plans will be able to be funded.

18.    For every project that is undertake outside the road corridor, a specific agreement with the agency controlling the land will be required, covering the ownership of the asset (this will usually be transferred to the agency controlling the land by Auckland Transport) and the budget from which on-going maintenance costs will be sourced. (usually this will be covered within the budget of the agency controlling the land).

Dust Suppressant

19.    Based on numerous requests from several rural Local Boards, Auckland Transport has carried out investigation into the use of dust suppressions and associated trials.

20.    Historically where budgets and circumstances allowed, District, Local and Regional Councils have used waste oil products on unsealed roads as a form of dust suppression.

21.    This practice was ceased, several years ago due to environmental impacts of the waste oils on the surrounding water ways, flora and fauna.    

22.    Since the cessation of this technique councils throughout New Zealand have carried research and trials to find a cost effective, efficient solution, of which includes the following products;

·        Boresperse CA

·        Dust-Loc

·        Glycerol

·        Graded Crushed Limestone

·        Gravel Lock

·        Otta seal Technique

·        PS30mm Metal/Clay

·        Rainstorm

·        Waste Oil

·        Weslig 120

 

23.    All of these products have been proved to be ineffective or cost prohibitive.

24.    However, the most promising results came from a 2004 trial of the Otta seal technique in various locations in New Zealand that showed that this product may be the best available dust suppression agent available to the New Zealand market.

25.    A research trial was proposed to, and funded by Land Transport New Zealand to set up four trial sites around New Zealand to compare the performance and life cycle cost of the Otta seal with waste oil and other dust minimisation techniques.

26.    In spite of environmental issues, waste oil was used in this research, as it has been widely regarded as the most cost-effective dust minimisation treatment for unsealed roads in New Zealand, and its use was still allowed by a number of territorial local authorities throughout the country at the time.

27.    The research concluded that the Otta seal is the most effective dust minimisation technique available, and the most cost-effective treatment based on life cycle costing, of flat roads with no complications. (The report also concludes that the use of waste oil as a dust minimisation treatment should be banned.)

28.    However subsequent trials in 2012 by the Whangarei District Council revealed this product did not work sufficiently well.

29.    Auckland Transport has since interrogated the research and has concluded that when comparing the cost of the treatment with current day practices and cost of on-going maintenance this produce was deemed cost prohibitive at this time.

30.    Attached is the research associated to the above;

·        Attachment “A” NZ Transport Agency research report 368

·        Attachment “B” Synopsis of Dust Suppressant trials (Northland)

Three-year Work Programme Workshops

31.    Auckland Transport will be work shopping the organisation’s programme within local board areas for the reminder of the 2014-15 financial year, and where information is available for 2015-16 and 2016-17 years.

32.    The workshops are scheduled for the scheduled for September/October 2014.

33.    Lists of capital expenditure and maintenance schedules will be provided and discussed on the workshop date.

Update on August 2014 resolutions;

34.    On the 13 August 2014 the Great Barrier local Board made the following resolution;

II.  Request a response from Auckland Transport on the following matters at the September 2014 business meeting which are not included in the officer’s report;

i.     An update on the speed limits project.

ii.     Further advise on the use of dust suppressant products, including the basis of statements that the product is cost prohibitive, and noting statements at the 28 July budget committee workshop from Auckland transport Chief Executive David Warburton that it was investigating this proposal.

III. An update on the Mulberry Grove traffic calming project.

IV. An update on Okupu Wharf re upgrades or replacement with pontoon.

V. An update on the Port Fitzroy wharf car park extension proposal.

VI. Proposals relating to fish passage provision with culvert repairs and replacement in the north, resulting from the storm.


35.              Auckland Transport update;

I.     Auckland Transport legislative team is working on this and an up-date is expected in November/December 2014.

II.    Dust suppressant, (Separate item above).

III.   Previously reported on.

IV.   Wharf Infrastructure and Facilities Manager will present at October workshop.

V.    Previously reported on.

VI.   Previously reported on.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

36.    The board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Māori impact statement

37.    No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

General

38.    The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy. All programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation

39.    All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

NZ Transport Agency research report 368

99

bView

Synopsis of Dust Suppressant trials (Northland)

151

     

Signatories

Author

Ivan Trethowen – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 





















































Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22901

 

  

Purpose

1.      This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive summary

2.      The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.      An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.      Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.      Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.      The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.      The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.      The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.      Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.    No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Note the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.    Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.    The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.    Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.    A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.    Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.    This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.    Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.    Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.    Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.    No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Māori impact statement

21.    This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.    The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.    The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline (2014-2015)

161

     

Signatories

Author

Helgard Wagener - Manager Policies & Bylaws

Authoriser

Warren Maclennan - Manager Planning - North/West, Regional & Local Planning

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2014/22036

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for the chairperson to update the Board on the projects and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         Receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chairperson Izzy Fordham's report

165

 

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 






Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2014/22035

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

a)         That the report of Board Member Susan Daly be received.

b)         That the report of Board Member Jeff Cleave be received.

c)         That the report of Board Member Judy Gilbert be received.

d)         That the report of Board Member Christina Spence be received.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Board member Susan Daly's report

173

bView

Board member Jeff Cleave's report

177

cView

Board member Judy Gibert's report

183

dView

Board member Christina Spence's report

185

    

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 





Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 






Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 




Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Reports Requested/Pending

File No.: CP2014/22033

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Attached is a list of reports requested/pending as at September 2014 for the Great Barrier Local Board’s information.

 

Recommendation

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         Receive the list of reports requested/pending as at September 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports requested/pending - September 2014

191

    

Signatories

Author s

Guia Nonoy - Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Correspondence

File No.: CP2014/22032

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Correspondence sent and received for the Great Barrier Local Board’s information.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         Receives the correspondence for the month of September 2014.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Email from Nortessa Montgomerie - Aotea Youth Speak

195

    


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 

Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2014/22030

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Attached are the Great Barrier Local Board workshop proceedings taken at the workshops held on 3rd, 9th and 24th September 2014.

 

Recommendation

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Receives the workshop proceedings for the workshops held on the 3rd, 9th and 24th September 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop proceedings - 3 September 2014

199

bView

Workshop proceedings - 9 September 2014

201

cView

Workshop proceedings - 24 September 2014

203

    

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Local Board Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

John Nash – Relationship Manager/ Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

08 October 2014