I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

4.30pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Greg Sayers

 

Members

David Cooper

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gaye Harding-Kirikiri

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Lovisa Rasmussen

 

 

Lisa Whyte

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

15 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Portfolio

Description

Local Board Members

Local planning, policy and governance

Relationship with governing body, Chairs meeting, protocols, code of conduct, local area plans, structure plans, Unitary Plan, RUB, plan changes

Julia Parfitt –Chairperson
Greg Sayers - Deputy Chairperson

Arts and culture

Arts centres, art programmes

Greg Sayers – Lead
Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Events

General oversight of events programme
music in parks, movies in parks

Greg Sayers and Julia Parfitt

Community services and facilities

Community development and safety, grants and funding, community facilities, community houses, community leases, Youth Connections

Julia Parfitt –Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Youth

Local board Youth Forum, Youth Representative

Lovisa Rasmussen – Lead
Gaye Harding-Kirkiri - Alternate

Libraries

 

Lisa Whyte –Lead
Gaye Harding-Kirkiri - Alternate

Recreation services

Pools, multi-sport facilities

Gaye Harding-Kirkiri – Lead
Lisa Whyte - Alternate

Parks

Reserve management plans, park usage, leasing on parks, liaison with parks staff on land owner approval

David Cooper –Lead
Julia Parfitt –Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen - Alternate

Built and natural environment

Heritage, infrastructure (including stormwater, wastewater, water), environmental programmes, conservation and biodiversity, biosecurity, waste minimisation

Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Economic Development

Economic development plans, developing ATEED relationship, broadband

Gary Holmes – Lead
Gaye Harding-Kirkiri -Alternate

Street environment and town centres

Gateways and mainstreet upgrades, Urban design champion

David Cooper and Gary Holmes – Leads
Janet Fitzgerald -Alternate

Transport

 

David Cooper – Lead
Gary Holmes – Alternate
Janet Fitzgerald – Lead
Greg Sayers - Alternate

Regulatory, bylaws and compliance

Bylaw policy feedback

Gaye Harding-Kirkiri -Lead

Julia Parfitt -Alternate

Resource consent applications

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

Communications and engagement

Media, stakeholder and community engagement including iwi relationships, Hibiscus and Bays Youth Voice and YAP

Julia Parfitt – Lead
Lovisa Rasmussen -Alternate

Finance

Budget overview, financial prudence and reporting, local board funding policy

Lisa Whyte – Lead
Julia Parfitt - Alternate

Civil defence/ emergency management

 

David Cooper –Lead
Greg Sayers -Alternate

Urban Design Champion

 

Gary Holmes – Lead
Janet Fitzgerald - Alternate

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Whangaparaoa Baptist Church                                                                          5

8.2     Silverdale Commercial Business Association                                                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Proposed summer set net control at Shakespear Regional Park beaches            9

13        Renewal and variation of community lease to Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated, Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay                                                                              15

14        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) 23

15        Seek Local Board approval for the facility building renewal work schedule for the 2014-205 financial year                                                                                                         37

16        Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local  Board, October 2014 39

17        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                               49

18        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                        59

19        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                        87

20        New Road Name - Woodridge Drive, Ruth Craig Place, Somerset Place, Eastview Crescent and Tirohanga Crescent                                                                          105

21        Feedback on Mayoral Proposal                                                                               111

22        Adoption of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014                                       113

23        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Meeting Schedule for 2015                               171

24        Community Grants Policy Feedback                                                                       175

25        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         181

26        Local Board Members Reports                                                                                183

27        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                185  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               193

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   193

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Chairperson JG Parfitt has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of the Local Board Plan Hearings – Hibiscus and Bays held on 10 September 2014 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 September 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to speak had been received.

 

8.1       Whangaparaoa Baptist Church

1.       Mr Joe Youssef, Team Leader, Whangaparaoa Baptist Church has requested a deputation to update local board members on the work he is doing.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Youssef for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Silverdale Commercial Business Association

Executive Summary

1.       Mrs Lorraine Sampson from the Silverdale Business Association has requested a deputation to discuss issues in Silverdale Village.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mrs Sampson for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Proposed summer set net control at Shakespear Regional Park beaches

 

File No.: CP2014/19501

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the endorsement of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for a recommendation to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee to approve a summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay within Shakespear Regional Park to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance.

Executive summary

2.       Shakespear Regional Park is the third most visited regional park in Auckland.  Visitors take part in a large range of water related recreational activities over the summer months including swimming, boating, kitesurfing, windsurfing, diving, kayaking and fishing.

3.       Members of the public have recently expressed concern about risks to public safety associated with set nets and have requested set netting be banned at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay within Shakespear Regional Park.  Complaints to the council include swimmers being entangled in drifting nets and kitesurfers and windsurfers being thrown from their boards after colliding with set nets. 

4.       The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 enables the council to make controls to prohibit or restrict recreational activities for specified times or seasons as considered necessary to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance (clause 9.3).

5.       A summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay is considered necessary to protect public safety and prevent nuisance and is consistent with the Auckland Regional Parks Management Plan 2010, which prohibits set netting from regional parks as a matter of policy (13.6.1.5).

6.       Public safety and nuisance controls cannot be made to protect fish stocks or wildlife such as the Maui dolphin as these policy reasons do not relate to the relevant bylaw making powers under the Local Government Act 2002.  The Ministry for Primary Industries is responsible for setting and enforcing fisheries regulations for the protection of such resources.

7.       Council staff recognise that in August this year the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board had requested set net controls be implemented at Hatfields Beach and Browns Bay as well. However, the council currently does not have sufficient evidence that set netting poses a similar risk to public safety at these beaches and the council is not currently resourced to enforce set net controls at these beaches for the 2014/2015 summer period.  The proposed control at Shakespear Regional Park will be enforced by regional park rangers and council staff recommend that the control be monitored for its effectiveness and evidence of risk be obtained before controls are implemented at other sites.

 

Recommendation

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee that a set net control be made for Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay at Shakespear Regional Park annually starting from 20th December to Easter Monday, extending 200 metres seaward of the mean high water mark. 

 

Comments

Background

 

8.       Shakespear Regional Park is an open wildlife sanctuary that integrates conservation, recreation and farming.  It is the third most visited regional park in Auckland and receives approximately 500,000 visitors per year.  Shakespear Regional Park is a popular location for a large range of water related recreational activities, particularly over the summer months. Activities include swimming, boating, kitesurfing, windsurfing, diving, kayaking and fishing. Of the three beaches at Shakespear Regional Park, swimmers most commonly utilise Te Haruhi Bay and Army Bay, as opposed to Okoromai Bay, which is unsuitable for swimming at low tide and is more known for shell fish gathering.

9.       Set netting is a fishing method defined by the Fisheries (Amateur Fishing) Regulations 2013. Set netting includes the use of a gill net or any other sort of net that acts by enmeshing, entrapping or entangling fish. Typically the nets are set in the water with a weighted groundline, anchors or weights and surface floats at either end.

Evidence of public safety and nuisance concern

10.     Public safety and nuisance concerns related to set netting at Te Haruhi Bay and Army Bay have been highlighted recently in public submissions on the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013, complaints to Auckland Council and council led surveys.

11.     The council received 36 public submissions on the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 with requests for set netting to be banned at various beaches in the legacy Rodney District Council area, nine of which were specific requests for a ban to be implemented at Te Haruhi Bay and Army Bay. Over the period January-February 2013 the council received approximately 50 complaints regarding set netting at Te Haruhi Bay.  The submissions and complaints showed that set nets can be perceived as a public safety issue and that there is a risk of entanglement for swimmers, paddle boarders, wind surfers and kitesurfers. Complaints referred to incidences of swimmers coming across drifting nets and kitesurfers and windsurfers being thrown from their boards after colliding with set nets.

12.     Concerns have been raised about the appropriateness of set netting at Te Haruhi and Army Bay given these locations are popular for a large range of other recreational water related activities.  In February 2014 a number of park visitors requested that set netting be banned at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay because set nets had restricted access to the shore for kayakers and paddle boarders. 

13.     The Ministry for Primary Industries Set Net Code of Practice advises set net fishers to avoid sites commonly used for other recreational activities such as wind surfing or swimming, however this is not a legal requirement.

Proposed summer set net control at Shakespear Regional Park

14.     The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 enables the council to make controls to prohibit or restrict set netting for specified times or seasons as considered necessary to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance (clause 9.3). As a matter of good decision-making, controls should be enforceable, evidence-based, complementary to other tools and flexible to be amended if proven ineffective.

15.     A summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay is considered necessary to protect public safety and prevent nuisance.  The duration of the proposed control has been set over an extended summer period to align with the school holiday and public holiday period, as well as to allow appropriate time to implement the control and evaluate effectiveness.  The distance of the control extending to 200 metres seaward of the mean high water mark is consistent with other regulations for recreational water related activities.

16.     The proposed control does not restrict fishing as an activity but regulates set netting as a method of fishing to protect public safety and minimise potential nuisance to other park users.  The two most common beaches for swimming and other recreational water related activities at Shakespear Regional Park have been included in the proposed control but not Okoromai Bay.

17.     A set netting control cannot be made under the bylaw to protect fish stocks or wildlife such as the Maui dolphin, as these policy reasons do not relate to the relevant bylaw making powers under the Local Government Act 2002. The Ministry for Primary Industries is responsible for setting and enforcing fisheries regulations for the protection of such resources . The Fisheries (Amateur Fishing) Regulations 2013 and Auckland and Kermadec Fishery Management Area Recreational Fishing Rules regulate the use of set nets and stipulate areas where set netting is prohibited to protect fisheries resources.

Further requests for set netting controls

18.     Council staff recognise that in August this year the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board had requested set net controls be implemented at Hatfields Beach and Browns Bay as well. Currently the council does not have adequate evidence of risk to users of these beaches to justify the making of similar controls on set netting. Also, the council is not currently resourced to enforce set net controls at these beaches for the 2014/2015 summer period. The proposed control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay will be enforced by regional park rangers and nearby beaches will be monitored for potential displacement issues.  Council staff recommend that the control be monitored for its effectiveness before controls are implemented at other sites.

19.     The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 enables the council to make temporary or seasonal controls for recreational activities, as opposed to permanent controls. If a permanent set netting control is a preferred approach, an amendment to the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 would be required.  

Consideration

Local board views and implications

20.     This report seeks the views of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

Māori impact statement

21.     Engagement with Māori on the proposed set net control is currently underway.  

Implementation

22.     A public notice will be required to inform the public of the summer set net control and organisations such as the Ministry for Primary Industries should be directly notified.  Signage will be required at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay.  All signage will be in Te Reo Māori and English.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Proposed control for Shakespear Regional Park

15

      

Signatories

Authors

Emma Pilkington - Policy Analyst

Rebekah Stuart-Wilson - Principal Policy Analyst - Planning, Policies & Bylaws.

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Renewal and variation of community lease to Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated, Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay

 

File No.: CP2014/21181

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to the renewal and variation of the community lease held by the Mairangi Bay Bowling Club for the site occupied on Mairangi Bay Park, Ramsgate Terrace Mairangi Bay.

Executive summary

2.       The Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated (the Club) occupies a site on Mairangi Bay Park, Ramsgate Terrace on which it has its clubrooms with associated facilities, two grass bowling greens and one artificial green.

3.       The Club has a community lease that will expire on 31 March 2015 which provides for one 10-year right of renewal.  If the renewal is exercised the final expiry date of the community lease will be 31 March 2025.

4.       The premises are well maintained, managed and used by the members of the Club and all lease conditions are being met.

5.       This report recommends that the renewal of the lease to Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated be approved for a period of 10 years from 1 April 2015 in accordance with the terms of the original lease agreement. 

6.       The Club has agreed to the inclusion of a community outcomes plan in accordance with the terms of the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.  The lease will be varied to accommodate this.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approve:

a)      the renewal and variation of the community lease to the Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated for  Part Lot 165 DP 13311 and Part Allotment NW 193 Takapuna Parish situated on Mairangi Bay Park, Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay subject to the following conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      Variation to the lease to include the Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment B).

b)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the terms of the original lease agreement and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

 

Comments

 

7.       The Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated has occupied the site on Mairangi Bay Park since 1948.  The club has developed clubrooms, toilets and changing facilities, storage sheds, two grass greens and one artificial  bowling green. (Attachment A)

8.       In 2005 the Club amalgamated with the Mairangi Bay Women’s Bowling Club and now has approximately 200 members.

9.       The property is maintained to a high standard and the Club has a strong committee that takes all opportunities to grow membership and invite others from the community to enjoy the facilities available through casual play and by offering “have a go” days. The club also invites students from local schools to coaching sessions through its collegiate bowling programme.

10.     The Club is mentioned favourably in the Auckland Region Bowls Facility Strategy and has already implemented many of the recommendations in the document.

11.     The facilities at the Club will be used to host the semi-finals of the National Bowls Championships to be run from the Browns Bay Bowling Club this December and January 2015.  The club is in the process of refurbishing the grass greens in preparation for this event.

12.     The site comprises Part Lot 165 DP13311 that is held by the Crown and classified as a recreation reserve. It is vested in Auckland Council in trust for this purpose.   The lease also covers Part Allotment NW193 that is also held by the Crown as an unclassified recreation reserve under the control and management of Council for this purpose.   Both parcels are subject to the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

13.     The Club has met all obligations under the terms of the community lease held for the site and it is recommended that the local board approve the renewal of the agreement for a further ten years from 1 April 2015.  A community outcome plan has been negotiated and agreed with the Club and will form part of the lease agreement.

14.     Council staff have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     Council staff sought input from the Hibiscus and Bays Facilities and Reserves Committee on 20 March 2014 at  which time no objections were raised.

16.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

17.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori.

Implementation

18.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

19.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated, Mairangi Bay Park

21

bView

Attachment B Mairangi Bay Bowling Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

23

 

Signatories

Authors

Maureen Buchanan - Community Lease Advisor North

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22888

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·        The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·        An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders.  This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      note that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

 

 

Comments

 

Local board feedback

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·        Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·        Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·        Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·        Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·        Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·        More public art outside the city centre

·        Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·        Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·        Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July 2014.  It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received.  Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre,  The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·        The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·        Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·        Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·        Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·        A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·        The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting.  Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·        The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures.  This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP.  They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

 

Next steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015.  The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process.  The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change.  The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP.  The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Feedback

29

bView

Consultation Summary

33

cView

Draft Arts and Culture Action Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebecca Kruse - Strategy Analyst

Maree Mills – Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 







Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Seek Local Board approval for the facility building renewal work schedule for the 2014-205 financial year

 

File No.: CP2014/21413

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the Stanmore Bay and HBC Leisure Centre facility building renewal capital work schedule for the 2014/2015 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       To continue the delivery of aquatic and recreational services and ensure the integrity of your assets, an ongoing capital works schedule is required.  This capital work schedule seeks to address future degradation of the building infrastructure, maintain or improve current service levels, capitalise on sustainability opportunities, and address health and safety concerns.  The work schedule includes deferred works which will not require sign off.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      confirm the 2015 aquatic and recreation facility building renewal capital work schedule.

b)      delegated authority to the Facilities and Reserves Committee to confirm the projects within the funding budget indicated in the list.

 

 

Comments

 

3.       The Auckland Councils Long Term Plan for this Board has a budget allocated for aquatic and recreational facilities building renewals.  This budget is allocated across 2 facilities – Stanmore Bay and HBC Leisure Centre. The purpose of the proposed capital work schedule is to ensure the future integrity of the buildings and surrounding infrastructure, maintain and improve the current level of service and efficiencies, and address any immediate or potential safety compliance issues.

4.       The Aquatic and leisure facilities represent an asset group with significant risk.  The conditions within the facilities (i.e. chlorinated pool halls and areas of continual high impact use) if not maintained effectively will result in the asset deteriorating at a rapid rate, reduction in the level of service that is able to be offered

5.       The specific projects below have been complied on information and advice from the Auckland Council Properties Department, the respective facility managers and an energy report compiled to improve the operational efficiencies of the Stanmore Bay and HBC Leisure Centre

 

 

 

6.       The full list of projects are detailed below

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       The capital work schedule will have been discussed with the Local Board Representatives of the Hibiscus and Bays.

Māori impact statement

8.       There are no particular impacts on Maori which are different from general users of the aquatic and recreation facilitates

Implementation

9.       Once approval for the schedule of work is received, project initiation forms will be completed from which the properties department will source a contractor to complete the works. 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jane  Franich - Contract Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local  Board, October 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23443

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.    To respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities.

Executive summary

2.    The report provides an update on transport matters for the information of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and a register of transport issues in the local board’s area, as collated by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager North.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      request a further rough order of costs for the provision of a footpath on the northern side of Ferry Road from 24 Ferry Road to 46 Ferry Road, to connect with the existing footpath, subject to confirmation by the Local Board’s Transport Portfolio Leads of a variation to the scope of the project and completion of a project proposal form.

b)      request the provision of a rough order of costs for the provision of a concrete vehicle crossing, parking bay and spaces for 5 – 6 parallel car parks on the property at 8 Galbraith Green, Silverdale, subject to confirmation of vehicle crossing specifications from Tim Sinclair, Senior Project Leader, City Transformation Projects.

 

 

Comments

 

Reduced speed starts on Hibiscus Coast Highway

 

3.    Reduction of the speed limit along a 3.3km stretch of Hibiscus Coast Highway between the Silverdale interchange and Moffat Road to 70km/h is due for implementation on Monday, 13 October 2014.  An overwhelming 89 per cent of people who participated in recent consultation about local road safety issues supported the reduction of the previous 80km/h speed limit through Silverdale.

 

4.    Crash data indicates that between 2009 and 2013 there were 123 crashes between the Silverdale interchange and Moffat Road, six of these speed-related and three of these serious, making the highway one of New Zealand Transport’s (NZTA) high risk corridors.

 

5.    Recent studies revealed that for every 1 km/h change in mean speed, there is an estimated 3% reduction in crash risk, demonstrating that reductions in speed contribute to improved safety.  They also improve safety for vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists.

 

6.    For more information visit www.at.govt.nz/hibiscus.

 

 

Hibiscus Coast New Network Update

 

7.    Analysis of the views submitted on the proposed New Network for the Hibiscus Coast are well underway, with some clear trends being seen in the feedback received.  A total of 874 submissions were received for the Hibiscus Coast.

 

8.    Issues raised within the feedback are now being carefully considered.  This includes investigating other options, driving the routes, and weighing up practical constraints.

 

9.    A complete consultation summary will be available by the end of this year on Auckland Transport’s website.

 

Albany Highway North upgrade to start in October

 

10.  AT has announced an expected October 2014 start date for its long-awaited upgrade of Albany Highway North, its biggest roading project on the North Shore since the Northern Busway.  The $38 million upgrade will see the highway more than double in capacity, with a new transit lane in each direction, on and off-road cycle routes and wider footpaths, a new bridge over the Oteha Stream and replacement of three major roundabouts with signalised intersections.

 

11.  Albany Highway is a regional arterial road serving the North Harbour industrial estate, five schools, Massey University and a cluster of residential estates.  The highway also provides an important connection to other areas of Auckland and is a vital transit road for commuters and industry.

 

12.  Together with the NZTA’s current upgrade of State Highway 1 between Upper Harbour Highway and Greville Road, the Albany Highway North upgrade is part of a wider strategy to improve transport links on the North Shore.

 

13.  AT predicts the upgrade will provide many benefits for the Albany community and others who use the busy arterial route, particularly during peak travel times.

 

14.  With traffic volumes on the highway predicted to rise from 15,000 to 20,000 vehicles a day by 2021, this upgrade is essential for reducing congestion, improving safety for all road users (including the area’s 5,000 students) and encouraging the use of a range of transport modes.

 

15.  The upgrade will also help cater for projected growth in the Albany area and assist the general flow of traffic. Importantly, the introduction of T3 transit lanes during peak travel times will improve journey times for those using public transport or ride-sharing.

 

16.  Local residents will also benefit from new walking and cycling facilities, including new off-road cycle paths that will provide safer journeys to and from school for young riders.

 

17.  AT will be holding public information days prior to construction to give people the opportunity to meet the project team, view plans and ask questions.  Details will be advertised in the near future.

 

18.  The 3.8km stretch of highway to be upgraded extends from the Schnapper Rock Road/Bush Road intersection in the south to the Albany Expressway in the north.

 

19.  The project is expected to take two and a half years to complete and will be delivered by contractor Fulton Hogan.

 

20.  For more information and updates on the Albany Highway North Upgrade, visit

            www.AT.govt.nz/albanyhighway

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

 

21.  The Auckland Council Infrastructure Committee has agreed to changes proposed by Auckland Council (AC) and AT relating to the eligibility of projects funded under the LBTCF. Until now, the eligibility of projects has been guided by a March 2013 decision of the former Strategy and Finance Committee which specifically precluded AT from using the LBTCF to undertake works outside the road corridor.  A number of local boards felt that this rule created unnecessary rigidity in the use of the fund, and earlier this year the Budget Committee re-examined the issue and referred it to the Infrastructure Committee for decision. On 3 September, the Infrastructure Committee resolved to allow works funded by the LBTCF to be undertaken on Council- or CCO-controlled land outside the road corridor, providing the body controlling the land was also in agreement with the proposal.

      

22.  This is expected to have greatest application on land controlled by AC Parks, where in particular walking and cycling infrastructure that connects with the Auckland Cycle Network or is included in Local Board Plans, will be able to be funded.  For every project that is undertaken outside the road corridor, a specific agreement with the agency controlling the land will be required, covering the ownership of the asset (this will usually be transferred to the agency controlling the land by AT) and the budget from which ongoing maintenance costs will be sourced (usually this will be covered within the budget of the agency controlling the land).

 

23.  The changes are effective immediately.  Some local board projects have been advanced in anticipation of the changes being made, and these should be able to move forward quickly now that the decision has been formalised.

 

24.  A reminder that local boards should now be identifying new project proposals for the LBTCF budgets allocated to them for the remainder of the term so that subsequent initial assessment, detailed design, consultation and statutory approvals (where required), and construction can be completed by 30 June 2016.

 

Update on the Hibiscus and Bays LBTCF Projects

 

25.  Construction of the following LBTCF projects nominated by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has now been completed:

 

·    Duck Creek Road, Stillwater – new footpath (Project 097);

·    201-246 Centreway Road, Orewa – new footpath (Project 100);

·    Titan Place to Silverdale Township, Silverdale – new footpath (Project 098);

·    East Coast Road (vicinity of Spencer Road), Pinehill – footpath upgrade (Project 094);

·    504 Beach Road, Murrays Bay – footpath upgrade (Project 099);

·    Grand Drive – Tauranga Place, Orewa – new walkway and footpath (Project 101);

·    St John’s School, Mairangi Bay – new footpath (Project 229).

 

26.  A draft design and cost estimate for Project 091, provision of a footpath with a higher than normal amenity value on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay, have been completed and will be discussed with the local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads (TPLs) at a meeting in October 2014.  The TPLs have approved a letter to residents affected by the work and this will be distributed following confirmation of the timeframe for construction.

 

27.  A design for safety improvements on Awaruku Road, Torbay (Project 096) is currently underway and a firm cost estimate will be provided on its completion.  Providing the firm cost estimate meets with the local board’s approval, construction will be carried out by AT’s minor works contractor.

 

28.  Car parking adjacent to Stillwater Reserve (Project 209) will be provided on completion of a new community hall on the reserve, design for and construction of which are  being managed by the community hall project manager.  Car parking along the southern side of Duck Creek Road must be completed no later than the end January 2015 to meet the conditions of resource consent.  AT staff are therefore working with Auckland Council staff to gather relevant information to enable a firm cost estimate to be completed for provision to the local board.

 

29.  At its meeting on 20 August 2014 the local board resolved to proceed to detail design of the following projects based on the rough cost estimates shown:

 

·    Project 232 – New footpath on Whangaparaoa Road, Stanmore Bay, from Cedar Terrace to Scott Road (rough order of cost $94,000.00).

 

·    Project 236 – New footpath on Okura River Road, Okura, from 68 Okura River Road to Vaughans Road (rough order of cost $165,000). Approval will now be sought from AT’s LBTCF steering committee for a deviation from ATCOP standards for the option chosen, a loose metal path with an asphalt concrete top along the edge of the seal.

 

·    Project 240 – Safe Crossing Point on Tavern Road, Silverdale (rough order of cost $40,000).

 

30.  Detail designs for these projects will now be completed and firm cost estimates prepared for the local board’s further consideration.

 

31.  With respect to Project 233, provision of a new footpath on Ferry Road, Arkles Bay from the property at 41 Ferry Road to Wade River Road, for which a rough cost estimate of $196,000 has been provided, the local board has resolved to undertake a further site visit to determine whether the project can be delivered in a cost effective way and what potential there is for further linkages and connections in the immediate area.  The site visit will be arranged by local board staff during October 2014.

 

32.  Should the local board wish to vary the scope of the project, to provide for construction of a footpath on the northern side from 24 Ferry Road to 46 Ferry Road, to connect with the existing footpath, a further rough order of costs will be required.

 

33.  Following the approval by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure Committee to allow AT to carry out works in its parks and reserves, and based on a total rough cost estimate of $110,000 for the project, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved at its meeting on 17 September 2014 to proceed to detail design, at a cost of approximately $10,000,  for Project 346, the provision of lighting on a section of Te Ara Tahuna Walkway through Western Reserve, Orewa.

 

34.  Detail design is now underway and a firm estimate of cost for the project will be advised on its completion.

 

35.  At the Local Board’s TPL meeting on 18 September 2014 members requested a rough order of costs for the provision of a parking bay and spaces for 5 – 6 parallel parks on the property at 8 Galbraith Green, Silverdale, which is being developed as a community hub with Stoney Homestead as its focal point.

 

36.  The local board will be provided with a rough order of cost as soon as this has been completed.

 

37.  At a meeting on 18 September 2014, the TPLs confirmed that they no longer wished to  pursue Project 090, Access to Matakatia Scenic Reserve, Whangaparaoa, for which a rough cost estimate of $115,000 had been provided.

 

 

Consultations

 

38.  The local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads (TPLs) have been asked to provide feedback on the following proposal over the period 1 – 29 September :

 

·    Proposed changes to the Eastern and Southern service lanes between Anzac and Inverness Roads, Browns Bay, including a loading zone, pedestrian crossing and parking restrictions, required as part of the construction of a new supermarket.  Feedback closed on 16 September 2014 with Member Cooper advising this his concerns related to the loading/unloading of goods, which were a significant and hazardous activity incorporating heavy vehicles (high productivity vehicles), fork lift trucks, containers.  He advised that it is normal practice at supermarkets and large businesses to undertake these often lengthy activities within their private properties where they can isolate hazards and take full responsibility of the activity so AT's Traffic Control Committee and Traffic Operations Manager must therefore have due regard for public safety if a commercial operation’s activities in the road space is to be approved.   The road in question is an access route between Anzac Road (and its car parks) and Inverness Road/Phoenix Plaza, and is well used by pedestrians and vehicles.  The proposed daily loading and unloading operations with fork lift trucks, could compromise safe passage for others through this access route.  The safe access and protection of pedestrians and other road users is paramount and must be fully assured.

 

·    Proposed installation of NSAAT restrictions on the northern side of Jutland Street, and at the Beach Road/Jutland Street intersection in Mairangi Bay, was forwarded to the local board's TPLs on 5 September 2014 with a request for responses no later that 23 September 2014.  Member Cooper advised that he supported the proposal providing the adjacent residents also approved.

 

·    Proposed improvements to facilities at the existing bus stop outside 4 Deep Creek Road, Torbay, and installation of a new shelter outside 13 Deep Creek Road with additional signage, road markings and NSAAT restrictions. Feedback requested by 2 October 2014.

 

·    Proposed improvements to on and off-road cycling and pedestrian facilities at the Orewa South Bridge, Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa. Feedback requested by 3 October 2014.

 

 

Issues Update

 

39.  The following Issues Update comprises issues raised by Elected Members and Local Board Services staff to 29 September 2014:

 

Location

Issue

Status

1

733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay

Request for repairs to road surface outside 733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay.

Member Fitzgerald advised on 16 July 2014 that the road surface outside the property at 733 Whangaparaoa Road, Arkles Bay, where new seal meets old, was uneven, asking that repairs be carried out to improve the surface. On 15 September 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that repairs have been carried out to address the uneven surface.

2

 376 Beach Road , Mairangi Bay

Sign facing wrong way at  376 Beach Road , Mairangi Bay

Member Cooper advised that a sign at a pedestrian refuge located at 376 Beach Road, Mairangi Bay, which warns that motorists have the right of way, faces towards motorists rather than pedestrians. Member Cooper was advised on 26 August 2014 that the sign had been adjusted  and now faces the right way.

3

246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay

Concerns that street lighting in the vicinity of 246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay, is inadequate.

Cr Wayne Walker's councillor support advisor advised that the resident of the property at 246A Beach Road, Campbells Bay, considers that the street lighting in the area is inadequate, asking that this be investigated.  Referred to Street Lighting.

4

Whangaparaoa Road, Red Beach

Delays at Whangaparaoa/Red Beach Road intersection, Red Beach.

Member Harding-Kirikiri advised at the local board's meeting on 20 August 2014 that there were long delays for traffic turning right from Whangaparaoa Road onto Red Beach Road at morning peak times, causing delays to parents taking children to school. On 16 September 2014 Member Harding-Kirikiri and the local board TPLs were advised that, during the morning peak times, the westbound traffic movement on Whangaparaoa Road is very heavy and this intersection provides two right turning lanes into Red Beach Road. The average numbers of vehicles turning right onto Red Beach during the morning peak is 1000 vehicles per hour and the average green time is 36 seconds, so the assigned  phase time is enough to clear the two right turning lanes every cycle. The green times are calculated using sensors which register vehicles waiting at the traffic signals and automatically adjust the phasing to allow an efficient traffic flow for all motorists.  However, a slow movement on Whangaparaoa Road at this location during the morning was noted and a minor adjustment applied to enhance the right turning green time.

5

Ralph Eagles Place, Long Bay

Request for P30 parking on Ralph Eagles Place, Long Bay.

Local board chairperson Julia Parfitt asked that P30 parking outside Long Bay Primary School on Ralph Eagles Place, Long Bay, be investigated to allow drop-off/pick up before and after school. Referred to RCO/Community Transport.

6

Montrose Terrace, Mairangi Bay

Request for safety improvements on Montrose Terrace, Mairangi Bay.

Member Cooper requested installation of  'No U turn' and 'Give Way to Pedestrians' signage in the vicinity of 1 Montrose Terrace, Mairangi Bay, to deter motorists from making u-turns at the access way and provide additional protection for pedestrians where the access way crosses the footpath. Referred to Road Corridor Operations.

7

Silverdale Busway Station, Silverdale

Request regarding relocation of Silverdale bus interchange to the Silverdale Busway Station, Silverdale.

Member Fitzgerald asked at the local board’s meeting on 17 September 2014 when the Silverdale bus interchange will be relocated to the Silverdale Busway Station. On 22 September 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that the interchange point for buses will continue to be located in Silverdale Street, Silverdale, until the New Network is implemented, hopefully in about April/May 2015. Changing the transfer location prior to this would involve a variation in the contract with the operator as the buses would have to travel further to make the connection, at considerable cost. However, the new stops and shelters on Painton Road should be operational before then as NZ Bus is keen to start using these rather than the current stops on Hibiscus Coast  Highway for buses travelling into the city.

8

Okura River Road, Okura

Request for metal to be laid at school bus stop on Okura River Road, Okura.

Local board chairperson Julia Parfitt advised on 17 September 2014 that during the recent reconstruction of Okura River Road large amounts of top soil was put down and possibly grass seeded at the school bus stop at the  Okura River Road/ Vaughans Road intersection, Okura. School children are dropped off on the metal behind the bus stop but with the heavy rain, the children are walking onto the road to avoid the muddy topsoil. Mrs Parfitt asked if it was possible for metal to be put down to the side of the bus shelter to reach the other metal area so that the children can walk safely to the shelter without getting covered in mud. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

9

141 Deep Creek Road, Torbay

Request for safety improvements at 141 Deep Creek Road, Torbay.

Member Cooper raised concerns on 17 September 2014 about the safety of children and parents at drop-off and pick-up times at Torbay Kindergarten, located at 141 Deep Creek Road, where the situation has been made much worse by an increase in traffic as a result of development in the area, and the use of the road by trucks associated with the on-going construction at Long Bay. Parking is also an issue, with only seven car parks available for a busy facility. He asked that consideration be given to the installation of an additional pedestrian crossing facility to the north-east of the kindergarten, to allow parents to park on the opposite side of the road and cross safely, or that the existing pedestrian refuge at 135 Deep Creek Road be relocated to directly outside kindergarten and upgraded to a zebra crossing. On 25 September 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that AT’s engineers had investigated the possible relocation of the existing pedestrian refuge; however, consider this is located at the most suitable site. If the refuge was to be relocated in front of the kindergarten, all the angle parking would need  to be removed as it would not be safe to have vehicles backing into the vicinity of the pedestrian refuge. Parking opposite the kindergarten would also need to be restricted. A local area traffic management assessment was carried out, including a pedestrian count, but this indicated pedestrian numbers are insufficient to justify the installation of an additional pedestrian crossing facility at this stage. Whilst it’s appreciated that crossing at the existing refuge involves a detour for some pedestrians, it’s considered that this remains the best option. Signage within the vicinity includes a 50km advisory speed and three Children warning signs, one of which is obscured by trees. The engineer has therefore requested that Auckland Council Parks staff trim the trees to improve the visibility of this sign. A request has also been forwarded to the Police for increased monitoring and speed enforcement during morning peak times. With regard to the angle parks in front of the kindergarten, the engineers advise that they will advise residents by letter not to park in the kindergarten spaces during school term times and pick up and drop off times. Whilst on site the engineer spoke to the kindergarten teachers and one teacher advised that she was parked in the angle parks at the time. A recommendation was also made that staff park further away to allow parents to use the available parks in front of the kindergarten.

10

Whangaparaoa Plaza/Town Centre, Whangaparaoa

Request for update on parking changes proposed for Whangaparaoa Plaza/Town Centre, Whangaparaoa.

Member Fitzgerald requested an update on 18 September 2014 of a proposal for parking changes at the Whangaparaoa Plaza/Town Centre area, covering all three parking areas - Main Street, Wade River Road and Whangaparaoa Road, which was sent to the Board's TPLs on 3 April 2014. On 24 September 2014 the local board's TPLs were advised that that the proposal is currently being reviewed after consideration of the feedback received to ensure that the most appropriate time restrictions are installed for this commercial centre. It is anticipated that the revised proposal will be circulated to affected parties for discussion in the last quarter of 2014.

11

Glenvar Ridge, Glenvar and Ashley Roads, Long Bay

Request for update on Glenvar Ridge Road project and clarification of scope of proposed improvements on Glenvar Road, Glenvar Ridge Road or Ashley Road.

Members requested an update on the Glenvar Ridge Road project and the timing for its construction on 24 September 2014, together with reassurance that there will be no compromise of the proposed on-road and off-road cycleways along any part of Glenvar Road, Glenvar Ridge Road or Ashley Road. Referred to Investigation and Design.

12

Arran Road, Browns Bay

Request for installation of NSAAT restrictions on Arran Road, Browns Bay.

On 25 September 2014 Member Fitzgerald requested an investigation into the installation of NSAAT restrictions on Arran Road, Browns Bay, between 32 – 43 and 74 - 94 Arran Road, to facilitate better manoeuvrability of passing traffic.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

40.       This report is for the Local Board’s information.

 

Māori impact statement

41.       No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

 

Implementation

42.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

43.       There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Ellen Barrett, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22884

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the update on the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

 

Comments

 

Background to the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation Programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place at the start of the new long-term plan.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife hunting and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Māori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

Implementation

22.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline

61

     

Signatories

Authors

Helgard Wagener – Manager Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan – Manager Planning North/West Planning

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23438

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy but the council must expand it to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

 

Background

 

7.       As part of the Long-term Plan (LTP) 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA 2002) and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       The legislative change requires the council to expand the current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a significant decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the draft policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a Special Consultative Procedure.Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, grey power, age concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of local boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy approach to engagement

18.     The LGA2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  (For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is “significant”).

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.            The thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.            The decision relates to strategic assets

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by including the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s LTP and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.

Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

 

 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, IMSB

Regional Strategy & Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

 

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

 

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

 

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·    an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·    a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August; 

·  workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council recognise that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on Engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through the engagement advisors.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

69

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Consultation and Engagement

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication & Engagement Director

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 

 

Title: Auckland Council logo

Title: Consultation in library - Description: The image shows a member of the public receiving guidance on how to access online information about a plan and being shown supporting materials and maps.Text Box: Significance and Engagement Policy
Consultation Draft - September 2014


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Credit: Heidi Ping Xu


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

1.          Table of Contents

1       Context 4

2       Decision making. 5

3       Significance. 7

4       Approach to engagement 9

5       Applying the policy. 11

6       Schedule 1: Methods of engagement 13

 


1        Context

1.1      Introduction

For Auckland Council, engagement is a genuine dialogue between decision-makers, communities and stakeholders for the purpose of making better decisions, policies or programmes of action.

Public input into decisions, policies or programmes of action is an essential part of ensuring they reflect the aspirations of residents, iwi, community groups and businesses - everyone who is invested in Auckland's future being one of prosperity, equality and wellbeing.

This policy aims to enable a flexible approach to engagement that recognises and supports the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities to get involved in council and civic life, and demonstrates a commitment to building ongoing relationships and greater understanding of community views and preferences.

 

1.2      Policy purpose and overview

The purpose of this policy is to enable Auckland Council  and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities; and

·     to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different  issues, assets, or other matters; and

·     to inform the council from the beginning of a decision-making process about—

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

2        Decision making

One of the key roles of local government is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities. At Auckland Council, decision-making for regional decisions is undertaken by the Governing Body and for local decisions by local boards. Local Boards also have a key role in identifying and communicating the views of local communities on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws.

While community and stakeholder engagement improves decision-making, it is not the sole input into a decision. As shown in the diagram below, there are a wide range of information sources and perspectives that will inform a council decision. The information sources and perspectives are harnessed and collated which helps make the decision ‘sustainable’ (i.e. unlikely to require re-visiting due to it being well-informed and well-considered). Decisions are based on a wide range of information sources and perspectives and it may differ from the prevailing public opinion.

Title: Decision making process - Description: Sustainable decision-making inputs: technical input and advice; financial costs, benefits and considerations; Auckland Plan and Local Board Plan outcomes;  Council strategy and policy; Government policy; other considerations; public / stakeholder opinions, concerns, ideas, needs, values, motivations and goals.

Inputs into public / stakeholder opinions: community and stakeholder engagement, for example stakeholder meetings and workshops, reference and advisory groups; consultation, for example feedback forms, Special Consultative Procedure; opinion research, for example representative surveys, focus groups.

 

 

 

 

2.1      The Mayor and Governing Body

The Mayor has a responsibility for ensuring there is effective engagement between Auckland Council and the people of Auckland, including those too young to vote. The Mayor has established a number of advisory panels to: provide strategic advice to council on issues of importance to their communities (youth, ethnic people, pacific people, seniors, disability, rural); and to advise on effective engagement by council with those communities.

The Governing Body, comprising the Mayor and councillors, focuses on region-wide strategic decisions and must ensure that consultation and engagement requirements are met when making those decisions.

2.2      Local boards

Local boards make decisions on local matters, provide local leadership and support strong local communities.

With regard to community engagement and consultation, local boards are responsible for:

·     making decisions about non-regulatory local matters, including negotiating the standards of services delivered locally;

·     making decisions about regulatory local matters delegated to it by the governing body;

·     identifying and communicating the views of local people on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws to the governing body;

·     providing local leadership and developing relationships with the community, community organisations and special interest groups in the local area.

 

2.3      Independent Māori Statutory Board

The Independent Māori Statutory Board has appointed mana whenua and matāwaka (Māori communities with no tribal affiliation in Auckland) representatives.

The board assists Auckland Council to make decisions, perform functions, and exercise powers by:

·     promoting cultural, economic, environmental, and social issues of significance for mana whenua groups; and matāwaka of Tamaki Makaurau; and

·     ensuring that the council acts in accordance with statutory provisions referring to the Treaty of Waitangi.


 

3        Significance

A decision is significant if:

a.   the thresholds related to an activity or groups of activities stated below are exceeded; or

b.   the decision relates to the strategic assets listed below.

A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria listed below, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

 

3.1      Thresholds

As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

 

3.2      Strategic assets

The council’s strategic assets are those vital for the delivery of its services to the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets (a network) because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. A network is deemed to include those components which are integral to the functioning of the network as a whole. There are also a few iconic assets which have strategic significance for the Auckland region. In addition the LGA 2002 provides that shares in a port company and an airport company and assets required to provide affordable housing are strategic assets.

The council’s strategic assets are set out below.

1.   Public transport network, including Britomart

2.   Roading network

3.   Stormwater network

4.   Water and wastewater network

5.   Parks network

6.   Network of swimming pools

7.   Network of community centres and halls

8.   Community library network

9.   Cemeteries, heritage scheduled buildings and structures

10. Freehold interest in waterfront land held by the Ports of Auckland and the Auckland Waterfront Development Agency

11. Shares in substantive CCOs

12. Auckland Central Library and the historical library collection

13. Civic Theatre, Aotea Centre, Zoo, Viaduct Events Centre, North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre, Q Theatre, Auckland Art Gallery (including the art collection owned by Regional Facilities Auckland), Mt Smart Stadium and the council's contractual rights and interests in Auckland City Arena (known as Vector Arena)

14. Social housing network including housing for the elderly

15. Shares in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL)

16. Shares in Ports of Auckland.

Strategic assets, as defined by this policy, that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO, are identified in the CCO accountability policy. CCOs must comply with the CCO accountability policy when making decisions in relation to strategic assets under their control.

 

3.3      General Criteria

The following general criteria will be applied to determine the degree of significance of a decision.

1.   The number of residents and ratepayers affected and the degree to which they are affected by the decision or proposal

2.   The likely impact/consequences of the decision or proposal from the perspective of those parties

3.   Whether this type of decision has a history of generating wide public interest within the local board area (for a local board decision) or the Auckland region or New Zealand generally (for a governing body decision)

4.   The impact of the decision on the governing body’s or local boards’ ability to deliver on the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural well-being of the local board area or Auckland region and any statutory responsibility

5.   The impact of the decision on intended service levels for a group of council activities, including a decision to commence or cease any such group of activity

6.   The degree to which the decision or proposal is reversible.

4        Approach to engagement

The extent to which the council will engage with communities and stakeholders about an issue or decision to be made will match how significant the issue or decision is. Engagement may be required at various stages of the decision-making process and may take different forms depending on the stage. Both significance and the form of engagement will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, relative to the criteria listed above. A guide to engagement methods is attached for further information.

 

4.1      Engagement principles

The following provides an overview of how council will meet the Local Government Act (LGA) principles.

 

Conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner; and give effect to its identified priorities and outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     conduct community and stakeholder engagement in a genuine effort to listen to, and consider with an open mind, community and stakeholder input;

·     when presenting options for community and stakeholder feedback, ensure the options are realistic and deliverable;

·     ensure that questions are objective (ie: not leading), allowing people to express their views freely;

·     allow enough time and provide adequate resources to ensure participants have been provided fair opportunity to understand the matter and contribute their views

·     allow time to allow for issues that might arise during an engagement process;

·     value contributions made and time given;

·     give timely feedback on the results of the public’s input and decisions made;

·     value, respect and give weight to local knowledge.

 

 

 

 

A local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all of its communities

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     build ongoing relationships with communities through a range of approaches such as through advisory panels, the People’s Panel and other reference groups and fora;

·     provide community members and stakeholders with a reasonable opportunity to present their views, and to participate in a way that suits them;

·     provide ways for the community to raise issues directly with the council so that it is a two-way relationship;

·     identify opportunities to work in partnership with community organisations and leaders to encourage greater community ownership and participation;

·     ensure good information sharing of community views and preferences within council.

 

When making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community's interests; and the interests of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them.

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     identify ways of reaching out to affected communities and stakeholders, including those who are typically heard from least often;

·     provide more than one way for people to participate;

·     when required, invest in community capacity building to enable participation;

·     use plain language and avoid jargon and acronyms.

 

A local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

To meet this principle the Council will actively consider through engagement:

·     the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tamaki Makaurau;

·     how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

Supporting Māori community infrastructure that enables:

·     early engagement with Māori in the development of appropriate plans and policies;

·     Māori to guide how they want to engage with Auckland Council.

Support Māori to fully engage with the council, for example through but not limited to capability and capacity building.


 

5        Applying the policy

5.1      Supporting information

·     Consultation and Engagement Guidebook - this provides more detailed guidance on engagement principles and good practice.

·     Guide on Engaging with Māori.

·     Quality Policy Advice guidelines

·     Templates and other related guidance such as the Accessible Communications and Information Guide.

 

5.2      Managing conflicts of interest

Auckland Council has processes in place for both elected representatives and staff on how to manage conflicts of interest, including within the community engagement and decision-making process.

 

5.3      Policy exclusions

This policy will not apply and engagement will not be required where:

·     in the opinion of the council, failure to make a decision urgently would result in unreasonable or significant damage to property, or risk to people’s health and safety, or the loss of a substantial opportunity to achieve the council’s strategic objectives. Other policy and legislative requirements will still apply.

·     Any physical alterations to strategic assets that are required to:

prevent an immediate hazardous situation arising

repair an asset to ensure public health and safety due to damage from an emergency or unforeseen situation

 

5.4      Other legislation

The Resource Management Act 1991 sets out processes for public involvement in certain decisions, for example for resource consents and when preparing and changing district plans. Not all of these decisions are required to be publicly notified but when they are, the council will follow the principles outlined above in determining the level and type of consultation required.

There are a number of other policies or bylaws that are also required under other legislation (e.g. Gambling Act) or enabled (e.g. Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act, Psychoactive Substances Act, Health Act).  Some of these are specific about the requirements and processes for engagement, but others refer back to the principles outlined above. 

 

 

5.5      Policy development, term and review

This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and will be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy will be reviewed every three years as part of the Long-term Plan process but can be amended at any time.


 

6        Schedule 1: Methods of engagement

Auckland Council uses a wide range of tools and techniques to engage with the community and stakeholders. The council uses the International Association of Public Participation spectrum as a framework for engagement which identifies the following levels:

·     Inform - to provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

·     Consult - to obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·     Involve - to work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

·     Collaborate - to partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

·     Empower - to place final decision making in the hands of the public.

During the development of a plan or policy, there might be a number of different stages of engagement with the community using a different level of participation at the different stages. This will vary depending on the decision but for complex issues, a targeted group of community and stakeholders might be ‘involved’ to aid the development of a draft document followed by wider ‘consultation’ on the draft document.

Joint Management Agreements, Memorandum of Understanding or other similar high level agreements will be considered when engaging ‘collaboratively’ with Māori.

Title: Timelines for consultation projects - Description: Simple process: step 1 developing draft plan or policy, step 2 draft of the plan released for engagement, step3 analysis of feedback and decision making.

Complex process: step 1 identify issues for development of a draft plan or policy, step 2 targeted engagement with key stakeholders to help develop the draft, step 3 draft of the plan released for engagement, step 4 analysis of feedback, step 5 hearings, step 6 decision-making.

6.1      Engagement methods

The following provides a guide to the different approaches to engagement that might be used. Other approaches may also be considered depending on the topic and population affected.

Where the decision or proposal is in relation to air, land or water, the council will take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with those places.

The council will refer to the general criteria in section 3.3 to determine the level of engagement required. In addition, the council will consider who is affected by the decision, for example, the level of diversity in terms of geographic, cultural or other key demographics.

Prior to determining an appropriate approach, the council will consider how much is already known about the community views and preferences on the issue.

 

 

Significance

Description

Example approach

Small and simple

Eg redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements

The audience is very localised or relatively small in number or very targeted. They are easy to access and the issue or decision is relatively straight forward and is not of high general public interest. For example, redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements.

Localised promotion, for example through display boards and local media. Targeted engagement with the relevant audience where appropriate. Promotion through e-newsletters and social media. Information online and through local libraries and service centres. Surveys and open days may also be appropriate. 

Medium

Eg action plans, local area plans

The audience is fairly broad or diverse: some segments are not easy to access. The issue is not straightforward and there may be mixed views from the community. For example, action plans and local area plans.

Targeted engagement with the relevant audience, online engagement which may include a survey and social media. Information available through libraries and service centres. Promotion through e-newsletters, the local media or through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland.

Large or complex

Eg Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan

The audience is large and diverse and the issue is of wide importance to the region or complex. Significant financial investment will be required. This is high profile, over-arching, touches every part of council / community. For example, Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan.

Large scale publicity and promotion. There could be an informal engagement / discussion phase plus a formal phase of consultation. There is likely to need to be consideration of different cultural styles and needs for engagement. Likely to include a range of events and a focus on online activities. Promotion through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland and through e-newsletters.

 

6.2      Special consultative procedure (SCP) 

Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 specifies the use of the SCP for some plans and processes including:

·     Long-term Plan

·     Local Board Plans

·     Annual Plan

·     Bylaws of significant interest

 

The SCP can also be used where the governing body (for a regional decision) or local board (for a local board decision) deems the issue to be significant. Under the SCP, Auckland Council is required to:

·     develop a statement of proposal and make this publicly available (and make the summary of full proposal as widely available as reasonably practicable);

·     describe how people can have their say;

·     ensure people are given an opportunity to present their views to the council; and

·     given access to a record of the decisions.

The engagement methods listed above under ‘Large or complex’ will be considered when preparing for a SCP but large or complex issues will not automatically follow a SCP.

 

6.3      Consultation (Section 82)

Auckland Council is required to carry out consultation in accordance with or giving effect to Section 82 of the Local Government Act 2002 on certain matters (regardless of whether they are considered significant as part of this policy).

For all other issues requiring a decision, the council will determine the appropriate level of engagement on a case by case basis.

 

6.4      Informal engagement

Auckland Council may seek to develop ongoing relationships with the community on general matters, rather than purely on issues that require a decision. This will also allow the community to raise matters that are not currently under consultation. This could include having a presence at markets, events and in public spaces for the purposes of hearing community views and preferences.


 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Title: University engagement event - Description: The photo shows a roadshow event at a university where there are information displays, documents and other materials for review and discussion.


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 

September 2014

Title: Auckland Council logo


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/21444

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To advise local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.  It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.   A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August 2014 and to a local board’s workshop on 18 August 2014.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan.  These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October 2014 (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October 2014 (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October 2014

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October 2014

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October 2014

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November 2014

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November 2014

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      determine if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

 

Comments

 

8.       The decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

93

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Andrew McKenzie - Chief Finance Officer

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

















Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

New Road Name - Woodridge Drive, Ruth Craig Place, Somerset Place, Eastview Crescent and Tirohanga Crescent

 

File No.: CP2014/22500

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval for the new road names in the Karepiro Holdings Limited Subdivision off Karepiro Drive and Wade River Road, Stanmore Bay.

Executive summary

2.       A condition of the subdivision consent requires the applicant to suggest to Council names for the new roads within the subdivision which will be vested to Council.

3.       The applicant wishes to name the series of roads that will serve the 124 lot mixed use subdivision as Woodridge Drive, Ruth Craig Place, Somerset Place, Eastview Crescent and Tirohanga Crescent.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 of Woodridge Drive, Ruth Craig Place, Somerset Place, Eastview Crescent and Tirohanga Crescent for the Karepiro Holdings Limited subdivision off Karepiro Drive and Wade River Road, Stanmore Bay. Council Reference SLC-55169.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       Applicant: Karepiro Holdings Limited

Site address: 79 Karepiro Drive & 127-133 Wade River Road

Council Reference: SLC-55169

5.       The original subdivision consent for this 109 lot residential and 15 lot commercial subdivision was granted in 2009.  A time extension was grated in 2014.  The subdivision will extend Karepiro Drive to the west and then create the new roads.

6.       Woodridge Drive – This will be the main road which runs through the subdivision.  The subdivision is aptly named Woodridge Estate due to the land sloping to the north from the ridge, and secondly the development preserves a large amount of the existing vegetation or ‘wood’ and further planting is also occurring.

7.       Eastview Crescent – Named due to its eastern location within the subdivisions and as residents on  this street will have panoramic views to the east.

8.       Tirohanga Crescent – Meaning view or aspect.

 

 

9.       Ruth Craig Place – In the early 1900s Mr Bruce Scott brought a large tract of land and owned the land until his death in 1947.  Scott Road is named after him.  At this time the land was passed onto and split between his three children, one of whom was Mrs Ruth Craig. Ruth Craig was devoted to mapping and surveying the land, examining the birds in the areas of bush, and either holidayed or lived on this land for 83 years of her life and was an active member of the community.  In the later years of her life, Mrs Craig sold her block of land to Cabra Developments Limited as she felt their subdivision plan would add value to the community and would satisfy her father’s vision.  Ruth Craig passed away in 2012, and this road is, therefore, named in her honour.

10.     Somerset Place – The Somerset countryside, in the United Kingdom, is renowned for its rolling topography and was a location that in older times was more popular in summer than winter.  The area has now become popular all year round.  This name was chosen as the land in this subdivision has a similar topography and also the fact that the Whangaparaoa Peninsula was also once primarily a holiday destination but is now popular in any season.

11.     Land Information NZ confirms that these names are unique and appropriate for the area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     A decision is sought from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Māori impact statement

13.     The applicant has contacted the 9 local iwi that have a vested interest in the area.

14.     Fiona McKenzie of the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Trust proposed two road names for the area, Taumata Crescent and Tirohanga Crescent.  As there is a Taumata Road in Omaha, it was decided that this name was not an appropriate option and Eastview Crescent is proposed instead.

15.     The remainder of the iwi groups have not responded.

Implementation

16.     If and when the names are approved, the developer will be advised that they are responsible for erecting the new road name signs.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

113

bView

Locality Map

115

     

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Northern Resource Consents

Authorisers

Bonnie Lees – Team Manager, Northern Resource Consents  

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Feedback on Mayoral Proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/23458

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      consider the mayoral proposal and whether to provide feedback on the implications of the proposal.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The mayoral proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the mayoral proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October 2014 to discuss responses to the mayoral proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the governing body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

 

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Financial Planning Manager Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Karen Lyons – Manager Local Board Services

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Adoption of Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23530

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

3.       The draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board considered the submissions from the SCP at its deliberations workshop in September 2014.

4.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014 is attached as Attachment A

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014.

b)      delegate to the Deputy Chairperson to approve any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

6.       Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies

·    works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

7.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

8.       The local board is required to use the SCP to consult on the draft local board plan. The SCP was held from 7 July to 6 August 2014. There were 280 submissions on the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The local board plan has been developed by considering a range of strategic issues, as well as the Auckland Plan and other regional strategies and policies.  Advice from subject matters experts, community views and public submissions has also been important in developing the plan.

10.     The local board deliberated on the SCP at its workshop in September 2014.

11.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014 is attached to this agenda.

12.     Submissions to the draft plan were supportive of all proposed six outcome areas and these have been retained in the final version.

13.     The title of the planning outcome “A better place to live” has been changed to “A great place to live due to planning well for growth” to give greater clarity and show a clear link to planning outcomes. Further information on the Hibiscus and Bays Area Plan has been added to this section to show the links between the two documents. The narrative on civil defence in this section has now been moved to the “safe and supported communities” outcome.

14.     The transport outcome of “connected communities with excellent transport choices” was considered the most important outcome by those who made submissions to the draft plan. Some additional narrative has been added in this section to ensure residents are aware of the local board’s advocacy role in this area. Signalisation at the intersection of Silverdale St and Hibiscus Coast Highway was mentioned as vitally important by a number of submitters. This initiative is supported by the local board and has been added to the initiatives table.

15.     A number of changes and additions have been made to the community development outcome of “safe and supported communities”. A submission made on behalf of a seniors workshop group asked that more focus be given in the plan on the area’s older people, particularly given the ageing population in the Hibiscus and Bays. The local board acknowledges they must consider the needs of the senior population when making decisions and a section on how they will do this is now included in the plan.

16.     A number of submissions mentioned the need for 24 hour access to medical facilities, particularly in the Hibiscus Coast area. Reference to the local board’s role as an advocate in this area is now included in the community development section.

17.     A large number of submissions relating to Smokefree issues were received by Hibiscus and Bays of which half were sent to all local boards.  The local board supports the Auckland Council smokefree policy and is committed to implementing it in the area as quickly as possible.  Reference to this is now included in the “safe and supported communities” outcome section.

18.     “A protected and enhanced environment” was considered the second most important outcome by those who made submissions to the draft plan.  A number of submitters mentioned the need to manage the issues that mangroves are causing in many of our waterways. The local board has no direct funds to assist but the plan now includes mention of the local board’s support for managing this problem through the volunteers programme. The local board’s intention to continue to work closely with the trusts that manage Stoney Homestead, Vaughan Homestead and Dacre Cottage is now mentioned in this section in relation to the protection of our heritage.

19.     Since the drafting of the local board plan earlier this year there has been a shift in funding available for locally driven projects in response to keeping rate rises to a minimum and reducing Auckland’s debt levels. References to this are made in the Chairpersons message and throughout the plan in relation to capital projects where previously funding had been more assured. Some initiatives have been removed from the initiative tables where it is no longer viable for these projects to go ahead within the next five years.   

 

Māori impact statement

20.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has given consideration to M­āori outcomes through the development of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan.  Consequently the implementation of the plan has the potential for positive outcomes for M­āori. 

21.     The local board held a hui with mana whenua in April 2014 to discuss future shared priorities and identify projects where they could work together.  The draft local board plan includes a section on valuing our local Māori identity which reflects those discussions. 

22.     The local board is committed to continuing to work with mana whenua and mataawaka, particularly on those initiatives identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2014. 

Implementation

23.     The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities.  The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Plan 2014

123

     

Signatories

Authors

Bridget Davey – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 






















































Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Meeting Schedule for 2015

 

File No.: CP2014/22434

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To recommend the meeting schedule for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for 2015.

 

Executive Summary

2.       Local board meetings are open to the public and will be notified through public notices in appropriate media.  It is prudent for the local board to adopt a meeting schedule as it ensures local board members have clarity about their commitments, gives an indication to the public of when meetings are to be held and meets the requirement of clause 19(5)(b), Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.  It also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures clarity about diary commitments.

 

3.       A meeting schedule for each local board is adopted to schedule the meetings for the upcoming year. 

 

4.       The specific times and dates for the hearing process for the Local Board Agreement 2015/2016 are yet to be finalised.  This is part of the special consultative process outlined in the Local Government Act 2002.  Local board meeting schedules will therefore need to be updated and provision made for these hearings, once the details are confirmed.

 

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopt the meeting schedule for 2015 as listed below:

 

 2015

 

DATE

TIME

VENUE

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 18 February 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 18 March 2015

4.30pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 20 May 2015

4.30pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 15 July 2015

4.30pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 19 August 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday,16 September 2015

4.30pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 21 October 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 18 November 2015

4.30pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

 

Business Meeting

Wednesday, 16 December 2015

4.30pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road

Orewa

 

 

b)      Notes that the dates and times for hearings and deliberations for the Local Board Agreement 2015/2016 are not finalised and as such the meeting schedule may require alteration. 

 

 

Discussion

5.       Adopting a meeting schedule allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures local board members have clarity about their commitments.  It also gives an indication to the public of when meetings are to be held and meets the requirement of clause 19, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

6.       Each local board develops a Local Board Agreement annually.  This document is subject to public consultation and the local board will hold hearings to give submitters the opportunity to express their views verbally.

7.       The specific times and dates for the hearings process for the local board agreement are yet to be finalised.  Local board meeting schedules may therefore need to be updated and provision made for hearings, once details are confirmed.

8.       In addition to local board meetings, local boards will hold workshops that are closed to the public.  The proceedings of every workshop are recorded and considered at the next business meeting of the local board in accordance with current local board standing order provisions.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views

9.       This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

10.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.

General

11.     Clauses 19(4), 19(5) and 19(6), Schedule 7, of the Local Government Act 2002 states that:

“(4) A local authority must hold meetings at the times and places that it appoints.

(5) Unless clause 22 (extraordinary meeting) applies, the chief executive must give notice in writing to each member of the time and place of a meeting -

(a) not less than 14 days before the meeting; or

(b) if the local authority has adopted a schedule of meetings, not less than 14 days before the first meeting on the schedule.”

(6) If a local authority adopts a schedule of meetings, -

(a) the schedule –

(i) may cover any future period that the local authority considers appropriate; and

(ii) may be amended; and

(b) notification of the schedule or of any amendment to that schedule constitutes a notification of every meeting on the schedule or amendment.”

12.     Similarly, the statutory requirement pursuant to clauses 46, 46(A) and 47 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 mentions that:

·          meetings of a local authority are publicly notified

·          agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting

·          local board meetings are open to the public.

Implementation Issues

13.     Meetings of the local boards are supported by Auckland Council’s Local Board Services Department.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Community Grants Policy Feedback

 

File No.: CP2014/23802

 

  

 

 

Executive summary

1.       At a business meeting on 17 September 2014 the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board delegated authority to interested members to prepare feedback on behalf of the local board to the Community Grants Policy.  A copy of the feedback is attached (Attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Community Grants Policy feedback memorandum dated 2 October 2014.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Community Grants Policy Feedback

183

     

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2014/22553

 

   

 

Purpose

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Cr Wayne Walker and Cr John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local Board Members Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/22554

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       This is an opportunity for local board members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the information.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

 

File No.: CP2014/22548

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on 27 August 2014 and 3 September 2014.  A copy of these workshop records is attached.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the records of the workshop meetings held on 27 August 2014 and 3 September 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Record of 27 August 2014

193

bView

Workshp Record of 3 September 2014

197

    

Signatories

Authors

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 




Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


      

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains information on proposed changes that may impact the employment of staff within the Auckland Council group..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.