I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 October 2014

3.30pm

Council Chamber
Henderson Civic Centre
6 Henderson Valley Road
Henderson

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Shane Henderson

 

Members

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Peter Chan, JP

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Will Flavell

 

 

Tracy Kirkley

 

 

Luke Wilson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

 

Busola Martins

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

9 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 440 7323

Email: busola.martins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

9          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Member Tracey Kirkley report - Making Community Governance Work for You and Your Communities Forum                                                                                                      9

13        Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme 2014/2015 13

14        Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Group Funding, Applications for Round Two, 2013/2014                                                                                                             37

15        Allocation of funding to support 'Summer in Henderson' event marketing concept  41

16        Fees and charges for Te Atatu Peninsula Community Centre                              45

17        Request for approval of Capital renewal works for WestWave Aquatic Centre 2014/15                                                                                                                                       49

18        Deed of Lease for Additional Space to Ranui Community House Incorporated, 472 - 474 Swanson Road, Ranui                                                                                                 53

19        Renewal of Community Lease for Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula                                                  63

20        Renewal of Community Lease for The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South                                                                       67

21        Renewal of Community Lease for The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South                                                                       71

22        Waterview Connection Project - Design Approval                                                  75

23        Update on SH16/20 Waterview expenditure plan                                                     87

24        LTP 2015-2025 Feedback on mayoral proposal                                                       89

25        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                        91

26        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                      125

27        Deliberations Report on the Henderson-Massey draft local board plan            153


 

28        Adoption of the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2014

            This report was not available at the time of building this agenda and will be circulated under separate cover.

29        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) 157

30        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014                                                                                                                             241

31        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                             253

32        Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference                    263

33        Auckland Development Committee - Housing Action Plan update                    267

34        Recommendation from Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee - 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report                                                                    291  

35        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

36        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               299

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   299  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The following are the declared conflicts of interest as at 2nd October 2014.

 

BOARD MEMBER

ORGANISATION

POSITION

Vanessa Neeson, JP (Chairman)

Ranui Sector Trial

Chair

Shane Henderson (Deputy Chairman)

Waitakere Community Law Service
Ranui Action Project

Employee
Co-Chairman

Brenda Brady, JP

Keep Waitakere Beautiful
Safer West Community Trust
Sunnyvale Residents & Ratepayers Society Inc.
West Auckland Historical Society
District Licensing Committee

Trustee
Trustee
Member
Member
Member

 Peter Chan, JP

Cantonese Opera Society of NZ
Asian Leaders Forum
NZ-Hong Kong Business Ass.
NZ-China Business Ass.
Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

Member
Member
Member
Member
Advisor

Warren Flaunty, QSM

Westgate Pharmacy
West Auckland Hospice
NorSGA Properties
Westgate Pharmacy Ltd
The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd Rodney Local Board
Waitemata District Health Board
Waitakere Licensing Trust
Massey Matters Inc.
Massey Birdwood Settlers Ass.
Taupaki Residents & Ratepayers Ass.

Contractor
Trustee
Director
Director
Director
Elected Member
Elected Member
Elected Member
Member
Member
Member

Will Flavell

Rutherford College

Employee

Tracy Kirkley

District Licensing Committee

Heart of Te Atatu South         

Member

Member

Luke Wilson

NZ Police - Massey Community Constable
D.A.R.E. West

Employee
Member

 


 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         Confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 October 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Item withdrawn

 

9          Item withdrawn

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Member Tracey Kirkley report - Making Community Governance Work for You and Your Communities Forum

 

File No.: CP2014/23588

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide Member Tracey Kirkley’s with the opportunity to inform Henderson Massey Local Board members of her learnings from the Making Community Governance Work for You and Your Communities Forum held on 25 September 2014 in Wellington.

Executive summary

2.       The forum was hosted by the Institute of Governance and Policy Studies, Victoria University.

3.       The workshop was broken into three morning sessions and two afternoon sessions. This report is an overview and summary of the notes taken at the conference. 

Session One : Peter McKinlay

4.       The Great Governance shift- there are trends emerging:

5.       There is a growing desire for shared decision making, examples of recent developments and practices.  UK- Lyons enquiry- place shaping at the principal role.

6.       Localism – empowering local government

7.       Nontraditional entities   (Funding trusts) how does their activity shape the direction of local communities? - distributing discretionary funds with the purpose of improving community outcomes.

8.       What are the implications?

9.       How do people want to engage?  Attitudes are changing, voting is no longer enough, and may not even be relevant to many people.

10.     Residents are not just voters, but customers - crucially, people who want to share in the decisions which affect their place. People want access to information.

11.     Council – Has two roles. Provision and production: i.e. egg: London Borough of Barnet, work with residents to set strategic priorities in the context of available resources and agree to a set of outcomes that reflect the needs of residents, a mix of in house and private sector service provision.

12.     There is the potential for technology to replace and side lines much of LGs role in community governance and leadership: i.e. website: neighbourly.co.nz, the way people communicate in social media etc.

13.     There is a basic assumption that LG will always be with us and always be lead player on community governance. However there is an emerging reality: community governance is becoming multi- faceted and communities have a number of potential partners. Whether Local government as we know it will always be of one of those is far from guaranteed.  The Message for LG -  this world is changing very rapidly, continued existence  of traditional  role of LG  is  seen by how much people value it, and see its relevance.  Will it be around in its present form in 20 years? 

14.     Statutory obligations often translate to a compliance mentality “tick the boxes “or go out and get it done/ - needing that flexibility in meeting comm needs.

15.     Council can tend to adopt a culture of consumer/ customers – not citizens.  This needs to be turned around. How?

16.     A great example of the Bendigo Bank was given, a case study of a commercial corporate investing and giving back directly to effect positive and tangible community outcomes, provision of resources etc.

 

Speaker - Gary Turner -  Thames  Coromandel District Council

17.     In 2012- there was a complete wipeout of all current elected members, only one elected member survived.   There was bold change coming – the Ivory towers were being dismantled.

18.     The outcome : Significant re-modelling back the district council model of boroughs, but without the bureaucracy.  Changed from a centralized council to service Centre offices established,  there were cost tradeoffs to build up Area offices.

19.     If the policy is not working- review the policy. De-centralized service delivery, capital management tightened.  “Feet on the street” 

20.     Council officers have delegations – 20 hrs. can be done in 2.  Direct on site meetings, with planners, decisions are made.  Parks services outsourced.  Community Board has broad delegations, with staff member support. The budget is then debated with Mayor/councilors.

21.     In TCDC’s view the inclusion of Boards in decision making must be genuine and extensive, leading to integrated leadership around a common vision

22.     My observation - (this model is miles apart from Auckland Council, a centralized model) yet it is significantly stronger, with surprising financial outcomes / rates intake below projected budgets.

23.     Suggestion:  Possibility of a road trip? ATEED  went down recently.

           

Paul Leistner-  City of Portland , Neighborhood Program Co ordinator

24.     Paul outlined a 40 year journey toward stronger community governance in the Portland area.   Population:  603,000 for the city,  2.3 million In the region.

25.     Breadth – ensure a broad diversity of people and perspectives and involved/ heard

26.     Depth - community members have real opportunity to affect outcomes. Traditional top down model is expert driven (adult /child) what can you tell me?

27.     Community Governance:  comm and local government partnership (adult/adult)

28.     Neighborhood Association implemented 1970s with the support of city staff. (95 staff helps the volunteer NA’s) – Self defined independent.  The neighborhood districts are funded by city Govt - $2 m, with staff of 30, 40. 

29.     Early 2000’s – top down funding cuts to NA’s- increased conflict.  This is not the Portland way. (A strong parallel with the Waitakere way) 

30.     A new mayor - mid/ late 2000’s re-engages Local Government with communities, new small grants program established, 7 districts, community run.

31.     Events- way to bring individuals together. Many are not community connected, but block parties, movies in parks etc. bring people together.

32.     People define their “community” in different ways, geographic, shared identity, shared issues. Interests can define a community - i.e. ethnic/ refugee.

33.     Identify and support different types of community, support given for people organizing with others whom they feel connected

34.     Encourage people to be involved in civic life and activities.

35.     An Office of Neighborhood Involvement was established.

36.     Its Mission:   to promote a culture of civic engagement by connecting and supporting Partnership,  early involvement, building relationships and community capacity, inclusiveness and equity, (staging times of meetings, accessibility,  transport, don’t just work with the people who are easy to reach)  good quality process design and implementation (don’t promise the impossible ) , transparency (how was our input used ? – Reporting back -)

37.     Tell the story to build broad support for community involvement, highlight our success stories.

38.     Questions: why does consultation need to be formal? Do the informal, the views and comments given it get considered with the same weight as formal? 

 

Round table discussions. 

39.     Q.  How do we build community governance in our communities?

40.     Q.  What realistic steps can we take to ensure continuing along the journey in the long term?

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receives Member Kirkley’s report on the Making Community Governance Work for You and Your Communities Forum.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Kirkley – Elected member, Henderson-Massey Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/22425

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the 2013/2014 Community Waitakere-Auckland Council Shared Work Programme (SWP) and seek approval of the 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme and funding.

Executive summary

2.       Community Waitakere has completed almost all deliverables agreed in the 2013/14 SWP. The Annual Report on the 2013/2014 SWP submitted by Community Waitakere is attached (Attachment A).

3.       A draft Community Waitakere-Auckland Council SWP has been developed for the 2014/2015 financial year. A copy of the draft SWP is attached (Attachment B).

4.       Funding allocated for the SWP in the Henderson-Massey Local Board budget needs to be released to ensure that Community Waitakere is able to meet financial obligations such as staff salaries in order to deliver on the SWP.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approves the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme

b)      Approves the funding of $83,520 for the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme.

 

Comments

 

5.      A partnering agreement was signed between Waitakere City Council and Community Waitakere on 29 November 2006 and renewed in 2010.

6.      A shared work programme has been negotiated on an annual basis with associated funding allocated in the Long Term Plan 2006-2016.

7.       The following is an overview of the work that has been undertaken by Community Waitakere that meets the deliverables agreed for the 2013/2014 year:

Strengthening Community Development

·    disseminated research, evaluation learnings and tools on website

·    supported capacity building e.g. “Committee 101” as part of training for a women’s leadership group in Massey

·    inquiry report on potential future of the Wellbeing Collaboration Strategy Project completed and disseminated.

 

Community Infrastructure

·    Open Door Days were well attended with sessions being held in different parts of the western local board cluster area

·    continued to convene Chief Executives Round Table meetings of local community and social sector agencies

·    civic engagement through forums e.g. co-facilitated (with Auckland Regional Public Health Service) three community workshops on the Auckland Council’s Draft Local Alcohol Policy at community hubs and houses in Henderson, Avondale and Glen Eden; and co-hosted a workshop with council staff on Auckland Council’s Draft Community Grants Policy

·    Community Resource Centre: affordable offices for rent available to community groups (between 80 - 100% occupancy), meeting room hire has increased

·    Skills Capacity Building: 227 attendees,12 training workshops

·    regular E-noticeboard reach continues to grow with almost 1000 subscribers.

 

Community Economic Development

·    continued to facilitate and support the Community Economic Development Network West

·    Enterprising Communities projects working across Massey and Glen Eden have been transitioned to Community Waitakere and Massey Matters.

 

Place Based Leadership

·    support provided informally to community through walk-ins, telephone and email with enquiries on a  range of matters including training, room hire, services and events

·    support also provided informally to community organisations on issues such as strategy, funding, Charities Services registration, accounts and financial management

·    work with place based initiatives to provide support as needed e.g. Henderson Town Centre safety issues.

 

8.       In response to feedback from local boards, Community Waitakere has sought to orient deliverables where possible to the different local board areas. The vast majority of the SWP has been delivered during the 2013/14 year, other than the scoping of back office support. This work has therefore been prioritised for the 2014/15 SWP.

9.       The draft 2014/2015 SWP has been developed in consultation with representatives of all western local boards to align with Auckland Council’s Thriving Communities Strategic Action Plan and local board priorities. The SWP has two main focus areas: community and place based leadership, and community infrastructure.

10.     In previous years, funding for the SWP was held in a regional budget. Since the 2013/2014 financial year, this funding has been devolved to local board budgets, with an allocation of $83,520 in each of the Henderson-Massey, Whau and Waitakere Ranges Local Board 2014/15 budgets.

11.     The allocation of $83,520 in the Henderson-Massey Local Board budget for the 2014/15 SWP needs to be released to Community Waitakere to support delivery of agreed activities.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     This report seeks local board approval of the SWP and associated funding. An operational review of the arrangement with Community Waitakere is currently underway. This process is due for completion in the first half of the current financial year, and no decisions have been made at this time that could impact on delivery of the 2014/15 SWP.

Māori impact statement

13.     The deliverables in the SWP contribute to wellbeing for Maori residents in the area by Community Waitakere and council working within a Treaty of Waitangi framework.

Implementation

14.     Council staff will regularly liaise with Community Waitakere staff to provide additional support required to deliver the SWP.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme
Final Report to 30 June 2014

17

bView

Auckland Council and Community Waitakere 2014/15 Shared Work Programme

31

     

Signatories

Authors

Tony Rea - Manager Community development & Partnerships – West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Kevin Marriott’s title to Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 














Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 







Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Group Funding, Applications for Round Two, 2013/2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22051

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications received under round two of the Henderson-Massey Local Board 2013/2014 Community Funding programme. The Henderson-Massey Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has a total Community Programme budget for 2013/2014 of $50,627. This is being distributed to community groups in two funding rounds. The first round closed on 5 July 2013 and the second on 28 February 2014.

3.       Under round one, the board committed $35,161 from its Community Funding programme budget, which leaves a balance of $15,466 for round two.

4.       The applications to be considered are those received for round two, which is the second and final round in this financial year.

5.       Forty-two applications have been received, requesting a total of $201,893.

 

Recommendation:

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      considers the applications listed in Table 1 and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table 1 – Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Funding Applications.

Organisation

Funding for

Amount requested

Multiple Sclerosis Auckland

Towards the pool hire and contract fees for qualified physiotherapist attendance at West Wave Swimming Pool

$5,000.00

Parent aid Waitakere Inc.

Towards the office lease and administration costs

$14,020.00

YMCA of Auckland Inc.

Towards the purchase and installation of new basketball hoops at the Massey Leisure Centre

$11,906.00

Ethiopian Sports and Cultural Club Inc.

Towards hall hireage, costume hire, fees for the performance coordinator, transport and refreshments for the event ‘Performance West’

$1,550.00

Netball Waitakere

Towards the purchase of medals, badges and trophies for the winter league prize giving

$9,451.00

Antara Association Inc. - Antara Free Natural Health Clinic

Towards the purchase of a vacuum cleaner

$699.00

Project Litefoot

Towards the costs of implementing LiteClub at Starling Park Sports Club

$2,873.00

Waiatarua Community Patrol Group

Towards first aid training for the volunteers

$1,000.00

Communicare (CMA)

Towards venue hire for the Te Atatu and Massey Friendship Centre

$3,456.00

Women's Centre Waitakere

Towards purchasing books, facilitator fees and window tinting for 111 McLeod Road, Te Atatu South

$4,700.00

Life Education Trust Waitakere

Towards the purchase of workbooks for use in the mobile classroom

$4,000.00

Barnardos New Zealand

Towards the purchase of resources, microwave and table chairs for the HIPPY programme at Colwill School

$3,892.00

Postnatal Distress Support Network Trust

Towards office rent at the Integrated Neurological Rehabilitation Foundation

$5,000.00

Hare Krishna Veggie Burgers

Towards the purchase of food and set up costs for the Veggie Burgers project in Henderson

$5,000.00

Blind Foundation

Towards a salary for the blind counsellor

$5,000.00

West City Youth Trust

Towards volunteer reimbursement, advertising, resources, prizes, event uniforms, venue hire and hireage of sports gear for youth workers in schools

$2,050.00

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards the facilitation and room rental costs for the basic youth and community Counselling Skills

$3,625.00

The Parenting Place - Toolbox Division

Towards additional subsidies for participants, course handbooks and volunteer expenses for courses run in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area

$2,699.00

Silver Fern MotorSport Charitable Trust

Towards fuel, salaries, and overhead costs of the Youth At Risk programme

$5,000.00

Neighbourhood Support Waitakere including Junior Neighbourhood Support Waitakere programme

Towards the purchase of the volunteer resource kits (portable table, chair, flags, gazebo and printing) and entrance fees to Rainbows End for the Junior Neighbourhood Support Big Day Out

$2,369.00

Action Education Incorporated

Towards facilitation costs and room rental for personal development programmes

$2,609.00

Fair Food Trust

Towards the purchase and printing of volunteer t-shirts and equipment for the volunteers

$2,240.00

Getin2life Youth Development Trust

Towards costs associated with running 6 Underground Street Play sessions in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area

$3,288.00

Christian Assist Trust

Towards the purchase of a laptop and printer for use at the Colwill School Budgeting Service

$707.00

Massey Community Trust

Towards the purchase of programme resources, hall hire costs, salary of the programme director and volunteer expenses for Breakfr3 programme.

$7,800.00

Te Atatu Peninsula Community Trust

Towards painting the inside of the building for the Te Atatu Peninsula Community Trust

$5,000.00

Te Ukaipo Mercy Initiatives for Rangatahi Limited

Towards the purchase of food and equipment for the Te Ukaipo Teaching Outreach in Ranui programme

$5,000.00

Ranui Swanson Waitakere Community Patrol

Towards the purchase of a vehicle for the  Ranui Swanson Patrols

$10,000.00

The Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Waitemata

Towards the operational costs of the West Auckland Family Centre in Henderson

$7,313.00

Auckland Action Against Poverty

Towards costs cellphone contracts, purchase of laptop, printer, volunteer expenses and equipment for the Kelston Community Hub

$1,900.00

Ranui Action Project

Towards purchase of a trailer BBQ for projects/events in the Ranui area

$5,000.00

Massey Community House

Towards costs associated with the Halloween and Christmas in the Park events at Triangle Park

$7,010.00

Massey Community House

Towards the purchase of equipment (playground, seating, storage and mural) for the beautification of Triangle Park

$5,000.00

Rainbow Youth Inc.

Towards the design, poster, pamphlets, postage and packaging for the Auckland Public Spaces Initiative

$3,000.00

Migrant Action Trust

Towards facilitators fees, workshop material, venue hire, administration and coordination costs, mileage and projector hire for the Start Right in NZ at the Waitakere Resource Centre

$4,222.00

Sport Waitakere

Towards the purchase of prizes, corflute sign, advertising pedometers and trophies for Run4Fun at Moire Park, Massey

$2,500.00

Piha Community Centre Society Incorporated

Towards roof treatment for the Barnett Hall, Piha

$825.00

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards travel expenses for volunteers, coordinator’s salary, workshop costs, programme overheads, facility rental and van hire for the ARMS Newcomer Supporter Programme

$14,273.00

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust - FYD Auckland

Towards camp costs, bus hire and staffing salaries for the Stars Peer Support at Rutherford College

$5,000.00

Waitakere Community Law Service

Towards the purchase of furniture for the Waitakere Community Law Services at 1a Trading Place, Henderson

$5,916.00

Henderson Community Men's Shed Trust

Towards the purchase of timber for the Mens Shed in Henderson

$5,000.00

Violence Free Waitakere

Towards the salary for the ECE Facilitator, salary for the Manutehau Hub ECE assistant, refreshments, venue koha and purchase of art materials for Massey East Community Weaving event

$5,000.00

 

Total:

$201,893.00

 

 

 

 

 

 


Comments

6.       In March 2013 the Regional Operations and Development Committee agreed to the continuation of the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year:

“That the Regional Development and Operations Committee endorse the continuation of the interim community funding programme for the 2013/2014 financial year, in accordance with current budgets and decisions-making delegations, due to the complexity of the range of funding models currently operating across the region, with the expectation that a new funding policy be in place for the 2014.2015 financial year, or before” (RDO/2013/32).

7.       Forty-two applications were received for this round, requesting a combined total of $201,893.

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Funding Programme Budget for 2013/14 is $50,627 of which $35,161 has been paid in grants, leaving a balance of $15,466.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       Board members received a summary of each application along with information relating to the current legacy community funding scheme priorities that apply.

Maori impact statement

10.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori.  Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community. The provision of community funding to support community development initiatives provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes and activities that benefit Maori.

Implementation

11.     Staff will confirm in writing all grants made by the local board and will administer payment and receipt of accountability for all grants made. The team will also notify all unsuccessful applicants in writing.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Kim Hammond - Community Grants and Support Officer West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Allocation of funding to support 'Summer in Henderson' event marketing concept

 

File No.: CP2014/23741

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek funding for street pole banners and media advertising as a part of the ‘Summer in Henderson’ event marketing concept.

Executive summary

2.       ‘Summer in Henderson’ is a marketing concept designed to promote events in Henderson, including regionally and local board funded and delivered events and those run by community groups and other organisations.

3.       The aim is to demonstrate that the Henderson area is a place where lots of ‘cool stuff’ happens, much of it free and family-oriented.

4.       It would not interfere with or try to customise other event advertising campaigns, but would create the concept that the events are part of the ‘Summer in Henderson’ event series.

5.       The concept was presented and discussed in detail at the Henderson-Massey Local Board workshop on 7 October and the marketing brief (attachment A) outlines the costings and details.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Allocate funding of $2689.20 for 18 street pole banners

b)      Allocate funding of $2800 per insert for full page colour Western Leader advertising

c)      Allocate funding of $800 per insert for 20x4 colour Western Leader advertising

d)      Identify a budget cost centre for allocated funding.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

'Summer in Henderson' marketing brief

43

     

Signatories

Authors

Wendy Kjestrup - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Summer in Henderson

 

‘Summer in Henderson’ is a concept designed to promote events that are funded, delivered and supported by the Local Board, as well as those run by community groups and organisations.

 

The aim is to demonstrate that the Henderson area is a place where lots of “cool stuff” happens – much of it free and family-oriented.

 

Events will be linked from the Auckland Council events page and listed under the local events header at:

 

www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/hendersonmassey

 

A link to this page and promotion of these events will be found at:

 

www.facebook.com/hendersonmassey

 

Other options for promoting events (over and above regular campaigns such as ‘Movies and Music in Parks’) include:

 

-     Street pole banners

-     Posters (A1/A3)

-     Neighbourly website

-     Media advertising

-     Adshels

-     Community web/FB pages

-    

For street pole banners (see attached examples), design would need to be bright (with maybe a sun incorporated into the design), simple and highly visible eg.

 

‘Summer in
 Henderson’

facebook.com/
hendersonmassey

[HMLB logo]

 

A reverse side could be a plain colour with sun logo or read eg:

Fun and
events for all

the family

[HMLB logo]

 

Adshels (if available) would need a similar treatment to be readable and effective.

Posters/newspapers ads etc could allow for the incorporation of more detail.

 


It is recommended that people are directed to the HMLB Facebook page for the following reasons:

 

1.   The url is easier to remember and use than www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/hendersonmassey/events

2.   It allows people to view other pieces of work/activities in the HMLB space that are commonly posted on Facebook.

 

 

Street (light) pole banners

 

-      There are 18 sites along Great North Road (Henderson)

-      Design done by council’s internal design studio

-      Production of banners (based on digitally printed banners in low quantities, screen printed banners can be lower in cost) $89.90 (each)

-      Installation of banners (council rate)   $59.50 (per pole)

-      Total cost of printing and installation x 18 = $2689.20

 

Adshels (bus stops)

 

-      Example: 12 x Adshels for a two-week period $4,644

 

 

Media advertising (Western Leader)

 

-      Example 1: Full page colour approx per insertion $2800

-      Example 2: 20x4 colour approx. per insertion $800

 

 

In terms of marketing regional programmes such as ‘Music and Movies in Parks’, we would not interfere with or try to customise those campaigns – there would be a cost issue and risk of confusing the brands – but make sure through our promotion that the events are recognised as part of the ‘Summer in Henderson’ event series.

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Fees and charges for Te Atatu Peninsula Community Centre

 

File No.: CP2014/22265

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Henderson-Massey Local Board approval of the fees and charges schedule proposed for the five bookable spaces within Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre at 595 Te Atatū Road.

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are required to set fees for the hire of local council-managed community venues, centres and arts facilities.

3.       Fees and charges for the new Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre were not included in the fees and charges schedule adopted as part of the 2014-2015 Henderson-Massey Local Board Agreement.

4.       The proposed fees and charges for Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre have been calculated using the ‘hire fee’ framework model which takes into account the size, condition, quality of each bookable space, levels of staffing and amenities available.

5.       It is recommended that the proposed fees and charges if adopted by the local board be reviewed before the end of 2014-2015 year and changed if required.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board :

a)      Adopts the fees and charges for Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre as follows:

Published Peak Standard hourly rate

Kotuku-Heron Hall                                 $89.00

Mātātā-Fern Bird Room                        $49.00

Kotare-Kingfisher Room                       $44.00

Kuaka-Godwit Room                            $39.00

Tuturiwhata-Dotterel Room                   $34.00

Published Off-Peak Standard hourly rate

Kotuku-Heron Hall                                 $71.20

Mātātā-Fern Bird Room                        $39.20

Kotare-Kingfisher Room                       $35.20

Kuaka-Godwit Room                            $31.20

Tuturiwhata-Dotterel Room                   $27.20

b)      The fees and charges set for Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre be reviewed before the end of 2014-2015 year and changed if required.

 

Comments

6.       Local boards are allocated the setting of fees and discounts for hire of their local council-run community arts venues, halls, centres and houses.  This allocation supports delivery of services, projects, events and activities for the wider community’s benefit.

7.       The following principles for bookings, fees and discounts for Henderson-Massey Local Board are:

·      On a first-come first-served basis, and charged at standard rates.

·      In order to meet demand for use of the facilities, a discount is applied at off peak hours.

·      Regular users (10 or more bookings per year) will be charged at a discounted rate.

·      Bookings for activities which achieve community outcomes and benefits that the Local Board has prioritised or which directly support priority outcomes and transformational shifts of the Auckland Plan, may be eligible for an additional discount, if certain criteria are met.

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board resolved on 17 April 2014 (HM/2014/66) that the priority activities for maximum discounts are those activities where the primary purpose is not for individual financial gain and offered by not-for-profit and community groups. Some groups may be eligible for 50% discount off the published rate.

9.       At that time the local board resolved that commercial hirers and religious ministry were to be charged at the standard rate.

10.     Proposed Fees and Charges for Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre are:

Room

Capacity

Published  Peak Standard

Published  Off-Peak Standard

Kotuku-Heron Hall

700

$89.00

$71.20

Mātātā-Fern Bird Room

50

$49.00

$39.20

Kotare-Kingfisher Room

40

$44.00

$35.20

Kuaka-Godwit Room

30

$39.00

$31.20

Tuturiwhata-Dotterel Room

24

$34.00

$27.20

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     The implementation of the new fees and charges framework was supported by the local board.

12.     The local board resolved to amend fees and charges for the 2014/2015 year for local community and arts facilities, so that the fees remain nearest 2013/2014 levels. These decisions confirmed that legacy or historical arrangements no longer applied.


 

13.     The fees and charges schedule effective at 1 July 2014 for community centres in the Henderson-Massey Local Board region are:

 

 

Hourly rate

as of 1 July 2014

Facility Category

Facility Name

Room

Capacity

Peak Standard

Off-Peak Standard

Community Houses and Centres

Kelston Community Centre

Activity Room 1

 

 

150

 $       26.00

 $       20.80

 

 

Activity Room 2

150

 $       26.00

 $       20.80

 

 

Committee Room

 

50

 $       20.00

 $       16.00

 

 

Main Hall

350

 $       39.00

 $       32.20

 

Te Atatu South Community Centre

Activity Room 1

 

 

100

 $       34.00

 $       27.20

 

 

Main Hall

230

 $       32.00

 $       25.60

 

Māori impact statement

14.     Opportunities for Maori to pursue social, cultural and environmental activities will be available through Te Atatū Peninsula Community Centre.

Implementation

15.     Should the local board approve the proposed fees and charges, it is planned that members of the public will be able to book use of the community centre from 1 November 2014.

16.     It is recommended that the proposed fees and charges if adopted by the local board be reviewed before the end of 2014-2015 year and changed if required.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Brya Taylor - Team Leader Community Centres South-West.

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Request for approval of Capital renewal works for WestWave Aquatic Centre 2014/15

 

File No.: CP2014/21295

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the Westwave Aquatic Centre renewal capital work schedule for the 2014/15 financial year

Executive summary

2.       To continue the delivery of aquatic and recreational services and ensure the integrity of your assets, an ongoing capital works schedule is required.  This capital work schedule seeks to address future degradation of the building infrastructure, maintain or improve current service levels, capitalise on sustainability opportunities, and address health and safety concerns.  The work schedule includes deferred works which will not require sign off.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approves the 2015 aquatic and recreation facility building renewal capital work schedule.

b)      Approves Auckland Council Officers to have delegated authority to manage the projects within the funding budget indicated in the list.

 

Comments

 

3.       The Auckland Councils Long Term Plan for this Board has a budget allocated for aquatic and recreational facilities building renewals.  This budget is allocated across 1 facility – Westwave Aquatic Centre. The purpose of the proposed capital work schedule is to ensure the future integrity of the buildings and surrounding infrastructure, maintain and improve the current level of service and efficiencies, and address any immediate or potential safety compliance issues.

4.       The Aquatic and leisure facilities represent an asset group with significant risk.  The conditions within the facilities (i.e. chlorinated pool halls and areas of continual high impact use) if not maintained effectively will result in the asset deteriorating at a rapid rate, reduction in the level of service that is able to be offered.

The specific projects below have been complied on information and advice from the Auckland Council Properties Department, the respective facility managers and an energy report compiled to improve the operational efficiencies of the Westwave Aquatic Centre


 

5.       The full list of projects are detailed below

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.       The capital work schedule will have been discussed with the Local Board Representatives of the Henderson Massey Local Board.

Māori impact statement

7.       There are no particular impacts on Maori which are different from general users of the aquatic and recreation facilitates

Implementation

8.       Once approval for the schedule of work is received, project initiation forms will be completed from which the properties department will source a contractor to complete the works. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Westwave Capital renewals works

51

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane  Franich - Contract Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Deed of Lease for Additional Space to Ranui Community House Incorporated, 472 - 474 Swanson Road, Ranui

 

File No.: CP2014/23026

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Henderson-Massey Local Board approval to grant a Deed of Lease for Additional Space to Ranui Community House Incorporated, 472 - 474 Swanson Road, Ranui, being part of Lot 10 and Lot 11 DP 20280. 

Executive summary

2.       Ranui Community House Incorporated (Community House) has a current community lease with Auckland Council from 1 September 2010 for a term of 5 years to 1 September 2015.  The community lease provides for a right of renewal for a further term of 5 years from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2020.  The building is council owned.

3.       The Community House seeks approval for a Deed of Lease for Additional Space, located on part of Lot 10 and Lot 11 Deposited Plan 20280.

4.       The property is described as being Lots 10 and 11 Deposited Plan 20280 comprising 736 and 1014 square metres respectively.  Lots 10 and 11 are held in fee simple by the Auckland Council and neither Lot is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       The Community House wishes to inherit the library space from Ranui Library.  The Ranui Library will vacate the premises in 2014 and move into the new library being built adjacent to the Community House. 

6.       On 3 October 2013, the Henderson-Massey Local Board passed a Resolution HM/2013/225 approving the space currently occupied by the Ranui Library to be given to the Ranui Community House once the Ranui Library vacates the premises.

7.       As specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, community occupancy agreements for community halls and community houses may not necessarily be publicly notified.

8.       Council staff recommends the granting of a Deed of Lease for Additional Space to the Community House for a term of 10 months from 16 October 2014 to 1 September 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approves a Deed of Lease for Additional Space to Ranui Community House Incorporated located at 474 Swanson Road, Ranui (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – Commencing 16 October 2014 to 1 September 2015

All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Comments

 

9.       The Community House has a community lease with Auckland Council from 1 September 2010 for a term of 5 years to 1 September 2015.  The community lease provides for a right of renewal for a further term of 5 years from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2020.  The building is council owned.

10.     The community house seeks approval for a Deed of Lease for Additional Space at the Community House, located on part of Lot 10 and Lot 11 Deposited Plan 20280.

11.     The property is described as being Lots 10 and 11 Deposited Plan 20280 comprising 736 and 1014 square metres respectively.  Lots 10 and 11 are held in fee simple by the Auckland Council and neither Lot is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

12.     The Community House wishes to inherit the library space from the Ranui Library.  On 3 October 2013, the Henderson-Massey Local Board passed a Resolution HM/2013/225 (Attachment B), approving the space currently occupied by the Ranui Library to be given to the Ranui Community House once the Ranui Library vacates the premises.

13.     The Ranui Library will vacate the premises and move into the new library being built adjacent to the Community House.  The Community House is currently short of space and incorporating the library space into their existing community lease will allow the Community House to continue its existing activities and enable the Community House to further promote the wellbeing of the Ranui Community.

14.     The Community House has been registered as an Incorporated Society since 23 October 2007.

15.     The objectives of the community house are to promote the wellbeing of the Ranui Community and run the Ranui Community Centre as a neighbourhood resource centre offering social, recreational, educational, cultural, and health and welfare activities to the public, in keeping with the needs of the neighbourhood.

16.     Council officers have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     At a Henderson-Massey portfolio holders meeting held on 10 September 2014, informal support for a Deed of Lease for Additional Space to the Community House was indicated.

18.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

19.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

20.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

21.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A

57

bView

Attachment B

61

     

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Site Plan for the Ranui Community House Incorporated

 

Location Map and Leased Area for Ranui Community House Incorporated

 

Property outlined in red, Leased Area outlined in Blue, Additional leased area outlined in Yellow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Renewal of Community Lease for Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula

 

File No.: CP2014/23042

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Henderson-Massey Local Board approval to grant a renewal of lease to Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated, on part of land known as Te Atatu Peninsula Park, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula. 

Executive summary

2.       Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated (the Club), had a community lease with legacy Waitakere Council from 1 June 1980 for a term of 33 years to 31 May 2013.  The renewal of lease for the Club is for a term of 33 years from 1 June 2013 to 31 May 2046.  The Club is currently occupying the building on a month by month basis.  The Club owns the building.

3.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Te Atatu Peninsula Park, being part of Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 and Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347.

4.       Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council and classified as a recreation reserve.  Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347 is held by the Crown through DOC and is classified as a recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for recreational purposes.  Lot 1 and Lot 47 are currently leased correctly to the Club in terms of the Reserves Act for lease renewal purposes.

5.       Clause 25 of the Deed of Lease dated 20 May 1980 provides for a renewal of lease to the Club for a further term of 33 years on the same terms and conditions. 

6.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a Community Outcomes Plan.  The Club has advised that they wish to continue their community lease on its current terms and conditions without variation.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approve the renewal of lease to Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated located on part of Te Atatu Peninsula Park, being part of Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 and Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:-

i)        Term – 33 years commencing 1 June 2013 to 31 May 2046;

ii)       Rent - $5.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

b)      Approval to vary the lease to change the name from Te Atatu Rugby League Football Club Incorporated to Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated.

 

 

Comments

 

7.          The Club has had a lease with legacy Waitakere Council from 1 June 1980.  The renewal of lease is for a term of 33 years from 1 June 2013 to 31 May 2046.  The Club has had occupation of the building on a month by month basis.  The Club owns the building.

8.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Te Atatu Peninsula Park, being part of Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 and Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347.

9.       Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council and classified as a recreation reserve.  Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347 is held by the Crown through DOC and is classified as a recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for recreational purposes.  Lot 1 and Lot 47 are currently leased correctly to the Club in terms of the Reserves Act for lease renewal purposes.

10.     The Club has been registered as an Incorporated Society since 19 April 1963.  The Club objectives are to provide and promote facilities for all who wish to play association football and to encourage the assistance and support of parents and others interested in the sport.

11.     Council officers have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     A Henderson-Massey portfolio holders meeting was held on 10 September 2014, and support for a renewal of lease to the Club for a term of 33 years was indicated.

13.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

14.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

15.     Lot 47 Deposited Plan 45411 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council and classified as a recreation reserve.  Lot 1 Deposited Plan 44347 is held by the Crown through DOC and is classified as a recreation reserve and vested in Auckland Council in trust for recreational purposes.  Lot 1 and Lot 47 are currently leased correctly to the Club in terms of the Reserves Act for lease renewal purposes.

16.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

17.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Site plan of Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula

                                                                                                 

Location map and leased area of Te Atatu Association Football Sports and Social Club Incorporated, 39 Neil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula

 

Park outlined in red and leased area outlined in blue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Renewal of Community Lease for The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South

 

File No.: CP2014/23046

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Henderson-Massey Local Board approval to grant a renewal of lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board on part of land known as Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South.

Executive summary

2.       The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board (the Trust) has had a lease with legacy Waitakere Council for the Training Rooms from 1 August 1985 to 31 July 2007.  The renewal of lease is for a term of 11 years from 1 August 2007 to 31 July 2018.  The Trust owns the building.

3.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137. 

4.       Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137 is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

5.       Clause17 of the Deed of Leased dated 27 November 1986 provides for a renewal of lease to the Trust for a further term of 11 years from 1 August 2007 to 31 July 2018.

6.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a Community Outcomes Plan.  The Club has advised that they wish to continue their community lease on its current terms and conditions without variation.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approve the renewal of lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board  on part of Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137,  247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:-

i)        Term – 11 years commencing 1 August 2007 to 31 July 2018;

ii)       Rent – $5.00 plus GST per annum.

b)      Approval to vary the lease to change the name from The Order of St John New Zealand Priory Trust Board to The Order of Saint John Northern Region Trust Board.

 

 

Comments

 

7.       The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board (the Trust) has had a lease with legacy Waitakere Council for the Training Rooms from 1 August 1985 to 31 July 2007.  The renewal of lease is for a term of 11 years from 1 August 2007 to 31 July 2018.

8.       The Trust has had occupation of the building on a month by month basis.  The Trust owns the building.

9.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137.

10.     Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137 is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

11.     The Trust was registered as an Incorporated Society on 8 April 1940.  The Trusts vision is to care for patients, families and communities and enhance health and well-being for all New Zealanders.

12.     Council officers have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     At a Henderson-Massey portfolio holders meeting held on 10 September 2014, support for a renewal of lease to the Club for a term of 11 years was indicated.

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

15.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

16.     Lot 38 Deposited Plan 37137 is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

17.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

18.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A

69

     

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Site Plan of The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board

 

Location map & leased area of The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Renewal of Community Lease for The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South

 

File No.: CP2014/23050

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Henderson-Massey Local Board approval to grant a renewal of lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board on part of land known as Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, 243 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South.

Executive summary

2.       The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board (the Trust) has had a lease with legacy Waitakere Council for the Ambulance Station from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2010.  The renewal of lease is for a term of 5 years from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015.  The Trust owns the building.

3.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lots 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137. 

4.       Lots 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137 are classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

5.       Clause18 of the Deed of Leased dated 29 June 2005 provides for a renewal of lease to the Trust for a further term of 5 years from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015.

6.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a Community Outcomes Plan.  The Club has advised that they wish to continue their community lease on its current terms and conditions without variation.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approve the renewal of lease to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board  on part of Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lots 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:-

i)        Term – 5 years commencing 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015;

ii)       Rent – $150.00 plus GST per annum.

b)      Approve to vary the lease to change the name from The Order of Saint John Northern Region Trust Board to The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board.

 

 

Comments

 

7.       The Trust has had a lease with legacy Waitakere Council for the Ambulance Station from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2010.  The renewal of lease is for a term of 5 years from 1 July 2010 to 30 June 2015.

8.       The Trust has had occupation of the building on a month by month basis.  The Trust owns the building.

9.       The Club wish to continue leasing the building located on Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, being part of Lots 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137.

10.     Lot 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137 are classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

11.     The Trust was registered as an Incorporated Society on 8 April 1940.  The Trusts vision is to care for patients, families and communities and enhance health and well-being for all New Zealanders.

12.     Council officers have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     At a Henderson-Massey portfolio holders meeting held on 10 September 2014, informal support for a renewal of lease to the Club for a term of 5 years was indicated.

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

15.     There is no significant change or impact for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

16.     Lots 26 and Lots 27 Deposited Plan 37137 is classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve and the activities on the land are in line with local purpose reserves.

17.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

18.     There are no cost implications for Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A

73

     

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Knudsen - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Attachment A: Site Plan of The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board

 

Location map and leased area of The Order of St John Northern Region Trust Board, Lloyd Morgan Lions Club Park, 247 Edmonton Road, Te Atatu South

 

Park outlined in red and leased area outlined in blue

 

 

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Waterview Connection Project - Design Approval

 

File No.: CP2014/21142

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to update the local board on design decisions made to date for Council owned or operated assets constructed or affected by the NZTA Waterview Connection Project and to present the resultant Open Space Restoration Plans for approval.

Executive summary

2.       The Board of Inquiry that approved the designation for the Waterview SH20 proposal included a number of consent conditions intended to recognize and offset the impact of the project on the surrounding community and council assets. One condition is a requirement that the designation holder (NZTA) be required to fund and undertake the restoration of a number of Council reserves affected by the construction works.

3.       The general scope of the restoration design was established by the Board of Inquiry and documented in the draft Urban Design Landscaping Plans (UDLPs). The design detail was to be determined and approved through the development of Open Space Restoration Plans for each affected reserve.

4.       The Board of Inquiry decision also required the establishment of Community Liaison Groups to act as an ongoing vehicle for community and stakeholder engagement, including input into design processes such as required for the Open Space Restoration Plans. These liaison groups include delegated representatives from the Local Boards.

5.       This report provides the Board with the final design in the form of the Open Space Restoration Plans and design details of the key assets within those areas that Council will own or operate.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receive the Waterview Connection Project design approval report

b)      Approve the open space restoration plan for Jack Colvin Park

c)      Approve the additional restoration works for Jack Colvin Park

 

Comments

 

Consultation

6.       The Board of Inquiry decision determined that the designation holder should establish Community, Education and Working liaison groups to provide stakeholders with opportunities for review and comment on the implementation of the project.

7.       The Working Liaison Group meetings have a targeted membership: Council, Housing New Zealand Corporation, Te Kawarau Iwi Tribal Authority, Ngati Whatua o Orakei, Kiwirail, Department of Conservation, Ministry of Education and the Local Boards.

8.       The regular Community Liaison Group (CLG) meetings include Local Board representatives are open to all interested parties within the project area

Regulatory framework for design decisions

9.       The designation conditions require design and approval processes to be predominantly managed through three work streams:

Urban Design Landscaping Plans (UDLP):

10.     These were originally submitted during the BoI and are required to be updated by the designation holder and signed off by Council’s regulatory team. These plans set out the proposed general arrangement of the reserves, including the location of key recreational facilities, paths, bridges etc.  The area covered by these plans include a mixture of Council and NZTA assets.

Outline Plan of Works (OPofW):

11.     A detailed design of the two tunnel portal areas was required to be developed and subjected to community consultation prior to sign off by Council's regulatory team. These areas contain mainly NZTA assets.  Council regulatory staff sign off of these areas has already taken place following consultation with the Community Liaison Group.

Open Space Restoration Plans (OSRP):

12.     The BoI required OSRP’s provide detailed designs for the final restoration of the following reserves:

·    Alan Wood

·    Waterview Reserve

·    Oakley Creek Esplanade (Waterview Glades)

·    Jack Colvin Park

·    Rosebank Domain

·    Harbourview-Orangihina Reserve

Design approvals

13.     Copies of the OSRPs and additional restoration package are attached for approval.

14.     The drawings attached to this report have been selected to provide a suitable overview of the final reserve design and details of specific assets. A design package consisting of the detailed drawings and design reports has also been placed in the Local Board offices.

15.     These designs are presented for approval on the understanding that many of the design decisions embedded within them have already effectively been made through the sign off of the UDLPs and the Local Board representatives on the Community Liaison Groups.

16.     If there are further design approvals they will be progressed through the Local Board representatives to the Community Liaison Group.

Jack Colvin Park additional restoration works

17.     It is noted that certain works fall within the area the BoI defined as requiring an Open Space Restoration Plan. (OSRP). These works were either specifically noted in the consent conditions or are a direct result of the consented works within that area.

18.     In addition to the BoI consented  works in the OSRP Council entered into an Access Agreement with NZTA at the start of the project to give their contractor access to the area for construction purposes.  This agreement provided for restoration of existing facilities . Under the provisions of this property agreement, Council staff have negotiated the  changes to the sportsfield and parking areas required to ensure the final design is compliant with operational requirements and the relevant sports codes.

19.     This consists of items which fall within the OSRP

·    New ball fence

·    Relocate training lights onto fence

·    Replacement and relocation of the existing seating

·    Noise wall and security fence detailing around building

20.     Items that have been negotiated as an additional restoration package

·    Move sports field away from the motorway to give adequate run off

·    Construction of a relocated car park between the main field and practice areas

·    Reinstatement of a 1.2 metre high spectator fence around the playing field

·    Timber bollards along a section of the single access lane to the new gravel car park, in proximity to Pixie Stream

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board appointed members Vanessa Neeson and Shane Henderson to work with officers on the Waterview Connect Project.

22.     The Local Board representatives to the Community Liaison groups have had input into the Open Space Restoration Plan design and the negotiations for the additional restoration works for Jack Colvin Park.

Māori impact statement

23.     Mana Whenua for this area are included in the Community Liaison groups and have been involved in the Board of Inquiry process that established the management framework  for these design decisions.

Implementation

24.     The designation holder through their contractors are obliged to manage the Open Space Restoration Plan processes for the named reserves and to undertake their construction and handover to Council as soon as possible.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Selected design elements

79

     

Signatories

Authors

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Update on SH16/20 Waterview expenditure plan

 

File No.: CP2014/21798

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To update the local board on the expenditure plan for the compensation payments received from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) as part of the mitigation package for the State Highway 16/20 Waterview Connection project.

Executive summary

2.       Over the next five years Auckland Council will receive around $8 million from the NZTA as part of the State Highway 16/20 Waterview Connection Project.  The income is generated from lease payments, compensation and property disposals within each of the three local board areas.  The estimated income for the Henderson-Massey local board is $2.51 million. 

3.       The projected income has been recorded in the annual plan and local board budgets for Henderson-Massey, Whau and Albert-Eden local boards.  These funds are either targeted to designation conditions, or are to be used for parks projects in communities impacted by the motorway development.

4.       This report updates the Henderson-Massey Local Board on the changes to the projected income.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receives this report

 

Comments

 

5.       The Waterview Connection completes a motorway ring route around the city linking State Highway 20 with State Highway 16.  The new portion of the motorway is 4.8km long and includes a 2.5km length of tunnel. The project also includes widening of existing parts of SH16 and upgrades to existing interchanges. The construction work started in 2012 and is expected to be completed in 2017.

6.       The decision-making for the Waterview Connection was made through a Board of Inquiry Process.  The Waterview Connection Proposal Board of Inquiry (BOI) decision (June 2011) included a number of consent conditions intended to recognise and offset the impact of the proposal on the surrounding community and council assets.  These conditions include a requirement for the designation holder, the NZTA, to fund and undertake the restoration of a number of council reserves directly affected by the construction works and provide cash compensation.  Additionally, over the construction period Auckland Council will receive income from NZTA in the form of lease payments for the occupation of public open space.

7.       The conditions in the BOI decision assigns some of the income to specific projects.  For the remainder of the income an expenditure plan has been developed through a process of workshops with the affected local boards.

8.       The key principles for expenditure have been endorsed by the local board and approved by the Strategy and Finance Committee.  These funds must:

·    be targeted to particular activities or areas where the designation conditions specifically require it (e.g. Howlett Reserve and Phyllis Reserve sports field)

·    be used in the local board area where they originate.

·    be used for parks and reserves related purposes

·    be approved by the governing body for decisions relating to revenue earned through land sale, land acquisition, sports field development, major upgrades and new facilities.

9.       The funds will be received at different stages of the project between 2012 and 2017 and are indicative values only, as the payments are linked to specific stages in the development of the motorway.

10.     The estimated income for the Henderson-Massey Local Board is $2,510,947 generated from compensation payments from land taken for motorway purposes and lease payments received from open space occupied by contractors as construction yards.  At the beginning of the Waterview Connection project the income for Henderson Massey Local Board was estimated to be $3,050,000.  This was calculated assuming a much larger area of Harbour View Orangihina Reserve would be used as a construction yard.  As the project has progressed the contractors have not required as much of the park as originally anticipated.

11.     An open space network plan is being prepared for the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.  The plan will identify priority open space projects the local board may want to fund from the compensation money.  Once the plan is complete staff will work with the local board to identify projects to fund with the compensation money.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Staff hold regular meetings with the local board chair to discuss the progress on the of the SH26/20 project.

Māori impact statement

13.     Mana Whenua are included in the Community Liaison groups and have been involved in the Board of Inquiry process that established the management framework for these design decisions.  It is anticipated where any matters may have a significant impact on sites of significance to Mana Whenua that appropriate consultation will be undertaken.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

LTP 2015-2025 Feedback on mayoral proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/23863

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Considers the mayoral proposal and whether to provide feedback on the implications of the proposal.

 

 

Comments

Background

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the LTP 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The mayoral proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the mayoral proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the LTP 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October to discuss responses to the mayoral proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the Governing Body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh - Financial Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/21596

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Determines if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

 

Comments

 

8.       This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 September 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

93

bView

Expenditure for Henderson

123

     

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 






























Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Expenditure for Henderson-Massey local board area for 2015 - 2018

$000

Budget

Budget

Budget

Financial year ending 30 June

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

 

 

 

 

Net Operating Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

1,658

1,782

1,768

Local built and natural environment

160

164

172

Local community services

2,796

3,173

3,440

Local economic development

490

709

890

Local governance

1,378

1,401

1,545

Local libraries

7,147

7,833

8,223

Local parks services

12,989

13,668

14,469

Local recreation services

3,871

3,881

4,132

Total net operating expenditure

30,489

32,611

34,639

 

 

 

 

Net Capital Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

44

45

65

Local built and natural environment

7

8

8

Local community services

475

5,143

3,467

Local economic development

1,157

0

0

Local governance

0

44

0

Local libraries

5,688

50

400

Local parks services

8,479

4,680

2,619

Local recreation services

729

1,394

237

Total net capital expenditure

16,579

11,364

6,796

 

 

 

 

Financial statements are based on the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, including approved changes made during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 financial years and annual planning processes.  Budgets are indicative only as they will be reviewed through the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (due for adoption in June 2015) and allocated in accordance with the Local Board Funding Policy.  

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23011

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this memo is to provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy but the council must expand it to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy

 

 

Background

 

7.       As part of the LTP 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the LGA2002 and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       The legislative change requires the council to expand the current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a significant decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the draft policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a Special Consultative Procedure. Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, grey power, age concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of local boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy approach to engagement

18.     The LGA2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  (For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is “significant”).

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.         The thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.         The decision relates to strategic assets

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by including the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive CCOs as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s LTP and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.

Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

 

 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, IMSB

Regional Strategy & Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

 

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

 

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

 

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·    an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·    a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August; 

·    workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council recognize that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on Engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through the engagement advisors.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

131

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Consultation and Engagement

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication & Engagement Director

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

 

Title: Auckland Council logo

Title: Consultation in library - Description: The image shows a member of the public receiving guidance on how to access online information about a plan and being shown supporting materials and maps.Text Box: Significance and Engagement Policy
Consultation Draft - September 2014


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Credit: Heidi Ping Xu


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

1.          Table of Contents

1       Context 4

2       Decision making. 5

3       Significance. 7

4       Approach to engagement 9

5       Applying the policy. 11

6       Schedule 1: Methods of engagement 13

 


1        Context

1.1      Introduction

For Auckland Council, engagement is a genuine dialogue between decision-makers, communities and stakeholders for the purpose of making better decisions, policies or programmes of action.

Public input into decisions, policies or programmes of action is an essential part of ensuring they reflect the aspirations of residents, iwi, community groups and businesses - everyone who is invested in Auckland's future being one of prosperity, equality and wellbeing.

This policy aims to enable a flexible approach to engagement that recognises and supports the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities to get involved in council and civic life, and demonstrates a commitment to building ongoing relationships and greater understanding of community views and preferences.

 

1.2      Policy purpose and overview

The purpose of this policy is to enable Auckland Council  and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities; and

·     to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different  issues, assets, or other matters; and

·     to inform the council from the beginning of a decision-making process about—

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

2        Decision making

One of the key roles of local government is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities. At Auckland Council, decision-making for regional decisions is undertaken by the Governing Body and for local decisions by local boards. Local Boards also have a key role in identifying and communicating the views of local communities on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws.

While community and stakeholder engagement improves decision-making, it is not the sole input into a decision. As shown in the diagram below, there are a wide range of information sources and perspectives that will inform a council decision. The information sources and perspectives are harnessed and collated which helps make the decision ‘sustainable’ (i.e. unlikely to require re-visiting due to it being well-informed and well-considered). Decisions are based on a wide range of information sources and perspectives and it may differ from the prevailing public opinion.

Title: Decision making process - Description: Sustainable decision-making inputs: technical input and advice; financial costs, benefits and considerations; Auckland Plan and Local Board Plan outcomes;  Council strategy and policy; Government policy; other considerations; public / stakeholder opinions, concerns, ideas, needs, values, motivations and goals.

Inputs into public / stakeholder opinions: community and stakeholder engagement, for example stakeholder meetings and workshops, reference and advisory groups; consultation, for example feedback forms, Special Consultative Procedure; opinion research, for example representative surveys, focus groups.

 

 

 

 

2.1      The Mayor and Governing Body

The Mayor has a responsibility for ensuring there is effective engagement between Auckland Council and the people of Auckland, including those too young to vote. The Mayor has established a number of advisory panels to: provide strategic advice to council on issues of importance to their communities (youth, ethnic people, pacific people, seniors, disability, rural); and to advise on effective engagement by council with those communities.

The Governing Body, comprising the Mayor and councillors, focuses on region-wide strategic decisions and must ensure that consultation and engagement requirements are met when making those decisions.

2.2      Local boards

Local boards make decisions on local matters, provide local leadership and support strong local communities.

With regard to community engagement and consultation, local boards are responsible for:

·     making decisions about non-regulatory local matters, including negotiating the standards of services delivered locally;

·     making decisions about regulatory local matters delegated to it by the governing body;

·     identifying and communicating the views of local people on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws to the governing body;

·     providing local leadership and developing relationships with the community, community organisations and special interest groups in the local area.

 

2.3      Independent Māori Statutory Board

The Independent Māori Statutory Board has appointed mana whenua and matāwaka (Māori communities with no tribal affiliation in Auckland) representatives.

The board assists Auckland Council to make decisions, perform functions, and exercise powers by:

·     promoting cultural, economic, environmental, and social issues of significance for mana whenua groups; and matāwaka of Tamaki Makaurau; and

·     ensuring that the council acts in accordance with statutory provisions referring to the Treaty of Waitangi.


 

3        Significance

A decision is significant if:

a.   the thresholds related to an activity or groups of activities stated below are exceeded; or

b.   the decision relates to the strategic assets listed below.

A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria listed below, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

 

3.1      Thresholds

As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

 

3.2      Strategic assets

The council’s strategic assets are those vital for the delivery of its services to the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets (a network) because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. A network is deemed to include those components which are integral to the functioning of the network as a whole. There are also a few iconic assets which have strategic significance for the Auckland region. In addition the LGA 2002 provides that shares in a port company and an airport company and assets required to provide affordable housing are strategic assets.

The council’s strategic assets are set out below.

1.   Public transport network, including Britomart

2.   Roading network

3.   Stormwater network

4.   Water and wastewater network

5.   Parks network

6.   Network of swimming pools

7.   Network of community centres and halls

8.   Community library network

9.   Cemeteries, heritage scheduled buildings and structures

10. Freehold interest in waterfront land held by the Ports of Auckland and the Auckland Waterfront Development Agency

11. Shares in substantive CCOs

12. Auckland Central Library and the historical library collection

13. Civic Theatre, Aotea Centre, Zoo, Viaduct Events Centre, North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre, Q Theatre, Auckland Art Gallery (including the art collection owned by Regional Facilities Auckland), Mt Smart Stadium and the council's contractual rights and interests in Auckland City Arena (known as Vector Arena)

14. Social housing network including housing for the elderly

15. Shares in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL)

16. Shares in Ports of Auckland.

Strategic assets, as defined by this policy, that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO, are identified in the CCO accountability policy. CCOs must comply with the CCO accountability policy when making decisions in relation to strategic assets under their control.

 

3.3      General Criteria

The following general criteria will be applied to determine the degree of significance of a decision.

1.   The number of residents and ratepayers affected and the degree to which they are affected by the decision or proposal

2.   The likely impact/consequences of the decision or proposal from the perspective of those parties

3.   Whether this type of decision has a history of generating wide public interest within the local board area (for a local board decision) or the Auckland region or New Zealand generally (for a governing body decision)

4.   The impact of the decision on the governing body’s or local boards’ ability to deliver on the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural well-being of the local board area or Auckland region and any statutory responsibility

5.   The impact of the decision on intended service levels for a group of council activities, including a decision to commence or cease any such group of activity

6.   The degree to which the decision or proposal is reversible.

4        Approach to engagement

The extent to which the council will engage with communities and stakeholders about an issue or decision to be made will match how significant the issue or decision is. Engagement may be required at various stages of the decision-making process and may take different forms depending on the stage. Both significance and the form of engagement will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, relative to the criteria listed above. A guide to engagement methods is attached for further information.

 

4.1      Engagement principles

The following provides an overview of how council will meet the Local Government Act (LGA) principles.

 

Conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner; and give effect to its identified priorities and outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     conduct community and stakeholder engagement in a genuine effort to listen to, and consider with an open mind, community and stakeholder input;

·     when presenting options for community and stakeholder feedback, ensure the options are realistic and deliverable;

·     ensure that questions are objective (ie: not leading), allowing people to express their views freely;

·     allow enough time and provide adequate resources to ensure participants have been provided fair opportunity to understand the matter and contribute their views

·     allow time to allow for issues that might arise during an engagement process;

·     value contributions made and time given;

·     give timely feedback on the results of the public’s input and decisions made;

·     value, respect and give weight to local knowledge.

 

 

 

 

A local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all of its communities

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     build ongoing relationships with communities through a range of approaches such as through advisory panels, the People’s Panel and other reference groups and fora;

·     provide community members and stakeholders with a reasonable opportunity to present their views, and to participate in a way that suits them;

·     provide ways for the community to raise issues directly with the council so that it is a two-way relationship;

·     identify opportunities to work in partnership with community organisations and leaders to encourage greater community ownership and participation;

·     ensure good information sharing of community views and preferences within council.

 

When making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community's interests; and the interests of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them.

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     identify ways of reaching out to affected communities and stakeholders, including those who are typically heard from least often;

·     provide more than one way for people to participate;

·     when required, invest in community capacity building to enable participation;

·     use plain language and avoid jargon and acronyms.

 

A local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

To meet this principle the Council will actively consider through engagement:

·     the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tamaki Makaurau;

·     how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

Supporting Māori community infrastructure that enables:

·     early engagement with Māori in the development of appropriate plans and policies;

·     Māori to guide how they want to engage with Auckland Council.

Support Māori to fully engage with the council, for example through but not limited to capability and capacity building.


 

5        Applying the policy

5.1      Supporting information

·     Consultation and Engagement Guidebook - this provides more detailed guidance on engagement principles and good practice.

·     Guide on Engaging with Māori.

·     Quality Policy Advice guidelines

·     Templates and other related guidance such as the Accessible Communications and Information Guide.

 

5.2      Managing conflicts of interest

Auckland Council has processes in place for both elected representatives and staff on how to manage conflicts of interest, including within the community engagement and decision-making process.

 

5.3      Policy exclusions

This policy will not apply and engagement will not be required where:

·     in the opinion of the council, failure to make a decision urgently would result in unreasonable or significant damage to property, or risk to people’s health and safety, or the loss of a substantial opportunity to achieve the council’s strategic objectives. Other policy and legislative requirements will still apply.

·     Any physical alterations to strategic assets that are required to:

prevent an immediate hazardous situation arising

repair an asset to ensure public health and safety due to damage from an emergency or unforeseen situation

 

5.4      Other legislation

The Resource Management Act 1991 sets out processes for public involvement in certain decisions, for example for resource consents and when preparing and changing district plans. Not all of these decisions are required to be publicly notified but when they are, the council will follow the principles outlined above in determining the level and type of consultation required.

There are a number of other policies or bylaws that are also required under other legislation (e.g. Gambling Act) or enabled (e.g. Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act, Psychoactive Substances Act, Health Act).  Some of these are specific about the requirements and processes for engagement, but others refer back to the principles outlined above. 

 

 

5.5      Policy development, term and review

This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and will be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy will be reviewed every three years as part of the Long-term Plan process but can be amended at any time.


 

6        Schedule 1: Methods of engagement

Auckland Council uses a wide range of tools and techniques to engage with the community and stakeholders. The council uses the International Association of Public Participation spectrum as a framework for engagement which identifies the following levels:

·     Inform - to provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

·     Consult - to obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·     Involve - to work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

·     Collaborate - to partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

·     Empower - to place final decision making in the hands of the public.

During the development of a plan or policy, there might be a number of different stages of engagement with the community using a different level of participation at the different stages. This will vary depending on the decision but for complex issues, a targeted group of community and stakeholders might be ‘involved’ to aid the development of a draft document followed by wider ‘consultation’ on the draft document.

Joint Management Agreements, Memorandum of Understanding or other similar high level agreements will be considered when engaging ‘collaboratively’ with Māori.

Title: Timelines for consultation projects - Description: Simple process: step 1 developing draft plan or policy, step 2 draft of the plan released for engagement, step3 analysis of feedback and decision making.

Complex process: step 1 identify issues for development of a draft plan or policy, step 2 targeted engagement with key stakeholders to help develop the draft, step 3 draft of the plan released for engagement, step 4 analysis of feedback, step 5 hearings, step 6 decision-making.

6.1      Engagement methods

The following provides a guide to the different approaches to engagement that might be used. Other approaches may also be considered depending on the topic and population affected.

Where the decision or proposal is in relation to air, land or water, the council will take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with those places.

The council will refer to the general criteria in section 3.3 to determine the level of engagement required. In addition, the council will consider who is affected by the decision, for example, the level of diversity in terms of geographic, cultural or other key demographics.

Prior to determining an appropriate approach, the council will consider how much is already known about the community views and preferences on the issue.

 

 

Significance

Description

Example approach

Small and simple

Eg redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements

The audience is very localised or relatively small in number or very targeted. They are easy to access and the issue or decision is relatively straight forward and is not of high general public interest. For example, redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements.

Localised promotion, for example through display boards and local media. Targeted engagement with the relevant audience where appropriate. Promotion through e-newsletters and social media. Information online and through local libraries and service centres. Surveys and open days may also be appropriate. 

Medium

Eg action plans, local area plans

The audience is fairly broad or diverse: some segments are not easy to access. The issue is not straightforward and there may be mixed views from the community. For example, action plans and local area plans.

Targeted engagement with the relevant audience, online engagement which may include a survey and social media. Information available through libraries and service centres. Promotion through e-newsletters, the local media or through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland.

Large or complex

Eg Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan

The audience is large and diverse and the issue is of wide importance to the region or complex. Significant financial investment will be required. This is high profile, over-arching, touches every part of council / community. For example, Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan.

Large scale publicity and promotion. There could be an informal engagement / discussion phase plus a formal phase of consultation. There is likely to need to be consideration of different cultural styles and needs for engagement. Likely to include a range of events and a focus on online activities. Promotion through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland and through e-newsletters.

 

6.2      Special consultative procedure (SCP) 

Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 specifies the use of the SCP for some plans and processes including:

·     Long-term Plan

·     Local Board Plans

·     Annual Plan

·     Bylaws of significant interest

 

The SCP can also be used where the governing body (for a regional decision) or local board (for a local board decision) deems the issue to be significant. Under the SCP, Auckland Council is required to:

·     develop a statement of proposal and make this publicly available (and make the summary of full proposal as widely available as reasonably practicable);

·     describe how people can have their say;

·     ensure people are given an opportunity to present their views to the council; and

·     given access to a record of the decisions.

The engagement methods listed above under ‘Large or complex’ will be considered when preparing for a SCP but large or complex issues will not automatically follow a SCP.

 

6.3      Consultation (Section 82)

Auckland Council is required to carry out consultation in accordance with or giving effect to Section 82 of the Local Government Act 2002 on certain matters (regardless of whether they are considered significant as part of this policy).

For all other issues requiring a decision, the council will determine the appropriate level of engagement on a case by case basis.

 

6.4      Informal engagement

Auckland Council may seek to develop ongoing relationships with the community on general matters, rather than purely on issues that require a decision. This will also allow the community to raise matters that are not currently under consultation. This could include having a presence at markets, events and in public spaces for the purposes of hearing community views and preferences.


 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Title: University engagement event - Description: The photo shows a roadshow event at a university where there are information displays, documents and other materials for review and discussion.


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

September 2014

Title: Auckland Council logo


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Deliberations Report on the Henderson-Massey draft local board plan

 

File No.: CP2014/23501

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.     This report recommends changes to the Henderson-Massey draft Local Board Plan as a result of the hearing held on 9th September, 2014 and subsequent deliberations by the Henderson-Massey Local Board. 

Executive summary

2.     The consultation period for the draft Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan ended on 6 August 2014.

3.     In total, 224 submissions were received to the draft plan, including 175 non-proforma and 49 proforma submissions. Thirty-six submitters were heard at the Local Board Plan hearings held on 9 September 2014.

4.     Overall, submitters were in support of the plan’s six outcomes and key initiatives. However, there was strong support for action to address the following issues in the area including:

·   strengthening community safety initiatives in the local board area

·   investigating a shared space in the Henderson shopping area

·   promoting and implementing Smoke Free initiatives

5.     After considering all submissions, the Henderson-Massey Local Board is proposing changes to respond to the issues raised by submitters. Other minor changes have been made to improve readability, reflect a review of the plan’s Maori responsiveness and respond to information that has become available since the writing of the plan.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)       Note that in general, submissions received on the draft Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan supported the six outcomes, key priorities and initiatives outlined in the plan. Responses to submitter requests are identified in the change description.

b)         Agree the following changes to the Draft Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan:

Map – include main waterways. Response to submitter request.

Page 11 – insert -  ‘kanohi ki te kanohi’ to indicate the board’s intention to work face to face with Maori and insert ‘kura’ into the list of Maori organisations the board is going to work with. Response to submitter request.

Page 11 – insert ‘We recognise that while Hoani Waititi marae is in the Waitakere Ranges local board area it is right on our border and serves a population that mostly lives in the Henderson-Massey local board area.’

Page 12 – change number of people consulted from 300 to many

Page 13 – amend to ‘As we grow, we will advocate to the governing body to use development contributions collected locally to build all the local facilities our new communities will need, such as roads, parks, and playing fields.’

Page 13 – insert ‘Recently Special Housing Areas have been identified in our area accelerating the development of up to 5,000 house sites, with more to come.’

Page 14 – add a recreation centre to the list of infrastructure projects for Westgate.

Page 15 – the paragraph on shared space be amended to reflect the positive submitter reaction to the shared space proposal and indicate that the board will investigate a shared space implementation that will be right for Henderson. Response to submitter request.

Page 15 – amend the paragraph on Council partnering with other enterprises to include reference to Wilsher Village.

Page 15 – insert the following: ‘We are working on making it easier to get to Corban Estate from the rail station or Henderson’s main shopping area. We are also preparing a plan for Corban Estate to ensure heritage assets are looked after and the arts centre continues to flourish.’

Page 15 – delete the reference  to the connection over the rail bridge.  The board has been advised this is not supported by Kiwirail.

Page 16 – insert the key moves from the Henderson Implementation Plan to support it through the local board plan.

Page 18 – change ‘work with’ to ‘advocate to’ to reflect the board’s role with ATEED and the council on the issue of small business support.

Page 18 – insert ‘School leavers are our future business leaders and employees.  The challenge for business is to harness the energy and talents of this very diverse new generation.’

Page 18 – insert ‘We support our Maori organisations in their work to provide better business and employment opportunities for rangatahi. We will work with Hoani Waititi marae to investigate a youth employment hub at the marae and support their proposal of an annual youth employment event targeted at young Maori.’

Page 19 – insert ‘We support Hoani Waititi marae’s aspiration for a Maori arts hub at the marae.

 

Page 20 – Community safety has been moved to the first topic to reflect  its importance to submitters and the community.

 

Page 21 – insert ‘ such as family, whanau and sexual violence’. Response to submitter request.

Page 21 – insert ‘The board is also right behind New Zealnd’s smokefree campaign and in this plan will fund a programme to promote smokefree places, events and activities.’ Also insert ‘smokefree’ to refer to events and facilities that are smokefree. Response to submitter requests.

Page 21 – insert ‘and other community safety organisations.’

Page 21 – correct spelling of ‘organisations’

Page 22 – replace Massey Midwinter Festival with Snow in the Park

Page 22 – insert ‘We support Auckland Council’s Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan which has been prepared working alongside the major sporting codes.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 22 – insert ‘Support Te Whanau o Waipareira’s Waitangi Day celebrations at Hoani Waititi Marae.’Page 23 – delete ‘We are advocating for a sprung wooden floor at the indoor courts, as this would increase training and competition use, as well as for further courts at Westgate. We also sponsor Auckland’s netball team, the Northern Mystics, and are thrilled to see local players progress through to Mystics level’ as the board has been advised the sprung wooden floor has technical issues at this venue and the board no longer has funds for a full Mystics sponsorship.

Page 23 – insert ‘People have told us they would like to see more recreational cycling activities in our area.  In the next three years the board will support BMX, mountain bike, pump trail and cycleway projects in Henderson-Massey.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 23 – change Te Ao Maori to ‘Support Te Whanau o Waipareira on  their Waitangi Day celebrations at Hoani Waititi Marae.

Page 22 – add ‘Supporting Auckland Council’s Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan available at www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz’ to the Creating the world’s most liveable city

Page 24 – include universal accessibility as a key initiative. Response to submitter request.

Page 26 – insert ‘You need easy access for older people with benches to rest at during shopping’

Page 28 – replace ‘bring footpaths used by older adults up to international best practice standard (Ausroads)’ with ‘improve our footpaths so they can be used by mobility scooters and strollers (Ausroads standard).’ Response to submitter request.

Page 27 – insert ‘. Wilsher Village is an exciting development occurring in partnership with Auckland Council Properties Limited and a developer which will provide over 200 comfortable and healthy units within walking distance of Henderson.

Page 29 – replace ‘Waterways’ with ‘Water Quality’.

Page 29 – insert ‘We realise that in some situations a more official response is necessary to protect the environment so we will advocate to the governing body for active enforcement of environment related bylaws.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 29 – insert ‘We will safeguard Henderson-Massey’s significant environmental areas, which can be found the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 30 – remove text box explaining D grade to improve readability.

Page 30 – insert ‘We would like our waterways to be in a condition that allows whanau to collect kai, people to go swimming and indigenous wildlife to flourish.’

Page 30 – insert ‘and freshwater’

Page 30 – insert ‘and waterways’

Page 30 – insert ‘The Henderson-Massey Local Board also supports the plans of the Whau Local Board to build a boardwalk along the Whau River.’

Page 30 – amend to ‘A large Part of the Motu Manawa (Pollen Island) Marine Reserve is in the local board area’. Response to submitter request.

Page 30 – insert ‘The Henderson-Massey Local Board also supports the plans of the Whau Local Board to build a boardwalk along the Whau River. Response to submitter request.

Page 31 – insert ‘We will also develop a dog park in our area when funding becomes available.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 31 – insert ‘The board especially wants to see park development consistent with ecological values in Harbourview-Orangihina Park and Taipari Strand.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 29 – insert ‘We would like our waterways to be in a condition that allows whanau to collect kai, people to go swimming and indigenous wildlife to flourish. Response to submitter request.

Page 31 – insert ‘and Ranui Domain is getting a perimeter path.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 31 – insert ‘We strongly support the development of shared use sports parks as this enables us to increase sportsfield capacity without the expensive purchase of new land.’

Page 31 – insert ‘and the park’s legal issues are settled,’

Page 31 – delete parks list to improve readability.

Page 29 to 32 – replace Peoples’ Choice Parks with destination parks

Page 32 – insert the following key initiative: ‘Advocate to the governing body to continue its research and prevention activities to control kauri dieback.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 32 – insert the following key initiative: ‘Advocate to Watercare to better manage sewage discharge at Taipari Strand during storm events.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 33 – insert ‘We have identified our transport priorities as increasing investment in walking and cycling infrastructure, improving public transport and reducing reliance on roads and cars’ to reflect the board’s transport priorities.

Page 33 – delete ‘The lack of travel choices is quite an issue in Henderson-Massey, just ask commuters using the northwestern motorway!’ and ‘We’re not taking sides for or against any mode of transport, we just need better transport choices across Henderson-Massey. And those modes’ to improve readability.

Page 34 – delete ‘We will focus our local board transport capital fund on road safety improvements, which will include improving and extending walk and cycle paths to support our road network. The board is’ to improve readability.

Page 34 – delete ‘greenways plan; there will be paths that link in with our roads but based around a’ to improve readability.

Page 34 – amend to – ‘We will advocate to fix footpaths’ to reflect the board’s role in footpath maintenance.

Page 34 – insert ‘We support the aspirations of the Te Atatu Moving Forward initiative and will encourage Auckland Transport to work with the community to achieve a cycle and pedestrian friendly Te Atatu Peninsula.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 35 – insert ‘We support the Central Rail Loop as it will enable us to get from Henderson to the city in 30 minutes on trains that go every 10 minutes in peak time.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 35 – insert ‘which would also keep the possibility of light rail open for the future.’ Response to submitter request.

Page 35 – Remove the paragraph on ferries from West Harbour as this is in the Upper Harbour local board area.

Page 36 – Remove the first, third and fourth paragraphs to improve readability, noting the level of detail is not required in a local board plan.

Page 37 -38 – Reduce number of key initiatives to five for consistency with the rest of the plan.

c)         Delegates the authority to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson to make final             amendments to the draft Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan.

 

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.     This report is presents changes to the draft Henderson-Massey local board plan prepared in consultation with the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Māori impact statement

7.     The changes to the Henderson-Massey draft local board plan that affect Maori have been suggested by the Te Waka Angamua department of Auckland Council after consultation with local Maori organisations.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Linda Smith - Senior Local Board Advisor (West)

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22660

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Endorses the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      Notes that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

Comments

 

Local board feedback

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·    Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·    Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·    Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·    Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·    Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·    More public art outside the city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·   Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·   Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·    The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·    Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·    Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·     Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·     A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·      The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·      The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

 

Next steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LB Feedback

161

bView

Consultation Summary

165

cView

Draft Arts and Culture Action Plan

171

     

Signatories

Authors

Maree Mill

Rebecca Kruse - Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

 

Local Board Feedback Summary

Engagement undertaken in 2013-14

Theme/Issue

Placemaking

·    Recognises importance of arts and culture in place making

·    Would like more community involvement and input

·    Nurturing/building a distinct area identity through arts and culture

·    Incentivise developers to incorporate arts and culture into new developments

·    Involve creative people in the planning process - designers, architects working with planners

·    Heritage and place recognised e.g. Writer’s walk, sculpture trail

·    Incorporation of Maori and European history in the environment

·    Public art/cultural design integrated in capital project design/urban design

·    Local artists to be involved with chance to win commissions for council buildings

Funding

·    More clarity on funding streams

·    Governing Body financial commitment

·    Who is going to fund what

·    Business sponsorship for arts and culture events

·    Council investment in art should equate to investment in sport

·    Funding issues are a key for supporting local theatres/galleries/museums and groups. Uneven investment in facilities throughout the region

Council role in ACSAP

·    More clarity on council’s role – arts and culture community want to understand what council can deliver and support

·    Plan focus should be on how the council can support the organisations

·    Foster partnerships

·    Advocacy

·    Local boards role in guardianship

·    Role of CCOs in arts and culture

Capacity Building

·    Streamline council processes – ‘go to person’

·    Provide better climate for building creative relationships

·    More capacity needed to assist local boards to go beyond business as usual and develop what assets they already have – guidance/advice to help see the huge potential for arts and culture in our community and translate into our local board plans.

·    The key question for this Plan should be “How do we create an organisation (council) that fosters/allows creativity to flourish?”

Education and pathway into employment

·    Need to highlight the value of (creative) education

·    Profile creative students and activities in the community (more recitals)

·    Growing skills, creativity, entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship

·    Local boards have a part to play

Events

·    Clarity of process around growing local events to regional

·    Events portal to promote all events

·    A stocktake of what is currently happening to ensure that one event is not ‘cannibalising’ the audience of other events – establish the correct balance between city centre and local

·    Importance of local cultural events

·    Promotion of events – linking local and regional events/festivals into each other, good local promotion of events

Diversity

·    Highlight Asian community

·    Need to highlight more than ethnic diversity

·    Inclusiveness of all communities

Facilities

·    Organisations to work together not in competition

·    Funded to meet  diverse need – how to achieve equity, consistency and sustainability

·    CFNP as a tool to enable review of community arts and culture facilities

·    Grow maker spaces

·    Don’t just focus on city centre

·    Development of arts and culture precincts

·    Local art facilities – many saw a lack in their area

·    Need for smaller theatre spaces and performance venues in smaller centres. 

Maori

·    Development of Maori cultural centre for the arts – great development initiative for our youth

·    Marae as a youth hub providing arts opportunities for youth

Barriers

·    Coast of transportation and parking

·    Entry and ticket prices

·    Distance to regional facilities

·    Buses(public transport) stop operating after the event

·    Compliance costs, rules and regulations

Other

·    More local public art outside city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture out to rural areas – increase exposure

·    More art displays in the parks – digital, physical, more art-based activities to encourage people into regional parks

·    Include acknowledgement of economic significance

·    Good use of case studies in summary document

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

ARTS & CULTURE STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN 2014

Submissions Report

 

The draft ACSAP was publicised via various channels including:

 

·    Targeted stakeholders  (e.g. advisory panels, IMSB, CCOs, key arts and culture organisations)

·    Through 146 venues (e.g. CDAC facilities, RFA, marae, community centres, libraries, local board offices, service centres, commercial galleries, performing arts venues, tertiary institutions, art schools, private museums and philanthropic organisations) and at events (e.g. Kapa Haka Super 12s, Art Educators Conference AUT and Net Hui).

·    Presentations to Creative Coalition, Lunchtime Learning, Artist Alliance, Pacific Arts Cluster and Digital Live

·    Published through various media channels (e.g. Our Auckland, digital banners, NZ Herald advert, press release to media commentators, council website and Facebook and Twitter accounts)

Submission Type

Submitter Group

The graph below shows the format the submissions were received in.

182 submissions have been received via the online form, 108 via the hard copy form, 109 from the Youth worksheet, and a further 39 via email non form submissions.

The graph below outlines what ‘group’ submitters belong to.

275 submissions have been from individuals, 51 from some form of group or organisation, and 109 from the Youth worksheet.

Feedback regarding the ACSAP Vision

Submitters were asked to rank how important the vision is to them.  The graph shows the importance of the visions to submitters. 

Feedback regarding the Goals

The graph outlines what importance submitters placed on each goal.  The table below outlines the labels used in the graph below.

 

 

 

Graph label

Goal

Access and participation

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Value and invest

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

Organisations and facilities

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Design and development

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

Cultural identity

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Creative economy

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

Feedback regarding the Actions

The graphs below show the priority given by submitters to action areas.

 

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

 

 

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

 

 

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

 

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

 

 

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

 


 

Submission by Local Board Area

The table below indicates the total numbers of submissions received by the local board area.

 

Local Board

Individual submissions

Children and young people worksheet

Organisation submissions

Total submissions

Albert-Eden Local Board

45

4

4

53

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14

0

5

19

Franklin Local Board

4

0

0

4

Great Barrier Local Board

0

0

0

0

Henderson-Massey Local Board

9

15

1

25

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

6

2

3

11

Howick Local Board

12

34

2

48

Kaipatiki Local Board

16

5

2

23

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board

5

0

0

5

Manurewa Local Board

4

1

1

6

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

15

4

0

19

Orakei Local Board

17

0

1

18

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board

7

0

0

7

Papakura Local Board

9

0

0

9

Puketapapa Local Board

8

0

0

8

Rodney Local Board

7

1

1

9

Upper Harbour Local Board

3

1

0

4

Waiheke Local Board

1

2

2

5

Waitakere Ranges Local Board

10

0

0

10

Waitemata Local Board

43

19

18

80

Whau Local Board

16

3

0

19

Regional

1

0

3

4

Not Supplied

2

0

1

3

Outside Auckland

21

19

11

51

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 





































































Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23898

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Henderson-Massey Local Board an overview Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2014.

Executive summary

1.       ACPL’s vision is to be a ‘centre of excellence’ that provides commercial expertise and value for money to the council in managing its property portfolio, acquisition and disposal activities, and the delivery of projects that implement council development initiatives.

2.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six-months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

3.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

§ Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

§ Place-shaping projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

§ ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

§ Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

§ Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

§ Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

§ The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

4.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A and B.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Accepts the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board six-monthly update 1 January to 30 June 2014.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       ACPL manages all Auckland Council or AT owned non-service properties. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development.

6.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six-months and now totals 1185 properties, an increase of 90 since our February 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

7.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the quarter ending 30 June 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $1.9 ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $25.4m against budget of $23.5m. During the quarter the average monthly collectable arrears rate and vacancies rate were respectively 2.1% and 2.4%. Well under the SOI targets of 5% and 3%.

8.       A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment A of this report. The schedule details:

§ Current ACPL managed commercial and residential property within the Henderson-Massey Local Board

§ Each property’s classification or reason for retention

§ The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

§ The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported, e.g. regional or local board.

9.       A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment B. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

10.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

11.     January to June 2014 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$12.3m disposal recommendations

$14.8m

These recommendations include $5.6m of sites that are identified for development projects

 

12.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

 

 

13.     2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

These targets will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net sales

 

Process

14.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with; council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Maori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

15.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Henderson-Massey area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment A.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

5 Trading Place, Henderson

Vacant site transferred from ACPD in August 2014 as non-service. The site was initally transferred to the former Waitakere City Council for roading purposes in December 2003 under the Public Works Act 1981. It does not appear to be currently associated with a budgeted service project. ACPL is accordingly progressing it through the Rationalisation Process to evaluate future use options. The internal organisation wide Expression of Interest phase commenced on 1 September. A local board workshop is to be booked in the near future to seek the local board's views.

 

Place Shaping and Housing Initiatives

Overview

16.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into around 48 council-driven place-shaping and housing initiatives region wide. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $400k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL lead developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

17.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Action Plan Group, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects with an affordable housing component over three years which would encompass Community Housing Organisation involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

Local Activities

18.     Wilsher Village redevelopment: This 1.5ha site previously held 34 Housing for the Elderly units. The site is strategically located in Henderson Valley Road and was identified as suitable for redevelopment under the former Waitakere City Council. ACPL canvased potential developers via an Expression of Interest (EOI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) process from which a preferred developer has been identified. ACPL is now progressing a Development Agreement which will result in 180 affordable housing units, including 40 council-owned one bedroom Housing for the Elderly units, in an integrated secure centre. The current target is to see Stage One completing in the second quarter of 2016.  

19.     Waitakere Central – 2-4 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson: This is a Waitakere Properties Limited legacy development that ACPL is now progressing. The mixed use development incorporates commercial and possible residential end uses. Minutes from a Waitakere City Council meeting set out approval for this development along with a request to keep relevant stakeholders updated. ACPL broached the opportunity for developing all vacant land with several developers and initially intended to progress an Expression of Interest (EOI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) mid-2014. However, following further assessment of economic activity in the area, ACPL's current recommendation is to hold of proceeding with these processes until the second quarter of 2015 in order to optimise potential outcomes. Further work is also to be completed assessing parking requirements.

20.     Property Optimisation: An increasing focus for ACPL is property optimisation. In this we are keen to work with local boards on development opportunities that facilitate upgrades within the service portfolio. For example a community facility upgrade or build may be funded by incorporating the facility into a mixed-use development that makes better use of the overall site. We welcome the opportunity to review any such opportunities that may be identified by the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Acquisitions

Overview

21.     ACPL continues to support Council and Auckland Transport programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved Council or Auckland Transport budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

22.     By the end of the financial year 2013 to 2014 two hundred and seven property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $132.4m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

23.     Over the past six months 14 properties were acquired to meet council open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

102 Hobsonville Road, Hobsonville

City Transformation

City Transformation

Upper Harbour

Hobsonville Point Community Buildings (HQ & Sunderland Lounge)

City Transformation

City Transformation / Community

Upper Harbour

150 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe

Parks, Sports & Recreation

Open Space

Upper Harbour

322 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

Community, Policy & Planning

Open Space

Waitakere-Ranges

51 Rimu Road, Oratia

Stormwater

Stormwater

Waitakere-Ranges

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

24.     72 properties were also acquired over the past six-months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects such as AMETI (30 acquisitions) Dominion Road (7 acquisitions) Te Atatu Road (9 acquisitions) and City Rail Link (16 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

25.      ACPL manages eight business interests region wide on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.      This report is for the Henderson-Massey Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

27.      The importance of effective communication and engagement with Maori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 listed Tamaki region mana whenua groups for our core business activities. 

28.      Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of waahi tapu or joint management relating to Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Henderson-Massey Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

29.      ACPL has additionally undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. The Improvement Planning Phase of this project is nearly complete. We anticipate finalising our MRP in September/October 2014.

Implementation

30.      There are no implementation issues.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

5. Henderson-Massey - Attachment A - Properties Managed - Aug 14

245

bView

5. Henderson-Massey - Attachment B - Portfolio Changes Jan - Jun 2014

249

     

Signatories

Authors

Caitlin Borgfeldt     Local Board Liaison

Authorisers

David Rankin    Chief Executive

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 



Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23012

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Notes the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

 

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Maori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline 2014/2015

261

     

Signatories

Authors

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference

 

File No.: CP2014/23853

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To update terms of reference for the Western Joint Funding committee with the inclusion of the facility partnership fund.

Executive summary

2.       The Western Joint Funding Committee (WJF)  is a joint committee established by the three Western local boards and has decision-making responsibility for the allocation of grants through the legacy community funding schemes.

3.       The terms of references were endorsed by three western local boards for the WJF committee in the beginning of the year and it has since been identified by staff that facility partnership fund was not included. This report seeks approval for updated terms of reference for the WJF committee.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Approves amended Terms of Reference for the Western Joint Funding Committee as per Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Amended  terms of reference for WJF Committee

265

     

Signatories

Authors

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - Manager Democracy Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Development Committee - Housing Action Plan update

 

File No.: CP2014/23566

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update to the Henderson-Massey local board on the Auckland Development Committee Meeting of 11/09/2014 and the Housing Action Plan report.

Executive summary

2.       The report and resolutions made at the Auckland Development Committee Meeting of 11/09/2014 are attached to this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Receives this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Strategic Action Plan Report

269

bView

Action Memo Item 9 Housing Strategic Action Plan-11 September 2014

289

     

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 





















Henderson-Massey Local Board

16 October 2014

 

 


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