I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Infrastructure Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 October 2014

1.30pm

Reception Lounge
Level 2
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Infrastructure Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Mike Lee

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Chris Darby

 

Members

Cr Cameron Brewer

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Dick Quax

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

Glenn Wilcox

 

Liane Ngamane

 

Ex officio

Member Len Brown, JP

 

 

Member Penny Hulse

 

 

 

(Quorum 7 members)

 

 

 

 

 

Barbara Watson

Democracy Advisor

 

15 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 307 7629

Email: barbara.watson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Responsibilities

 

Overview and provide feedback on key physical infrastructure plans and projects relating to transport, water, wastewater and stormwater.

 

Provide strategic direction to guide development of transport, water, wastewater and stormwater strategies.

 

Consider views of Local Boards, public, stakeholders and infrastructure providers in relation to infrastructure planning, delivery and operation.

 

Make recommendations to the parent committee to ensure:

 

·         alignment between the infrastructure sector, the Auckland Plan and the Unitary Plan to manage Auckland’s growth

·         alignment of the Regional Land Transport Plan and Integrated Transport Programme with the council’s strategic direction

·         alignment of water, wastewater and stormwater strategies with the council’s strategies and plans

·         asset management plans for physical infrastructure support the Unitary Plan and other relevant council plans and policies

·         council input to legislative changes, central government policies and plans and key infrastructure projects

·         council consideration of infrastructure strategy and planning matters from across Auckland’s infrastructure sector.

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities.

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          5  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    5

5.1     Chris Hoff-Neilsen - ECycles, Waiheke Island                                                  5

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          5

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

9          Stormwater Infrastructure - First Quarter 2014/2015 Update                                   7

10        Update from Watercare Services Ltd                                                                        13

11        Auckland Travel Information Update                                                                        25

12        Update from Auckland Transport                                                                              53

13        Information Items                                                                                                         99

14        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 3 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 3.21 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Committee Secretary, in writing, no later than two (2) working days prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Chris Hoff-Neilsen - ECycles, Waiheke Island

Purpose

1.       Chris Hoff-Neilsen, representing ECycles of Waiheke Island, would like to give a presentation to the Infrastructure Committee meeting on the subject of electric bike hire facilities at Matiatia ferry terminal.

Recommendation/s

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      thank Chris Hoff-Neilsen, representing ECycles of Waiheke Island, for his presentation.

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 3.22 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give two (2) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 3.9.14 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

Stormwater Infrastructure - First Quarter 2014/2015 Update

 

File No.: CP2014/23910

 

Purpose

1.       To provide a quarterly update on the activities of the Stormwater unit and an overview of major stormwater projects and achievements.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides a summary of major stormwater infrastructure projects, including the stormwater bylaw and asset management plan.

3.       Updates will be provided to the committee on a quarterly basis with additional reporting to be provided as and when required.

Recommendation

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      receive the Stormwater Infrastructure – First Quarter 2014/2015 Update.

Comments

Asset Management Plan

4.       A key focus for the Stormwater Unit over the past six months has been the preparation and delivery of the 2015-45 Stormwater Asset Management Plan (STWAMP) in order to assist the development of the Long-term Plan (LTP).

5.       The latest capital works programme is primarily focused on renewals and growth with a significant reprioritisation of projects towards supporting Council’s priority growth areas and Special Housing Areas (SHA).  Attachment A provides information on the draft STWAMP showing the 30 year uninflated capital works forecast, business driver proportions for the five main Stormwater programmes, and relative weighting of Stormwater priorities.

6.       A further reprioritisation was undertaken in response to the Mayor’s proposal to include capital funding for the Healthy Waterways project. If the additional operational funding identified in the Healthy Waterways Long-term Plan (LTP) proposal for increased compliance monitoring and associated community education and programmes is provided, the full benefits and contribution of the project to the two Auckland Plan transformational shifts can be realised.  The two transformational shifts are as follows:

·        No. 2 - ‘strongly commit to environmental action and green growth’

·        No. 4 - ‘radically improve the quality of urban living’.

7.       An initial review of the Stormwater Unit AMP has indicated a high level of maturity of information and analysis. However, there is further work to do to address a lack of data and systems which make it difficult for the AMP to optimise patterns of renewals, maintenance and relationship with growth.

8.       The ability of the Stormwater Unit to optimise is predominately due to the data and systems inherited upon integration in 2010.  The Stormwater Unit is addressing these issues through its improvement planning and this is reflected in the improvement planning section of the AMP.

9.       Part of the Stormwater Unit’s improvement plan is “Project 1+”, which seeks to establish a single complete Asset Management System, thereby replacing six Geographic Information Systems and four Asset Management Systems. Despite this project being complex and linked to wider Council Information System initiatives substantial progress has been achieved to date.  The project is expected to be completed in approximately two years.

Stormwater Bylaw

10.     The Auckland Council Stormwater bylaw was developed to:

·     ensure that the public stormwater network and private stormwater systems are of a consistently high standard throughout Auckland;

·     require on-site stormwater devices on private land to be well maintained, as they form part of the wider stormwater network;

·     manage activities on private property that have adverse impacts on the public stormwater network; and

·     enable the council to develop stormwater controls for specific areas and specific local issues.

11.     The Stormwater Bylaw was publicly notified for submissions in September.  Submissions closed on Wednesday 8 October 2014 and are now being reviewed. A date for the hearing of submissions has not yet been set.

Stormwater Capital Works Programme

12.     Delivery of the Stormwater capital works programme is slightly ahead of schedule with an actual spend of $11.6 million against a  budget of $10.2 million for the first quarter.  The full year forecast remains within the approved budget of $65 million. 

Freemans Bay New Stormwater Outfalls

13.     The objective of this project is to undertake flood alleviation works to reduce frequent flooding of commercial floors, basement car parks and major transport routes around the lower Freemans Bay area and Victoria Park at an estimated capital cost of $18-20 million.  The project supports development of Wynyard Quarter South and the Fonterra site.

14.     Detailed investigations into existing services in Fanshawe Street and discussions with the New Zealand Transport Authority (NZTA) over the second Waitemata Harbour crossing have identified a number of issues with the proposed concept. 

15.     The project will be split into three separate projects that will be delivered over differing time periods to ensure the components that support development are completed in the appropriate timeframes. 

16.     The first project will be local stormwater network upgrades that will be coordinated with Auckland Transport’s works in Wynyard Quarter. 

17.     The second project involves the construction of a high level discharge to Lighter Quay basin and will be delivered in parallel with the works in Wynyard Quarter subject to resource consents.

18.     The third and largest portion of the project involves working collaboratively with NZTA to identify a solution for the main stormwater flooding issues with provision for a potential diversion pipeline around the proposed second Harbour crossing.

Walmsley-Underwood Oakley Stream Widening

19.     The objective of this project is to undertake flood alleviation works to reduce habitable floor flooding of 98 houses and to provide for growth in the Oakley stormwater catchment at an estimated capital cost of $20-22 million.

20.     The preliminary design of this project is now underway with detailed design expected to begin in the middle of next year.

21.     Opportunities to collaborate with other council departments and the Puketapapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards to achieve enhanced facilities and youth employment outcomes in the stormwater construction contract are being investigated.


Ports of Auckland Stormwater Upgrade Project

22.     The objective of this project is to rehabilitate or replace the Stanley Street outfall pipeline that is in poor condition and resolve extensive flooding.  The scope of the project includes construction of a culvert (nominal diameter 3.3m or equivalent) from the rail corridor, across Quay Street and the Ports of Auckland land to the sea.  The project will supplement or replace the existing stormwater pipeline and will address flooding in the lower catchment.”

23.     The project is in the procurement phase of an Early Contractor Involvement design and build type contract with the Registration for Interest (RFI) process and evaluation completed for the initial design phase.  Four companies were selected to proceed to the next stage (Request for Proposals (RFP)) that will close within in four weeks.

Artillery Drive Stormwater Upgrade Project

24.     This project involves providing a large stormwater conveyance tunnel to recently released Greenfield land in Takanini at an estimated capital cost of approximately $19 million.  The project objective is to provide stormwater conveyance for growth and remove the existing stormwater constraints (flooding).  This project will enable development of approximately 1,500 properties in Takanini.

25.     The project is in the design phase and it is being progressed by the Stormwater Design Office team with the intention of utilising the Housing Accord Special Housing Areas legislation to fast track the infrastructure consents.

Collaboration with Watercare and Auckland Transport 

26.     The Stormwater Unit work with Watercare and Auckland Transport on joint projects. A number of opportunities are being investigated and reviewed, including but not limited to:

·     Central Interceptor Catchments – reviewing opportunities to optimise investment

·     Wynyard Quarter Development – under investigation

·     Optimised Catchpit cleaning programme – this will be subject to a comprehensive paper to the Committee when investigations are complete

·     Carlton Gore Road Separation – works predominantly complete

·     Picton Street  and Angelsea Street Separation, Rehabilitation and Flood mitigation works – design underway

·     Okahu Bay Separation – concept design complete

·     Franklin Road Upgrade and Separation – investigation underway; and

·     Castle Street to Fife Street Stormwater Extension – investigation underway.

Special Housing Areas

27.     The Stormwater SHA team continues to support the Housing Project Office (HPO) to deliver the housing targets of the Auckland Housing Accord.

28.     After initial difficulties in upskilling developers and consultants on the requirements and provisions of the draft Unitary Plan, Council staff are receiving positive feedback on the flexibility and collaborative approach of the SHA process.  Stormwater Management Plans (SMPs) for Scotts Point, Belmont and Karaka Lakes South are under internal review and are nearing completion.  The SMPs are a result of substantial collaborative effort of staff from Council’s stormwater, parks and urban design teams, Auckland Transport, and developers and their consultants.

29.     The Network Discharge Consent (NDC) to support development in the Hingaia SHA was lodged in the first week of October.

30.     The Stormwater Design Office is progressing the concepts and designs of stormwater solutions in each of the candidate SHAs to provide the HPO with the details of the infrastructure constraints and solutions.  Development of conceptual solutions and preliminary designs are progressing in New Lynn, Tamaki North, Takanini and Okahu Bay.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

31.     The stormwater unit provides local boards with quarterly updates on its work programme and works closely with local boards on issues within their local board areas.  During this reporting period, workshops with the Puketapapa and Papakura Local Boards have been held to discuss and answer questions on the Walmsley-Underwood and Artillery Road projects respectively.

Māori impact statement

32.     Stormwater and environmental management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

33.     The concept design of the Okahu Bay daylighting project is underway.  The objective of the concept design is to confirm proof of concept and quantify the benefits and risks of the proposal by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.  The daylighting of streams was identified by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei in the Okahu Bay Ecological Restoration Plan as one means to improve the Okahu Bay environment.  The concept plan may also address issues of stormwater discharge into Okahu Bay highlighted in the Restoration Plan as an additional opportunity to improve the mauri of local waterways. 

Implementation

34.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Stormwater 30 Year Capital Works Forecast and stormwater weighting priorities

11

 

Signatories

Authors

Craig Mcilroy – Manager Stormwater

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

Update from Watercare Services Ltd

 

File No.: CP2014/23979

 

Purpose

1.       Graham Wood, Chief Infrastructure Officer of Watercare Services Ltd has provided a written report covering capital projects in progress (Attachment A), to which he will speak to at the meeting.

2.       Accompanying Mr Wood will be Mark Bourne, Operations Manager of Wastewater, who will also assist in giving a powerpoint presentation on “Mangere Wastewater Treatment Plant and The Manukau Harbour’, including the Central Interceptor Project.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      thank the Chief Infrastructure Officer and the Operations Manager of Watercare Services Ltd for their presentations.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Watercare Services Ltd report for October 2014

15

bView

A3 version of  'Infrastructure Group Dashboard - Capex' (for ease of reading)

23

     

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator



Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator

 



Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

Auckland Travel Information Update

 

File No.: CP2014/20223

 

Purpose

1.       To update the committee with information about travel patterns in Auckland, including a report prepared for the Ministry of Transport on Census 2013 journey to work results and further information about travel for non-work purposes.

Executive summary

2.       A broad “transport trends” paper was presented to the committee in June 2014, highlighting a number of different transport indicators that were showing changes from previously long-standing trends, as well as discussing the future implications of these. At the June meeting, members of the committee requested ongoing information about transport trends and data in Auckland to help inform key transport decisions.

3.       Information from the Household Travel Survey provides an understanding of trips made for all purposes, including non-commuting travel. This data highlights the significant role of journeys to education, particularly during the morning peak period when these trips are greater in number than journeys to work.

4.       A Ministry of Transport report, prepared by Richard Paling Consulting Ltd., provides a further level of detailed analysis of the journey to work information derived from the 2013 census. The report’s executive summary is included as Attachment A to this paper, with the full report available on the Ministry of Transport website at http://www.transport.govt.nz/research/othertransportresearch/research-on-auckland/.

5.       The report provides a useful in depth analysis of journey to work travel pattern, including:

·    commuting patterns in Auckland from 2001 to 2013

·    comparisons with commuting patterns of Australian cities

·    journey to work patterns by sub-regional areas, local board areas, and census area units (CAU)

·    commuting movements to selected key employment centres and from selected residential areas

·    changes associated with investment in the rail corridor and Northern Busway

·    commuting movements across the Waitemata Harbour.

6.       Overall, the report highlights the modal shift from private vehicles (including passengers) to public transport, walking and cycling.  However, the report notes that different parts of Auckland have very different transport trends. A further key finding in the report is that journey to work trip distance in outer areas is significantly greater than in inner areas.

7.       The information outlined in this report provides further support for a number of key proposed transport projects outlined in the Auckland Plan as well as the benefits from a quality compact urban form.

Recommendation/s

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      note key trends from the 2013 Census about journeys to work as well as information from the Household Travel Survey about journeys for non-work purposes

b)      recognises the connections between the travel information contained in this report, key Auckland Plan transport projects and the location of future growth.

 

Comments

Journeys for Non-Work Purposes

8.       In June 2014 the Infrastructure Committee requested further information about journeys for non-work purposes, particularly trips to school or tertiary education that often occur during peak periods. Census data only captures journey to work information, which tells a very incomplete story of travel around Auckland.

9.       Data from the Household Travel Survey, collated by the Ministry of Transport, provides further information on ‘trip legs’ by purpose and by time of day, which helps provide a more complete picture of travel occurring around Auckland on a typical weekday. The most recent information available, collected between 2009 and 2013 from the travel survey, is shown in Figure 1 below:

cid:image002.png@01CFCC4F.C3787D90

Figure 1: Auckland Trips by Purpose and Time of Day (source: Household Travel Survey 2009-2013 data)

10.     Of particular note in the above graph is the importance of trips to education during the 8-9am (8-9) hour, which is overall the busiest hour of the day for the Auckland transport network to manage. Figure 1 shows that during this hour, more trip legs to education are being made than trip legs to employment, highlighting the very significant role of these types of trips in the Auckland travel market. Of further interest is that more trip legs are made during the 3-4pm (15-16) hour than in either of the traditional “evening peak” hours between 4pm and 6pm (16-18), again reflecting the importance of journeys for educational purposes.

11.     Trips to tertiary education are a significant contributor to public transport use not collected through the census. Auckland Transport has undertaken travel surveys of different tertiary facilities to better understand mode-shares for people travelling to tertiary education. The 2014 survey noted that across six major tertiary institutes nearly 60% of students regularly caught public transport and 23% regularly walked or cycled. As detailed further below, overall mode-share for journeys to work in Auckland is 84% private vehicles, 10% public transport and 6% walking and cycling.

12.     Auckland Transport public transport data can also provide a more complete picture of transport use than the census journey to work information. For example, Auckland Transport information shows there are approximately 42,000 rail trips on an average weekday (likely to be approximately 21,000 people making two trips each) whereas the census only records just under 9,500 rail journeys to work. This comparison indicates a significant proportion of rail trips are being made for non-work purposes.

2013 Census Journey to Work Information – Auckland-wide analysis

13.     Results from the 2013 Census have been progressively released over the past year. As outlined, journey to work information has been released in a number of stages, progressively providing more detailed analysis. The 2013 Census results are particularly important to analyse, as there was a seven year gap between censuses and significant changes occurred in transport trends during the 2006-13 period. These changes were the result of a number of different factors, including fuel price fluctuations, the Global Financial Crisis, changing technologies, culture as well as significant transport investment in Auckland. The June report on “Transport Trends” provides more detail on the causes and impacts of these changing trends.

14.     In August 2014 the Ministry of Transport published “Journey to Work Patterns in the Auckland Region”, prepared by Richard Paling Consulting Ltd. The report looked at just under 590,000 journeys to work that were recorded at the 2013 Census. Importantly, the census only records the “main means of travel”, which may understate the importance of walking (to access public transport) or bus trips (where these are a feeder service to a train station).

15.     Once “work from home” and “not elsewhere included” trips are excluded, the 2013 Census showed approximately 84% of journey to work trips were made by private vehicle (driver or passenger), 10% by public transport (“other” is included as ferry in this analysis) and 6% by active modes (walking and cycling).

16.     The graph below (figure 3.4 of the report) shows the level of change in mode-share between different journey to work modes between 2006 and 2013:


 

17.     The report notes the important differences between mode-share trends for drivers (which is relatively constant) and those for private vehicle passengers (which has fallen quite significantly). At this stage it is unclear what might be behind the fall in private vehicle passenger trips. All public transport and active transport modes experienced growth in mode-share between 2006 and 2013.

18.     The report also compares Auckland’s mode-share with a number of different Australian cities, with the key finding that Auckland has a similar private vehicle mode-share (aside from Sydney), lower public transport mode-share and higher active transport mode-share. Auckland also has a larger proportion of people who work from home than Australian cities. This is shown below (figure 3.6 of the report):

Sub-Regional Analysis

19.     Council’s Research, Investigation and Monitoring Unit (RIMU) has undertaken analysis of trip origins and destinations. This is shown in table 2 below. The boundaries used to break down the sub-regions for the above analysis are shown in Attachment B to this report.

 

 

Area of Residence

Destinations

 

Rural North

Urban North

Urban West

Gulf Islands

Urban Central

Urban South

Rural South

Rural North

11631

1875

1116

15

801

459

72

Urban North

4638

73425

6816

75

9345

4278

561

Urban West

1455

4353

35355

30

6390

2433

270

Gulf Islands

12

102

24

2523

132

39

6

Urban Central

3147

32247

31971

747

120795

39747

4125

Urban South

519

4428

5832

63

17052

77109

7749

Rural South

51

303

228

9

759

2388

12711

Table 2: Sub-Regional Journey to Work Analysis (raw numbers)


 

20.     The same information, but in percentage terms, is shown in table 3 below:

 

 

Area of Residence

Destinations (%)

 

Rural North

Urban North

Urban West

Gulf Islands

Urban Central

Urban South

Rural South

Rural North

54%

2%

1%

0%

1%

0%

0%

Urban North

22%

63%

8%

2%

6%

3%

2%

Urban West

7%

4%

43%

1%

4%

2%

1%

Gulf Islands

0%

0%

0%

73%

0%

0%

0%

Urban Central

15%

28%

39%

22%

78%

31%

16%

Urban South

2%

4%

7%

2%

11%

61%

30%

Rural South

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

2%

50%

Table 3: Sub-Regional Journey to Work Analysis (percentages)

21.     Differences between the level of ‘self-containment’ of different areas are important from a transport perspective. Nearly 80% of residents in the urban central area are also employed in this same part of Auckland compared to only 43% of urban west residents – reflecting the relatively low level of employment available in the western part of Auckland. There are also strong flows to employment in the urban central area from all adjoining urban areas.

22.     The Richard Paling Consulting Report undertakes sub-regional analysis in a different way, comparing travel origin and destination points for city centre, city fringe, inner suburban, outer suburban and rural areas. City centre and city fringe areas have a greater number of destination points than trip origins (due to their employment focus) while other areas are the reverse (due to their primarily residential nature).

23.     As shown below (figure 4.3 of the report), the most common journeys to work are within outer suburban areas and within inner suburban areas. There are also fairly significant flows from outer suburban origin points to inner suburban destinations and from inner suburban origin points to city centre destinations.


 

24.     Mode-share varies quite significantly by destination point, with trips to the city centre having much lower private vehicle mode-share than trips to other employment locations. Working from home was, unsurprisingly, most common in rural areas. This is shown below (figure 4.8 of the report):


Detailed Analysis

25.     Looking at the data at a finer-grained census areas unit (CAU) level highlights some important trends that impact on future land-use and transport planning. For example, when journey to work trip length is calculated by the point of origin, there is a clear pattern that people who live in more central areas make shorter journeys to work. Another important characteristic highlighted by this analysis is that journeys to work in southern areas are typically much shorter than those in West Auckland – as shown below (figure 6.1 of the report):

26.     Longer journeys to work place greater pressure on the transport network, place a greater burden on commuters and have a higher environmental impact. Enabling residential growth in areas where commutes are currently shorter as well as increasing employment in areas with longer commutes (so there are more local employment options) are important strategic land-use responses to this information.

27.     Trip length by destination point (figure 6.2 of the report, below) outline a more complex pattern, but generally major employment areas (city centre, Airport, Penrose-Onehunga, East Tamaki etc.) have longer trip distances than other areas. This is likely to be due to the wider variety and therefore more regional catchment of jobs in these locations. It is notable that employment in the Airport area has the longest trip length of all locations, as significant growth in employment in this part of Auckland is planned over the next 30 years (an increase in employment numbers from approximately 10,000 to 30,000). Providing high speed, high quality public transport options for employees in the Airport area is likely to be increasingly required to relieve pressure on the wider transport network, due to the very long commutes people make to the Airport area.

28.     Mode-share patterns by point of origin also show some strong trends across Auckland, with inner areas having the lowest private vehicle share and locations in the northwest and southeast of Auckland having the highest reliance on private vehicles to access employment. This is shown below (figure 6.4 of the report):

29.     Northwest and southeast parts of Auckland generally have poor access to rail or busways, meaning that public transport is typically a poor quality option for people living in these areas. Strategic transport interventions of the AMETI busway and the Northwest Busway along State Highway 16 are currently in various stages of planning and implementation. These projects should make a significant contribution to reducing the reliance of the areas they serve on private vehicles (as has happened with the Northern Busway and areas around the rail network).

30.     For rail, an important statistic is the proportion of trips to the city centre from particular parts of Auckland that are taken by rail. As shown below (figure 6.7 of the report), this ‘share of trips’ is highest in the south and quite low along the Western Line:

31.     CAUs along the Western Line (particularly inner areas) contain many more residents who work in the city centre than those along the outer parts of the Southern Line (see figure 6.9 of the main report), but a low proportion of those commuters are currently choosing to use the train – instead travelling by private vehicle, bus or other mode. This may be due to the slow rail trip (compared to other modes) from inner Western Line stations to the city centre, caused by the need to travel via Newmarket. The City Rail Link project will dramatically reduce travel times to the city centre from the Western Line and it would appear from the census data that there is significant growth potential for rail for trips from stations along the Western Line into the city centre.

32.     Recent investment in the rail network (although the 2013 Census results precede the rollout of electric trains) and in the Northern Busway have been reflected in growth in mode shares for areas around the rail network and for much of the North Shore. Bus mode share has also increased in inner isthmus areas, but declined in areas well served by rail (as presumably bus users have switched to rail as the service has improved). The trends in changing public transport mode shares as shown in the two maps below (figures 6.12 and 6.13 of the report):

33.     While recent investment in public transport has clearly resulted in modal share shifts, the report also highlights that trips to major employment centres other than the city centre (for example, North Harbour, Highbrook/East Tamaki, Manukau Central, Onehunga/Penrose, Airport etc.) typically have much longer trip lengths than the regional average, but also have very high private vehicle mode-shares (figures 7.15 and 7.16 of the report).


34.     Growing these major employment areas is important for Auckland’s economy, as their wide variety of employment and increased specialisation enables agglomeration and productivity benefits. However, the long trips lengths and high private vehicle dependency of these areas (for example the Airport has an average journey to work distance of 18.1km and a private vehicle mode-share of 92.6%) will place increasing strain on Auckland’s transport network and liveability as these employment areas grow – unless a greater level of modal shift occurs.

35.     Non-city centre major employment areas fall into two categories, large industrial areas and metropolitan centres. Significantly increasing the use of public transport for those employed in metropolitan centres is likely to be more successful and cost-effective than for industrial areas, due to the higher intensity of employment and higher land values, which make the provision of extensive employee parking in metropolitan areas less economic. This needs to be weighed against socio-economic concerns, where the impact on household budgets of those employed in industrial areas being highly dependent on owning multiple private vehicles, is significant.

36.     Current plans to improve rapid transit focus on improving access to and between key metropolitan centres (and the Airport), to ensure sufficient speed and capacity are provided to achieve a modal shift from private vehicles. This is supported by an enhanced network of frequent public transport routes that feed into these centres and other employment locations, to enable better access to employment locations outside the city centre than is provided by the current network.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

37.     Section 5 of the report by Richard Paling Consulting Ltd. includes breakdowns of travel patterns by Local Board area.

Māori impact statement

38.     Census information discussed in this report highlights that many areas of Auckland with a concentration of Māori remain highly car dependent, with likely negative effects of that car dependency on liveability and prosperity. Planned future improvements to the transport network, particularly those that improve the provision of quality affordable transport choices, are likely to benefit Māori.

Implementation

39.     Development of the Auckland transport network to meet current and future travel requirements is the responsibility of Auckland Transport, the NZ Transport Agency and KiwiRail. Council has an important role in defining and updating the strategic direction for transport in Auckland (through the Auckland Plan’s transport chapter) and in funding Auckland Transport.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Travel Patterns in the Auckland Region - Executive Summary

37

bView

Map of Sub-Regional Boundaries

51

 

Signatories

Authors

Joshua Arbury - Principal Transport Planner

Authorisers

Harvey Brookes - Manager Economic Development

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

 



Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

Update from Auckland Transport

 

File No.: CP2014/23980

 

Purpose

1.       Peter Clark, General Manager Strategy & Planning, Auckland Transport will give a verbal presentation to the Infrastructure Committee outlining key projects and initiatives.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      thank the General Manager Strategy & Planning, Auckland Transport for his presentation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chief Executive's Report to October 2014

55

bView

Monthly Indicators Report - August 2014

83

     

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator

 



Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

Information Items

 

File No.: CP2014/23981

 

Purpose

1.       The Chair of the Infrastructure Committee requested the attached items of interest be included in the agenda, for information purposes only.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Infrastructure Committee:

a)      receive the information.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Transport Monthly Statistics Report - August 2014

101

     

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Infrastructure Committee

21 October 2014

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator