I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 13 October 2014

5.00pm

Manukau Chambers
Level 1
Manukau Civic Centre
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Fa'anana Efeso Collins

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson

 

Members

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Stephen Grey

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

John McCracken

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

6 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 8969

Email: carol.McGarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Manukau Ward Councillors Update                                                                            7

13        Te Puke o Tara Refurbishment report                                                                        9

14        Otara Cube Asset Lifestyle and Ongoing Programming                                        15

15        2013/2014 Environmental Work Programme - Summary of Achievements and Outcomes Report                                                                                                                           23

16        Allocation of the 2014/15 Infrastructure and Environmental Services Budget    31

17        Auckland Transport Report - 13 October 2014                                                        33

18        Otara and Papatoetoe Crime Prevention Officer Funding                                     41

19        Christmas Tree Lights 2014                                                                                       43

20        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Community Group Funding - Applications for Round One 2014/2015                                                                                                                      49

21        Sistema Aotearoa - Grant for office and teaching space                                        53

22        Approvals for Capex Renewal projects for Aquatic and Recreation facilities     55

23        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) 57

24        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                               69

25        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                        81

26        Draft Community Grants Policy                                                                               105

27        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                      127

28        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Long Term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal                                                                                                                                     145

29        Monthly budget update including the 2014/2015 capital programme deferral considered by the 21 August and 24 September 2014 Finance and Performance Committee 147

30        Adoption of the Otara-Papatoetoe local board plan 2014                                    151

31        For Information: Reports referred to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board          191

32        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board  Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term    193

33        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  199

34        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Reports and Actions Pending                            209

35        Otara Papatoetoe Local Board members portfolio update                                  215

36        Chairpersons Announcements                                                                                219  

37        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

38        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               221

C1       Commercial Proposal for a Reserve                                                                       221

C2       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   221  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 15 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to speak had been received.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2014/20761

 

  

 

Executive Summary

A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         receive the verbal reports.

b)         receive the written report from Councillor Arthur Anae.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Te Puke o Tara Refurbishment report

 

File No.: CP2014/22766

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report enables the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board to receive the refurbishment report that it commissioned for Te Puke o Tara Community Centre. It seeks approval to utilise existing community facility capital funding to upgrade the centre.

Executive summary

2.       Te Puke o Tara Centre (The Centre) opened in 1975. It is a well located facility that has a variety of uses and users, but is not utilised to its full potential because the kitchen needs upgrading and the building looks tired and dated. A report was prepared seeking funding to enable a refurbishment study to be undertaken and at the 18 November 2013 Board meeting an allocation of $15,000 was made.

The Roots Creative Entrepreneurs (Roots) were engaged to undertake a community consultation and identify possible refurbishment options for The Centre. This work was completed in May 2014 and was presented to a Board workshop on Friday 2 May 2014.  A report was prepared for the Board meeting on 16 June 2014 with the aim of enabling the Board to formally receive the Roots report and consider the use of funding available. At this meeting the Board indicated that it needed further information about the Papatoetoe Chambers and wider community accommodation needs before it could make any decision

 

3.       This information was discussed at the Boards workshop on 5 September 2014 where the Board confirmed a preference to progress the redevelopment of Te Puke o Tara whilst only spending enough money to maintain the Papatoetoe Chambers for community use. The future of the Chambers to be considered when a wider town centre planning exercise is undertaken.

4.       The Roots report is attached and identifies three refurbishment options. Option 3 is the preferred option as it would address all the expectations raised through the community consultation process. It would increase the useable space at the centre by 176 sq metres and provide more spaces for meetings and programmes. It would ensure higher visibility, act as a catalyst for more community use and ensure that the centre is able to meet community needs for the next 20 years. This option will cost $1,382,000 based on the costs identified by Roots in their report

 

5.       Currently in the Long Term Plan, the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board has budget of $1,525,000 in year 2016/17 for the upgrade of community facilities. It is recommended that $1,300,000 of that money be committed to fund the refurbishment of Te Puke o Tara along with the $82,000 identified in the 2013/ 14 Board’s community facilities renewal program. 

 

6.       From this total budget, funds of $300,000 would need to be brought forward to year 2015/16 to enable design and consenting work to be carried out for Te Puke o Tara.  The balance of $1,082,000 in year 2016/17 would be used to enable the physical works at Te Puke o Tara.to be completed.  It is recommended that the $225,000 required for work to enable continued community use of the Papatoetoe Chambers be brought forward to 2015/16.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Receive the refurbishment report on Te Puke o Tara Community Centre prepared by The Roots Creative Entrepreneurs

b)      Confirm option 3 identified in the report as the preferred refurbishment option for Te Puke o Tara Community Centre

c)      Allocate $1,300,000 from the community facilities upgrade budget to fund this refurbishment and confirms the use of $82,000 from its 2013/14 community facilities renewal budget.

d)      Allocate $225,000 from the community facilities upgrade budget to undertake remedial work on the Papatoetoe Chambers to enable continued community use of this building.

 

Comments

 

7.       Te Puke o Tara Centre (The Centre) opened in 1975. It is a well located facility that has a variety of uses and users, but is not utilised to its full potential because the kitchen needs upgrading and the building looks tired and dated. A report was prepared seeking funding to enable a refurbishment study to be undertaken. On 18 November 2013 the Board resolved that it;

a)        Supports the engagement of an architect to review the current condition of Te Puke o Tara Centre and provide a detailed refurbishment report with options to redevelop the Centre to ensure it meets future community needs.

b)        Allocates $15,000 from its Community Response Fund (OPEX) to obtain a report on options to redevelop Te Puke o Tara Community Centre, including a concept plan for refurbishment, by 30 April 2014.

c)         Appoints the Community Services & Libraries portfolio-holder to keep an overview of the review process on behalf of the board.  

CP2013/25819

 

8.       The Roots Creative Entrepreneurs (Roots) were engaged to undertake a community consultation and identify possible refurbishment options for the centre. This work was completed in May 2014 and was presented to a Board workshop on Friday 2 May 2014. The Roots report is attached. A report was prepared for the Boards meeting on 16 June 2014 with the aim of enabling the Board to formally receive the Roots report and consider the use of funding available. At this meeting the Board indicated that it needed further information about the Papatoetoe Chambers and wider community accommodation needs before it could make any decision. It resolved;

Resolution number OP/2014/83

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board defer the Te Puke o Tara Community Centre

and Papatoetoe Chambers capital development projects to further workshop and

reporting.

 

9.       This information was presented to a Board workshop on 5 September 2014. The feedback at the workshop was that the Board wanted to pursue the redevelopment of Te Puke o Tara as a priority and only spend a minimal amount on the Papatoetoe Chambers to enable continued community occupancy. Future decisions about the Chambers would be considered as part of a wider town centre redevelopment.

 

10.     The consultation feedback regarding Te Puke o Tara identified the need for improvements to the air conditioning and ventilation at the centre and more open and flexible spaces.  There was a desire to see more youth oriented programmes and music and better provision for drama, performance and community events. The overall community aspirations for Te Puke o Tara were for a warm and welcoming centre, space for youth and a facility that reflected the cultural identity of the area better.

 

11.     The specific recommendations from Roots were to;

·   maximize dead/ unused spaces

·   develop better flow and circulation in the centre

·   develop larger and flexible community spaces

·   extend outdoor community space to new community rooms

·   connect to surrounding landscape environment

·   more welcoming entrance and a more formal entry point

·   develop exterior decking

·   better interior / exterior connection

·   develop new unisex accessible toilets

12.     The report developed by Roots identified three refurbishment options for consideration. These options are detailed in the report attached have been and costed.

Option 1. The most economical solution and would

·   work around existing physiotherapist offices

·   redefine entry point to deliver wheel chair accessibility

·   create better flow and flexibility between spaces

·   open up community rooms to surrounding natural environment

·   upgrade the kitchen facilities

·   new community spaces and offices for additional lease

·   new reception area

·   new unisex accessible w/c and baby changing room

·   new connection between community rooms

·   Interior decor cosmetic upgrade with vibrant palette , smarter user

interface, security and branding

Budget cost $715,700

Option 2 achieves a mid-level of upgrade and would

·   work with and incorporate new physiotherapist spaces

·   redefine entry point for users

·   create better flow and flexibility between spaces

·   larger community rooms and flexible spaces

·   new kitchen facilities

·   open the centre to its surroundings and natural environment

·   new community spaces and offices for lease

·   new reception area

·   new unisex accessible w/c and baby changing room

·   better access to upstairs office / storage

·   Interior decor cosmetic upgrade with vibrant palette , smarter user

interface, security and branding

Budget cost $1,061,600

Option 3 achieves the highest level of upgrade and would

·   remove the physiotherapist freeing up space

·   redefine entry point for users

·   create better flow and flexibility between spaces

·   larger community rooms and flexible spaces

·   new kitchen facilities

·   create covered areas to encourage interaction of users outside of the

centre and to engage with the natural environment

·   new community spaces and offices for lease

·         new reception area

·         renovation of male and female w/c

·         new unisex accessible w/c and baby changing room

·         removal of upstairs allow more natural light into community spaces

·         stage for community events and performances

·         dedicated youth space

·         Interior decor cosmetic upgrade with vibrant palette , smarter user interface and

branding

Budget Cost $1,382,000

 

13.     Option 3 is the preferred option as it would address all the expectations and issues raised through the community consultation process. It would increase the useable space at the centre by 176 sq metres and provide more spaces for meetings and community programmes. It would ensure higher centre visibility, act as a catalyst for more use and ensure that it is able to meet community needs for the next 20 years. This option would cost $1,382,000 based on the costs identified by Roots in their report.

 

14.     Currently in the Long Term Plan the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board has budget of $1,525,000 in year 2016/ 2017 for the upgrade of community facilities. This funding was linked to the redevelopment of the Papatoetoe Chambers which has been conservatively costed at $3,046,000. Even looking at a staged redevelopment of this facility, the minimum required is $2,303,000 and is not affordable within the current budget available. 

 

 

15.     This report recommends that the Local Board consider spending sufficient money on the Papatoetoe Chambers to maintain community use of this building until its long term future is decided. This will require funding of $225,000. It is recommended that the balance of the available budget of $1,300,000 be committed to fund the refurbishment of Te Puke o Tara Community Centre along with the $82,000 identified in the 2013/14 Board’s community facilities renewal program.  Funds of $300,000 would need to be brought forward to year 2015/16 to enable design and consenting work to be carried out for Te Puke o Tara.  The balance of $1,082,000 in year 2016/17 would be used to enable the physical works at Te Puke o Tara to be completed.  It is recommended that the $225,000 required for work to enable continued community use of the Papatoetoe Chambers be brought forward to 2015/16.

 

16.     Allocating budget towards the refurbishment of Te Puke o Tara would enable the Board to redevelop an already functioning facility that is seeing increasing usage following the appointment of a centre manager. It would respond in a positive manner to the consultation process undertaken and the community expectations raised.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     The refurbishment report has been work shopped with the Board who indicated support for option 3. This report is seeking the Local Board support to progress this refurbishment option.  Further information was also prepared for a Board workshop on 5 September 2014 concerning the use of the Papatoetoe Chambers and Depot sites to enable the Board to consider the wider community accommodation needs in the area.

Māori impact statement

18.     The facility already caters for a wide community and a refurbished facility will enable its continued operation and deliver of programs and activities of benefit to Maori.

Implementation

19.     There are no implementation issues with this proposal due to the available lead time for the project development.

 

A copy of the TPot Feasibility, attachment A to this report, can be found at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/  - Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board meeting “Attachments”

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

TPoT Feasibility (Under Separate Cover Board members only)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Peter Loud - Team Leader Community Facilities

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture s

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Otara Cube Asset Lifestyle and Ongoing Programming

 

File No.: CP2014/22676

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on the status of the Ōtara Cube asset following the expiry of this temporary structure’s resource consent on 31 October 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 13 September 2013 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved a payment of $25,000 to  Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) towards construction of a three metre shipping container, retrofitted as a temporary exhibition space (Ōtara Cube), to be installed at the Ōtara Bus Interchange.

3.       The resource consent for Ōtara Cube as a temporary structure expires on 31 October 2014.

4.       At the time of creation, the local board provided funding for the development of the temporary asset only. The programming of the six weekly exhibitions was funded by MIT at a total cost of $5,000.  MIT have indicated that they will not be funding on-going programming past 31 October.

5.       The temporary asset will be decommissioned in November unless alternative options for re-siting, future ownership and programming are investigated, prioritised and resourced. All alternative options will have cost implications for the local board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Decommission and dispose of the temporary Ōtara Cube

b)      Request staff to investigate alternative options for re-siting, future ownership and programming of Ōtara Cube, including the sale or gift of the asset.

 

 

Comments

 

6.       In 2012, Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Ōtara Business Association launched a shared initiative to rejuvenate the Ōtara Town Centre. The first manifestation of the shared initiative was Ōtara Cube. The cube is a powered, three metre shipping container retrofitted as a secure temporary exhibition space.

7.       On 13 September 2013, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approved a payment of $25,000 to MIT towards construction of Ōtara Cube, to be installed at the Ōtara Bus Interchange.

That the Ōtara -Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)           Approves a grant of $25,000 to the Creative Arts Faculty of the Manukau Institute of Technology for the construction and installation of their ‘ŌTARA cube’ interactive art project to be located at the Ōtara Bus Interchange, to be funded from the Ōtara Town Centre Public Art budget.

b)           Requests that the Creative Arts Faculty of the Manukau Institute of Technology liaise with BID Partnership Advisor Ōtara Town Centre regarding the location and timing of this installation.

c)           Requests that council staff coordinate a funding agreement and payment of the grant to the Creative Arts Faculty of the Manukau Institute of Technology.

d)           Thanks officers for their hard work and support over the electoral term (res OP/2013/503).

CARRIED

8.       As a restricted discretionary activity lasting more than six days, the Ōtara Cube temporary structure required resource consent, which included landowner approval on an Auckland Transport site. Following approval of the consent, the Cube was installed in November 2013 (For images refer to Appendix A).

9.       The acquisition of Ōtara Cube was funded with capital expenditure budget, and the cube became an asset of Auckland Council, who is responsible for care and maintenance over its lifespan. Electricity to the site is paid for by council. Vandalism over the last 6 months has been minimal, as the structure was treated with a sacrificial graffiti guard layer.

10.     At the time of creation, the local board provided funding for the development and operation of the cube as a temporary asset only. For the cube’s consented year of operation, the programming of the six weekly exhibitions was funded by MIT at a total cost of $5,000.  (For planned programming details refer to Appendix B). MIT have indicated that they will not be funding on-going programming past 31 October.

11.     The resource consent for Ōtara Cube as a temporary structure expires on 31 October 2014. In accordance with original lifespan commitments, staff will start the decommissioning and disposal process in November unless the local board immediately directs staff to investigate alternative options that could include:

·    permanent asset on the current site

·    permanent asset on a new site

·    temporary movable asset on a new site

·    gifting of the asset to a third party

·    sale of the asset.

12.     All alternative options will have financial implications for the local board. The details of these will be identified if alternative options are investigated.If an alternative option is preferred and resourced by the local board, the cube will need to be moved more than once (with associated costs) to comply with the conditions of the current resource consent.

Strategic Context

13.     The Cube aligns with strategic aims in the Auckland Plan regarding integrating arts and culture into the everyday lives of Aucklanders, as it is an accessible format for visual arts in open public space.

14.     The Cube reflects the aims of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan, in working with key stakeholders such as Manukau Institute of Technology to “generate more services and economic vitality” in Ōtara Town Centre as part of the Ōtara Town Centre revitalisation plan. However, MIT has confirmed that its programming resources for the cube will not be extended beyond its current commitments which expire on 30 October 2014.  

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     At a workshop on 27 August 2014, the local board arts and culture portfolio holder recommended that the decision on the future of Ōtara Cube be tabled at a full local board workshop.  A workshop slot was not able to be scheduled; therefore an opportunity for discussion on this report is sought at the 13 October local board business meeting.

Māori impact statement

16.     If the local board direct staff to investigate alternative options for permanently locating the Ōtara Cube, then this will include engagement with local iwi as part of the resource consenting process.

Implementation

17.     Decommissioning of the asset will involve removal, potential storage, and then disposal. This work is expected to commence in November and all costs will be covered from the regional collections management budget.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A - Otara Cube Lifecycle Insitu images

19

bView

Attachment B - OtaraCube Lifecycle Programme 2014

21

     

Signatories

Authors

Hanna Scott – Manager Arts and Culture Programming

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

2013/2014 Environmental Work Programme - Summary of Achievements and Outcomes Report

 

File No.: CP2014/19384

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide a summary report to the Otara- Papatoetoe Local Board (the board) about the achievements and outcomes of the board’s environmental work programme for the 2013/2014 year.

Executive summary

2.       The board allocated a total of $15,000 towards environmental outcomes in 2013/2014.

3.       Over the course of 2013/2014 this budget was allocated the Wai Care activity in the board area.

4.       In particular, the Wai Care programme supported monitoring and litter clean ups of the Otara Creek, as well as undertaking streamside (riparian) planting.

5.       In addition to summarising the key achievements and outcomes of the 2013/2014 local board environment work programme this report also provides an update on key regional environmental work programmes delivered in the board area in 2013/2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receives the 2013/2014 Environment Work Programme – Summary of Achievements and Outcomes report.

 

Comments

6.       As a member of the Tamaki Estuary and Manukau Harbour Forums, the board committed $15,000 in its 2013/2014 Local Board Agreement to enable the Wai Care programme to engage the community, particularly schools, in the restoration of Otara Creek.

7.       As part of their involvement in the Wai Care programme, a number of schools participated in class sessions on stream ecology before undertaking stream monitoring trips and fish surveys. During these stream monitoring sessions, students found banded kokopu and short fin eels. One school is also using the Wai Care programme to enhance existing classroom lessons and NCEA assessments.

8.       As well as stream monitoring, students from also undertook planting work along the Otara Stream. A total of 1200 plants were planted along the stream during the past planting season.

9.       The board’s funding for the Wai Care programme was matched by Contact Energy. This funding supported planting at the Birmingham Road planting site on the Otara Creek.

Regional Projects

10.     In addition, to the locally funded Wai Care activity, regional funding supports other environmental programmes in the board area namely Wai Care and Trees of Survival.

11.     Wai Care is also supporting three schools in the board area to undertake environmental activity in their local streams and water ways.This includes helping Papatoetoe East School to develop a native area and outdoor classroom near the stream on their school boundary. Assistance was also provided to a student and teacher from De La Salle College in monitoring the water quality of their Otara creek and Otaki stream. Restoration work along the Otaki Stream in Middlemore is also supported with regional Wai Care funding. This includes litter clean ups and riparian planting with members of the local community. In addition, staff are working with Housing New Zealand to identify the possibility of that organization providing further support for restoration work along the Otaki Stream.

12.     A specialist science teacher at Dawson Primary has started a Wai Care project, building a large pond with Mahurangi Technical Institute input and with inanga provided by fish expert Paul Woodard.

13.     A planting day was held on a property at Prices Road in Papatoetoe as part of the regional Trees for Survival Programme. A total of 600 plants were planted by students and volunteers from the local Rotary Club. This programme supports landowners interested in improving the environment on private land.

Consideration

14.     This is a report prepared specifically for the Otara – Papatoetoe Local Board.

Local board views and implications

15.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report. Regular reporting on project delivery was provided through the quarterly report from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department, or as required.

Māori impact statement

16.     No consultation with Maori was required for the purposes of this report.  It is acknowledged that environmental management; water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Implementation

17.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report. Regular reporting on project delivery was provided through the quarterly report from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department, or as required.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Wai Care Programme in Otara - Papatoetoe Local Board area

25

     

Signatories

Authors

Varsha Belwalkar - Relationship Advisor

Hazel Meadows Environmental Initiatives Team Manager

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 







Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Allocation of the 2014/15 Infrastructure and Environmental Services Budget

 

File No.: CP2014/19377

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.   To approve the work programme supporting the 2014/2015 Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board budget for environmental programme ($15,029).

Executive summary

2.   The board as part of its deliberations on its Local Board Agreement (LBA) agreed to allocate $15,529 from its 2014/2015 budget to support environmental programmes in its area. This report recommends a work programme supporting that budget line, in particular, the continuation of the Wai Care project in the Otara-Flatbush catchment.

3.   The board agreed at its August 2014 meeting (resolution number OP/2014/132) to contribute $8,500 of the total $ 15,529 available in the 2014/15 financial year towards the Manukau Harbour Forum action plan and work programme, to be paid from the board’s Environmental Project budget.

 

Recommendations

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:                                   

a)      agrees to fund an enhanced Wai Care programme in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area at a cost of $7,029.

b)      forwards this report and associated resolutions to the Manukau Harbour Forum. 

 

Comments

 

4.   The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan notes that the board will support environmental projects on the Tamaki Estuary and the Manukau Harbour.  As such, the board agreed to use $8,500 of its environmental programme budget to fund its contribution to the first year of the Manukau Harbour Forum (MHF) work programme.

5.   It is recommended that the remaining $7,029 of the environmental programmes budget line continue to support Wai Care work in the Otara Flatbush catchment. This initiative supports the board’s priority of supporting projects that contribute to improving the Tamaki Estuary.

6.   Another priority for the board is increasing the wellbeing of the Otara-Papatoetoe community. Many environmental projects have a dual outcome of seeking to increase community development and wellbeing through engagement with the environment.  Wai Care projects engage local communities, particularly schools and young people, in monitoring and managing local streams.

Estimate for Wai Care Programme for 2014/15.

7.   The available local funding will support planting work along the Otara Creek. However, available local funding is insufficient to fund a full Wai Care programme in this waterway. A draft restoration programme is noted below in case furthersurplus from other programmes funding becomes available;

·    $10,000 for enhancement (continuing to grow and develop groups with education session and action projects such as stream clean ups and monitoring).

·    $15,000 for plants (continuing work along the Otara Creek from the flood detention dam to East Tamaki Road- see map below).

·    $2,000 for planting site preparation and maintenance.

 

                          Map of Planting Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.   This is a report prepared specifically for the Otara – Papatoetoe Local Board.

9.   The Board allocated $15,529 in its 2014/2015 LBA to support environmental programmes through a reprioritization of its 2013/2014 budget. This budget supports the ‘improving and using our waterways’ and ‘increase the wellbeing of our communities’ priorities included in the Local Board Plan.

Māori impact statement

10. No consultation with Maori was required for the purposes of this report.  It is acknowledged that environmental management; water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Implementation

11. No external consultation was required for this report.  Staffs have discussed the draft work programme with various community organisations in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Varsha Belwalkar - Relationship Advisor

Hazel Meadows Environmental Initiatives Team Manager

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - 13 October 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22946

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport activities in the local board area.

Executive summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific applications and interest to the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board and its community, matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector, and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Receive the Auckland Transport Monthly report for October 2014.

b)      Approve $280,000 to completely upgrade the lights and poles at Hunters Corner from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

c)      Approve $500,000 as a contribution to the MIT/Otara Town Centre connection project to include a footpath upgrade to the MIT side of the Town Centre from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

 

 

Comments

 

3.       Bus Shelters

Feedback on the new bus shelters has closed and we are moving in to the next stages which is:

·        The feedback received is being used to improve the shelters and will form one of several criteria which they will be assessed against when selecting the new bus shelter design (or designs) for Auckland

·        Auckland Transport will prepare a report summarising the feedback received and announcing final decisions on the bus shelters.  It is anticipated that this report will be available to all submitters and the public in December 2014

·        The new bus shelter design (or designs) will start to be rolled out across Auckland in late 2014 / early 2015. The rollout will be gradual and on-going

·        The priority for the rollout of the bus shelter will be on key/frequent routes in the new public transport network and existing shelters in poor condition.

4.       Parking Discussion Document

There have been 6,000 submissions on this document; in comparison the unitary plan received 9,300.  Processing these submissions has taken Auckland Transport significantly longer than anticipated.  At the time of writing this report the intention is to deliver high level summaries of the themes to the Auckland Transport Board this month, then a briefing to the local boards towards the end of this calendar year.

          Resolution Update

5.       OP/2013/553 - No Stopping Restrictions at the Intersection of Carruth Road/Birdwood Avenue/Victoria Road. 

That the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board refers the petition from Arvind Patel and residents to Auckland Transport and requests review, consideration and report-back to the local board by Auckland Transport in close consultation with the local board’s Transport portfolio and requests that no action be taken until this is reported back to the board.

This project was delivered at the end of August as reported in July.

 

6.       OP/2014/31 - Requests that the Otara/Papatoetoe Local Board receive the information on Auckland Transport’s Rough Orders of Cost for the following Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects: Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF);

Upgraded lighting

7.       In 2013 Old Papatoetoe lighting was upgraded to reflect the heritage nature of the area at the cost of Auckland Transport.  Hunters Corner would benefit from an upgrade in lighting and there are three options available:

·    Option one - to install lights the same as Old Papatoetoe the cost of this would be $280,000

·    Option two - would be a mix of new poles and luminaires at a cost of $52,000

·    Option three - to change the light bulbs to white at a cost of $4,000.

Auckland Transport recommends the board choose the first option, changing the lights and poles would bring cohesion to the area.

Footpath improvements

8.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has identified the need to encourage economic development within the Town Centre’s of Otara and Old Papatoetoe.  Both of these areas would benefit significantly if the footpaths and street furniture in these Town Centres were to be upgraded.

9.       In Otara, a project was presented to the local board to establish a better connection from MIT to the Otara Town Centre.  To date this project had the following funding:

$500,000 - from the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board.

$500,000 – committed from Economic Development

Auckland Transport asked if a footpath-upgrade to the footpath on the Town Centre at the cost of $300,000 from the Transport Capital fund could be added as a variation to the original project.

Unfortunately, the budget constraints on Auckland Council means that there has been a loss of $200,000 from the amount Economic Development could contribute.

It is proposed that rather than a variation to the project for the footpath upgrade, that the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board uses $500,000 of the Local Board Capital Fund to partner with Auckland Council.

This will see the connection and footpath upgrade completed as a joint project, similar to the way the successful Davies Avenue Upgrade project was delivered, that was completed earlier this year.

By enabling this contribution to the project, it would enable the entire footpath on the MIT side of the Otara Town Centre to be rejuvenated.  This project has already progressed to the point where construction can begin.

The local board independently has also identified the need for the footpaths within the Otara Town Centre to be upgraded and this would be included in the project.

10.     Old Papatoetoe has some significant historical land marks that have previously been recognised by granite markers in the footpath.  Auckland Transport agree that this area would benefit from an upgrade of the footpaths, however, there is no significant budget to allow for this in the current budget.  At the time of writing this report a rough order of cost of $500,000 was suggested for new street furniture and exposed grey aggregate footpath. However, this would not include providing further markers for additional historical sites

11.     Following a visit to Papatoetoe, there could be further improvement to the footpath by including some of the railway significance in to the footpath design.  Auckland Transport advice at this stage is for an additional rough order of costs be sort to include railway sleepers and additional historical granite stones in the footpath upgrade.  This will allow the board to make a better decision about the design of the Town Centre footpaths.

Redesign of the bus stop outside the Old Papatoetoe town hall

12.     This project is still intended to be delivered as part of the Public Transport infrastructure improvement projects being undertaken as part of the Southern Frequent Network upgrade. Auckland Transport is not in a position to announce when this is able to be delivered at this stage as there has not yet been a presentation to the Local Board in a workshop.

13.     OP/2014/12  - Pedestrian over-bridges on Great South Road and St George St described in the Draft Local Board Plan, and the projects identified in the board resolution of 17 February 2014.

Auckland Transport does not recommend pedestrian over bridges in these area, they are cost prohibitive and unlikely to achieve the desired pedestrian uptake for the cost. A cost estimate based on similar requests in other South Auckland areas is approx. $1.5m per bridge. Auckland Transport will look at options to improve pedestrian movements in these areas that involve more cost effective options.

14.     Papatoetoe Town Centre - St George/Kolmar/Wallace Rd intersection realignment, as previously included in the Regional Land Transport Programme (years 4-10):  the board’s proposal is an offer to contribute money from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards this project, to fix a specific (early) start date for the project.  The costing needed relates to the total costs of the project, and for an estimate of the board share required to expedite the project.

            This request for information is covered elsewhere in this report and in previous reports.

Bus shelters (locations to be decided).

15.     Auckland Transport is developing new bus stops and infrastructure to align with the new frequent transport network. AT’s advice would be holding off on bus shelters until the final decisions have been made from the project team undertaking the work.

            Welcome to Ōtara Signs (2 or three costing options)

16.     As per the workshop discussion regarding welcome signs, the board also asked for Auckland Transport to develop rough order of costs (ROC) for entrance signs to both Papatoetoe and Otara. The options available are on attachment A, prices as follows:

·    Option A $15,800

·    Option B $49,440

·    Option C $19,800

·    Option D $14,000

It is important to note that these ROC’s do not include design cost, project management time and traffic management plans. It is possible for the board to select a combination of signage dependent on where this would be placed.

17.     OP/2014/52 - Auckland Transport Capital Fund, Refers the discussion of projects under the local board capital fund to a workshop, when Auckland Transport staff can present costing for projects previously suggested.

            This is an ongoing workshop topic until the projects are finalised.

18.     OP/2014/30 - Auckland Transport Quarterly Update requests clarification of the statement in Attachment C about the St George/Kolmar/Wallace Rd intersection realignment, that “funding was available in the LTP in 2016/17, now moved to 2024/25”.  The board asks when this decision was made, and the reasons: noting that this project is included in the current Regional Land Transport Programme as well as the Long Term Plan and that the board has not been consulted in relation to changes to either document.

19.     There have been no final decisions made regarding projects in the current Long Term Plan.  Auckland Transport will be meeting with local boards in workshops in October. This is the opportunity for Auckland Transport to hear the local board advocacy for key projects or initiatives they feel should be included in the Long term Plan.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

20.     The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board LBTCF is $549,314.00 per annum; this can be spent per year or rolled together and used for larger projects. I.e. three years’ worth of funding is $1,647,942.00, yet to be allocated.

Chip Seal

 

21.     Auckland Transport is about to embark on its annual road resealing programme.  Wherever possible chipseal will be used as it provides a cost effective, and good durable road surface, which is well suited to Auckland’s flexible road pavements. 

          Resealing the road surface waterproofs the surface and improves the road skid resistance to ensure that the roads stay in good condition.  Regular maintenance of the roads means that they do not need to be totally reconstructed.  Generally the road surface will last between 10 to 15 years. 

 

          In general a typical reseal would follow this timeline:

            Some weeks prior to reseal;

·        Fix any road failures in the street – Localised road pavement repairs

          A few days prior to reseal;

·        Letter drop informing residents of the road reseal

Day of reseal;

·   Set up traffic management

·   Sweep road for debris

·   Chip seal applied

·   Roll chip into road surface

A few days of reseal;

·   Sweep excess chip off the road

·   Reinstatement of road marking

A week or so after reseal;

·   Road surface checked

·   Further sweeping to pick up any excess loose chip

·   Remove traffic management

3 – 4 weeks after reseal

·   Additional sweeping if required, to remove any remaining loose chip.

The Contractor responds to any Call Centre service requests relating to the chip sealing during the course of the work.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes. 

Implementation

23.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Welcome to Ōtara Signs options

39

     

Signatories

Authors

Melanie Dale – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Otara and Papatoetoe Crime Prevention Officer Funding

 

File No.: CP2014/22612

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to request that the board revoke resolution OP/2013/369(b) and approve the Ōtara Business Association as the provider for the Ōtara Crime Prevention Officer (CPO).

2.       This report seeks local board agreement to continue the funding of the Hunters Corner and Old Papatoetoe CPO for the 2014/2015 period.

Executive summary

3.       The board resolved the following at their meeting on 20 August 2013, as part of resolution OP/2013/369:

“Utilises the CCTV and town centre budget of up to $70,000 to fund the Ōtara Business Association to implement a one year pilot of an Ōtara Crime Prevention Officer, to be managed by Manukau Institute of Technology”.

4.       A management contract was offered to the Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) to undertake the employment and supervision of the CPO role on behalf of the Ōtara Business Association, through an existing memorandum of understanding between the association and MIT.

5.       MIT attempted, for several months to recruit a CPO, but was unsuccessful. They subsequently handed the management of the CPO back to Ōtara Business Association.

6.       The Ōtara Business Association is now undertaking the recruitment and employment process for the CPO.

7.       The role is currently listed on the Seek employment website, has been advertised through Auckland Council and community networks and interviews will be held towards the end of September 2014.

8.       In order for an appointment to be made to this CPO role, staff are seeking revocation of resolution OP/2013/369(b). The funding agreement is already in place and the funding has been uplifted. . 

9.       This report also seeks confirmation from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to implement a funding agreement for $55,000 with Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society to fund the Hunters Corner and Old Papatoetoe CPO role for the 2014/2015 period.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Revoke resolution OP/2013/369(b) “Utilises the CCTV and town centre budget of up to $70,000 to fund the Ōtara Business Association to implement a one year pilot of an Ōtara Crime Prevention Officer, to be managed by Manukau Institute of Technology”.

b)      Utilises the CCTV and town centre budget of up to $70,000 to fund the Ōtara Business Association to implement a one year pilot of an Ōtara Crime Prevention Officer to be managed by the Ōtara Business Association.

c)      Utilises the CCTV and town centre budget of up to $55,000 to fund the Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society to continue with implementation of the Hunters Corner and Old Papatoetoe Crime Prevention Officer role.

 

 

Comments

10.     The Crime Prevention Officer acts as a single point of contact and co-ordination of safety and security activities in the relevant town centres. The duties of the CPO include patrolling the streets of the town centres, liaising with police, educating businesses on crime prevention and coordinating the ambassadors.

11.     The Otara and Papatoetoe Crime Prevention Officers will provide management services to ensure the effective co-ordination of ambassadors, Pacific and Maori wardens around town centres. 

12.     The CPOs will provide a clear sense of direction for the ambassadors and wardens, ensure that all designated duties and procedures implemented by the town centre management are adhered to and that completed monthly reports are submitted on time to the town centre managers.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     At a recent workshop of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, the board members requested that staff meet with the Ōtara Business Association and establish a process of recruitment and employment of a CPO for the Ōtara town centre. This action has been carried out.

14.     At a recent workshop of the board, staff were instructed to put forward a report seeking funding approval for the Papatoetoe CPO role for the 2014/2015 financial period.

Māori impact statement

15.     While this project is not specifically targeting Maori, it is noted that Maori are generally over-represented as both victims and perpetrators in crime statistics. Maori are likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community from having a Crime Prevention Officer in the area.

Implementation

16.     Staff will continue to provide support to the Ōtara Business Association regarding the recruitment and employment processes.

17.     The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lance Watene - Senior Community Development Facilitator

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Christmas Tree Lights 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22508

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To decide whether to fund Christmas tree lights at Ōtara and Papatoetoe in 2014, and the future of the lights.

Executive summary

2.       In 2012 and 2013 the board funded Christmas tree lights on three trees.  These were at Fergusson Oaks Reserve (Dawson Road), Burnside Park (St George St) and beside the RSA in Wallace Road. 

3.       Christmas lights at these locations have traditionally been provided by council.  Prior to 2012 the costs were not paid by the local board, but funded from other council budgets that are no longer available.

4.       The board allocated $34,379 to provide the lights for Christmas 2013 (OP/2013/540). In 2012, a similar cost was incurred of $32,050.

5.       Board members expressed concern about the level of these annually recurring costs, and were advised that this largely reflects the need to hire a contractor with a large crane to replace the incandescent light bulbs each year and to check electrical connections on the tree, with associated health and safety measures.  Temporary switches and wiring installed each year also contribute to the costs.  These costs do not cover the “switching on” public event at Dawson Rd, which is budgeted separately ($7,000.)

6.       Board members considered options for 2014 and later years at recent workshops.  Members discussed whether there is adequate return on this annual investment of over $30,000, considering the relatively short period each year that Christmas lights deliver benefits to the community.  The possibility of installing Christmas lights at a new location at Ōtara Town Centre was suggested by one member.

7.       The Team Leader Event Facilitation South has investigated the options and presents these in Attachment A.  Options for 2014 include continuing with the existing lights at all three locations at a cost of $35,148.  Costs could be reduced by lighting fewer trees. 

8.       Options for future years are to convert to LED lights, with an initial higher cost to install in the first year, but lower recurring annual costs.  Another option is to provide Christmas decorations in another form, details to be developed.

9.       The board has no specific budget to cover Christmas tree lights this year.  Discretionary budgets would need to be reprioritised to fund Christmas lights.  Two possible sources are the Community Response Fund (opex) which has $40,000 remaining for the year, and the Local Events Grants funding, which has $33,000 remaining for the year.  Use of events grants money would mean cancelling or reducing the Round 2 events grants.

10.     Decisions are now required on the board’s preferred option, and the identification of the funding source.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Consider and choose an option for the Christmas lights in 2014.

b)      Identify the funding source to be reprioritised

c)      Consider options for future years and request reports accordingly.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Christmas Lights Options and Costings

45

     

Signatories

Authors

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 





Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Community Group Funding - Applications for Round One 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/20966

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications received under round one of the 2014/2015 Community Funding programme.  The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is requested to fund, part fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has a total budget of $117,701 for the 2014/2015 financial year for the community grants programme.

3.       The board approved a total of $4,400 for school holiday programmes running between 29 September 2014 and 17 July 2015, which leaves a balance of $113,301 for the year.

4.       The applications to be considered at this time are for round one which is the first of two rounds for this financial year.

5.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board discussed these applications at a workshop on 6 October 2014.

6.       Fifteen eligible applications have been received for this round, requesting a total of $145,612.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)   considers the applications listed below and agrees to fund, part fund or decline each application in this round

Fund Type

Applicant

Funds required for

Amount requested

Social Investment Fund

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust - FYD Auckland

Towards the salaries of two Kiwi Can leaders to provide a weekly life skills and values programme for five-12 year olds, delivered in primary and intermediate schools

$10,000

Social Investment Fund

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards a salary and office expenses for a part-time activities co-ordinator

$14,184

Social Investment Fund

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Towards the salary of a social work case manager, radio advertising and activities for the Vietnamese community

$19,752

Social Investment Fund

Dream Big Trust

Towards staffing costs (coaches, administrators) and sports equipment for the after-school sports coaching programme

$9,655

Social Investment Fund

Father and Child

Towards the salary of a support worker

$10,000

Social Investment Fund

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Trust NZ

Towards the salary of the Auckland outreach worker and the costs of the monthly newsletter

$1,164

Social Investment Fund

Inner Wheel Club of Howick

Towards the cost of knitting wool for knitted baby clothes and polar fleece for blankets gifted to new-borns at Kidz First Middlemore Hospital, plus dolls cots for children undergoing operations and provision of toilet/hygiene bags for mothers

$1,000

Social Investment Fund

Nigerian Association of New Zealand.

Towards the purchase of two computer notebooks, six iPads, six iPad minis and 85 book vouchers as prizes for the Nigerian youth presentations of cultural dance, voice pieces, and an essay writing at a youth talent day

$9,000

Social Investment Fund

Papatoetoe Adolescent Christian Trust

Towards wages and living expenses for 'Te Ora Hou' a home for teenage girls from November 2014 to October 2015

$20,001

Social Investment Fund

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Towards the salary of a Samoan youth worker

$15,000

Social Investment Fund

South Asian Trust Inc.

Towards the cost to deliver group therapy and social support to 25-30 women of the South Asian community (including those of Indian, Fiji-Indian, Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan, Pakistani, Afghani, and Malaysian backgrounds) by fully qualified counsellors

$3,562

Social Investment Fund

The Parenting Place - Attitude Youth Division

Towards the costs of 28 Attitude presentations to approximately 4,500 students at Aorere College, De La Salle College, Papatoetoe High School, Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate and Tangaroa College between November 2014 and October 2015

$5,069

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Tuilaepa Youth Mentoring Service

Towards the cost of a mentoring service to bridge Māori and Pasifika young people aged eight to 24 years back into school or forward into meaningful education, employment or training

$5,000

Social Investment Fund

WaterSafe Auckland Inc.

Towards the cost to deliver the free Whānau Nui swimming and water safety skills programme at the Papatoetoe and Ōtara swimming pools during summer 2014/2015

$2,225

Social Investment Fund

Youthline Auckland

Towards the annual salary of the Centre Manager

$20,000

Total Amount Requested

$145,612

 

Comments

7.       The 6 March 2014 Regional Strategy and Policy Committee agreed to the continuation of the interim community funding approach for the 2014/2015 financial year:

“That the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee endorse existing funding arrangements and grants schemes being rolled over for the 2014 /2015 financial year.” (REG/2014/36)

8.       The funds for the legacy community funding and local board discretionary community funding schemes within the southern local board areas cover the following funds:

·          Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

·          Social Investment

·          School Holiday Programme Fund

·          School Swimming Pool Fund

·          Rates Assistance to Community Groups Owning Land In Manukau

·          Community Crime Prevention Fund

·          Immediate Response Crime/Safety Fund

·          Marae Facilities Fund

9.       Fifteen eligible applications were received in this round to be considered under the following fund:

·          Social Investment Fund

10.     One application has been transferred from the Mangere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board list as the group is working with students in the Clover Park area.

11.     When considering the applications to the Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board should be guided by their Local Board Plan priorities.  These are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to support the local board when considering the merits of each application. 

12.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board held a workshop on 6 October 2014, to discuss each application and how each project aligned with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board plan priorities and the south “Community Funding Policy for Grants, Donations and Sponsorships” that currently apply.

13.     Financial Summary – Summary of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s available balance for the 2014/2015 financial year:

2014/15

Annual

Budget

 

Type of Fund

Grants approved

Balance

 

 

$16,515

 

Community Crime Prevention Fund

 

$16,515

$33,340

 

Marae Facilities Fund

 

$33,340

$8,752

 

Rates Assistance to Community Groups Owning Land in Manukau Fund

 

$8,752

$8,724

 

School Holiday Programme Fund

$4,400

$4,324

$3,330

 

School Pool Fund

 

$3,330

$47,040

 

Social Investment Fund

 

$47,040

$0

 

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

 

$0

$117,701

TOTAL

$4,400

$113,301

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     A copy of the current legacy community funding and local board discretionary community funding schemes and funding guidelines within the southern local board areas current were circulated to all board members for the workshop held on 6 October 2014.

15.     Local board feedback on these applications was sought at a workshop with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on 6 October 2014.

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan and budgets.

17.     The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Māori impact statement

18.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori.  Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community. The Marae Facilities Fund aims to support marae facilities in recognition that they provide a valuable community resource for Maori communities.

Implementation

19.     Following the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocating funding for round one, Community Development Arts and Culture will notify the applicants, in writing, of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Sistema Aotearoa - Grant for office and teaching space

 

File No.: CP2014/23200

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To consider making a grant of $10,500 to Sistema Aotearoa.

Executive summary

2.       The board is familiar with the Sistema Aotearoa children’s orchestra and the positive community outcomes that it promotes. 

3.       Sistema has applied for a grant of $10,500 from the board to assist with their rent.  Sistema uses council owned facilities at Ōtara Music Arts Centre (OMAC) for offices and teaching space. 

4.       The board previously gave financial support of $10,500 in each of the 2012/13 and 2013/14 financial years to the Sistema programme to help with the hire of OMAC.

5.       Sistema representatives attended the annual plan 2014/15 hearings.  They asked the board for financial support for their OMAC rental costs of $29,695 per annum.  The board was positive about the work Sistema does, but did not make a specific budget allocation in the annual plan.

6.       Separately, the approved Community Development Arts and Culture work programme for 2014/15 is supporting some of Sistema’s programmes out of local board budgets.  This does not include any assistance with rent.

7.       The board needs to consider if it wants to make a grant to Sistema of $10,500 this year.

8.       The only available source of funding for a grant in the current year is the Community Response Fund (Opex), which has a balance remaining for this year of just over $40,000.  (Note that a separate report discusses using some of this money for Christmas Lights.)

9.       This appears to be an annually recurring issue.  When considering the new long-term plan, board members may wish to consider if an ongoing allocation (line item) for Sistema Aotearoa is desirable. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Approve a grant of $10,500 from the Community Response Fund (Opex) to Sistema Aotearoa to assist with rent at Otara Music Art Centre in the 2014/2015 year.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Approvals for Capex Renewal projects for Aquatic and Recreation facilities

 

File No.: CP2014/21602

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the Allan Brewster Recreation Centre and Papatoetoe Centennial Pools facility building renewal capital work schedule for the 2014/15 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       To continue the delivery of aquatic and recreational services and ensure the integrity of your assets, an ongoing capital works schedule is required.  This capital work schedule seeks to address future degradation of the building infrastructure, maintain or improve current service levels, capitalise on sustainability opportunities, and address health and safety concerns.  The work schedule includes deferred works which will not require sign off.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the 2015 aquatic and recreation facility building renewal capital work schedule.

b)      approve Auckland Council Officers have delegated authority to manage the projects within the funding budget indicated in the list.

 

 

Comments

 

3.       The Auckland Councils Long Term Plan for this Board has a budget allocated for aquatic and recreational facilities building renewals.  This budget is allocated across 2 facilities – Allan Brewster Recreation Centre and Papatoetoe Centennial Pools.  The purpose of the proposed capital work schedule is to ensure the future integrity of the buildings and surrounding infrastructure, maintain and improve the current level of service and efficiencies, and address any immediate or potential safety compliance issues.

 

4.       The Aquatic and leisure facilities represent an asset group with significant risk.  The conditions within the facilities (i.e. chlorinated pool halls and areas of continual high impact use) if not maintained effectively will result in the asset deteriorating at a rapid rate, reduction in the level of service that is able to be offered.

 

5.       The specific projects below have been complied on information and advice from the Auckland Council Properties Department, the respective facility managers and an energy report compiled to improve the operational efficiencies of the Allan Brewster Recreation Centre and Papatoetoe Centennial Pools.

 

 

 

 

6.       A list of renewal projects is detailed below

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       The capital work schedule will have been discussed with the Otara - Papatoetoe Local Board

Māori impact statement

8.       There are no particular impacts on Maori which are different from general users of the aquatic and recreation facilitates

Implementation

9.       Once approval for the schedule of work is received, project initiation forms will be completed from which the properties department will source a contractor to complete the work. 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jane  Franich - Contract Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22742

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·    The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·    An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      note that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

Comments

Local board feedback

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·   Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·   Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·   Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·   Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·   Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·   More public art outside the city centre

·   Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·   Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·   Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·    The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·    Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·    Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·     Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·     A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·    The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·    The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

 

Next steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the Long-term Plan 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

A copy of the Arts and Culture Action Plan, attachment C to this report, can be found at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/  - Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board meeting “Attachments”

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Feedback

61

bView

Consultation Summary

65

cView

Draft Arts and Culture Action Plan (Under Separate Cover Board members only)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebecca Kruse - Strategy Analyst

Maree Mills - Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 




Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 





Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22969

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

 

 

 

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Maori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

Signatories  Author is Helgard Wagener

Authoriser is Warren Maclennan

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline 2014/2015

79

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23066

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this memo is to provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy but the council must expand it to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy

 

 

Background

 

7.       As part of the LTP 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the LGA2002 and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       The legislative change requires the council to expand the current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a significant decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the draft policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a Special Consultative Procedure. Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, grey power, age concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of local boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy approach to engagement

18.     The LGA2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  (For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is “significant”).

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.         The thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.         The decision relates to strategic assets

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by including the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive CCOs as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s LTP and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.

Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

 

 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, IMSB

Regional Strategy & Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

 

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

 

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

 

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·    an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·    a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August; 

·    workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council recognize that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on Engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through the engagement advisors.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

87

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Consultation and Engagement

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication & Engagement Director

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



















Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Draft Community Grants Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/21736

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Community Grants Policy (Attachment A) and provide an overview of public feedback on the policy for members’ consideration. The report also briefly outlines the key components of the draft policy, proposes a transitional approach to establishing a multi-board grants programme, and discusses the budgetary implications of the policy.

Executive summary

2.       On 3 July 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) endorsed a new draft Community Grants Policy (CGP) for local board engagement and public consultation.

3.       The draft CGP has been developed to guide the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders. It covers grants for community development, arts and culture, events, sport and recreation, environment and heritage.

4.       The draft CGP proposes a new community grants programme aligned to Auckland Council’s governance structure, with:

a)      a local component (21 local grants programmes and a ‘multi-board’ grants programme, governed by local boards and aligned with local board plans), and

b)      a regional component (six regional grants programmes aligned to strategic directions in the Auckland Plan, with governing body decision-making).

5.       Community grants are a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and the council’s core regional strategies, policies and plans. The draft CGP provides a regional framework for grant-making by Auckland Council, while ensuring flexibility for local boards to shape their own grants programme to respond to the specific needs and priorities of their communities. To reflect this, and give effect to local boards’ decision-making role in relation to local grants, staff propose that each local board be supported to develop an individual schedule to the CGP that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

6.       The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. However to achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff propose that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year. Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same.

7.       Once adopted, the CGP will replace an interim community funding programme that has operated since amalgamation, consisting of more than 50 local and legacy ‘city-wide’ grants schemes and a small number of regional grants schemes. The community grants budgets inherited from the legacy councils are currently over-subscribed, especially at the regional level. To fully implement the CGP and deliver on the transformational shifts, staff propose additional investment of $2 million p.a. be considered through the Long-term Plan process 2015-2025. This will increase the amount of funding for regional grants to a more viable level, without reducing the existing funding envelope for local and multi-board grants.

Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October. Public feedback on the CGP was invited between 14 July and 11 August, and a summary of this input is provided as Attachments B and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Endorse the Community Grants Policy as a regional framework for the Auckland Council community grants programme, noting that the local board will be supported to develop an individual schedule to the policy that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

b)      Provide feedback on any policy provisions of specific interest or concern to the local board, for consideration during the review and finalisation of the Community Grants Policy.

c)      Indicate whether they support the proposal to participate in an interim ‘multi-board cluster’ with Howick Local Board, Franklin Local Board, Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Manurewa Local Board and Papakura Local Board to consider jointly supporting projects and activities of mutual benefit, noting that if this is agreed:

i)        staff will work with participating local boards to agree funding priorities and terms of reference for the cluster;

ii)       participating local boards will continue to hold their funds separately within the cluster, and can choose whether or not to allocate funds towards individual grant applications on a case-by-case basis;

iii)      additional multi-board clusters can still be explored, and will be supported wherever feasible;

iv)      the cluster is a transitional arrangement and would exist for the duration of the 2015-2016 financial year only, unless otherwise agreed by the participating local boards.

 

Comments

 

Background

8.       A discussion paper outlining the key elements, issues and options for a new Community Grants Policy (CGP) was work-shopped with local boards during March and April 2014. Workshops were also held to test draft approaches with the governing body and key stakeholders in May. A summary of the feedback received is provided as Attachment D.

9.       Feedback on the discussion paper informed the preparation of a draft CGP, which was reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) on 3 July 2014. The Committee endorsed the draft CGP for local board engagement and public consultation.

10.     Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October.

Summary of draft Community Grants Policy approach

11.     The draft Community Grants Policy proposes a framework for a new Auckland Council community grants programme with two main components: a local grants programme (incorporating multi-board grants) and a regional grants programme.

 

 

Local grants programme

12.     Local grants are a key tool local boards can use to implement the vision set out in their local board plans, and provide a direct, tangible way of supporting local community aspirations and responding to local needs and opportunities.

13.     At the local level the CGP is not intended to be prescriptive, but rather to provide a framework and guidelines that will assist local boards to deliver best practice in grant-making. This approach responds directly to feedback received from local boards during consultation on the draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012.

14.     The draft CGP proposes that each local board is supported to operate their own local grants programme under the broader umbrella of the CGP, and can award grants to groups and organisations, projects, services, events and activities that benefit residents in their local board area. Boards will be supported to develop specific funding priorities for their grants programme, drawing on the priorities set out in their local board plans.

15.     Two grant schemes are proposed to operate through the local grants programme:

a)      Fast Response Local Grants (up to $1,000)

Applicants for Fast Response Local Grants will complete simplified application and accountability processes. Funding rounds are proposed to be held more regularly, and timeframes for decision-making and payment will be kept as short as possible to ensure responsiveness to the community.

b)      Local Grants (over $1,000)

Local Grants are for larger amounts and are proposed to be distributed only once or twice per year, to enable the local board to consider how best to allocate their limited grants budget to deliver the local outcomes they are seeking. Applicants for Local Grants will complete application and accountability processes proportionate to the size of the grant they are seeking. Grants can be ‘one-off’ awards, or a commitment to fund over multiple years (up to a full political term).

Local board grants programme schedule

16.     A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June 2014 to provide an overview of the proposed policy and discuss next steps ahead of reporting to the Committee.

17.     At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Although the policy does provide sufficient flexibility for local boards to exercise this decision-making, it was felt this authority needed to be made more explicit. Following further discussion, it was agreed that this could be achieved by working with local boards to shape the structure and intent of their individual local grants programmes. Once the local board has agreed and adopted their programme, this can become a schedule to the policy. This approach was endorsed by local board chairs at the Chairs Forum on 28 July.

18.     Each individual local board grants programme schedule could include:

a)      Outcomes sought through the local grants programme (driven by local board plans) Any specific local funding priorities

b)      The types of funding opportunities available through the local grants programme

c)      Any specific eligibility criteria or exclusions that are additional to the baseline provisions of the CGP

d)      Any other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

19.     Staff will work with local boards between February and April 2015 to develop and adopt their local grants programme schedules, and an implementation plan will be prepared for each local board to sit alongside the schedule (outlining key operational aspects such as the number and timing of funding rounds).

20.     Local boards will be able to review and update their schedules over time as strategic priorities and budgets change.

Proposed multi-board grants programme

21.     The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. These clusters will invite applications from, and award grants to organisations, services, projects, events and activities that benefit residents across their combined areas. Local boards could participate in more than one cluster.

22.     Multi-board clusters may be:

a)      Groups of local boards with contiguous boundaries, for example southern local boards wanting to support events in the Southern Initiative area

b)      Local boards that share a common characteristic or interest, for example high populations of older people, or bordering the Hauraki Gulf

c)      Local boards that want to address a common issue, for example by supporting employment programmes targeting marginalised young people.

23.     Staff will engage with local boards to scope and establish appropriate clusters, which may be in response to a need or opportunity identified by their communities, or to deliver strategic outcomes they have mutually identified in their local board plans. Once local boards have instigated (or agreed to participate in) a multi-board cluster, council staff will work with the participating boards to understand the outcomes sought, and design a grants programme to deliver these.

24.     Applicants seeking support from a multi-board cluster will make one combined application to all participating local boards in the cluster, will receive a single decision notification and grant award, and will submit one accountability report when their funded activities have been completed.

Implementation of the multi-board grants programme

25.     To achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff propose that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year.

26.     Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same. Participating local boards would agree new funding priorities and terms of reference with the other local boards in that cluster, have discretion over the amount of their local funding to set aside for considering multi-board applications, and support applications on a case-by-case basis.

27.     This phased approach would enable a multi-board grants programme to launch in 2015 alongside the new local grants programmes with minimum additional preparation, given that the joint funding committees and subcommittees have some existing structure in place that could be used as a guide (e.g. delegated local board representatives, approximate schedule of funding rounds, and an existing pool of applicants). Staff could work with these existing multi-board clusters to develop appropriate funding priorities for the transitional year. This approach would be a good test for the model and enable refinements to the process to be agreed with local boards, while minimising any initial impact on community organisations.

28.     The current geographical clusters of local boards (i.e. the joint funding committees aligned to the former city and district council areas in the Auckland region) are:

a)      Northern cluster: Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipatiki, Upper Harbour (Northern Metro Subcommittee) Hibiscus and Bays, Rodney (Former RDC Subcommittee)

b)      Southern cluster: Franklin, Howick, Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe, Papakura (note that suitable arrangements would need to be developed with the southern local boards, as they have not been operating as a cluster)

c)      Western cluster: Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

d)      Central cluster: Albert-Eden, Great Barrier (optional), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke, Waitemata

29.     In addition, if boards wish to establish and resource other clusters, this could also be supported where feasible.

30.     If this approach is agreed, the transitional arrangements would be reviewed prior to the financial year commencing 1 July 2016. At this time, the clusters could either continue, or additional and/or alternative clusters could be established.

Regional grants programme

31.     It is proposed that the governing body of Auckland Council, through its various committees, will award grants to regionally significant organisations, services, events and activities that benefit residents across Auckland. At the regional level the CGP proposes six activity-focused grants programmes aligned to strategic directions outlined in the Auckland Plan.

32.     The proposed regional grants programmes are:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme

b)      Regional Community Development Grants Programme

c)      Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme

d)      Regional Events Grants Programme

e)      Regional Historic Heritage Grants Programme

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

33.     Each of the proposed regional grants programmes is conceived and will be promoted as a key mechanism to implement the relevant regional strategy, policy or plan (e.g. the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme will support the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan). These regional strategies enable – or will enable – the council to determine where it will target its resources in the medium to long term.

34.     The draft CGP proposes that most of the regional grants programmes provide for two distinct grant types: single-year project grants, for standalone initiatives, and multi-year strategic relationship grants. Project grants of varying size will be awarded through a contestable process at least once per year, while the strategic relationship grants will enable the council to enter multi-year funding relationships with a small number of organisations operating at the regional level. The majority of organisations receiving strategic relationship grants will have an existing relationship with Auckland Council and be able to demonstrate a clear track record of achievement at this level.

35.     To be considered eligible for regional grants, applicants must be able to show that their service, project or activity:

a)      Primarily addresses regionally determined priorities, and it would therefore be unreasonable to expect local boards to meet the cost, and is:

b)      Regional in terms of scale and/or significance, and/or is

c)      Regional in terms of impact and/or reach.

36.     The regional grants programmes are described in schedules to the Draft Community Grants Policy, as it is anticipated these schedules may be reviewed and updated over time as strategic priorities change.

Feedback from public consultation

37.     Public consultation on the CGP was undertaken from 14 July – 17 August 2014 and included:

a)      provision of accessible and easy-read versions of the policy summary document

b)      distribution of information packs and fliers at all Auckland Council service centres, community centres, local board offices and libraries

c)      provision of information via ‘Shape Auckland’ and a dedicated webpage on the Auckland Council website

d)      advertisement in ‘Our Auckland’

e)      advertisement through community and ethnic newspapers

f)       promotion via Council’s social media channels (e.g. Facebook)

g)      provision of a dedicated community assistance email account to allow people to make enquiries and submit feedback

h)      distribution of online survey to the following audiences:

·        those who provided feedback during previous consultations

·        all community grant applicants since amalgamation

·        community networks via Council’s advisory teams (CDAC, PSR, IE)

·        other stakeholder networks as appropriate

i)        provision of hard copy consultation material and submission forms by request

j)        five public workshops (Rodney, north, central, west and south)

k)      local board public workshops as requested (Orakei and Maungakiekie-Tamaki)

l)        two Mataawaka hui (west and south)

m)     presentations at southern and northern mana whenua hui and a regional environmental sector hui.

38.     At the regional local board briefing on 30 June, some members expressed interest in seeing feedback from their communities prior to providing their own feedback on the policy. To enable this staff agreed to extend formal reporting to local boards so that a summary of public input could be provided.  This is now attached for the local board’s consideration (Attachments B and C).

Financial implications of the CGP

39.     The CGP will be a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and core regional strategies, policies and plans, and it is important that there is sufficient funding to effectively resource the new programme for this purpose.

40.     The legacy grants budgets inherited at amalgamation (or created subsequently) total c. $8.3 million p.a., or around $6 per head of population, with the majority supporting groups and activities that are either local or multi-board (via the legacy ‘city-wide’ funds). These funds are already oversubscribed – on average the value of requests is three times the available budget, and in some cases considerably more.

41.     Of the total community grants budget, c. $2.4 million is currently targeting regional groups and activities. Current baseline funding for each of the regional grants programmes is as follows:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture grants programme (c. $650,000)

b)      Regional Community Development grants programme (No regional budget: all current grant schemes for this activity are administered by local boards, with some regional groups receiving interim allocations via the Annual Plan)

c)      Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants programme (up to $545,000)

d)      Regional Events grants programme ($400,000)

e)      Regional Historic Heritage grants programme (up to $345,000)

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme (c. $500,000)

42.     The existing grants programmes at this level are not able to meet current demand, and in some cases include funding tagged to specific recipients, or funding for regional outcomes that is being provided through local grants schemes. While contestability will be introduced for all funding schemes, there is little ‘headroom’ to support new applicants or address emerging priorities. For example, there is an expectation that a number of major events dropped from ATEED’s portfolio will now need to be funded through the Regional Events Fund from 2015/16, at an additional cost of $170,000 against the existing budget of $400,000.

43.     Many regional organisations have been waiting for implementation of the new CGP to access regional funding, and in some cases their need has become so urgent that the governing body has allocated emergency funding through the annual plan as an interim measure.

44.     Additional investment in the regional grants programme of $2 million p.a. is proposed as an option for governing body consideration through the LTP process 2015-2025. Staff consider a minimum of between $600,000 and $800,000 is required for each regional grants programme if the CGP is to support meaningful progress against the council’s stated priorities in these activity areas and deliver on the transformational shifts. The level of investment requested will support an average fund size of $750,000 (the exact distribution of budget between the six programmes would be proposed alongside the final policy).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

45.     The design of the new grants programme proposed in the CGP has been strongly influenced by local board feedback received during consultation on the first draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012, and during more recent engagement.

46.     A discussion paper on the new CGP was prepared in February 2014 and discussed in specially convened local board cluster workshops in March 2014, which were attended by representatives of all local boards. The paper outlined the basic elements of the proposed grants programme and sought feedback on specific policy issues. A summary of the feedback received during the cluster workshops and how this has been reflected in the draft CGP is provided as Attachment D.

47.     A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June to provide a further overview of the proposed policy and to discuss next steps.  At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Staff met with local board chairs on 28 July and agreed a process to address this concern (see ‘Local board grants programme schedule’ paras 16-20).

48.     Staff attended workshops with local boards during July and August 2014 to discuss the draft policy and support the provision of formal local board feedback requested via this report.

Māori impact statement

49.     Community grants have the potential to make a significant impact on Māori through supporting the outcomes in the Māori Plan. Under the proposed principles for the CGP, all grants programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing, as outlined in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and regional strategies, policies and plans, by providing grants to organisations delivering Māori outcomes locally and regionally.

50.     There is already some dedicated funding for Māori outcomes at the regional level, currently focused on papakainga and marae development across Auckland. Te Waka Angamua will be working with mana whenua and mataawaka to explore how best to target this and/or other funding allocated for Māori outcomes in future, e.g. determining eligibility criteria and the most appropriate forums for priority-setting and decision-making.

51.     During workshops in March/April 2014, staff discussed options with local boards for creating dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level, or embedding Māori outcomes as a ‘standing priority’ across all proposed grants programmes at the local and regional level. Local boards expressed interest in dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level if regional funding was made available to them for this purpose, but otherwise felt it was more appropriate for any targeted spending to be at each local board’s discretion, driven by local board plan priorities. The CGP’s intent to align grant-making to strategic priorities should ensure funding is allocated to groups and projects delivering Māori outcomes.

52.     The current interim funding programme includes one grants scheme dedicated to Māori outcomes (the Marae Development Fund in the former Manukau City area), and this particular scheme, along with all others operating through the interim programme, will cease to operate once a new CGP is adopted. Regional marae development funding may provide some capacity to meet this need going forward, and Te Waka Angamua will release details of the application and decision-making process for that funding for the next financial year.

53.     However local boards also have full discretion to provide grants for any purpose that benefits their local communities, and this is likely to include supporting marae especially where grants have been provided for this purpose in the past. The draft CGP provides flexibility for decision-makers to award grants to community groups that are not formally constituted charitable organisations, where appropriate, and staff understand this should increase access to funding for some Māori organisations, such as marae, who may not previously have been eligible.

Implementation

Budget alignment

54.     Existing funding arrangements and grants schemes were rolled over for the 2014/2015 financial year. If adopted, implementation of the CGP will begin from 1 July 2015 to align with the new LTP 2015-2025 and implementation of the Local Board Funding Policy (LBFP). This will enable the finalised budget structures to be implemented alongside the policy.

55.     Existing grants budgets categorised as ‘local’ will form part of the overall locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget allocated to local boards through the LBFP formula. Local boards will then set aside a budget to support their local grants programme from their LDI funding envelope through the Local Board Agreement process.

56.     Staff will propose an overall budget structure for the new grants programme when the final policy is tabled with the committee in November 2014, outlining the treatment of any inherited (and new) community grants budgets and funding arrangements that will support the CGP going forward. This should enable staff to take into account the outcome of LTP deliberations in the second half of 2014 and present budget structure options accordingly.

Operationalisation of the CGP

57.     The draft CGP has been developed with substantial input from the relevant operational departments to ensure that it is able to be delivered.

58.     The proposed implementation timeframe should provide operational teams with adequate time to design supporting systems and business processes, and to produce public-facing collateral that outlines the structure and requirements of the new grants programmes in detail. This will include:

a)      Working with all decision-makers to schedule an annual calendar of funding rounds for each level of the programme

b)      Working with local boards to assist them in developing their local board grants programme schedules

c)      Producing new promotional materials for the council website, marketing and promotion through media channels and to support public information sessions

d)      Designing new online application forms and guidelines for prospective applicants

e)      Ensuring support will be available for prospective applicants requiring assistance or capacity building to access the grants programmes, working with specialist colleagues where appropriate

f)       Developing business processes and templates to enable consistent assessment and reporting to elected members, and to support their decision-making

g)      Updating funding agreements, accountability forms and other legal documentation to ensure they are fit-for-purpose, and developing processes to deal with any grant recipients in breach of their agreements

h)      Ensuring payments processes and associated financial controls are robust, efficient and fit-for-purpose.

59.     If the CGP is adopted on schedule towards the end of 2014, grant applicants / recipients will also have more than six months to prepare for the changeover to the new policy and manage any implications. Staff will work with previously funded organisations to support them to access the new grants programmes during subsequent years, and provide advice to elected members if there is a need to consider transitional arrangements in individual cases.

 

A copy of the Draft Community Grants Policy, attachment A to this report, can be found at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/  - Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board meeting “Attachments”

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Community Grants Policy (Under Separate Cover Board members only)

 

bView

Summary of feedback from public consultation

115

cView

Summary of public feedback from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area

121

dView

Key feedback provided during political engagement

123

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebekah Lauren - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 







Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 





Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/21443

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      determine if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

 

Comments

 

8.       This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

129

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan, Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker, Manager Financial Planning Policy and Budgeting

Andrew McKenzie, Chief Financial Officer

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

















Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Long Term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/23059

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Consider the mayoral proposal and whether to provide feedback on the implications of the proposal.

 

 

Comments

Background

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the LTP 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The mayoral proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the mayoral proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the LTP 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October to discuss responses to the mayoral proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the Governing Body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Financial Planning Manager Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Karen Lyons – Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Monthly budget update including the 2014/2015 capital programme deferral considered by the 21 August and 24 September 2014 Finance and Performance Committee

 

File No.: CP2014/23416

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a copy of the resolutions, report and attachments relating to the monthly budget update report which included the 2014/2015 capital programme deferral considered by the:

i)        21 August 2014 Finance and Performance Committee

ii)       24 September 2014 Finance and Performance Committee

Executive summary

2.       The Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting held on 21 August 2014 considered the Monthly Budget Update report and resolved as follows:

Resolution number FIN/2014/47

Deputy Chairperson RI Clow MOVED the substantive motion, seconded by Cr AJ Anae:

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

a)      note the status of the Alternative Transport Funding project budget.

b)      agree that Auckland Transport reduce or defer $100 million of council funded capex from 2014/2015, reminding Auckland Transport of the council’s commitment to Auckland Plan Transformational Shift 3: ‘move to outstanding public transport within one network’ and of the Auckland Plan commitment to double public transport patronage to 140 million trips per year by 2022, and therefore increasing public transport patronage, remains a cardinal strategic priority, noting that the gross reduction (including NZTA funded capex) will be approximately $150 million. Auckland Transport are required to provide a modified Statement of Intent to the CCO Governance and Monitoring Committee in November.

c)      agree that Auckland Transport ensure that in determining which projects to defer, specifically exclude ring-fenced projects and take into account the council’s priority towards maintaining public transport and active mode outcomes.

d)      agree that Regional Facilities Auckland defer $5.3 million of capex from 2014/2015. Regional Facilities Auckland are required to provide a modified Statement of Intent to the CCO Governance and Monitoring Committee in November.

e)      agree that Waterfront Auckland defer $2.8 million public capex from 2014/2015. Waterfront Auckland are required to provide a modified Statement of Intent to the CCO Governance and Monitoring Committee in November.

f)       agree that decisions on the Local Board CAPEX deferrals be deferred until Local Boards have formally considered and responded in full to each project.

g)      require management to exercise financial constraint and put controls in place around procurement to minimise further commitments of outer year capital expenditure prior to decisions being made with regards to the LTP 2015-2025.

h)      require management to find efficiencies and work through the regional capex programme to identify further deferrals with a target of achieving the remaining 2014/2015 Annual Plan deferral assumption, and

i)        agree that the council’s budgets be updated to reflect the financial implications of the above decisions.

CARRIED

 

The Finance and Performance Committee at its 21 September 2014 meeting considered the Monthly Budget Update report and resolved as follows:

Resolution number FIN/2014/59

 

The substantive motion was MOVED by Chairperson MP Webster, seconded by Cr J

Watson:

 

That the Finance and Performance Committee:

 

a)      agree to the list of regional deferrals set out in Attachment A of the addendum agenda.

 

b)      note the local board resolutions included as Attachment B of the addendum agenda.

 

c)      agree to remove $400,000 for Pioneer Women’s and Ellen Melville Hall from the staff list of local deferrals set out in Attachment C on the basis that aligning the timing of this project with the upgrade of the adjoining Freyberg Square will provide project delivery efficiencies.

 

d)      recommend that the Budget Committee reconsider all local deferrals set out in attachment C of the agenda as an important part of the Draft LTP deliberations and project reprioritisation.

 

e)      agree to the staff list of local deferrals set out in Attachment C of the addendum agenda which reflects the application of standard criteria across all local boards.

 

f)       note that 17 local boards resolved that the capital deferrals be given priority in 2015/2016.

 

g)      agree that the council’s budgets be updated to reflect the financial implications of the above decisions.

CARRIED

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the resolutions, report and attachment from the 21 August and 24 September 2014 Finance and Performance Committee relating to the Monthly Budget Update report which included the 2014/2015 capital programme deferral.

 

Copies of the attachments to this report can be found at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/  - Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board meeting “Attachments”

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

21 August 2014 Finance and Performance Committee Monthly Budget Update report and attachments (Under Separate Cover Board members only)

 

bView

24 September 2014 Finance and Performance Committee Monthly Budget Update report and attachments (Under Separate Cover Board members only)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Adoption of the Otara-Papatoetoe local board plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/21182

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

3.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe draft Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014.  The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board considered the submissions from the SCP at its meeting on 29 August 2014.

4.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan is attached to this agenda.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopts the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan

b)      delegates to the Chair to approve any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

6.       Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies

·    works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

7.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

Consideration

8.       The board developed a draft local board plan in the first half of 2014.  Numerous board workshops and public engagement events led up to this.

9.       The board considered a range of strategic issues, as well as the Auckland Plan and other regional strategies and policies.  Advice from subject matter experts, community views and public submissions were important in developing the draft plan.  A report to the board on 16 June 2014 recorded the process to develop the draft plan. 

10.     The board resolved on 16 June 2014 (OP/2014/92) to approve the draft Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2014 for public consultation using the special consultative procedure. 

11.     The special consultative procedure was notified on 7 July and submissions were open until 6 August 2014. Submissions were received from 129 people and groups.  Details of the submissions were reported to the board hearings meeting on 29 August 2014.

12.     The local board heard submissions on the draft plan on 29 August 2014 and deliberated after the hearings on the submissions received.  Changes were made to the draft plan in response to submissions.

13.     The revised plan is attached to this agenda (Attachment A) for final approval by the board.

14.     Attachment A incorporates changes to the Chair’s message, and changes to text relating to the “draft plan” and special consultative procedure.  Minor grammatical corrections and improvements are also included.

Local board views and implications

15.     The local board’s views have driven the development of the plan attached to this report.

Māori impact statement

16.     The local board plan contributes to improving wellbeing in Māori communities, as well as the community in general.

17.     A hui involving representatives of the six southern local boards and the relevant mana whenua was held on March 8th. Of the 13 iwi invited, eight attended. All gave positive feedback about the hui itself and five expressed a desire for ongoing engagement with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

18.     In later consultation, a copy of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe draft Local Board Plan was sent to each of the 13 iwi who have registered an interest in the board area. These iwi were invited to provide feedback on the draft, and several iwi took up this opportunity.  One made a formal submission on the draft plan.  The plan was amended in response to this feedback. 

Implementation

19.     The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities. The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Revised Draft Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan

153

     

Signatories

Authors

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 







































Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/22080

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of information-only reports and resolutions for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.  Because no board decisions are required for these items, the full reports are included in links to this report.

2.       The 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report to Local Boards has been referred from the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee meeting on 27 August 2014:

3.       Resolution number ENV/2014/1

MOVED by Member Wilson, seconded by Cr C Darby:  

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)      receive the 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary report.

b)      forward the 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary report to the Local Boards for their information.

CARRIED

A copy of the report can be located at the following link – pages 15 to 18:                  

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2014/08/ENV_20140827_AGN_4784_AT.PDF

 

4.       The Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage report has been referred from the Auckland Development Committee meeting on 11 September 2014.

 

5.       Resolution number AUC/2014/2

          MOVED by Chairperson PA Hulse, seconded by Cr LA Cooper:  

That the Auckland Development Committee:

c)      circulate the report to all local boards, the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) and the advisory panels, for their information.

CARRIED

A copy of the report can be located at the following link – pages 7 to 26:                    

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2014/09/AUC_20140911_AGN_4744_AT.PDF

 

6.       The Delegations from the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to Auckland Council report has been referred by the Governing Body on 25 September 2014.

7.       Resolution number GB/2014/106

MOVED by Cr C Darby, seconded by Cr WB Cashmore: 

That the Governing Body:    

a)      note the delegations made to the Auckland Council by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority in its “Operating Procedures and Delegations for the Routine Management of the Maunga and Administered Lands”.

b)      note that all such delegations are operational in nature.

c)      sub-delegate all delegations made to the council by the Authority in its “Operating Procedures and Delegations for the Routine Management of the Maunga and Administered Lands”, including any future operational delegations, to:

i)       Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

ii)      Manager Volcanic Cones

d)      request that the report be forwarded to all affected local boards for their information.

CARRIED

 

A copy of the report can be located at the following link – pages 79 to 82 :                 

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2014/09/GB_20140925_AGN_4574_AT.PDF

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)            note the report of the 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report.

b)            note the Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage report.

c)      note the Delegations from the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to Auckland Council report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board  Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term

File No.: CP2014/21133

 

  

 

Executive Summary                                        

Providing an update on achievements of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for the 2013 – 2016 Electoral Term.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term report be received.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term

195

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 




Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2014/20765

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Attached are the notes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshops held on 5, 10 and 19 and 29 September 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the workshop notes for 5, 10 and 19 and 29 September 2014.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

5 September 2014 Workshop Notes

201

bView

10 September 2014 Workshop Notes

203

cView

19 September 2014 Workshop Notes

205

dView

29 September 2014 Workshop Notes

207

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Reports and Actions Pending

 

File No.: CP2014/20764

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on actions and reports pending/requested at previous meetings or workshops.

 

Recommendation/s                                           

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports and Actions pending

211

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 




Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Otara Papatoetoe Local Board members portfolio update

 

File No.: CP2014/20763

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity at the business meeting for portfolio holders to update the full Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board on any significant activities over the last month.

Executive Summary

2.       The portfolio leads and alternates for Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board are as follows:

Portfolio

Lead

Alternate

Planning, Regulatory, bylaws and compliance

Efeso Collins

Ross Robertson

Arts, Culture and Events

Donna Lee

Lotu Fuli

Community Services and Libraries

Mary Gush and Donna Lee (co-portfolio leaders)

 

Youth Development

Lotu Fuli

Efeso Collins

Recreation Services

Ross Robertson

Stephen Grey

Parks and Reserves

John McCracken

Ross Robertson

Built and Natural Environment, Heritage and Housing

Stephen Grey

Donna Lee

Economic Development, Business and Town Centre revitalisation

Stephen Grey

Mary Gush

Transport

Efeso Collins

John McCracken

 

3.       At the commencement of this electoral term, the reasons for having local board portfolio-holders was workshopped with the Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board and it was generally agreed that the objectives of local board portfolio holders are to:

·    Provide clear steering of the relevant work programme

·    Lift detailed discussion out of local board meetings and workshops

·    Ensure key decisions go before the full local board

·    Reduce or avoid delays in project delivery

·    Enable local board members to apply their time and energy with enthusiasm and interest

·    Ensure clear communications within the local board and between the local board and officers

·    Maintain strong, connected relationships between the local board and its communities

·    Maintain mutual trust

 

4.       The Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board also workshopped what the role or job description of a portfolio holder might be, and some examples of how local board members might perform their role as a portfolio holder are outlined below:

 

Portfolio role

Examples of actions by portfolio holder

Undertaking roles specified in officer delegation protocols

·    Landowner consents; and proposed asset renewal works:  The portfolio-holder can either decide the issue or ask officers to refer it to the full local board for a decision

·    Providing feedback on resource consent applications

Sharing the workload between local board members

·    Speaking at external meetings on local board matters e.g. at sports clubs – to gather their views, and represent the views of the local board

·    Supporting the Chair and other local board members in speaking to governing body committees or at public meetings on portfolio topics

·    Keeping alternate portfolio-holders informed, so they can assist the portfolio-holder where needed

Gathering knowledge

·    Receiving officer progress updates on projects already agreed by the local board, noting that work programmes are approved by the full local board

·    Engaging and maintaining relationships with stakeholders

·    Reading background reports relevant to the portfolio

Acting as a sounding-board and advising officers

·    Meeting with officers to give the local board view of issues

·    Where there is no known local board view, the portfolio-holder gathers the views of all local board members and formulates the local board position. (Contentious issues are best referred to a local board workshop)

·    Helping to shape details of departmental annual work programmes before presentation to the local board, to secure local board plan outcomes

·    Commenting on proposed design details and other issues arising from local board projects

·    Enabling officers to test possible local board interest in a proposal

·    Helping officers to define preferred options or approaches before reporting to the local board

·    Encouraging officers, especially through difficult decisions

Monitoring action against the Local Board Plan

·    Asking officers for progress updates

·    Advising officers and local board when projects need response or attention

Leading local board projects as a convenor of the relevant steering group or working party

Various, but currently include:

·    Aorere Park joint steering group

·    Otara Lake and waterways steering group

·    Youth Connections project

Providing regular updates on portfolio activity to the local board

·    At board business meetings: portfolio-holders can report back at this agenda item

·    Portfolio-holders lead board discussion on officer reports relevant to their portfolio

·    Emails to all local board members, when information needs to be timely

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal or written reports from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board portfolio holders be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Chairpersons Announcements

File No.: CP2014/20762

 

  

 

Executive Summary

This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal update be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

      

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Commercial Proposal for a Reserve

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains information that is commercially sensitive at this time..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains information on proposed changes that may impact the employment of staff within the Auckland Council group..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.