I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

4:30pm

Annex Room, Ground Floor 
Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Wiri Station Road

Manukau
Auckland

 

Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Interim Chairperson

Aiolupotea Sina Aiolupotea-aiono

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Tunumafono Ava Fa'amoe

 

 

Rev Tevita Finau

 

 

Tevita Funaki

 

 

Sefita Hao'uli

 

 

Ofeina Langi

 

 

Afa'ese Manoa

 

 

Richard Pamatatau

 

 

Sam Sefuiva

 

 

Leilani Tamu

 

Liason Councillor

Anae Arthur Anae

 

 

(Quorum 6 members)

 

 

 

Crispian Franklin

Democracy Advisor

 

9 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 373 6205

Email: crispian.franklin@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 

 

 TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

The Terms of Reference set out the purpose, role and protocols of the Panel. 

 

Panel members will also be expected to abide by the Code of Conduct for members of Auckland Council advisory panels.

 

 

Purpose

 

The purpose of the panels is to provide strategic advice to the Council on issues of significance to their communities and to advise on effective engagement by Council with those communities.

 

 

Outcomes

 

The Panel will provide advice through an agreed annual work programme, integrated wherever possible, with other panels and approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.

 

 

Annual work programme

 

The Council will advise the Panel of the areas of strategy, policy and plan development that are likely to require comment or advice from the Panel during the course of the year. The work programme should also provide scope for the Panel to respond to issues and concerns arising from its communities and to develop its own priorities.

 

As resources allow, budget is available for the Panel to support activities that clearly contribute to the agreed work programme but the Panel may not access external resources for activities or events, except with the agreement of Council.

 

 

Submissions

 

Panel advice will contribute to Council decision-making, but panels will not make formal submissions on Council strategies, polices and plans, for example, the Long Term Plan.

In their advisory role to the Council, Panels may have input to submissions made by the Council to external organisations but do not make independent submissions, except as agreed with Council.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as Panel members.

 

* The above information is a summary of the 2014 Terms of Reference document and is based on the Governing Body decisions of 19 December 2013.

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          Public Input - Pasifika Centre Community Lead Group                                            7

6          Election of the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson                                              9

7          Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel - Work Programme Update                                  13

8          Diversity Initiatives 2014                                                                                             27

9          Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) update                             29

10        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                        39

11        Proposed summer set net control at Shakespear Regional Park beaches          71

12        East West Connections Project – Public Engagement                                           77 

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 August 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Public Input - Pasifika Centre Community Lead Group

 

File No.: CP2014/23861

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The Pasifika Centre Community Lead Group wish to present to the Panel in support for the Pasifika Centre at Manukau Institute Technology.

Executive summary

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      thank the Pasifika Centre Community lead Group for their presentation on Pasifika Centre at Manukau Institute Technology.

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Election of the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson

 

File No.: CP2014/23094

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To elect a chairperson and deputy chairperson for the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel.

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with the Terms of Reference for demographic panels, the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel must, at its third meeting, elect a chairperson and a deputy chairperson.

3.       The panel must decide whether the election will be conducted by open or closed ballot, and choose a voting system.  Staff recommend that the Panel adopt one of the two voting systems outlined in the Local Government Act 2002 (explained at paragraphs 12 and 13 of this report).

4.       Once the panel has made these choices, the Lead Officer Support will lead the process for the election of the chairperson.  Once elected, the new chairperson will in turn lead the process for the election of the deputy chairperson.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      decide whether the chairperson and deputy chairperson will be elected by open or closed ballot

b)      decide whether the chairperson and deputy chairperson will be elected using voting system A or voting system B (as described in Schedule 7, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002)

c)      elect a chairperson

d)      elect a deputy chairperson.

 

Comments

5.       The Governing Body appointed the Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples and Seniors Advisory Panels at its meeting of 1 May 2014 (Resolution no. GB/2014/42).  The panels held their first meetings in June.

6.       In accordance with the Terms of Reference for demographic panels, the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel must, at its third meeting, elect one member to the position of chairperson and one member to the position of deputy chairperson.

7.       The panel at its second meeting held on 27 August 2014, was briefed on the requirement to elect a chairperson and deputy chairperson at the next meeting.  As part of the briefing, the panel was advised that panel processes should, whenever possible, mirror committee processes.  This included using the voting systems of local committees. 

8.       There is no provision for proxy voting, only members present may nominate and vote for the chair and deputy chair.  Candidates can vote for themselves.

Open or closed ballot

9.       The Youth, Seniors and Ethnic Peoples Panels have already elected a chair and deputy chairperson at their last meetings.  All chose a closed ballot for the method of election.  The Pacific Seniors Advisory Panel can choose either option.

 

Voting System

10.     The panel needs to decide what voting system it wants to use.

11.     Staff recommend to undertake the election in accordance with Schedule 7, Clause 25 of the Local Government Act 2002, and to choose one of the two systems that can be used to elect chairpersons and deputy chairpersons of regional councils and other committees.  The two systems are described below.

12.     System A -

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives the votes of a majority of the members of the local authority or committee present and voting; and

(b)          has the following characteristics:

(i)  there is a first round of voting for all candidates; and

(ii)     if no candidate is successful in that round there is a          second round of voting from which the candidate with the fewest votes in the first round is excluded; and

(iii)     if no candidate is successful in the second round there is a third, and if necessary subsequent, round of voting from which, each time, the candidate with the fewest votes in the previous round is excluded; and

(iv)    in any round of voting, if two or more candidates tie for the lowest number of votes, the person excluded from the next round is resolved by lot.

13.     System B -

(a)     requires that a person is elected or appointed if he or she receives more votes than any other candidate; and

(b)          has the following characteristics:

(i)  there is only one round of voting; and

(ii) if two or more candidates tie for the most votes, the tie is resolved by lot.

Voting procedure at the meeting

14.     The meeting will proceed as follows:

(a)     The interim chairperson will call the meeting to order and deal with apologies and the initial procedural items.

(b)     The first item of substantive business will be the election of chairperson.

(c)     The interim chairperson will vacate the chair and the meeting will be chaired by the lead officer, assisted by the democracy advisor.

(d)     The lead officer will call for a decision on whether the ballot will be open or closed. This will be by simple voice or show of hands vote.

(e)     The lead officer will then call for a decision on the voting system. Once a member moves one of the systems and is seconded, it will be put to the vote. Again a decision will be by voice or show of hands.

(f)      The lead officer will call for nominations for chairperson. Each candidate must be nominated and seconded by a panel member who is present.

(g)     If there is only one nomination that person will be declared elected and will assume the chair.

(h)     If there is more than one candidate, an election will take place using the voting system agreed earlier.

(i)      If it is closed voting, the democracy advisor will undertake the vote, scrutineered by the liaison councillor.

(j)      Once elected, the successful candidate will assume the chair and call for nominations for deputy chairperson.

(k)     The relevant parts of the process will be repeated for the election of the deputy chairperson.

(l)      The meeting will then continue with the next item of business.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     There are no local board implications.

Māori impact statement

16.     There are no items in this report which impact on matters of significance for Māori.

Implementation

17.     There are no significant implication issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas - Principal Advisor Panels

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - Manager Democracy Services

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel - Work Programme Update

 

File No.: CP2014/23044

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To advise that the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel’s work programme has been ratified and discuss opportunities for its integration with the work programmes of the other demographic panels.

Executive summary

2.       All demographic panels are to prepare an annual work programme for ratification by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.  The work programmes of the Pacific Peoples and Ethnic Peoples and Seniors Advisory Panels have already been ratified. The Youth Advisory Panel’s work programme is expected to be ratified on 9 October 2014.

3.       The panels’ terms of reference also require that the work programmes of the different panels be integrated wherever possible.  The panel should review the other panels’ programmes and discuss opportunities for integration, alignment and collaboration.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the work programme of the Ethnic Peoples, Youth and Seniors Advisory Panels

b)      discuss opportunities for integration, alignment and collaboration between its work programme and that of the other panels.

 

Comments

4.       The Governing Body at its meeting on Thursday 19 December 2013 resolved to establish five demographic panels for this term of council (GB/2013/160). The terms of reference for the panels require an annual work programme to be ratified by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee.

5.       The work programme for the Youth Advisory Panel has been put on the agenda for approval of the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee at its meeting on Thursday 9 October 2014.

6.       The Ethnic Peoples, Pacific Peoples and Seniors Advisory Panels work programmes have previously been ratified. These work programmes have been updated with standardised and more consistent terminology and are attached to this report.

7.       As the membership of the Disability Advisory Panel is currently under review their work programme will not be developed until the end of the year.

8.       Wherever possible, the annual work programme for each panel is to be integrated with that of other panels. With the majority of the work programmes complete, the work programmes can now be shared so panels can be aware of the priorities of others and discuss opportunities for integration, alignment and collaboration. This will assist staff when reporting to two or more panels and may lead to collaborative projects between panels. There may also be opportunities for a combined summit.

9.       Following the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel work programme being referred to the Regional Strategy & Policy Committee in September, panel members suggested several inclusions. Many of the suggestions have been incorporated in the October update (attached).

 

10.     The proposed addition relating to a diversity programme is outside the scope of the panel’s mandate.  However a briefing on diversity initiatives is included in this agenda.

11.     Below is a table of the key priorities of the panels.

Seniors

Ethnic Peoples

Pacific Peoples

Youth

Inclusiveness

Engagement

Engagement

Youth Voice

Housing

Community Grants

Capacity Building

Hauora Tamaki Makaurau

Transport Accessibility

Community Facilities

The Southern Initiative

Rangatahi

Urban Design

Community Development

Social Development

 

Connecting Aucklanders

Health and Safety

Children and Young Persons

Children and Young Persons

Youth Employment

 

 

Arts and Culture

Auckland Environment

 

 

Economic Development

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Having their work programmes confirmed Local Boards will be able to identify areas of common interest in terms of their Local Board plans.  Local boards may seek advice from the panels.

Māori impact statement

13.     The panels work programme may overlap with the council’s Māori responsiveness objectives.

Implementation

14.     The panels are beginning to implement their work programmes.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel - Work Programme

17

bView

Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel - Work Programme

21

cView

Youth Advisory Panel - Work programme

23

dView

Seniors Advisory Panel - Work Programme

25

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas - Principal Advisor Panels

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - Manager Democracy Services

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 



Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


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15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

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Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Diversity Initiatives 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23740

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       Dr Phillippa Reed will be presenting to the Panel on Council’s diversity programme.

Executive summary

 

2.       The Auckland Council through its learning and capability department have a number of programmes and initiatives in its diversity programme. Dr Philippa Reed will present to the panel and discuss these programmes including

·        Research programme on Maori employment

·        Graduate and cadet recruitment including the information evening at Manukau

·        Finalist in NZAGE awards for diversity in graduate recruitment campaign and details of outcome

·        Moana Pacifika network

·        Unconscious bias training

·        Diversity Council

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      engage with officers in lead-up to graduate recruitment round 2015/2016.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Crispian Franklin - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) update

 

File No.: CP2014/20114

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To receive an update on the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) consultation and seek advice on organisations that should be included for further targeted consultation.

Executive summary

2.       The draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) was consulted on from 23 June to 24 July 2014.

3.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

4.       Submitters endorsed the six goals and sixteen action areas in the ACSAP.

5.       Feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

6.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

7.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

8.       The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      advise of any issues particularly relevant to Pacific communities that should be considered in the development of the implementation plan.

b)      advise of any Pacific organisations that should be included in further targeted consultation.

 

 

Comments

 

Significance for the Pacific People’s Advisory Panel

9.       Priority 1 of chapter 3 of the Auckland Plan is to “value and foster Auckland’s cultural diversity”. In September 2013, a workshop was organised involving Pacific creative practitioners and community leaders. Feedback received during this session and previous feedback from Pacific groups on other council’s plans helped to develop the draft ACSAP.

10.    The draft ACSAP acknowledges that “Auckland is also home to the largest Pacific Island populations in the world” and that Pacific arts and the engagement of Pacific audiences are vitally important for the success of New Zealand arts generally.

 

Consultation feedback

11.     The draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) was consulted on from 23 June to 24 July 2014.

12.     A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

13.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

 

Submission analysis

14.     Attachment A contains the quantitative summary of the feedback received in response to the specific questions in the survey.

15.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are (priority goals and action areas are highlighted):

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

 

 

16.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·    The importance of public art and arts and culture in place making

·    Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·    Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·    An independent structure or body to represent the diversity of stakeholders i.e. “Creative Auckland’.

·    Develop a Pacific network to increase participation in arts and culture

·    Communicate the value of arts and culture to children, i.e. interactive artist/children’s program to foster arts and culture between generations

·    Greater recognition of Pacific and Asian contributions to the sector and Auckland’s arts and culture

·    Acknowledge Churches as sites for pacific culture

NB. The Community Facilities Network Plan recognises that centres of worship cater to a wider need and will investigate how centres of worship are utilised by the wider community.  The ACSAP acknowledges that many places of worship add to the arts and cultural richness of Auckland.

17.     The following actions are included in the proposal and are of particular relevance to Pacific people:

Remove barriers to access and participation

·    Complete a feasibility study on the implementation of an Arts Passport scheme

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

·    Use arts and culture activities to promote and celebrate Te Reo Māori, Pasifika languages and other non-English languages spoken in  Auckland

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

·    Develop and grow the capacity of a Pacific network to increase participation in Arts and Culture.

18.     It is clear that more work is needed on profiling the contribution of Pacific communities to Auckland’s cultural identity and arts and creative sectors.  We need to ensure that the Plan is encompassing of all cultures.  The Panel is asked to advise on how this can be achieved through implementation. 

Next steps

19.     The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

20.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 now requires us to refine the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

21.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     There was a predominantly positive response to the Draft ACSAP from the boards who consider  they can use it support their own arts and culture aspirations, and align local board plan objectives to the ACSAP. Local boards will continue to be engaged in developing the implementation section.

Māori impact statement

23.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

24.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

25.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Consultation Summary

33

     

Signatories

Authors

Maree Mills- Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Kevin Wright - Manager: Transport Strategy

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

ARTS & CULTURE STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN 2014

Submissions Report

 

Submission Type

Submitter Group

The graph below shows the format the submissions were received in.

182 submissions have been received via the online form, 108 via the hard copy form, 109 from the Youth worksheet, and a further 39 via email non form submissions.

The graph below outlines what ‘group’ submitters belong to.

275 submissions have been from individuals, 51 from some form of group or organisation, and 109 from the Youth worksheet .

 

 

 

Feedback regarding the ACSAP Vision

Submitters were asked to rank how important the vision is to them.  The graph shows the importance of the visions to submitters.  (270 responses)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feedback regarding the Goals

The graph outlines what importance submitters placed on each goal.  The table below outlines the labels used in the graph below.

 

 

Graph label

Goal

Access and participation

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Value and invest

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

Organisations and facilities

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Design and development

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

Cultural identity

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Creative economy

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

 

 

 

 

Feedback regarding the Actions

The graphs below show the priority given by submitters to action areas.

 

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

 

 

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

 

 

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

 

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

 

 

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

 

 

Submission by Local Board Area

The table below indicates the total numbers of submissions received by the local board area.

 

Local Board

Individual submissions

Youth worksheet

Organisation submissions

Total submissions

Albert-Eden Local Board

45

4

4

53

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14

0

5

19

Franklin Local Board

4

0

0

4

Great Barrier Local Board

0

0

0

0

Henderson-Massey Local Board

9

15

1

25

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

6

2

3

11

Howick Local Board

12

34

2

48

Kaipatiki Local Board

16

5

2

23

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board

5

0

0

5

Manurewa Local Board

4

1

1

6

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

15

4

0

19

Orakei Local Board

17

0

1

18

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board

7

0

0

7

Papakura Local Board

9

0

0

9

Puketapapa Local Board

8

0

0

8

Rodney Local Board

7

1

1

9

Upper Harbour Local Board

3

1

0

4

Waiheke Local Board

1

2

2

5

Waitakere Ranges Local Board

10

0

0

10

Waitemata Local Board

43

19

18

80

Whau Local Board

16

3

0

19

Regional

1

0

3

4

Not Supplied

2

0

1

3

Outside Auckland

21

19

11

51

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/22962

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy and to gain feedback on engagement guidelines.

Executive summary

2.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014.

3.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues.

4.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the draft policy and suggests other ideas of how the council could encourage feedback on the draft from Pacific people.

b)      provide feedback on current draft engagement guidelines which will help to inform the engagement plan for the draft Long-term Plan.

 

 

Comments

 

5.       The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. This draft policy is attached for the panel’s information.

6.       The Local Government Act (2002) sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow when consulting.

7.       Additional principles have been included within the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

8.       The draft Significance and Engagement Policy also sets out guidance on the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue.

9.       The changes to legislation mean that some of the current requirements for formal consultations could be relaxed. How the council manages formal submissions and hearings is something that the council is currently looking into in preparation for the Long-term Plan consultation in early 2015.

10.     Advice from the Pacific People’s Advisory Panel on what would make formal processes more user-friendly for ethnic communities would be welcome.

Consultation on the draft policy

11.     Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

12.     Consultation with the general public and other stakeholder groups will largely be focused online through the ShapeAuckland website.

13.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy and on how the council could improve its engagement with the community.

Updating Engagement Guidelines

14.     Auckland Council has an existing Consultation and Engagement Guidebook which is being updated alongside the development of the policy. Existing guidance is attached.

15.     Staff workshops took place in August and September to consider how to improve civic engagement with the Pacific community. Further workshops have been scheduled to progress this further. Notes and additional guidance from those workshops are attached.

16.     Feedback from the Pacific People’s Advisory Panel on these draft guidelines and on other issues to consider would be welcome.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     An initial discussion took place with the Local Board Chairs Forum on 28 April 2014. Local board members were invited to a workshop to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August and workshops are taking place with many individual local boards. 

18.     Formal feedback has also been requested on the draft policy.

Māori impact statement

19.     Auckland Council recognises that Māori are a critical / important audience that needs to be engaged in a meaningful way.

20.     The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy to give effect to the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. The draft policy was presented to the Independent Māori Statutory Board for discussion and feedback. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalising the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

21.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

Implementation

22.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

23.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

43

bView

Draft guidelines for engaging with pacific peoples

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Senior Specialist, Engagement and Consultation

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson, Communications and Engagement Director

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

 

 

Title: Auckland Council logo

Title: Consultation in library - Description: The image shows a member of the public receiving guidance on how to access online information about a plan and being shown supporting materials and maps.Text Box: Significance and Engagement Policy
Consultation Draft - September 2014


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Credit: Heidi Ping Xu


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

1.          Table of Contents

1       Context 4

2       Decision making. 5

3       Significance. 7

4       Approach to engagement 9

5       Applying the policy. 11

6       Schedule 1: Methods of engagement 13

 


1        Context

1.1      Introduction

For Auckland Council, engagement is a genuine dialogue between decision-makers, communities and stakeholders for the purpose of making better decisions, policies or programmes of action.

Public input into decisions, policies or programmes of action is an essential part of ensuring they reflect the aspirations of residents, iwi, community groups and businesses - everyone who is invested in Auckland's future being one of prosperity, equality and wellbeing.

This policy aims to enable a flexible approach to engagement that recognises and supports the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities to get involved in council and civic life, and demonstrates a commitment to building ongoing relationships and greater understanding of community views and preferences.

 

1.2      Policy purpose and overview

The purpose of this policy is to enable Auckland Council  and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities; and

·     to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different  issues, assets, or other matters; and

·     to inform the council from the beginning of a decision-making process about—

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

2        Decision making

One of the key roles of local government is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities. At Auckland Council, decision-making for regional decisions is undertaken by the Governing Body and for local decisions by local boards. Local Boards also have a key role in identifying and communicating the views of local communities on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws.

While community and stakeholder engagement improves decision-making, it is not the sole input into a decision. As shown in the diagram below, there are a wide range of information sources and perspectives that will inform a council decision. The information sources and perspectives are harnessed and collated which helps make the decision ‘sustainable’ (i.e. unlikely to require re-visiting due to it being well-informed and well-considered). Decisions are based on a wide range of information sources and perspectives and it may differ from the prevailing public opinion.

Title: Decision making process - Description: Sustainable decision-making inputs: technical input and advice; financial costs, benefits and considerations; Auckland Plan and Local Board Plan outcomes;  Council strategy and policy; Government policy; other considerations; public / stakeholder opinions, concerns, ideas, needs, values, motivations and goals.

Inputs into public / stakeholder opinions: community and stakeholder engagement, for example stakeholder meetings and workshops, reference and advisory groups; consultation, for example feedback forms, Special Consultative Procedure; opinion research, for example representative surveys, focus groups.

 

 

 

 

2.1      The Mayor and Governing Body

The Mayor has a responsibility for ensuring there is effective engagement between Auckland Council and the people of Auckland, including those too young to vote. The Mayor has established a number of advisory panels to: provide strategic advice to council on issues of importance to their communities (youth, ethnic people, pacific people, seniors, disability, rural); and to advise on effective engagement by council with those communities.

The Governing Body, comprising the Mayor and councillors, focuses on region-wide strategic decisions and must ensure that consultation and engagement requirements are met when making those decisions.

2.2      Local boards

Local boards make decisions on local matters, provide local leadership and support strong local communities.

With regard to community engagement and consultation, local boards are responsible for:

·     making decisions about non-regulatory local matters, including negotiating the standards of services delivered locally;

·     making decisions about regulatory local matters delegated to it by the governing body;

·     identifying and communicating the views of local people on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws to the governing body;

·     providing local leadership and developing relationships with the community, community organisations and special interest groups in the local area.

 

2.3      Independent Māori Statutory Board

The Independent Māori Statutory Board has appointed mana whenua and matāwaka (Māori communities with no tribal affiliation in Auckland) representatives.

The board assists Auckland Council to make decisions, perform functions, and exercise powers by:

·     promoting cultural, economic, environmental, and social issues of significance for mana whenua groups; and matāwaka of Tamaki Makaurau; and

·     ensuring that the council acts in accordance with statutory provisions referring to the Treaty of Waitangi.


 

3        Significance

A decision is significant if:

a.   the thresholds related to an activity or groups of activities stated below are exceeded; or

b.   the decision relates to the strategic assets listed below.

A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria listed below, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

 

3.1      Thresholds

As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

 

3.2      Strategic assets

The council’s strategic assets are those vital for the delivery of its services to the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets (a network) because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. A network is deemed to include those components which are integral to the functioning of the network as a whole. There are also a few iconic assets which have strategic significance for the Auckland region. In addition the LGA 2002 provides that shares in a port company and an airport company and assets required to provide affordable housing are strategic assets.

The council’s strategic assets are set out below.

1.   Public transport network, including Britomart

2.   Roading network

3.   Stormwater network

4.   Water and wastewater network

5.   Parks network

6.   Network of swimming pools

7.   Network of community centres and halls

8.   Community library network

9.   Cemeteries, heritage scheduled buildings and structures

10. Freehold interest in waterfront land held by the Ports of Auckland and the Auckland Waterfront Development Agency

11. Shares in substantive CCOs

12. Auckland Central Library and the historical library collection

13. Civic Theatre, Aotea Centre, Zoo, Viaduct Events Centre, North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre, Q Theatre, Auckland Art Gallery (including the art collection owned by Regional Facilities Auckland), Mt Smart Stadium and the council's contractual rights and interests in Auckland City Arena (known as Vector Arena)

14. Social housing network including housing for the elderly

15. Shares in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL)

16. Shares in Ports of Auckland.

Strategic assets, as defined by this policy, that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO, are identified in the CCO accountability policy. CCOs must comply with the CCO accountability policy when making decisions in relation to strategic assets under their control.

 

3.3      General Criteria

The following general criteria will be applied to determine the degree of significance of a decision.

1.   The number of residents and ratepayers affected and the degree to which they are affected by the decision or proposal

2.   The likely impact/consequences of the decision or proposal from the perspective of those parties

3.   Whether this type of decision has a history of generating wide public interest within the local board area (for a local board decision) or the Auckland region or New Zealand generally (for a governing body decision)

4.   The impact of the decision on the governing body’s or local boards’ ability to deliver on the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural well-being of the local board area or Auckland region and any statutory responsibility

5.   The impact of the decision on intended service levels for a group of council activities, including a decision to commence or cease any such group of activity

6.   The degree to which the decision or proposal is reversible.

4        Approach to engagement

The extent to which the council will engage with communities and stakeholders about an issue or decision to be made will match how significant the issue or decision is. Engagement may be required at various stages of the decision-making process and may take different forms depending on the stage. Both significance and the form of engagement will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, relative to the criteria listed above. A guide to engagement methods is attached for further information.

 

4.1      Engagement principles

The following provides an overview of how council will meet the Local Government Act (LGA) principles.

 

Conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner; and give effect to its identified priorities and outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     conduct community and stakeholder engagement in a genuine effort to listen to, and consider with an open mind, community and stakeholder input;

·     when presenting options for community and stakeholder feedback, ensure the options are realistic and deliverable;

·     ensure that questions are objective (ie: not leading), allowing people to express their views freely;

·     allow enough time and provide adequate resources to ensure participants have been provided fair opportunity to understand the matter and contribute their views

·     allow time to allow for issues that might arise during an engagement process;

·     value contributions made and time given;

·     give timely feedback on the results of the public’s input and decisions made;

·     value, respect and give weight to local knowledge.

 

 

 

 

A local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all of its communities

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     build ongoing relationships with communities through a range of approaches such as through advisory panels, the People’s Panel and other reference groups and fora;

·     provide community members and stakeholders with a reasonable opportunity to present their views, and to participate in a way that suits them;

·     provide ways for the community to raise issues directly with the council so that it is a two-way relationship;

·     identify opportunities to work in partnership with community organisations and leaders to encourage greater community ownership and participation;

·     ensure good information sharing of community views and preferences within council.

 

When making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community's interests; and the interests of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them.

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     identify ways of reaching out to affected communities and stakeholders, including those who are typically heard from least often;

·     provide more than one way for people to participate;

·     when required, invest in community capacity building to enable participation;

·     use plain language and avoid jargon and acronyms.

 

A local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

To meet this principle the Council will actively consider through engagement:

·     the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tamaki Makaurau;

·     how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

Supporting Māori community infrastructure that enables:

·     early engagement with Māori in the development of appropriate plans and policies;

·     Māori to guide how they want to engage with Auckland Council.

Support Māori to fully engage with the council, for example through but not limited to capability and capacity building.


 

5        Applying the policy

5.1      Supporting information

·     Consultation and Engagement Guidebook - this provides more detailed guidance on engagement principles and good practice.

·     Guide on Engaging with Māori.

·     Quality Policy Advice guidelines

·     Templates and other related guidance such as the Accessible Communications and Information Guide.

 

5.2      Managing conflicts of interest

Auckland Council has processes in place for both elected representatives and staff on how to manage conflicts of interest, including within the community engagement and decision-making process.

 

5.3      Policy exclusions

This policy will not apply and engagement will not be required where:

·     in the opinion of the council, failure to make a decision urgently would result in unreasonable or significant damage to property, or risk to people’s health and safety, or the loss of a substantial opportunity to achieve the council’s strategic objectives. Other policy and legislative requirements will still apply.

·     Any physical alterations to strategic assets that are required to:

prevent an immediate hazardous situation arising

repair an asset to ensure public health and safety due to damage from an emergency or unforeseen situation

 

5.4      Other legislation

The Resource Management Act 1991 sets out processes for public involvement in certain decisions, for example for resource consents and when preparing and changing district plans. Not all of these decisions are required to be publicly notified but when they are, the council will follow the principles outlined above in determining the level and type of consultation required.

There are a number of other policies or bylaws that are also required under other legislation (e.g. Gambling Act) or enabled (e.g. Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act, Psychoactive Substances Act, Health Act).  Some of these are specific about the requirements and processes for engagement, but others refer back to the principles outlined above. 

 

 

5.5      Policy development, term and review

This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and will be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy will be reviewed every three years as part of the Long-term Plan process but can be amended at any time.


 

6        Schedule 1: Methods of engagement

Auckland Council uses a wide range of tools and techniques to engage with the community and stakeholders. The council uses the International Association of Public Participation spectrum as a framework for engagement which identifies the following levels:

·     Inform - to provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

·     Consult - to obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·     Involve - to work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

·     Collaborate - to partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

·     Empower - to place final decision making in the hands of the public.

During the development of a plan or policy, there might be a number of different stages of engagement with the community using a different level of participation at the different stages. This will vary depending on the decision but for complex issues, a targeted group of community and stakeholders might be ‘involved’ to aid the development of a draft document followed by wider ‘consultation’ on the draft document.

Joint Management Agreements, Memorandum of Understanding or other similar high level agreements will be considered when engaging ‘collaboratively’ with Māori.

Title: Timelines for consultation projects - Description: Simple process: step 1 developing draft plan or policy, step 2 draft of the plan released for engagement, step3 analysis of feedback and decision making.

Complex process: step 1 identify issues for development of a draft plan or policy, step 2 targeted engagement with key stakeholders to help develop the draft, step 3 draft of the plan released for engagement, step 4 analysis of feedback, step 5 hearings, step 6 decision-making.

6.1      Engagement methods

The following provides a guide to the different approaches to engagement that might be used. Other approaches may also be considered depending on the topic and population affected.

Where the decision or proposal is in relation to air, land or water, the council will take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with those places.

The council will refer to the general criteria in section 3.3 to determine the level of engagement required. In addition, the council will consider who is affected by the decision, for example, the level of diversity in terms of geographic, cultural or other key demographics.

Prior to determining an appropriate approach, the council will consider how much is already known about the community views and preferences on the issue.

 

 

Significance

Description

Example approach

Small and simple

Eg redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements

The audience is very localised or relatively small in number or very targeted. They are easy to access and the issue or decision is relatively straight forward and is not of high general public interest. For example, redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements.

Localised promotion, for example through display boards and local media. Targeted engagement with the relevant audience where appropriate. Promotion through e-newsletters and social media. Information online and through local libraries and service centres. Surveys and open days may also be appropriate. 

Medium

Eg action plans, local area plans

The audience is fairly broad or diverse: some segments are not easy to access. The issue is not straightforward and there may be mixed views from the community. For example, action plans and local area plans.

Targeted engagement with the relevant audience, online engagement which may include a survey and social media. Information available through libraries and service centres. Promotion through e-newsletters, the local media or through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland.

Large or complex

Eg Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan

The audience is large and diverse and the issue is of wide importance to the region or complex. Significant financial investment will be required. This is high profile, over-arching, touches every part of council / community. For example, Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan.

Large scale publicity and promotion. There could be an informal engagement / discussion phase plus a formal phase of consultation. There is likely to need to be consideration of different cultural styles and needs for engagement. Likely to include a range of events and a focus on online activities. Promotion through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland and through e-newsletters.

 

6.2      Special consultative procedure (SCP) 

Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 specifies the use of the SCP for some plans and processes including:

·     Long-term Plan

·     Local Board Plans

·     Annual Plan

·     Bylaws of significant interest

 

The SCP can also be used where the governing body (for a regional decision) or local board (for a local board decision) deems the issue to be significant. Under the SCP, Auckland Council is required to:

·     develop a statement of proposal and make this publicly available (and make the summary of full proposal as widely available as reasonably practicable);

·     describe how people can have their say;

·     ensure people are given an opportunity to present their views to the council; and

·     given access to a record of the decisions.

The engagement methods listed above under ‘Large or complex’ will be considered when preparing for a SCP but large or complex issues will not automatically follow a SCP.

 

6.3      Consultation (Section 82)

Auckland Council is required to carry out consultation in accordance with or giving effect to Section 82 of the Local Government Act 2002 on certain matters (regardless of whether they are considered significant as part of this policy).

For all other issues requiring a decision, the council will determine the appropriate level of engagement on a case by case basis.

 

6.4      Informal engagement

Auckland Council may seek to develop ongoing relationships with the community on general matters, rather than purely on issues that require a decision. This will also allow the community to raise matters that are not currently under consultation. This could include having a presence at markets, events and in public spaces for the purposes of hearing community views and preferences.


 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Title: University engagement event - Description: The photo shows a roadshow event at a university where there are information displays, documents and other materials for review and discussion.


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

 

September 2014

Title: Auckland Council logo


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Civic engagement with the Pacific community

Census 2013 data

Auckland’s Pacific population continues to increase. In 2013, pacific peoples made up almost 15% of Auckland’s population.

Of Auckland’s local boards, the highest populations of Pacific ethnicity were in Mangere-Otahuhu, Otara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa and Henderson-Massey.

Samoan is the largest Pacific sub-group, followed by Tongan. Of the five largest Pacific groups, the Fijian group experienced the most rapid increase since 2006, increasing by 45.3 per cent.

Thirty-five per cent of Pacific peoples were aged under 15 in 2013 while only 5% of Pacific peoples were aged 65 and over.

Sixty per cent of Auckland’s people of Pacific ethnicity were born in New Zealand.

In addition, Samoan is the second most common language spoken in Auckland.

Relationships

It is important to establish ongoing relationships. Council staff have already developed many good relationships – use the contacts below to help you understand what relationships and networks are already in place. They may also be able to help support your events and activities by providing advice and guidance about what is already known about the community’s views and preferences for engagement.

There is also an internal council network for Pacific staff who are part of the wider Pacific community of Auckland.  These people can help to communicate with pacific people also get advice on approaches for how we engage different Pacific communities.

Understanding Pacific values, culture and protocols is key to ensuring we engage in a way that is meaningful and relevant to each Pacific community. These values underline everything that we do eg integrity – doing what we say we will do, closing the loop, showing up, participating, taking part, actioning opportunities etc.

 

Ministry of Pacific Island Affairs guidance

Cultural drivers

Considerations for engagement

Tend to be motivated by individual benefit within a wider value of communications

 

A policy option which fails to see the individual as part of family, community or society may not work

 

Are likely to see mutual help as bringing future security more effectively than individual policies

 

A view of ‘rational’ individually-focused behaviours will have limited application

 

Like to take time to properly understand and come to a consensus view

 

You may not get quick advice or decisions, especially if you do not listen attentively

 

Emphasise spiritual dimensions and see the church and pastor as very important

 

The spiritual and holistic dimensions of a policy issue will be very important

 

Highly value reciprocity and give and expect thank you gestures

 

You should always observe protocols and give a form of koha following consultation

 

May pay greater respect to the authority and value status specific in their nation

You should uphold the value of status and authority on their terms as well as your own

 

 

Remember that Pacific People are diverse

They straddle both western and Pacific cultures – don’t assume that all groups have an inflexible or entirely common set of beliefs. The status, authority, tradition, obligations and power structures are different within each Pacific culture.

English is often the most comfortable language for a group, but older Pacific peoples can often only participate effectively when their own language is used. Provide the opportunity to have an interpreter present where possible.

Cultural differences are important for running a successful consultation process, and policy solutions which directly address the economic and social disadvantage of Pacific peoples are the important ones; suggest an option which enables them to determine the solution.

Other tips

·    Always find someone to help present the topic who is well respected in that particular Pacific community

·    Go where Pacific Peoples are, where they naturally meet, perhaps connected to a church if that is familiar

·    Try and make the issues real and personal to groups

·    Has this group been consulted too much? Get the views and support of community leaders for the issue before you set up your fono or meeting

·    Pacific cultures are traditionally oral cultures and place importance on oratory. This needs to be kept in mind in terms of how they like to engage and give feedback through our consultation processes.

 

Younger Pacific communities

Research at events such as Pasifika and Polyfest has highlighted opportunities to improve engagement with younger members of the Pacific community. It indicated a preference for providing feedback online – through social media or surveys and using smart phones or tablets. Providing feedback at festivals or community events was also seen as a positive method for engagement.

Case studies

o Dare to explore

An example from libraries. 9000 young people between 5-13 years were engaged through this programme. The aim of this programme was to increase awareness and participation in libraries. There was a good response rate on the survey that was sent out as part of the engagement process. Really helped that the survey was sent out by people that the young people trusted. This ensured buy-in and ownership of the programme.

·    Pacific services strategy

The Auckland Libraries team engaged through their pacific staff who shared a link to an online survey via their social networks. Some paper versions were available for people to translate informally for family members. Through 55 members of staff, there were 700 surveys completed with a good cross section of demographics.

o Manurewa Youth Council

An example from the Unitary Plan consultation. The youth council took part in Unitary Plan Whaat! – a gamification activity on a fictional city called Rewa. Youth at these workshops were divided into teams and each team was given a $1million budget to govern this city. Each team had a wish list of what they would like to see being built e.g. libraries, swimming pools, recreational centres, parks, etc, the total sum of which came to $20 million. As a result, each of the teams had to prioritise their wish list given their limited budget.

·    Waste management

Pictorials were used as a way of helping to guide the public through changes in the waste service. These were used for face to face conversations. Churches played a big role in the engagement.

·    Navigation Safety bylaw

Asian and Pacific communities were identified as a key audience for engagement. The approach taken was to target information with different language speakers at boat ramps to target actual boat users who would be affected by the bylaw. In addition, engagement took place at Pasifika to help reach this target audience.

 

Media

The council has a wide range of ethnic and pacific media on its mailing list for council communications. In addition, quarterly Migrant Media briefings have been taking place through the Mayor’s office. This is currently being reviewed to identify what has been working well and what needs improvement.

o Samoan multimedia group (SMG) – this group covers all the communications channels including online. Recently with the David Tua fight, asked viewers to attend this event by taking part in creating a FB account and uploading photos of family members. This got viewers from various age groups going online to FB and it was great to see the online interactions in their own languages.

o Radio is key – this is still the tool to use to connect with Pacific communities. Social media is important with younger pacific people, but we shouldn’t overlook the power of radio.

o Variety of communications channels to use when engaging with pacific communities – we should look at not just online, but other channels such as radio and newspapers e.g. mai fm, planet fm.

 

Translations / interpreting 

It is important to provide context and background information to ensure that translations are meaningful – not literal translations and that when interpreting, cultural context and frame of reference is understood.

It is important to have both briefing and debriefing sessions with interpreters. Briefings provide an opportunity for interpreters to properly prepare for the topics and contents for discussion in advance, while debriefing would allow the council to get feedback from interpreters on the level of general understanding of the attendees.

There is currently no guidance on translations, a more cohesive and structured approach would be helpful.

 

Resources

Moana Pasifika staff network

This network is designed to connect our Pacific people, support employee development, and celebrate Pacific culture. There are approx. 200 members across the region, and four committees that cover the key areas of health and wellbeing, communications, events and HR. There’s also a biennial forum where it’s an opportunity for pacific staff across the region to get together and build relationships.

 

Translations

New Zealand Society of Translators and Interpreters is a professional body for translators and interpreters.

For less important documents and simple and straight forward brochures, the following resources can be utilised:

Professional Studies at the post-graduate level at Auckland University – Waterfront Auckland use them for translation by post-graduate students.

AUT runs the diploma course on liaison interpreting.

In addition, language line could be promoted more widely internally as a tool to help support engagement.


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Proposed summer set net control at Shakespear Regional Park beaches

 

File No.: CP2014/22883

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to obtain feedback from the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel on a proposed recommendation by council staff to the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee to approve a summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay within Shakespear Regional Park between the 20th of December 2014 and 29th of March 2015 to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance.

Executive summary

2.       Shakespear Regional Park is the third most visited regional park in Auckland.  Visitors take part in a large range of water related recreational activities over the summer months including swimming, boating, kitesurfing, windsurfing, diving, kayaking and fishing.

3.       Members of the public have since 2012 being expressing concern about risks to public safety associated with set nets and have requested set netting be banned at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay within Shakespear Regional Park.  Complaints to the council include swimmers being entangled in drifting nets and kitesurfers and windsurfers being thrown from their boards after colliding with set nets. 

4.       The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 enables the council to make controls to prohibit or restrict recreational activities on beaches for specified times or seasons as considered necessary to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance (clause 9.3).

5.       The proposed control at Shakespear Regional Park will be enforced by regional park rangers and council staff recommend that the control be monitored for its effectiveness and evidence of risk be obtained before controls are implemented at other sites.

6.       This report is being presented to the panel as council staff recognise that set netting is a common form of recreational fishing by a number of communities, including Pacific peoples, for food gathering. The intent of the report is to inform the panel of the proposed controls at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay, between the 20th of December 2014 and 29th of March 2015, in the interest of public safety. Set netting will still be permitted at Okoromai Bay.

 

Recommendation

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      provide feedback to the Manager Policies and Bylaws on the proposed summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay within Shakespear Regional Park between the 20th of December 2014 and 29th of March 2015 by 24 November 2015.

 

Comments

7.       Shakespear Regional Park is an open wildlife sanctuary that integrates conservation, recreation and farming.  It is the third most visited regional park in Auckland and is a popular location for a large range of water related recreational activities, particularly over the summer months. Activities include swimming, boating, kitesurfing, windsurfing, diving, kayaking and fishing. Of the three beaches at Shakespear Regional Park, swimmers most commonly utilise Te Haruhi Bay and Army Bay, as opposed to Okoromai Bay, which is unsuitable for swimming at low tide and is more known for shell fish gathering.

8.       Set netting is a fishing method defined by the Fisheries (Amateur Fishing) Regulations 2013 and includes the use of a gill net or any other sort of net that acts by enmeshing, entrapping or entangling fish. Typically the nets are set in the water with a weighted anchors or weights and surface floats at either end.

9.       Over the last few years a number of concerns have been raised about the impact of set nets on public safety and the risk of entanglement for swimmers, paddle boarders, windsurfers and kitesurfers. Complaints about set netting tend to escalate over the summer period and where there are a high number of beach users.

10.     The Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013 enables the council to make controls to prohibit or restrict set netting for specified times or seasons as considered necessary to ensure public safety and prevent nuisance (clause 9.3). As a matter of good decision-making, controls should be enforceable, evidence-based, complementary to other tools and flexible to be amended if proven ineffective.

11.     A summer set net control at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay is considered necessary to protect public safety and prevent nuisance.  The duration of the proposed control has been set over an extended summer period to align with the school holiday and public holiday period, as well as to allow appropriate time to implement the control and evaluate effectiveness.  The proposed control does not restrict fishing as an activity but regulates set netting as a method of fishing to protect public safety and minimise potential nuisance to other park users. Set netting is still permitted at Okoromai Bay.

Significance for the Pacific People’s Advisory Panel

12.     Council staff acknowledge that set netting is a popular recreational activity for Pacific peoples for the purposes of food gathering.  The proposed control does not restrict fishing as an activity but regulates set netting as a method of fishing to protect public safety and minimise potential nuisance to other park users. Council staff are mindful that this control may have an impact on those who engage in this activity however set netting is still permitted at Okoromai Bay. The purpose of this report is to inform the panel who may be able to advise the community of the proposed control and the rationale for implementing it.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

13.     A report is to be presented to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on the 15th of October seeking their views on the proposal. 

Māori impact statement

14.     Local iwi were invited to provide their feedback on the proposal and council staff met with a representative from Ngati Whatua and mataawaka. Feedback from both representatives was that there should be no restrictions on people’s ability to gather food for their own personal use and there needs to be a better understanding of what the real issues are.  They recommended that a more balanced approach should be undertaken including education of all beach users, including swimmers.

Implementation

15.     A public notice will be required to inform the public of the summer set net control and organisations such as the Ministry for Primary Industries should be directly notified.  Signage will be required at Army Bay and Te Haruhi Bay.  All signage will be in Te Reo Māori and English.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Proposed control for Shakespear Regional Park

75

     

Signatories

Authors

Emma Pilkington - Policy Analyst

Rebekah Stuart-Wilson - Principal Policy Analyst - Planning, Policies & Bylaws.

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

East West Connections Project – Public Engagement

 

File No.: CP2014/23803

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       Auckland Transport (AT) and the NZ Transport Agency (Transport Agency) seek to inform the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel about the East West Connections project, and upcoming engagement events for the project.

Executive summary

1.       East West Connections is a joint Transport Agency and AT programme to improve freight efficiency, commuter travel, public transport and walking and cycling options over the next 30 years. The programme area is shown in Appendix 1.

A project has been identified to address two priority issues:

· Improving connections into and out of the Onehunga-Penrose industrial area

· Improving public transport between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park.

The aims of the project are:

·             To create more reliable travel times and better transport connections for freight and business traffic

· Make travel times by bus more reliable by creating priority for buses.

2.       A number of potential options have been identified to address these issues and an initial assessment of the options has been undertaken. This included assessing factors such as transport performance, construction costs, ability to consent, constructability, urban design and social, natural environment, public health and cultural heritage effect.

3.       There are now six shortlisted options. AT and the Transport Agency are seeking feedback from the public on these options. The feedback received will be used to further develop the options and assist us to identify the option to be progressed.

4.       AT and the Transport Agency would like to inform the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel of upcoming public engagement events, and encourage Panel members to attend these events.

a)   Public open days will be held:

·    11 October, 10am-1pm: Onehunga Primary School Hall

·    16 October, 3:30-7:30pm: Otahuhu College Sports Pavilion

·    19 October, 1-4pm: Te Papapa Squash Club

b)   Community workshops will be held for people who wish to provide more detailed feedback on the project, focused on particular areas of interest:

·    20 October, 6:30-9pm: Māngere Inlet, Waikaraka walkway and Ann's Creek

·    21 October, 6:30-9pm: Onehunga town centre

·    22 October, 6:30-9pm: Sylvia Park and Mutukaroa-Hamlins Hill

·    23 October, 6:30-9pm: Public transport between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park

Interested people should RSVP to eastwest@nzta.govt.nz.

 

c)   Feedback can be provided online at www.nzta.govt.nz/east-west.

d)   Feedback closes on 31 October 2014 at 5pm.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel:

a)      come along to one of the community open days or workshops to provide feedback to AT and the Transport Agency on the project, or alternatively fill in the feedback form distributed at the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel meeting.

 

 

Comments

 

Significance for the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

5.       The East West Connections project, particularly the proposed public transport improvements between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park, is located in an area with a high Pacific population. The project will therefore have an impact on Pacific people who live, work and play in the area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.       AT and the Transport Agency are engaging with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Boards.

 

Māori impact statement

7.       AT and the Transport Agency are engaging with Mana Whenua groups and Mataawaka.

Implementation

N/A

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

East West Connection Programme Area

79

     

Signatories

Authors

Saby Virdi (Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

 


Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

15 October 2014

 

 

Attachment 1: East West Connections Programme Area

 

 

http://www.nzta.govt.nz/projects/east-west-connections/img/e2wlink-main-graphic.jpg