I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

4.30pm

Local Board Chambers
Papakura Service Centre
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Bill McEntee

 

Deputy Chairperson

Michael Turner

 

Members

Stuart Britnell

 

 

Brent Catchpole

 

 

Graham Purdy

 

 

Katrina Winn

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Trish Wayper

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

7 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 295 1331

Email: Patricia.Wayper@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Progressive Papakura Incorporated - Tracey Shackleton        5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Councillors' Update                                                                                                       7

13        Options for the Future Governance and Management of Community Facilities on Smiths Reserve, Papakura                                                                                                         9

14        Papakura Local Board Community Group Funding - Applications for Round One 2014/2015                                                                                                                      19

15        Seeking Approval for Capex Renewal Projects for Aquatic and Recreation Facilities                                                                                                                                        23

16        Papakura Careers Expo                                                                                              25

17        Allocation of the 2014/2015 Infrastructure and Environmental Services Budget 27

18        Council's Role in Early Childhood Education                                                          29

19        Auckland Transport Update - October 2014                                                            39

20        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                        45

21        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                        69

22        Integrated Bylaws Review and Implementation Programme (IBRI) Update – September 2014                                                                                                                               87

23        Local Board Feedback on the Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)                                                                                                                                       97

24        Papakura Local Board Long Term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal   181

25        Adoption of the Papakura Local Board Plan 2014                                                 183

26        For Information: Reports referred to the Papakura Local Board                        221

27        Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term        223

28        Reports Requested - Pending - Issues                                                                   229

29        Papakura Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                237  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

31        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               247

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   247  

 


1          Welcome

 

A Board Member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to speak had been received.

 

8.1       Deputation - Progressive Papakura Incorporated - Tracey Shackleton

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to allow Progressive Papakura Incorporated to update the board.

Executive summary

2.       Tracey Shakleton, Progressive Papakura Incorporated is to present an overview of the work being undertaken by their group.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board thank Progressive Papakura for their presentation to the board.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Councillors' Update

 

File No.: CP2014/23539

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity is provided for Councillors’ Calum Penrose and Sir John Walker to update the Board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Councillors’ update be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Trish Wayper - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Options for the Future Governance and Management of Community Facilities on Smiths Reserve, Papakura

 

File No.: CP2014/22049

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve options for the future governance and management of community facilities in Smiths Reserve, Papakura.

Executive summary

2.       Smiths Reserve is located between Sir Edmund Hilary Intermediate School and Papakura Marae on Smiths Avenue in South East Papakura. It was vested in Papakura Borough Council in 1969 for recreation purposes, to manage in trust for the Crown. The reserve is zoned recreation, and is unclassified with respect to the Reserves Act 1977. A map is attached (Attachment A). The reserve is located in an area with a high degree of social deprivation.

3.       Located on the reserve are 10 concreted games courts, a hall which is a council venue for hire, a small toilet block, and a community house.  At a workshop on 13th August 2014 the Local Board indicated that their future plan for the reserve is that the community house be leased for community use, and that the hall remains as a venue for hire.  Additionally, the rest of the reserve will be used for largely informal recreation as now.

4.       The community house has been occupied by the Pikorua Community Charitable Trust (the Trust) since 2011. In December 2011 the Papakura Local Board offered to lease the house to the Trust and allow them to use the hall at no cost during specified times of the day Although the Trust continues to occupy the house, a formal lease has not been executed.  There is some uncertainty with regard to the correct current constitution of the Trust. Officers are trying to determine who the trustees of the trust are. The Trust also holds a key to the community hall on the reserve, and at times allowed access to third parties outside of council’s formal booking process. This carries significant potential risks to council.

5.       A key issue is the use and management of the house and hall on the reserve. The report proposes that the hall is managed exclusively by council in the future. A lease of the house for community purposes is proposed subject to the granting of resource consent and appropriate classification under the Reserves Act 1977. Prior to a lease being entered into for the house, council practice is to undertake an expression of interest process to identify all possible lessees who could occupy the house. An agreement to lease can then be entered into subject to classification and resource consent.

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Notes that the community house requires resource consent and the reserve appropriately classified under the Reserves Act 1977, prior to a community occupancy being formalised on the site.  

b)      Approves an Expression of Interest process is undertaken to identify possible lessees of the community house, and an agreement to lease entered into with the successful applicant subject to reserve classification and resource consent.

c)      Notes that a report will be provided to the Board at the end of the Expressions of Interest process, for the Board to determine the successful applicant.

d)      Recommends to the Governing Body that the reserve is classified part recreation and part local purpose as shown in Attachment A.

e)      Agrees that the hall is managed exclusively by council in the future.

f)       Notes that the Pikorua Trust do not currently hold public liability insurance and would need to obtain it if they were to be granted a lease in the future. 

g)      Allocates $15000 from the Board’s budget to classify the reserve and undertake resource consent process

Comments

Background

6.       Smiths Reserve was vested in Papakura Borough Council in 1969 for recreation purposes, to manage in trust for the Crown. Located on the reserve are a hall, a community house, a toilet block and several concreted games courts.

7.       Historically from the early 1970s Papakura Netball was based at the reserve.  However, in the late 90s they moved to the netball centre in Bruce Pulman Park. This resulted in a large reduction in the formal use of the Smiths Reserve courts. The current hall on the site was originally the clubrooms for Papakura Netball.

8.       In May 2008, Papakura District Council moved the community house onto the site to provide a base for the multi-agency Awhi project. The community house offers two small main rooms, a kitchen, laundry and shower/toilet facility. The Awhi project was led by NZ Police and its objectives included reduction of localised alcohol and other drug use, youth related truancy, tagging, and high rates of domestic violence.

9.       In August 2010, Pikorua Community Charitable Trust (the Trust) was formed by the Awhi project coordinator and volunteers after the agencies involved in the project were unable to reach agreement over long term resourcing. The objectives of the Trust are: “to reduce social exclusion and poverty, fostering a strong vibrant community using a community development “hands up” approach”. The Awhi project was wound up in 2011.

10.     At their meeting of 14 December 2011, the Papakura Local Board considered some options to provide short term continuity for the Awhi project. At that meeting the Board resolved (PPK/2011/209):

a.   That a lease agreement be offered to Pikorua Trust for the house

b.   That Council and Trust develop a management plan which includes a funding strategy for the longer term sustainability of the house

c.   That the Trust provides a six monthly progress report to the Local Board on the local community outcomes and activities relating to the work of the Trust

d.   That the Papakura Local Board allocates $5000 from the Local Board discretionary fund to support lease and operating costs over the 2012 and 2013 fiscal years.

Consideration

Management of Facilities: The Community House

11.     In order for a lease to be granted for the house, the facility must comply with any regulatory requirements and the occupant must be eligible for a lease,

Resource Consent

12.     A key issue affecting both current and future occupation of the house is lack of resource consent for the house, without which a lease cannot be granted.  The reserve is zoned urban reserve under the Auckland Council District Plan Operative Papakura section 1999. The initial placement of a house intended for community purposes on a recreation reserve should have triggered a resource consent application. A resource consent must be undertaken now in order for the Board’s plan for the future of the house to be realised.  The estimated cost for a resource consent is $8000. The responsibility for costs lies with the Local Board. It is estimated that the process could take up to five months.

Eligibility to Lease

13.     As outlined in council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines, eligibility criteria for leasing community facilities include:

·     Compliance with any occupancy or other agreement the group may have had with council during the preceding three years.

·     Proof of public liability insurance

·     Demonstration of the benefits of their activities in terms of outcomes achieved.

·     Be able to demonstrate its viability to deliver its services or activities through:

·         Audited accounts

·         Demonstration of a clear and effective governance structure

·     The activities undertaken by the applicant align with local board priorities.

 

14.     The Trust does not currently meet the eligibility criteria as it does not carry public liability insurance, has not provided audited accounts, and is unable to meet the costs of occupancy. The Board has however allocated $6661 for the operation of the Smiths Ave Community House over the 2014/15 financial year.

15.     The Board has previously identified the Trust as its preferred occupier of the house. In May 2014, staff invited the Trust to apply for a lease of the house, including providing the necessary information for council to assess its application. Staff assisted the Trust in developing its strategic and operational plans.  The Trust was unable to submit the application by the required date on the   2nd June 2014, and then an extended date of the 16th June 2014.

Expression of Interest (EOI)

16.     Council practice is to publicly advertise that a facility is available for lease, and to ask interested parties to submit an application. The EoI process is a fair and transparent way of identifying all interested parties to the lease. The eligibility of each application is determined using the eligibility criteria outlined in Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines, and the applicants are then ranked according to a weighted assessment scale. An EoI process is therefore recommended.  The Trust is able to participate in the process, and ultimately, the decision to issue a lease is the responsibility of the Board.

Management of Facilities: The Community Hall

17.     The hall on the site is a council venue for hire. As mentioned earlier, the Trust is a regular user, has access to a key, and do not normally use council’s booking process. The Board has expressed a preference to see the Trust’s regular access to the hall preserved, and requested options for the future management of the hall. The analysis of the three key options is provided below:

Option

Benefits 

Risks

1.   The Trust  manages the hall on behalf of council through a contract.

·    Provides a single source of bookings for the facility (and more accurate records) compared to the current model where council and the Trust manage bookings separately.

·    The contract would be legally binding and the parties’ responsibilities will be clarified.

 

 

·    The Trust could use the income from the hall for its activities or to meet the costs of occupying the house.

 

1.   The Trust’s capacity to manage the facility in the public interest, keep accurate records and comply with council’s requirements is unknown

2.   The Trust will need appropriate insurances and management capability to meet council requirements

3.   Loss of revenue from the hall for the Local Board

4.   No direct oversight of users/uses of the hall or the fees charged.

 

2.   Council management of the hall with a regular booking for the Trust (and continued free use).

·    The Trust is assured of regular use of the hall

·    Council’s legal risk is minimised

·    Public access preserved and consistent to other facilities in Papakura

·    Better oversight of users/uses of the facility

 

1.   If the Board allows free use of the hall by the Trust, there is a loss of revenue

2.   Depending on the extent of the Trust’s regular booking, reduced access to the wider community

3.   Preferential treatment for a single group

 

3.   Council management of the hall with no regular or free use for the Trust. 

·    Does not show favouritism to one group and maximises community access

·    Booking process is open and transparent

·    Accurate record keeping of usage

·    Potential revenue maximised.

·    Trust will have to compete with other users

·    May have a significant impact on the Trust’s operations and ability to deliver programmes

·    Trust unable to pay for the hall use or use revenue from hall bookings.

 

18.     Full council management of the hall is the recommended option, regardless of who occupies the house as a result of the EoI process. The regular or free use of the hall for specified times could then be negotiated (if needed) with the occupier of the house as part of any agreement to lease.  Additionally, it is suggested that the set of keys held by the Trust is removed immediately.

Future Options and Process

19.     At a workshop on 13th August the Board indicated that the plan for the reserve is that the community house be leased for community use, and that the hall remains as a venue for hire.  Additionally, it is anticipated that the rest of the reserve will be used for largely informal recreation as now.

20.     Community use of the house requires that the reserve be classified under the Reserves Act 1977. This is discussed below.

Reserve Classification

21.     Where a facility to be leased for community purposes is sited on recreation reserve, the reserve needs to be classified under the Reserves Act 1977, and the activities of the lessee must comply with the classification.  The options for classification of the reserve and the implications with respect to activities which comply with the classification are shown on the table below:


 

Reserve Classification Option

Implications

Recreation Reserve

Only recreational activities to take place on the reserve. The community activities taking place in the community house and hall would not comply.

Local Purpose Reserve

Only community activities allowed. The current recreation activities taking place on the games courts would not comply.

Split Classification: part local purpose and part recreation

Community activities take place on the local purpose part of the reserve and recreation facing activities take place on the recreation classified part of the reserve.

 

22.     Smiths Reserve was vested to manage for recreation purposes. Its primary purpose was intended to be recreation. The activities taking place in the community house and in the hall are largely community activities, so they do not comply with the use the Reserve was intended for. However the area where the hall and house are situated on the reserve has not been identified as being required to meet the future recreation needs of Papakura. Newer facilities including McLennan Park, Opaheke and Bruce Pullman Park are likely to attract more formal recreation use in the future.

23.     The split classification option appears to align with the current and anticipated future activities taking place on the reserve. The Board recently held a consultation event at Smiths Reserve to inform the development of their 2014 Local Board Plan. Although the consultation referred to all of Papakura, the submissions of the local residents indicated they seek to have space for community facing events and for community activities such as Kapa Haka and Maori arts and crafts.

24.     The amount of time it would take and the potential costs associated with each classification option are discussed below.

Reserves Classification Process

25.     As mentioned previously, the primary purpose of Smiths Reserve was intended as recreation. Classification of the reserve other than as recreation therefore involves a longer, more complex process, and higher cost. The table below briefly outlines the classification process, the estimated time it takes and the estimated cost for each classification option.

 

Reserve Classification Option

Process

Estimated Time

Estimated  Cost

Recreation

·    Approval of Board and Parks Recreation and Sport Committee. (PRS)

·    Consult Local iwi

·    Report outcome to Board  and PRS

·    Delegated officer signs and registers gazette notice

10 months

0

Local Purpose

·    Report to Board, then PRS

·    Consult Local iwi

·    Advertise and carry out  public consultation

·    Report to LB and PRS

·    Delegated officer signs and registers gazette notice

11 months

$2000 (for public consultation)

Split classification Local Purpose/Recreation

·    Report to Board, then PRS

·    Survey the Reserve

·    Consult Local iwi

·    Advertise and carry out public consultation

·    Report to LB and PRS

·    Report to LB and PRS

·    DoC approves classifications and signs gazette notice

·    Register the gazette notice

 

13 months

$7000 (public consultation and for the services of a surveyor)

 

26.     In order to align with the current and anticipated future activities taking place on the reserve, it is recommended the Board endorse the option to classify the reserve part Local purpose and part Recreation.  Note that the EoI can be undertaken concurrently with the reserve classification process, and an agreement to lease entered into with the successful applicant subject to reserve classification.

27.     The suggested boundary between the recreation classification and local purpose classification is shown on an aerial photograph of the reserve in Attachment A.

Local Board Views and Implications

28.     At the request of the Papakura Local Board, an internal staff working group was formed in March 2014 to address the immediate needs and risks in relation to Smiths Reserve, and to provide the board with advice on future options for the reserve.

29.     A workshop was held with the Board on 13 August 2014 on future options for Smiths Reserve and the Board indicated its support for the split classification of the reserve.

30.     The Board also indicated that the Trust was its preferred occupier of the community house.  However, in order to provide a transparent and fair process, this report recommends an EoI process to determine the most suitable occupier, before any lease is issued.

Māori Impact Statement

31.     The ethnicity of residents who live around Smiths Reserve is approximately 33% Maori, so the future uses of the reserve are very relevant to this group.

32.     No specific consultation has as yet been undertaken with respect to the future of the reserve. However, consultation with local iwi will be undertaken as part of the reserve classification process. Iwi are also able to participate in a notified resource consent process.

33.     As the reserve was vested in trust to council to manage on behalf of the crown, there is a possibility it may be identified to be used in a future Treaty of Waitangi settlement.


 

Implementation

34.     A lease for the community house will be subject to an EoI process, with an agreement to lease with the successful applicant entered into subject to resource consent and appropriate reserve classification. Subject to local board approval, the management of the hall will revert to council, and any keys removed from the Trust immediately. The costs of the resource consent and reserve classification process needs to be met by the board (or be subject to a cost sharing agreement with the occupier of the house).

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Aerial Photo of Smiths Reserve

17

     

Signatories

Authors

Sally McComb - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional and Local Planning Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Community Group Funding - Applications for Round One 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/21024

 

  

Purpose

1.   This report presents applications received under Round One of the Papakura Local Board 2014/2015 Community Funding programme.  The Papakura Local Board is requested to fund, part fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.   The Papakura Local Board has a total budget of $105,442 for the 2014/2015 financial year for the community grants programme.

3.   The applications to be considered at this time are for Round One, which is the first of two rounds for this financial year.

4.   The Papakura Local Board considered these applications at a workshop on 10 September 2014.

5.   Fifteen eligible applications have been received for this round, requesting a total of $35,389.

6.   One request was withdrawn by the applicant group after consideration at the board workshop.

Recommendation:

That the Papakura Local Board considers the applications listed below and agrees to fund, part fund or decline each application in this round:

Fund Type

Applicant

Project

Amount requested

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Alfriston Indoor Bowling Club

Towards hall hire at the Alfriston Hall from 11 March 2015 to 27 October 2015.

 

$1,487

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Towards venue hire, promotion and administration costs.

$2,928

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Communicare CMA

Towards rental costs at the Papakura Baptist Church for the Papakura Friendship Centre from 1 January to 31 December 2015.

$1,300

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Father and Child Trust

Towards programme costs for staff to provide the Father and Child services to 300 new, young or existing fathers.

$3,000

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Fetupupula Youth Group

Towards costs to hold a ball to be held on13 December 2014 at the Papakura Pacific Island Presbyterian Church Hall, 1 Fetu Pupula Place, Papakura.

$2,500

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Trust NZ

Towards a contribution to the salary of the Auckland Outreach Worker and contribution to producing the monthly newsletter.

$1,918

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Marne Road Lawn Bowling Club

Towards painting and redecoration of the inside of the clubrooms.

Withdrawn

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Mercy Missions Trust

Towards rates assistance to continue to service the community.

$2,500

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

New Foundations Trust    (NFT)

Towards the provision of one-on-one mentoring to five individuals, viewed at high-risk, dis-engaged from education from intermediate or secondary students in the Papakura area.

$5,290

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Papakura Family Service Centre

Towards the HIPPY Papakura graduation ceremony 2014 to be held at the Red Hill Community Centre 163 Dominion Rd, Redhill, Papakura.

$944

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Society for Community Development Support Inc. (t/a Pregnancy Options and Help)

Towards volunteer fuel costs. 

$2,500

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Society for Community Development Support Inc. (t/a Pregnancy Options and Help)

Towards wages for a support person.

$2,500

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

Takanini Family Service Centre

Towards the HIPPY Takanini graduation ceremony to be held at the Red Hill Community Centre 163 Dominion Rd, Redhill, Papakura on 10 December 2014.

$1,168

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

YMCA of Auckland Inc.

Towards the cost of a mentoring service to bridge Māori and Pasifika young people aged eight to 24 years back into school or forward into meaningful education, employment or training.

$4,000

Social Investment Fund

Auckland Single Parent’s Trust and Te Kaitiakitanga Tamaki Makaurau o te Matua Kotahitanga

Towards workshops and one-on-one personal coaching.

$3,354

Total Amount Requested

$35,389

 


Discussion

 

7.         The 6 March 2014 meeting of the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee agreed to the continuation of the interim community funding approach for the 2014/2015 financial year:

That the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee endorse existing funding arrangements and grants schemes being rolled over for the 2014 /2015 financial year.” (REG/2014/36)

 

8.         The funds for the legacy community funding and local board discretionary community funding schemes within the southern local board areas cover the following funds:

·          Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

·          Social Investment Fund

·          School Holiday Programme Fund

·          School Swimming Pool Fund

·          Community Crime Prevention Fund

·          Marae Facilities Fund

·          Papakura Local Community Grants

 

9.         Fifteen applications were received in this round to be considered under the following funds:

·          Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund

·          Social Investment Funds

10.       When considering the applications to the Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Fund, the Papakura Local Board should be guided by their Local Board Plan priorities.  These are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to support the local board when considering the merits of each application. 

11.       The Papakura Local Board held a workshop on 10 September 2014 to consider each application and how each project aligned with the Papakura Local Board Plan priorities and the south “Community Funding Policy for Grants, Donations and Sponsorships” that currently apply.

12.       Financial Summary – Summary of Papakura Local Board’s available balance for the 2014/2015 financial year:

2014/15

Annual

Budget

 

Type of Fund

Grants paid

Balance

$20,827

 

Local Board Discretionary Community Fund

 

$20,827

$16,498

 

Social Investment Fund

 

$16,498

$2,053

 

School Holiday Programme Fund

 

$2,053

$2,155

 

School Swimming Pool Fund

 

$2,155

$4,857

 

Community Crime Prevention Fund

 

$4,857

$17,395

 

Marae Facilities Fund

 

$17,395

$41,657

 

Papakura Local Community Grants

 

$41,657

$105,442

TOTAL

 

$105,442

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

13.       A copy of the current legacy community funding and local board discretionary community funding schemes and funding guidelines within the southern local board areas current were circulated to all board members for the workshop held on 10 September 2014.

14.       Local board feedback on these applications was sought at a workshop with the Papakura Local Board on 10 September 2014.

15.       The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan and budgets.

16.       The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Maori Impact Statement

17.       Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori.  Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.  The provision of community funding to support community development initiatives provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes and activities that benefit Maori.

Implementation

18.       Following the Papakura Local Board decisions for Round One, Community Development, Arts and Culture will notify all applicants, in writing, of the decision.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jan Perkins - Community Funding Co-ordinator South

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Seeking Approval for Capex Renewal Projects for Aquatic and Recreation Facilities

 

File No.: CP2014/21465

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the Massey Park Aquatic Centre and Papakura Recreation Centre facility building renewal capital work schedule for the 2014/15 financial year.

Executive Summary

2.       To continue the delivery of aquatic and recreational services and ensure the integrity of your assets, an ongoing capital works schedule is required.  This capital work schedule seeks to address future degradation of the building infrastructure, maintain or improve current service levels, capitalise on sustainability opportunities, and address health and safety concerns.  The work schedule includes deferred works which will not require sign off.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Approves the 2015 aquatic and recreation facility building renewal capital work schedule.

b)      Approves Auckland Council Officers have delegated authority to manage the projects within the funding budget indicated in the list.

 

Comments

 

3.       The Auckland Councils Long Term Plan for this Board has a budget allocated for aquatic and recreational facilities building renewals.  This budget is allocated across two facilities – the Massey Park Aquatic Centre and Papakura Recreation Centre.  The purpose of the proposed capital work schedule is to ensure the future integrity of the buildings and surrounding infrastructure, maintain and improve the current level of service and efficiencies, and address any immediate or potential safety compliance issues.

4.       The Aquatic and leisure facilities represent an asset group with significant risk.  The conditions within the facilities (i.e. chlorinated pool halls and areas of continual high impact use) if not maintained effectively will result in the asset deteriorating at a rapid rate, reduction in the level of service that is able to be offered.

5.       The specific projects below have been compiled on information and advice from the Auckland Council Properties Department, the respective facility managers and an energy report compiled to improve the operational efficiencies of the Massey Park Aquatic Centre and Papakura Recreation Centre   

6.       A list of renewal projects is detailed below

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

7.       The capital work schedule will have been discussed with the Papakura Local Board.

Māori Impact Statement

8.       There are no particular impacts on Maori which are different from general users of the aquatic and recreation facilitates.

Implementation

9.       Once approval for the schedule of work is received, project initiation forms will be completed from which the properties department will source a contractor to complete the work.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Jane  Franich - Contract Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Papakura Careers Expo

 

File No.: CP2014/21725

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek financial support from the Papakura Local Board for the 2015 Papakura Careers EXPO.

Executive summary

2.       In response to a growing need in Auckland for entry level workers and a higher than average unemployment rate in Papakura, Community Development and Safety staff organised the first Papakura Careers EXPO on 26 June 2014.

3.       The EXPO provided an interactive platform for visitors, students, tertiary education institutions, skills and training providers, as well as employers, to discuss a wide range of training, apprenticeship and employment opportunities with over 500 students and Papakura residents.

4.       Participating organisations reported that the Papakura Careers EXPO was one of the best of its kind and expressed support for the event to be held annually.

5.       As a result of the EXPO over 70 people have applied for work or study with participating organisations, three of which were interviewed on the day and started work the following week.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      contributes funding for the 2015 Papakura Careers EXPO to the value of $7,000.

 

Discussion

6.       The EXPO was supported by the Papakura Local Board and was successful in:

·    increasing collaboration between educational institutes, schools and service providers in the wider Papakura area

·    raising awareness of job opportunities and educational pathways

·    attracting over 500 attendees

7.       As a result of the EXPO, the following education and employment outcomes were achieved:

·    30 attendees applied for positions at SERCO NZ

·    25 applied for positions at Fulton Hogan and three attendees who were interviewed at the EXPO started new jobs the following week

·    seven applied for courses at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi

·    five applied for Open Wānanga courses

·    one has completed work experience at the Papakura Leisure Centre

·    five applied for courses at MIT.

8.       Staff plan to bring a funding proposal for future Career EXPO auxiliary events to the Papakura Local Board for consideration in quarter two.

9.       Discussions with Industry Training Organisations (ITOs) the tertiary sector, Papakura Youth Connections, secondary schools and community agencies indicated continued strong interest in supporting the Papakura Careers EXPO into the future.

10.     The 2015 Papakura Careers EXPO aims to link trade training organisations, private training establishments and the tertiary sector in a focused and collaborative approach with schools, marae, Youth services, churches, new migrant services and Iwi.

11.     Additionally, the EXPO aims to provide support to Papakura youth and their whanau through bureaucratic barriers which, recent research shows, can often stifle participation in the workforce.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

12.     The local board has previously supported the Papakura Careers EXPO with funding and also expressed its support for it to be an annual event.

Maori Impact Statement

13.     It is noted that there is significant participation by Maori education and training providers in the organising of the EXPO and community participants are predominantly Maori. Maori economic and educational leaders are committed to improving Maori employment and educational outcomes.

Implementation

14.     There are no significant implementation issues foreseen as a result of the decisions in this report.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Anna Jacob - Community Development Project Leader

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Commun ity Development Arts and Culture

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Allocation of the 2014/2015 Infrastructure and Environmental Services Budget

 

File No.: CP2014/19387

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve the Papakura Local Board’s environmental budget of $29,547 for the 2014/2015 financial year to fund a targeted biodiversity and private landowner engagement programme on private land.

Executive summary

2.       As part of its Local Board Agreement the Papakura Local board committed $29,547 to bush site management programmes in the board area for the 2014/2015 financial year.

3.       It is recommended that this budget funds an initiative to engage with private landowners in the board area to raise awareness of biodiversity values on private land, and provide advice to interested landowners on how best to manage biodiversity on their properties.

4.       These initiatives support the ‘Protecting our cultural and natural heritage’ and ‘Enhancing our living spaces and places’ priorities in the Papakura Local Board Plan.

 

Recommendations

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)   Agrees to fund a  targeted biodiversity and private landowner engagement programme on private land at a cost of $29,457

b)   Requests any significant changes to this work programme be brought back to the board.

Comments

5.       As part of its Local Board Agreement the Papakura Local Board committed $29,547 to bush site management programmes in the board area for the 2014/2015 financial year.

6.       It is recommended that this budget funds an initiative to engage with private landowners in the board area to raise awareness of biodiversity values on private land, and provide advice to interested landowners on how best to manage biodiversity on their properties.

7.       This programme would be delivered by biodiversity officers in the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department and run in a similar fashion to council’s current Covenant Monitoring Programme, which occurs in the Franklin, Rodney and Waitakere Local Board areas.

8.       The purpose of the Covenant Monitoring Programme is to engage with private landowners who have statutory covenants registered on their title, and assist them in:

a.   Understanding the ecological values of the bush covenant on their property;

b.   Understanding the threats to the covenant health on their property from invasive species (i.e. weeds, pest animals) or wandering stock;

c.   Understanding their statutory obligations to look after the covenant on their property;

d.   Knowing how to manage the covenant effectively to ensure the ongoing health of that ecosystem.

e.   Each landowner receives a ‘Covenant Management Plan’ for their property which is tailored to their needs and provides important ecological information and advice to support the ongoing management of the covenant.

 

9.       The Papakura biodiversity and landowner engagement project would be of a similar nature, but the scope of the project would be extended to all interested landowners within the board area with areas of biodiversity on their land (i.e. not purely those landowners with statutory covenants on their property).

10.     A contractor would be engaged to complete the scope of works as per below:

a)   identify potential private properties within the board area that may have existing biodiversity value (i.e. natural areas);

b)   carry out a site visit with landowner permission;

c)   carry out a rapid ecological assessment of the site;

d)   produce a tailored management plan for the landowner with an aim of assisting them to manage the biodiversity (i.e. wetland, forest, stream bank) on their property.

11.     The ecological prioritisation of parks within the Papakura Local Board area has been a key piece of work for the biodiversity and parks teams over the past year. This exercise has categorised the parks within the Papakura Local Board area in terms of ‘high’, ‘medium’ and ‘low’ priority for ecological management.

12.     This report will be presented to the board for its consideration in due course. Four sites (Red Hill Scenic Reserve, Margan Bush, Kirk’s Bush and Dominion Reserve) were classified as ‘high’ priority for ecological management due to their high ecological value (and other qualities) in the Papakura Local Board area.

13.     As part of this private landowner engagement initiative, it is proposed to visit property owners adjacent to these ‘high priority’ parks in the first instance, and then progressively to ‘medium’ and ‘low’ areas as resources permit.

14.     Other sites will be considered based on their ecological values such as larger areas of forest on the eastern side of the Papakura Local Board area.

Consideration

15.     This is a report prepared specifically for the Papakura Local Board.

Local Board Views and Implications

16.     This is a report prepared specifically for the Papakura Local Board. The proposal recommended in this report was discussed and developed with the environmental portfolio holders for the Papakura Local Board.

Māori Impact Statement

17.     No consultation with Maori was required for the purposes of this report.  It is acknowledged that environmental management; water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

Implementation

18.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report. Regular reporting on project delivery was provided through the quarterly report from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department, or as required.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Michael Ngatai – Biodiversity Advisor

Varsha Belwalkar - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Council's Role in Early Childhood Education

 

File No.: CP2014/22317

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report responds to the Papakura Local Board’s concern about the demand on existing parks and open space to provide for early childhood education facilities and proposes some principles to guide staff when responding to future requests.

Executive Summary

2.       Research shows that children who are involved in quality early childhood education (ECE) benefit in many ways, and that these benefits extend to their family/whānau and the wider community. Taking part in ECE builds a strong foundation for children’s ongoing education, learning and development.

3.       Auckland Council has signalled its support for ECE services through the Auckland Plan and the Southern Initiative. A target has been identified in the Auckland Plan for all three to four year olds to participate in, and have access to quality, culturally appropriate ECE services by 2020.

4.       Council’s main involvement in supporting ECE services to date ranges from being a direct provider to providing community leases for council facilities (land and buildings), programme support, grant funding and use of temporary bookable spaces. The council has no statutory responsibilities or role in the establishment, management or funding of ECE services. 

5.       There is growing tension between the use of parks and open space for non-exclusive recreation purposes, and the demand to lease council land for community based ECE provision.  With no policies or guidelines currently in place that provide detailed guidance for decision-makers around ECE services applications are assessed on a case by case basis.

6.       The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan permits ECE services up to 100m2 in an existing building in various public open space zones.  Stand-alone ECE facilities are a non-complying activity.

7.       Staff held a number of workshops with southern local boards between May and August 2014 to discuss options for the council’s role in supporting ECE services. The feedback from the workshops have provided the basis for the development of key guiding principles that will help the board determine how it approaches requests for a lease to occupy parks and open space for the purpose of ECEs in the future.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Adopt the following principles to guide decisions on requests for lease of public open space for early childhood education provision;

I.     that central government has the main responsibility for the establishment of    early childhood education services

II.    that the establishment of new early childhood education services on council’s parks and open space will not be supported, unless there is a direct benefit to the open space and its users

III.   that existing early childhood education centres seeking expansion will be supported where the impact on the parks and open space provision and its users have been assessed as minimal. 

 

 

Comments

8.       At local board meetings in August and September 2013, the Otara - Papatoetoe and Mangere - Otahuhu Local Boards requested:

a)   an analysis of ECE [Early Childhood Education] demand in the Local Board and The Southern Initiative area.

b)   that the governing body develop a strategic approach to the provision of ECEs as a matter of urgency and include this on their work programme.

c)   the identification of those open spaces which are suitably zoned and classified to support the establishment of ECEs.

d)   the identification of those open spaces which are suitably classified and will be appropriately zoned in the Unitary Plan to support the establishment of ECEs.

9.       The resolutions were forwarded to other local boards for their information, and the Manurewa and Papakura Local Boards also expressed an interest in being involved in these discussions.

10.     There are three main ways the council currently supports the provision of ECE services:

a) direct provider – the council manages a number of ECE services located in council owned facilities (e.g. Kauri Kids)

b) leasing council facilities – the main focus has been land but includes buildings to generally community based ECE providers 

c) indirect provider - through programme support, use of non-exclusive bookable spaces in council facilities and grants.

11.     Some southern local boards have raised concerns around the tension between park and open space provision for recreation and the demand for use of these spaces by ECE providers. Much of the land that is appropriately zoned under the District Plan and classified under the Reserves Act in the southern sector is at capacity and applications are being received from ECE providers to use reserve land whose purpose and use is for recreation (informal and active/sports). This is raising concerns around the appropriateness of that land for ECE services and the cumulative loss of public open space.

12.     Although council has specified support for ECE services and various directives have been set through the Auckland Plan and the Southern Initiative, there are no policies or guidelines in place that provide detailed guidance for decision-makers around ECE services. This means that applications are being dealt with on a case by case basis.

13.     The proposed Auckland Unitary Plan permits ECE services up to 100m2 in an existing building in the informal recreation, spot and active recreation and community open space zones.  They are a discretionary activity in the civic zone and non-complying in the conservation zone.  Stand-alone ECE facilities on any open space zone would be a non-complying activity.  Through the current submission hearing process changes to this aspect of the plan may result.

14.     Prior to the workshops with the southern local boards, a discussion paper was prepared which contained ECE data specific to each local board, and some preliminary options on council’s role in supporting ECE services in the future. The options paper is provided in Attachment A.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

15.     A cluster workshop was held with representatives from the Manurewa, Otara - Papatoetoe, Mangere - Otahuhu and Papakura Local Boards on 22 May 2014, where local board members discussed council’s current and potential future role(s) in supporting early learning, with a particular focus on the use of parks and open space land.  Attendees requested additional information and that individual workshops be held with their boards to ensure members were cognisant of the issues and to inform decision making.  

16.     Individual workshops were held with the Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe, Mangere-Otahuhu and Papakura local boards over August and September 2014. Howick and Franklin Local Boards did not request a workshop but were included in the distribution of discussion documents and briefed on the workshop outcomes.

17.     The following themes evolved from these workshops and have been used to inform the recommendations contained in this report :

·    New ECEs on parks and open space are generally not supported unless a direct benefit to the open space and its users can be shown (e.g. where the ECE will activate the space and provide for community use outside operating hours)

·    Consideration will be given to the expansion of existing ECE facilities, where the impacts on the public open space and its users are assessed to be no more than minor

·    Advocate that ECE facilities on parks and open space expand their purpose outside operating hours to accommodate other community opportunities (e.g. adult education)

·    Support, in general, the council being a direct provider as part of the provision of a range of holistic activities in council owned facilities. It was suggested that consideration could be given to existing services being contracted out or sold

·    The establishment of ECE services is essentially a central government responsibility and as such should be funded by the Ministry of Education

·    Advocate for land to be secured in new developments for ECE services to be established, where a need is identified through for example, working with the Housing Project Office and Special Housing Area developers, the Ministry of Education and ECE providers

·    Generally not supportive of selling parks and open space for ECE development.

It is recommended that the board adopts these as guiding principles to assist decision making on applications for ECEs on parks and open space in the future.

Māori Impact Statement

18.     Specific consultation has not been undertaken with Māori. The Auckland Plan and the Southern Initiative objectives and targets around early learning address all children.

19.     The national participation rate in early childhood learning prior to primary school for Māori children has increased to 93.0% for the year ending March 2014, up 1.2 percentage points on the March 2013 rate. However, in some Auckland communities, the Māori participation is significantly lower. The Ministry of Education is implementing the Engaging Priority Families initiative which seeks to provide intensive early learning support to families and whānau of three and four year olds in target communities. The priority for this initiative is Māori, Pasifika and low socio-economic status families.

20.     It is expected that any impacts on Maori will not differ greatly to other parties seeking land for the establishment of early childhood education centres

Implementation

21.     Further work will be undertaken by council staff to gain further clarity on the preliminary options discussed at the local board workshops, subject to the outcome of the Long Term Plan process and resource availability.

22.     Whatever recommendations are adopted, the main stakeholders (e.g. the Ministry of Education) will be advised of the viewpoint for the local board area.

23.     Applications from ECE providers for use of public open space that are currently being processed will be progressed on a case by case basis

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Council's Future Role in Supporting ECE Services - Preliminary Options July 2014

33

     

Signatories

Authors

Erin Clarke - Policy Analyst,South

Sophie Bell - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional and Local Planning Manager

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

July 2014

 

COUNCIL’S ROLE IN SUPPORTING ECE SERVICES

-    PRELIMINARY OPTIONS

 

It is well documented that early childhood education (ECE) services contribute to society by providing educational, social, and cultural benefits. Participation in quality ECE services is an important predictor of future education outcomes. It lays the foundation for children’s ongoing learning, helping equip them with social skills and contributing to a child’s development. Quality early childhood programmes can help narrow achievement gaps between children from disadvantaged families and those from other families. In addition, the availability of ECE services is often essential to working parents.

.

Auckland Council signals its support for ECE services through the Auckland Plan. It seeks to increase the ECE participation rate in Auckland - Tamaki Makaurau, and more particularly within the Southern Initiative area. A target has been identified for all 3 to 4 year olds to participate in, and have access to quality, culturally appropriate ECE services by 2020. Delivery on this aspect of the Auckland Plan is a shared responsibility of central and local government as well as community organisations and the private sector.

 

The council’s main involvement in supporting ECE services to date ranges from being a direct provider, to leasing council facilities (land and buildings) to community based providers, programme support, use of non-exclusive bookable spaces and grants. The council has no statutory responsibilities or role in the actual establishment, management or funding of ECE services. This falls to the applicant and the Ministry of Education.

 

Although the council has specified support for ECE services and various directives have been set, there are no policies or guidelines in place that provide detailed guidance for decision-making around ECE services. There are a variety of responses the council could consider in supporting the provision of ECE services. These are listed below with the benefits and considerations outlined for each. Many of these roles are not stand-alone and can be combined.

 

The options provided are not comprehensive, rather they have been presented to stimulate discussion.

 

Direct Provider

 

Council is currently a direct provider of ten ECE services in various council facilities offering a total of 345 licensed places. The council also contracts out three ECE services. The majority of these centres have transferred to Auckland Council from legacy councils and have been operating for more than twenty years. They have evolved from a drop in crèche for the children of those utilising the facilities to more structured licensed centres.

 

The majority of council led ECE centres have become an inherent function of recreation and leisure centres contributing to the holistic approach of what is offered the community. They contribute to the wider ECE network within the Auckland region. 

 

The Leisure Unit (ECE team) works closely with the MoE and were recently asked to take over two trust run facilities operated out of Council buildings which were facing closure by MoE for failing to comply with regulations. 

       Benefits                                                                Considerations

·      Improves connectivity and community networks through hub model of facilities e.g. leisure facilities or libraries with ECE services

·      Provides a platform to work with the community and other stakeholders on parenting advice, adult learning etc

·      Can assist in increasing participation where rates are low

·      Generates income that is offset against operational costs of the centre and wider Leisure Unit

·      Provides a service to diverse communities

·      Provides community spaces that allow a variety of services and support for communities including better public outcomes

·    Supports better community outcomes with quality consistent services

·   No mandate as to whether this should be Council’s core business

·   No mandate to grow current business

·   Can impact on other providers i.e. interfere with market conditions where council prices are lower

·   Ensuring they comply with Reserves Act provisions

 

Leasing of council owned land and buildings

Auckland Council (including the legacy council’s) most frequent response to ECE service needs has been in the provision of leases of council owned land (largely park land) and buildings to community based organisations. ECE services are considered to be a community facility and are most appropriately located on land that is suitably zoned under the District Plan/PAUP and classified under the Reserves Act 1977 (generally as local purpose [community buildings] reserve). Much of this land is now at capacity. Adopted reserve management plans also play a part in determining whether land is suitable for ECE centres.

 

Benefits                                                                 Considerations

·    Addresses an identified need for land in areas where more ECE services are required to increase participation

·   Supports the Auckland Plan, Southern Initiative, Thriving Communities (Community and Social Development Action Plan), and I am Auckland (Auckland-wide Strategic Action Plan for Children and Young People)

·   Supports community based organisations through low rent and provision of land

·   Can activate the reserve if designed and located appropriately

·    Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, Public Open Space Community zone – provides an opportunity to plan, in conjunction with MoE, the location of these sites, particularly in greenfield developments and Special Housing Areas

·    Existing buildings could be run by Auckland Council and provide a return to rate payers

 

·   The ability to provide facilities for a larger number of children is resulting in increasing requests to extend existing ECE facilities

·   Can result in exclusive use of the park (examples where 2 or more ECE facilities are co-located) to the detriment of other users. Balancing competing demands and expectations can result in user conflicts

·   Can be perceived as alienating land from public use

·   Can have adverse effects on the parks values, amenity, use and enjoyment, and infrastructure

·   Cumulative loss of land within the parks and open space network. There is no current planning around replacement land being acquired or monetary compensation to offset the loss and to mitigate the loss for the community

·   Depending on location and design can render surrounding land un-useable

·   The activity can create conflict with /surrounding neighbours e.g. noise, increased traffic

·   Can impact on future development opportunities of the park

·   Risk – financial/land holding

·   Potential for services to fold with council taking on the liability (there is evidence of this)

·   Can incur landlord costs e.g. maintenance, building WoFs

·   Reserves allocated for community facilities are nearing capacity, resulting in applications being received to use other land e.g. informal recreation spaces.

·   Councils primary responsibilities do not include the provision of land to support educational outcomes under the LGA

·   ECE facilities are growing in size. Recent applications have been for 50 places which equates to a lease footprint range between 1500 and 2000m2 (not including parking)

 

Indirect Provider

 

Council currently supports and runs programmes which incorporate ECE, and enables council facilities to be used on a temporary basis (non-exclusive booking e.g. by play groups). This includes OSCAR programmes (after school care) and holiday programmes (e.g. Wriggle and Rhyme run at libraries). The culture of continuous improvement ensures quality programmes are delivered.

 

     Benefits                                                                  Considerations

·   Supports the Auckland Plan, Southern Imitative, Thriving Communities (Community and Social Development Action Plan), and I am Auckland (Auckland-wide Strategic Action Plan for Children and Young People)

·   Low operating cost (benefits lower socio-economic communities)

·   Contributes to multi-use of facilities

·   Flexible to address changing community needs

·   Complementary to licensed ECE services

·   Offers a range of opportunities

·   Generates income that is offset against operational costs

·   Limited hours

·   Subject to facility availability

·   Set up/take down requirements and storage

·   Is not recognised as a contributor to statistically quantifiable ECE service hours

·   Cost of hiring the facility can be prohibitive

·   Regular bookings to provide certainty for ECE (playgroups) can limit ability to accommodate casual users

 

 


Advocate

 

The current council advocacy role can be strengthened and expanded in the following ways;

·  Continue to advocate addressing barriers to ECE participation e.g. transport, cost, illness and lack of confidence

·  Advocate to central government for funding of land, ECE services establishment on education land and other government owned land in high need areas, and for partnerships with other land providers e.g. Ministry of Health, Ministry of Social Development, Housing NZ

·  Advocate to developers that land be set aside for ECE service providers (private and community based) in new subdivisions e.g. Special Housing Areas, greenfield developments. Provide connections and support.

·  Incorporate positive parenting messages into “Our Auckland” and other council publications

·  Support and educate community groups around the requirements and process for establishing ECE services

·  Encourage large employers to assess the benefits of providing onsite ECE services

·  Support establishment of playgroups within council facilities and mobile play trucks.

 

  Benefits                                                               Considerations

·      Supports the Auckland Plan, Southern Initiative, Thriving Communities (Community and Social Development Action Plan), and I am Auckland (Auckland-wide Strategic Action Plan for Children and Young People)

·      ECE and young families are promoted

·      Low risk to the council

·   To solely advocate would provide limited outcomes to solving current issues

·   May raise funding expectations

 

Partnering/Funding

 

Partnering and funding can be addressed in the following ways;

·  Partner with developers to identify suitable residential land within new developments for ECE

·  Partner with MoE to find land in identified low participation areas and to ensure there is a shared overview/policy and clarity around roles and responsibilities with MoE

·  Incentivise developers and ECE service providers to establish facilities (particularly in new developments/areas of need). Options that could be investigated might include rates relief or providing a monetary contribution towards the land component (e.g. through a contestable fund). It should be noted that a Facility Partnerships Funding Policy is currently underway and ECE services are outside the scope of this work. If included there would be implications around budget.

·  Grants to private providers via economic development programmes could be considered

·  Low cost loans for ECE service providers.

 


Benefits                                                                  Considerations       

·      Supports the Auckland Plan, Southern Imitative, Thriving Communities (Community and Social Development Action Plan), and I am Auckland (Auckland-wide Strategic Action Plan for Children and Young People)

·      Recognises a shift in delivery (in response to the changing climate e.g. reduced land availability, increasing costs, market competition)

·      Reduces council risk

·      Reduces the council’s direct involvement

·      Plays to providers specialist strengths

·      Encourages provision of ECE services where populations of young families are increasing

·      Reduces cost of establishing ECE centres

·      May adversely affect not-for profit ECE service providers

·      Cost/funding implications

·      Any revenue goes to the provider and not to the council

·      Develop a policy and parameters around partnerships and funding to increase transparency

·      Ensure there is a shared overview/policy and clarity around roles and responsibilities with MoE

 

Land purchase/land allocation for community facilities

 

If land is purchased for community facilities there is no requirement that it be held as reserve under the Reserves Act. While providers may wish for reserve land for ECE provision, this is not necessarily in areas of low participation or areas of high need. 

 

Benefits                                                                Considerations

·   Addresses an identified need and supports the Auckland Plan, Southern Initiative, Thriving Communities (Community and Social Development Action Plan), and I am Auckland (Auckland-wide Strategic Action Plan for Children and Young People)

·   Enables the council to facilitate planning for ECE services

·   Ease of processing applications – improved customer experience

·   Provider and public expectations established

·   If allocating land within large parks can help to activate the space and enhance the creation of a community hub

 

 

·   Development contributions do not currently provide for land purchase for community facilities. If the council wished to support the provision of early learning services in SHAs or other areas they would have to be funded from rates. Council can only charge development contributions for infrastructure it provides in response to growth. ECE services are not envisaged by the Local Government Act as something for which contributions can be charged.

·   If allocating existing park land, need to ensure it is suitable, and be aware of the impact on the reserve values and its users, and the cumulative impact on the open space network

·   Budget implications

·   Will be difficult to use this method to address existing deficiencies in existing urban areas

·  Balancing demand from competing community facilities – land could be dominated by ECE service facilities

 


Sell council land

 

There is the potential to assess park land no longer required for that purpose and council owned land held in other portfolios (i.e. not held for parks or open space purposes) as to whether they could be suitable to sell to private ECE service providers or be retained and leased to community based ECE providers. This could also include working with crown agencies to undertake land swaps or collaborations for mixed ownership in communities where ECE provision and participation is low.

 

Benefits                                                                  Considerations

·   Encourages provision of ECE services

·   Financial benefit to the council

·   Lowers total maintenance cost

·   Unsuitable land removed from open space network

·   Reduces ECE pressure on remaining open space

·    Repatriation process is complex

·    Reserves Act process is complex and requires public consultation

·    Affordability for community based groups

·    May not be a great deal of suitable land available for disposal

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - October 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23531

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Papakura Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to AT activities or the transport sector; and AT media releases for the information of the Board and community.

Monthly Overview

  3.       The transport leads hosted discussions with Auckland Transports experts regarding Mill Road. The Papakura Transport Portfolio meeting took place on October 01. Transport matters in the Local Board areas were discussed as well as updates on ongoing issues of concern.

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board receives the report entitled “Auckland Transport Update – October 2014.”

Discussion

Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

4.         The Papakura Local Board is allocated $306,184 per annum from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. These funds can be used annually or rolled together to use the full three years’ of funding.

5.         Taking into account funding already allocated, The Papakura Local Board has $762,308 remaining to be utilized in this electoral term.

6.         The Board has asked Auckland Transport to investigate using the LBCTF allocation to undertake the following projects: 

Project

Description

Status

Projected Cost

Connection of Railway Station and Town Centre:

Looking at ways of cognitively linking the town Centre with the Railway station.

 

 

Projects for further investigation include:

- Making the intersection Railway Street West/ Wood Street more pedestrian friendly

- Great South Road intersection with Opaheke Rd

- Investigating a covered walkway on Railway Street West down Avril Street and Wood Street

 

- Providing a mirror to “make safe” the alley way at the end of the Railway Street West Ramp

- Street furniture/way-finding lighting etc..

These will be investigated once firm costs are received for the “all weather bridge project”.

T.B.C

All weather over bridge

A Structurflex canopy to cover the stairs and walkway that connects east and west across the Papakura Train Station.

The structural assessment has shown the beams are slender and are already working to capacity due to wind loading.  The Local Board approved movingforward to the design phase to investigate other options to attach the canopy to the bridge. 

Very rough costing to date for this project is =  $750,000

Cycle lanes:

Auckland Transport is working on a Rough Order of Cost for the following three areas: Connecting Great South Road to the Papakura Railway Station (down Chapel and up Railways Street West), connecting Grove Road with Bruce Pullman Park and the inland straight of Conifer Grove (along the motorway).

 

This project will be investigated once firm costs are received for the “all weather bridge project”.

 

T.B.C

 

7.         The local board transport portfolio members will continue to work closely with Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager to develop project plans in the priority areas stated above.

Current Papakura Local Board project update:

Project

Description

Status

Projected Cost

Refresh of signage in Papakrua

Refresh of navigation and directional signage, identification of parking buildings and areas of significance/interest (Maraes, galleries)

The Transport leads met with AT early October to tie down scope of the project.  AT will provide the Transport leads a comprehensive report of signs to be installed mid- November.

On July 16 the Board approved a maximum of $110,000 to refresh the signage in the Papakura Local Board area.

 


Board Consultations

8.         Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Papakura Local Board for its feedback.  As the Board’s transport portfolio holders provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only.

 

New Bus Stops and Shelters – Route 365:

 

9.         Auckland Transport consulted with the Papakura Local Board regarding new bus stops and shelters for Route 365 as part of New Public Transport Network for South Auckland.

 

10.       The Transport spokesman raised concerns regarding bus stops on Porchester Road. These concerns are now being investigated by Auckland Transport.

 

Removal of P180 time restriction – Railway Street West:

11.       Auckland Transport Parking consulted on the removal of P180 time restriction from the mobility parking in Railway Street West. These changes are being carried out as a direct result of requests from the Papakrua Local Board.

12.       The Papakura Local Board is supportive of this proposal.

General Information Items:

 

Chip Seal

 

13.       Auckland Transport is about to embark on its annual road resealing programme.  Wherever possible chipseal will be used as it provides a cost effective, and good durable road surface, which is well suited to Auckland’s flexible road pavements. 

14.       Resealing the road surface waterproofs the surface and improves the road skid resistance to ensure that the roads stay in good condition.  Regular maintenance of the roads means that they do not need to be totally reconstructed.  Generally the road surface will last between 10 to 15 years. 

 

15.       In general a typical reseal would follow this timeline:

 

Some weeks prior to reseal;

·    Fix any road failures in the street – Localised road pavement repairs

 

A few days prior to reseal;

·    Letter drop informing residents of the road reseal

 

Day of reseal;

·    Set up traffic management

·    Sweep road for debris

·    Chip seal applied

·    Roll chip into road surface

 

Within a few days of reseal;

·    Sweep excess chip off the road

·    Reinstatement of road marking

 

 

A week or so after reseal;

·    Road surface checked

·    Further sweeping to pick up any excess loose chip

·    Remove traffic management

 

3 – 4 weeks after reseal

·    Additional sweeping if required, to remove any remaining loose chip.

 

16.       The Contractor responds to any Call Centre service requests relating to the chip sealing during the course of the work.

 

Electrification update

 

17.       The last part of the electrification of the Auckland metro rail network is now complete.

18.       All of the urban rail network has now been permanently energised with the final section between Newmarket and Swanson being switched on.

19.       The whole network should now be treated as being live with 25,000 volts at all times.

 

Proposed Signage Bylaw

20.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are seeking feedback on a draft bylaw that will help manage the display of publicly visible signs.

21.       The proposed Signage Bylaw will manage the display, placement and size of signs visible from the road and other public places throughout the Auckland region.  It will provide for a consistent standard of signage across the region and ensure pedestrian safety and visual amenity of local areas is maintained.  The new bylaw will replace the 23 different sets of rules inherited from previous councils that related to signs.

22.       The new bylaw is intended to continue to:

·        provide for the safety of vehicular and pedestrian traffic on roads and public places by limiting obstruction and distraction caused by signage

·        protect the public from harm or damage caused by the poor maintenance or abandonment of signage

·        assist in enhancing, maintaining, and promoting the visual amenity of Auckland’s cultural character, and its built and natural environments

·        assist in enabling the economic benefits to Auckland that are provided through signage

·        assist in protecting roads and other public assets from damage or misuse.

 

23.       The bylaw proposes to cover the following types of signage:

·        portable signs (sandwich boards)

·        free standing signs, posters and banners

·        veranda signage and window signage

·        signs advertising commercial sexual services

 

24.       The proposed bylaw will not apply to specific signs covered by the Unitary Plan such as heritage signs, billboards or signage that is part of a comprehensive development of a site.  Election signs are also covered separately under Auckland Transport’s Election Signage Bylaw 2013.

25.       Submissions on the proposed Signage Bylaw opened on 3 September and close at 4pm on 3 October 2014.

Media Releases

 

Travel Myths debunked in winning campaign

 

26.       Auckland Transport’s ‘Travel Myths’ campaign has taken out a major prize at the TVNZ New Zealand Marketing Awards winning the Public Sector category.

27.       Auckland Transport wanted to promote reliable high frequency bus services in the central corridors of Mount Eden/Sandringham.

28.       Pre-campaign research had shown a young, professional demographic in the area and the campaign was tailored to appeal to this market.

29.       ‘Travel Myths’ used pop-art inspired imagery in the style of Roy Lichtenstein and a dose of self-deprecating humour to debunk some popular misconceptions about public transport.

30.       The campaign appeared on bus backs, at bus shelters, on street posters, online and through direct marketing.  The campaign was developed by Port Group.

31.       Life-size caricatures of Rupert and Janet, who were the faces of the campaign, also featured as part of this year’s Auckland Comedy Festival.

32.       A post-evaluation report found a 20% rise in the perception that Auckland Transport was friendly, 28% thought the campaign was effective and 32% judged it to be innovative.

33.       In the six months following the campaign passenger trips in the central corridor rose by 49,000.

34.       Another Auckland Transport campaign ‘Driver Distraction’ was a finalist in the awards.  This campaign focussed on the dangers of drivers being distracted by others in the vehicle.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Felicity Merrington – Elected Member Liaison

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23297

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this memo is to provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy but the council must expand it to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation/s

The Papakura Local Board provides the following feedback on the draft significance and engagement policy:

 

a)      Endorses the principle-led approach taken to the drafting the policy.

b)      Agrees that the development of consultation and engagement guidelines for Auckland Council will support the policy and the sharing of best practice.

c)      Requests that staff make use of local boards’ extensive community engagement experience to inform the development of the guidelines.

 

Background

7.       As part of the LTP 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the LGA2002 and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       The legislative change requires the council to expand the current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a significant decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the Draft Policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a Special Consultative Procedure. Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, grey power, age concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of Local Boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy Approach to Engagement

18.     The LGA 2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  (For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is “significant”).

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.   The thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.   The decision relates to strategic assets

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by including the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive CCOs as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s Long Term Plan (LTP) and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the LGA 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.


Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, Independent Maori Statutory Board,

Regional Strategy and Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

 

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·    an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·    a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on
22 August; 

·    workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori Impact Statement

36.     Auckland Council recognise that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalising the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

 

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on Engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through the engagement advisors.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

51

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Consultation and Engagement

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication and Engagement Director

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



















Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/23311

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      determine if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

Comments

 

8.       This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

71

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

















Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Integrated Bylaws Review and Implementation Programme (IBRI) Update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23310

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation Programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for Bylaw Review and Implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on Review Stage for Bylaw Topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously called liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health and hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

 

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Maori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline 2014/2015

95

     

Signatories

Authors

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional and Local Planning Manager

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local Board Feedback on the Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22669

 

  

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      Note that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

Comments

Local Board Feedback

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·    Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·    Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·    Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·    Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·    Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·    More public art outside the city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·    Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·    Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public Feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·    The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·    Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·    Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·    Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·    A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP Through a Two-stage Process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·    The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·    The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP Strategic Section: Proposed Goals and Action Areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

Next Steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori Impact Statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LB Feedback

101

bView

Consultation Summary

105

cView

Draft Arts and Culture Action Plan

111

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebecca Kruse - Strategy Analyst

Maree Mills - Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 

Local Board Feedback Summary

Engagement undertaken in 2013-14

Theme/Issue

Placemaking

·    Recognises importance of arts and culture in place making

·    Would like more community involvement and input

·    Nurturing/building a distinct area identity through arts and culture

·    Incentivise developers to incorporate arts and culture into new developments

·    Involve creative people in the planning process - designers, architects working with planners

·    Heritage and place recognised e.g. Writer’s walk, sculpture trail

·    Incorporation of Maori and European history in the environment

·    Public art/cultural design integrated in capital project design/urban design

·    Local artists to be involved with chance to win commissions for council buildings

Funding

·    More clarity on funding streams

·    Governing Body financial commitment

·    Who is going to fund what

·    Business sponsorship for arts and culture events

·    Council investment in art should equate to investment in sport

·    Funding issues are a key for supporting local theatres/galleries/museums and groups. Uneven investment in facilities throughout the region

Council role in ACSAP

·    More clarity on council’s role – arts and culture community want to understand what council can deliver and support

·    Plan focus should be on how the council can support the organisations

·    Foster partnerships

·    Advocacy

·    Local boards role in guardianship

·    Role of CCOs in arts and culture

Capacity Building

·    Streamline council processes – ‘go to person’

·    Provide better climate for building creative relationships

·    More capacity needed to assist local boards to go beyond business as usual and develop what assets they already have – guidance/advice to help see the huge potential for arts and culture in our community and translate into our local board plans.

·    The key question for this Plan should be “How do we create an organisation (council) that fosters/allows creativity to flourish?”

Education and pathway into employment

·    Need to highlight the value of (creative) education

·    Profile creative students and activities in the community (more recitals)

·    Growing skills, creativity, entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship

·    Local boards have a part to play

Events

·    Clarity of process around growing local events to regional

·    Events portal to promote all events

·    A stocktake of what is currently happening to ensure that one event is not ‘cannibalising’ the audience of other events – establish the correct balance between city centre and local

·    Importance of local cultural events

·    Promotion of events – linking local and regional events/festivals into each other, good local promotion of events

Diversity

·    Highlight Asian community

·    Need to highlight more than ethnic diversity

·    Inclusiveness of all communities

Facilities

·    Organisations to work together not in competition

·    Funded to meet  diverse need – how to achieve equity, consistency and sustainability

·    CFNP as a tool to enable review of community arts and culture facilities

·    Grow maker spaces

·    Don’t just focus on city centre

·    Development of arts and culture precincts

·    Local art facilities – many saw a lack in their area

·    Need for smaller theatre spaces and performance venues in smaller centres. 

Maori

·    Development of Maori cultural centre for the arts – great development initiative for our youth

·    Marae as a youth hub providing arts opportunities for youth

Barriers

·    Coast of transportation and parking

·    Entry and ticket prices

·    Distance to regional facilities

·    Buses(public transport) stop operating after the event

·    Compliance costs, rules and regulations

Other

·    More local public art outside city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture out to rural areas – increase exposure

·    More art displays in the parks – digital, physical, more art-based activities to encourage people into regional parks

·    Include acknowledgement of economic significance

·    Good use of case studies in summary document

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





































































Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Long Term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/23312

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      Delegate authority to the Papakura Local Board Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson to provide feedback at such meetings as appropriate including the local board’s discussion with the Budget Committee.

Comments

Background

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the LTP 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The mayoral proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the mayoral proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the LTP 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October to discuss responses to the mayoral proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the Governing Body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.


 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Financial Planning Manager Local Boards

Authorisers

Mathew Walker – Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Karen Lyons – Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Adoption of the Papakura Local Board Plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22630

 

  

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Papakura Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

3.       The Papakura  draft Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014.  The Papakura Local Board considered the submissions from the SCP at its deliberations meeting in September.

4.       The Papakura Local Board Plan is attached to this agenda.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      adopts the Papakura Local Board Plan

b)      delegates to the Chair to approve any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

Comments

 

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

6.       Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies

·    works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

7.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

8.       The local board is required to use the SCP to consult on the draft local board plan. The SCP was held from 7 July to 6 August 2014. There were 101 of submissions on the draft local board plan.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The local board’s views have driven the development of the plan attached to this report.

Māori impact statement

10.     The Papakura Local Board has given consideration to Māori outcomes throughout the development of the Papakura Local Board Plan; consequently the implementation of the Plan has the potential for positive outcomes for Māori. 

11.     Local mana whenua were invited to a southern sub regional Hui on 8 March 2014 where their views were sought on the issues to be addressed in southern local board’s plans, including Papakura. The processes and protocols for ongoing engagement were also discussed and follow up contact made by the local board chairs.

12.     The Papakura Local Board also engaged with Māori rate payers and residents through engagement activities that were accessible to the general public as well as targeted stakeholder events both in the early stages of the Plan’s development and throughout the consultation period. A focused meeting with the staff at Papakura Marae enabled the dissemination of awareness and literature through the networks coordinated there, which particularly involve local mataawaka Māori.

13.     The outcomes, objectives and initiatives included in the plan will support the delivery of the Auckland Plan Transformational shift 6 – “significantly lift Maori social and economic wellbeing”.  The draft Papakura Local Board Plan includes initiatives of particular relevance to mana whenua and mataawaka.  These include support for Māori businesses; training and skills programmes for Māori youth; protection and enhancement of the Manukau Harbour; improvement of water quality in catchment streams; and the identification and protection of wahi tapu in and around Papakura.

Implementation

14.     The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities. The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Papakura Local Board Plan 2014

185

     

Signatories

Authors

Karen Gadomski - Senior Local Board Advisor Papakura

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Plan

Contents

 

Message from the chair

Mihi

Our vision..

Papakura Local Board area.

About local boards.

Working with Māori

About local board plans.

Local boards in the south – working together

How we got your feedback.

Outcome: A vibrant metropolitan centre.

Outcome: A skilled workforce for local jobs.

Outcome: A sports and recreation hub.

Outcome: Well-connected and easy to move around.

Outcome: treasured for its environment and heritage.

Outcome: Strong, safe and healthy communities.

Indicative budget and funding sources.

Indicative budget tables.

Your Papakura Local Board members.


Message from the chair

It is my pleasure to introduce the Papakura Local Board Plan for the next three years and beyond. We put this plan together with your help, so thank you to all of you who gave us ideas and comments or made formal submissions on the draft. You strongly supported our prioritisation of town centre revitalisation and were keen to see more work on community hubs and youth facilities. You were also concerned about health and social issues, like smoking, gambling and alcohol related harm.

 

Through this plan, we will help to meet the needs of Papakura and set the scene for council action to create a better future for the area. Most of the initiatives in the plan are subject to funding from the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025, which will be finalised in June 2015. The board will use this local board plan to advocate strongly for funding in the LTP, for the next three years and beyond.  If council funding is tight in the short term, we will look for agencies and groups to advance some initiatives in partnership with us.

 

Papakura is very proud of its heritage. We have a rich cultural history from early Māori settlement to the present and we want to keep this alive. We will work towards a greater understanding of Māori cultural and spiritual values in order to build a strong relationship with mana whenua. Through this relationship, we will celebrate our links with the land and the Manukau Harbour.

 

The Auckland Plan has thrown out a challenge to us – become a strong metropolitan centre serving major population growth and urban expansion in the south. We will take up that challenge by drawing on the strength, diversity, knowledge and experience of our communities, to revitalise and rejuvenate our area. Our people need to be supported by good and affordable transport connections and quality services and infrastructure, such as parks, libraries, recreation and sporting facilities. We will work to improve opportunities to gain training, jobs and careers in Papakura for our youth, our future leaders. We will care for and respect our elderly, the teachers of our strong community values.

 

Bill McEntee

Chair, Papakura Local Board

 


Mihi

Tēnā kia hoea e au taku waka mā ngā tai mihi o ata

e uru ake ai au mā te awa o Tāmaki

ki te ūnga o Tainui waka i Ōtāhuhu.

I reira ka toia aku mihi ki te uru ki te Pūkaki-Tapu-a-Poutūkeka,

i reira ko te Pā i Māngere.

E hoe aku mihi mā te Mānukanuka a Hoturoa

ki te kūrae o te Kūiti o Āwhitu. 

I kona ka rere taku haere mā te ākau ki te puaha o Waikato,

te awa tukukiri o ngā tūpuna, Waikato Taniwharau, he piko he taniwha.

Ka hīkoi anō aku mihi mā te taha whakararo

mā Maioro ki Waiuku ki Mātukureira

kei kona ko ngā Pā o Tahuna me Reretewhioi.

Ka aro whakarunga au kia tau atu ki Pukekohe.

Ka tahuri te haere a taku reo ki te ao o te tonga e whāriki atu rā mā runga i ngā hiwi,

kia taka atu au ki Te Paina, ki te Pou o Mangatāwhiri.

Mātika tonu aku mihi ki a koe Kaiaua

te whākana atu rā ō whatu mā Tīkapa Moana ki te maunga tapu o Moehau.

Ka kauhoetia e aku kōrero te moana ki Maraetai

kia hoki ake au ki uta ki Ōhuiarangi, heteri mō Pakuranga.

I reira ka hoki whakaroto ake anō au i te awa o Tāmaki

ma te taha whakarunga ki te Puke o Taramainuku, kei kona ko Ōtara.

Katahi au ka toro atu ki te Manurewa a Tamapohore,

kia whakatau aku mihi mutunga ki runga o Pukekiwiriki

kei raro ko Papakura ki kona au ka whakatau.

 

Let this vessel that carries my greetings

travel by way of the Tāmaki River

to the landing place of Tainui canoe at Ōtāhuhu.

There, let my salutations be borne across the isthmus to the Pūkaki lagoon

and the community of Māngere.

Paddling the Manukau Harbour

we follow the Āwhitu Peninsula to the headland.

From there we fly down coast to the Waikato river mouth,

sacred waters of our forebears.

Coming ashore on the Northern side

at Maioro we head inland to Waiuku and Mātukureira,

there too is the Pā at Tāhuna and Reretewhioi.

Heading southward I come to Pukekohe.

My words turn to follow the ancient ridgelines along the Southern boundary,

dropping down into Mercer and Te Pou o Mangatāwhiri.

My greetings reach you at Kaiaua

who gaze across Tīkapa Moana to the sacred mountain, Moehau.

Taking to the sea, my remarks travel to Maraetai

and then to Ōhuiarangi, sentinel to Pakuranga.

There we follow again the Tāmaki River

to Te Puke o Taramainuku, Ōtara resides there.

From here I reach for Manurewa

until my greetings come to rest on Pukekiwiriki

below lies Papakura and there I rest.


Our vision

Creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level

Pride in Papakura – our goal is to develop a thriving, safe and well-connected vibrant community.

 

We are proud of Papakura and we see pride in the faces of its people. Papakura will become a vibrant metropolitan centre, boosted by a growing population and new neighbourhoods. We will create an ‘avenue of culture’ in the heart of Papakura, where good design, local artwork and great places to meet will make it somewhere people want to live or visit. Takanini and Drury will also provide strong local centres for our growing communities, each playing complementary roles to Papakura metropolitan centre and, further afield, to Manurewa town centre,.

 

Our town is growing fast and more homes and businesses mean lots of construction. Papakura will have a booming economy and a skilled workforce, supported by great schools and access to a wide range of training opportunities. We offer the excellence of Bruce Pulman Park, Massey Park and many other sports facilities, which means we can host national and international tournaments. Papakura will be known as a sporting hub and as the gateway to the Hunua ranges for recreation and tourism.

 

Papakura’s businesses will be drawn to its good road and rail access and local people will enjoy the great cycling and walking network throughout the town and along the coastline. The Manukau Harbour will be internationally recognised for its Māori heritage, environmental quality and natural beauty. Papakura will be loved for its setting on Pāhurehure Inlet and the water will again be clean enough for people to swim in safely and gather the fruits of the sea without fear of harm or pollution.

 

We will champion green businesses and the eco-friendly design of new development. We will work to safeguard our natural resources and ensure we pass on a better environment to our children and grandchildren.

 

There will be many events celebrating Papakura’s heritage and its multi-cultural communities. Good facilities will be at the heart of our local communities. Great parks and play spaces will mean our people are active and healthy. Our young people will have a voice, be valued and contribute to shaping the future of our area.

Our outcomes

The Papakura Local Board Plan works towards creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level. Creating the world’s most liveable city is the vision of the Auckland Plan. Our local board plan takes into account the outcomes in the 30-year Auckland Plan to help deliver this vision.

 

Papakura Local Board Plan

 

The Auckland Plan

A vibrant metropolitan centre

It’s great that Papakura meets our needs for shopping, leisure, arts and culture and we don’t need to travel elsewhere for these things.

A skilled workforce for local jobs

We have lots of local job opportunities and it’s easy for us to get training and learn new skills.

A sports and recreation hub

We have excellent sports facilities that we all use and enjoy. We are proud that Papakura is the place of choice for high-class sporting events.

Well-connected and easy to move around

We like to live in Papakura because it is so well-connected by road, rail and bus and has lots of safe cycling and walking links.

Treasured for its environment and heritage

We value and protect the land of our ancestors and the shores of Pāhurehure. We love our well designed streets and buildings.

Strong, safe and healthy communities

We have good places for communities to meet and great places to play in. Our young people get a great start in life and we value the wisdom and experience of our older people.

Title: Arrow pointing leftTitle: Arrow pointing right

Vision

To become the world’s most liveable city

 

Outcomes

·    a fair, safe and healthy Auckland

·    a green Auckland

·    an Auckland of prosperity and opportunity

·    a well-connected and accessible Auckland

·    a beautiful Auckland, loved by its people

·    a culturally rich and creative Auckland

·    a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world.

 

Contents

Papakura Local Board area



The Papakura area takes in the inlets and foreshores of the Manukau Harbour, fertile plains, and rolling hills which lead out into the nearby Hunua ranges. Around the Takanini area was once a huge wetland and peat bog and there are still many ancient Kauri buried there. Red Hill was a key viewpoint for local Māori and Pukekiwiriki Paa gave them a wide overview of the rohe. A long military history helped to shape the modern town but today only SAS forces are based locally.


 

There has been steady population growth, with 45,633 people living here in 2013, which is an increase of nearly 10 per cent since 2006. At the 2013 census, over a quarter of Papakura’s residents were Māori. The Asian ethnic population is around 13 per cent and the Pacific population around 14 per cent. Although the number of people aged 65 years and over has risen in the last seven years, nearly a quarter of Papakura’s population are now children aged 14 years and under.


 

The Papakura Local Board area extends from Drury in the south to Alfriston in the north, and includes Takanini, Hingaia, Red Hill, Pahurehure and the current Papakura town centre.

 


About local boards

Auckland Council has a unique model of local government in New Zealand, comprising the governing body (made up of the mayor and 20 ward councillors) and 21 local boards. The governing body focuses on the big picture and on Auckland-wide issues and decisions.

 

Local boards provide local leadership and make decisions on local issues, activities and facilities, such as local parks, libraries and community halls. Local boards can also fund other organisations through community grants and other funding arrangements, for activities such as events and community programmes.

 

Local boards engage with and represent their communities, provide important local input into Auckland-wide strategies and plans and work with others to build strong communities. Many council activities that are important to local communities are the responsibility of the governing body and council-controlled organisations (including Auckland Transport). Local boards act as champions and advocates for their communities when others have the decision-making role.

 

Local boards also play an important role in delivering at the local level on Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori.

Working with Māori

Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. As part of this commitment Papakura Local Board will continue to strengthen and formalise its relationship with mana whenua. We will engage with the 11 local iwi that are mana whenua, rangatira ki te rangatira or chief to chief, to share information and work together.

 

We will have hui each year, to take stock of our working relationships, discuss any improvements that could be made and ensure that Māori are involved in the development of local policy and projects.

 

We work with Papakura Marae in support of local programmes which benefit mataawaka in our community. Our local board plan objectives support kaitiakitanga, the guardianship of our environment and special places, through cooperation between the local board and mana whenua. Throughout the plan, we focus on the future of rangatahi or young people, and ensuring respect for our kaumātua or elders.

About local board plans

This plan is about the Papakura Local Board area. It expresses what we have heard from you.

 

The plan sets the framework that will guide our decision-making and actions for the next three years. It informs the board’s decisions on local activities, and enables us to represent your interests and preferences on regional strategies and plans. It also provides the flexibility to cope with changes that will happen during the next three years. During this time we will continue to work closely with all sectors of our community to understand your ongoing needs, issues and priorities.

 

About local board funding

The local boards funding policy in the long-term plan (LTP) sets out how local boards are funded.

 

Some local board funding relates to local assets and facilities. The governing body makes the initial investment decisions and then local boards oversee the budgets and operations. Local boards are also allocated funding to deliver local programmes and initiatives. The actual budget for each year is agreed with the governing body as part of discussion on the annual local board agreement.

 

This local board plan contains indicative budget tables for the next three years. This budget is based on the LTP 2012-2022, with adjustments to reflect annual plans and other budget changes since then.

 

The actual budgets for the next three years will be different. This is because they will reflect recent amendments to the local boards funding policy, and because the council is preparing the draft LTP 2015-2025. This preparation includes a review of funding for all projects, which may affect some local board plan projects that are currently funded.

Our draft local board plan showed the funding status of key initiatives to deliver each plan outcome. This funding status is not included in this final local board plan, because it could change as the LTP 2015-2025 is developed.

Local boards in the south – working together

We share many issues with our neighbours in Manurewa and Franklin, including how to plan for more people coming to the area for new housing and jobs. The centres along the Great South Road between Manurewa and Papakura/Drury are a priority area for the council organisation as a whole and we expect concerted resources to be focused along this corridor.

 

Across the south, we can build on our position at the gateway to New Zealand, with Auckland airport giving us opportunities to bring in visitors and investment. Our young population compared to the country as a whole puts us in a great position for growth and development.

How we got your feedback

Engaging with our communities has been an important part of developing this plan. You have told us your views on many issues over the past three years as part of the development of a wide range of council plans.

 

We also undertook further specific engagement in developing this plan. We listened to your views at meetings and gathered information informally though other means. Formal consultation then followed, where you made written submissions. We held hearings, considered all submissions fully and made changes to our plan based on your feedback.

 

Our engagement activities

In February 2014, drop-in events at Papakura Library, Smiths Avenue Reserve and Takanini Countdown gave people an opportunity to talk to local board members and write some ideas up on post-it notes. We asked ‘what do you think would make our neighbourhoods even better places to live, work and play?’ We looked at the themes coming from your feedback and held a workshop to explore your ideas in more detail and start to prioritise areas for action. In July-August 2014, we consulted you on the draft plan and we received 101 formal submissions.  Key changes made to the plan as a result of your submissions are:

·    Greater emphasis on health related issues, such as smoke free places, gambling, alcohol and drugs

·    Greater emphasis on helping communities to lead their own projects

 

What we heard from you:

 

The centre of Papakura needs to be revitalised. You want more boutique shops, places to eat out, attractive and less car dominated streets with meeting places and sculptures, more cultural and community events. But you also want safer streets and less $2 shops and liquor stores.

 

You are generally happy with the local sports facilities but you want more for younger children to do, such as improved playgrounds and skate parks. You want more cycle and footpath links and better access to the waterfront and coastal esplanades; improvements to water quality in the Manukau Harbour; and the removal of mangroves and pacific oysters, so that beaches could be re-created.

 

In your own local areas, you want better bus connections, multi-use community buildings and community gardens. Community and youth groups want our support so that they can lead on their own projects or start new enterprises.

 

You want better job and education prospects for young people and for the community to respect the contribution of elderly people. You are concerned about health issues in the local communities and want more focus on smoke free places, and on reducing harm from gambling, alcohol and drugs.

 

What else have we considered

We have looked at the Auckland Plan, the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and a range of other council strategies and policies, as well as documents from other organisations. These all help to provide the setting for place-shaping and exploring new opportunities in Papakura.

 

There are some key documents and strategies relevant to Papakura’s communities; this plan is our local response to these bigger strategies:

·    I Am Auckland – Children and Young People’s Strategic Action Plan

·    Positive Ageing – a Government strategy for improving the well-being of older people

·    The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau – Independent Māori Statutory Board

·    Thriving Communities – a three-year action plan for community and social development

·    Aspirations for the World’s Most Liveable, Accessible and Inclusive City – The Auckland Disability Strategic Advisory Group.

 

Auckland Plan: The Southern Initiative

Papakura is part of the area covered by the Southern Initiative, which is about improving the quality of life and well-being of local communities in south Auckland. Our plan will help to achieve this through its focus on local training and jobs, and on building strong, safe and healthy communities.

 


Outcome: A vibrant metropolitan centre

It’s great that Papakura meets our needs for shopping, leisure, arts and culture and we don’t need to travel elsewhere for these things.

 

Papakura is called a ‘metropolitan centre’ in the Auckland Plan, which means that it is planned to develop as a larger and more important centre, to help support the major population and housing growth targeted for south Auckland. This will not be an overnight change and the Auckland Plan recognises that regeneration will be a priority if Papakura is to play its part in the region’s development over the next 30 years. Special land use zoning and rules are being applied through the Unitary Plan but that alone will not bring about the level of change necessary to raise Papakura’s profile and its fortunes.

 

Looking at your comments and suggestions, it’s clear you want a safer street environment and more town centre activities for children and young people. This means creating great places to meet, more things to do and good transport into the centre. Older people and people with disabilities want to be able to move around easily, on well-maintained and safe footways. This means they need to be able to get to the centre easily to shop, eat out, and meet with family.

 

We are committed to working with local businesses and communities to bring about change for the better. This will involve efforts across the council and its organisations, such as Auckland Transport, to find and agree solutions that will revitalise the town centre. We cannot directly provide new shopping and leisure developments, but we can make sure the right planning and promotion is done so that businesses and investors are attracted to it.

 

An important part of this will be work on a planning framework that does some joined-up thinking for the Great South Road and its centres, which include Takanini and Drury (as well as Manurewa and Te Mahia). A town centre task force will be set up to start looking at the opportunities from a business and private investment perspective.

 

The planning framework will help set the scene for designing the town as a ‘metropolitan centre’ of the future. The design and master planning work will look at how people move around, the creation of new public spaces for events and markets, and how some older or vacant sites could be redeveloped. This will lay the foundation stones for re-branding Papakura as the place to be for home, work or play: a place to be proud of. To help shift people’s views of the town centre and showcase local talent, we will support artists to create an ‘avenue of culture’ along the main street. We want Papakura’s strong Māori culture and values to shine through in new street art and meeting places. We also want Māori businesses to prosper in the centre of Papakura and to provide role models and jobs for local rangatahi.

 

What you told us

·    “Papakura metropolitan centre is...a centre where people mix and mingle, hang out, socialise and shop...take cars out by flipping streets to pedestrian malls or to shared spaces.” (Takanini resident)

·    “Promote development as an outlet store/factory store destination” (Papakura resident)

·    “A prosperous town centre is the first priority – all else follows” (Papakura resident)

 


 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

A metropolitan centre planned for people rather than cars

Metropolitan centre master plan

Funding

Local leadership Partnering

Auckland Transport

BID

Local businesses

$50,000

 

Safety patrols and street ambassadors

Funding

NZ Police

Local safety Trusts and patrols

BID

$150,000 annually

 

Joined-up thinking for the Great South Road and its centres

Great South Road spatial development framework

Local leadership

Champion

Partnering

Auckland Transport

Local businesses

 

Creation of an ‘avenue of culture’ along the main street

Funding of local talent to create street art

Funding

Local leadership

Creative New Zealand

BID

Mana whenua

$35,000 annually

Attract new businesses and leisure providers to the centre of Papakura

Town centre task force and promotion campaign

Funding

Champion

Partnering

BID – targeted rate

Local businesses

$50,000

 


Outcome: A skilled workforce for local jobs

We have lots of local job opportunities and it’s easy for us to get training and learn new skills.

 

Papakura’s economy grew quickly over the past 10 years and there is a wide variety of local businesses. Our town has strengths in food and drink manufacturing and in construction and engineering. We have the New Zealand Bloodstock Centre, which is important for export businesses that bring money into New Zealand.

 

The rail station is the third busiest on the Auckland network and the first stop for the Northern Explorer scenic rail service. Located on the Manukau Harbour and forming the gateway to the Hunua ranges, we are well-placed to grow the local tourism industry.

 

Papakura’s economy is one of the most diverse in Auckland, with a strong manufacturing base and some large, well-known businesses. Qualification levels and household income are lower than the Auckland average at the moment and a quarter of young people between 15 and 24 do not have jobs. Looking to the future, the untapped potential of our young people is a key strength for Papakura and for growing our local businesses.

 

In partnership with schools and local training providers, we will ensure young people are ready for work and apprenticeships. Our youth connections programme will continue to help them make links with employers. We will give scholarships for young people to help them get into further education and training, or grants to help with their travel costs if necessary.

 

Māori youth sometimes need extra support for skills development and finding local employment. We will support the Māori Enterprise Association to mentor them, showcase local talent and encourage innovation. We will look at how we can best assist local Māori to set up new businesses, benefit from treaty settlements and promote their cultural identity through tourism.

 

We have already made a start by agreeing on a local economic development action plan and a Māori economic development programme. To build on this, we will fund the development of an investor pack and investor champion service to help new businesses move into the area and focus more on ‘green’ business ideas. We will set up a commercial property landlord forum, a business forum and a network to share ideas and knowledge. We will work with universities and with industry training providers to bring further education and trades related courses to Papakura. We will work with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) to promote Papakura to tourists.

 

We have local groups who wish to set up social or community enterprises in the Papakura area. These are not for profit businesses that re-invest income back into the community and many have wider social objectives, such as providing employment for people with otherwise limited opportunities. Social enterprise models help to reduce grant dependency and enable independent planning and decision making for the businesses involved.

 

To bring new business ideas to Papakura and support the growth of community and social enterprises, we will help to establish  ‘innovation stations’ and community learning hubs, where people can train and share their experience and knowledge.

 

What you told us

·    “We would like to see some commitment to support for community or social enterprise ...by creating an economic base from which to do that and to provide employment for local people who might otherwise struggle to find work.” (Community group)

·    “Training for people of all ages, but especially teens, is so important and a trades/apprenticeship focus should give families a real boost” (Papakura resident)

·    [We should] “promote Papakura region as a good tourist centre to other Aucklanders, Kiwis and overseas tourists.” (Papakura resident)

 


 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

Seek new business opportunities

Business forum and commercial property landlord forum

Partnering

Funding

Local businesses

Māori Enterprise Association (MEA)

$30,000

 

Attract new businesses and ‘green’ businesses

Investor pack/ investor champion service

Funding

Champion Partnering

ATEED

Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE)

MEA

Sustainable Business Network

$10,000

 

Leverage ultra-fast broadband

Funding

Champion

ATEED

$25,000

Tourism promotion and branding

 

Funding

Partnering

ATEED

$50,000

 

Provide clear links from school to training to employment

Youth connections

Funding

Partnering

Businesses Schools

MIT/AUT

 

$25,000 annually

 

Scholarships or travel grants

Funding

Champion

MIT/AUT

Industry trainers

$25,000 annually

Support innovation and  social enterprise

Innovation station

Funding

MBIE

COMET Auckland

$50,000

 

Community learning hubs

Funding

Champion

Tertiary Education Commission (TEC)

COMET Auckland

Schools

$30,000

 

 


Outcome: A sports and recreation hub

We have excellent sports facilities that we all use and enjoy. We are proud that Papakura is the place of choice for high-class sporting events.

 

We love our local sports teams and we have great facilities that we want to keep improving. Investment in our sports fields, buildings and lighting over the past few years has given opportunities for local sports to prosper. Key facilities such as Massey Park Stadium and Pool, McLennan Park and the world-class facilities developing at Bruce Pulman Park bring competitors and teams from well outside Papakura. Sport keeps us fit, brings in visitors and has spin off benefits for local businesses.

 

Young people are most likely to be involved in organised team sports. They need plenty of accessible facilities for fitness and training. Even if they don’t play a formal sport, young people like to keep active by walking and cycling and they like to watch sports too. Older people and people with disabilities also want places where they can keep active, which might mean providing special exercise equipment in safe and easy to reach areas of parks. Older people are also more likely to coach sports teams and their experience makes them good mentors for our up and coming young players.

 

According to Auckland’s Māori Plan, many rangatahi saw sport as a means to express their Māori identity. Providing mentors, training and facilities that are easy to get to will give more opportunities for Māori to participate.

 

Massey Park is our town centre stadium, easy to get to by train, bus, walking and cycling and near to the town centre eating places and shops. McLennan Park is set to become a venue for the FIFA under 20 World Cup in 2015. Bruce Pulman Park Trust continues to attract private and New Zealand Lottery Grants Board money into Takanini to fund high-class sports facilities. Work has started on the Opaheke fields, which will give space for a range of sports and is in an area of future housing growth.

 

We already have plenty of good places for sports and recreation. We will keep improving their quality and promote them as places to host major competitions. Alongside this, we will find out whether there are other types of sport where we could do more, such as provide artificial pitches. Not all of us want to play formal sports though, so we also need to make sure our facilities can be used for other activities, such as walking, cycling and children’s play.

 

Sport is part of our identity; it can be a point of difference for the town and something to celebrate. In partnership with clubs and other organisations, we plan to set up new events that will bring people to Papakura. We will build on the already successful Pāhurehure Inlet Protection Society (PIPS) Canoe Day by adding other water based activities, because we have a great setting at Pāhurehure Inlet.

 

We will work in partnership with other organisations to bring money and sponsorship to events and competitions and to bring fun runs, marathons and cycling events right into the metropolitan centre. We’ll also look to partner with local schools to open up their activity centres to wider public use.

 

What you told us

·    “Look to protect the quality asset that we have by allocating appropriate funds so that McLennan park is a facility that will continue to attract the highest quality of sporting events” (Papakura City Football Club)

·    “Don’t allow maintenance to become the easy target for cuts...a gradual decline in the quality of the asset takes us back to frequent field closures and sad faced children...” (Auckland Football Federation)

·    “We urge the local board to consider...how it might create more pathways into active lifestyles that are affordable for families and easy to access.” (Community group)

 

 


 

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

Maintain and improve sports and recreation facilities

Continued development of Opaheke fields

Funding

Sports clubs

$3,000,000

 

Study the gaps in provision for different types of sports

Funding

Partnering

Sport New Zealand

Counties Manukau Sport

$50,000

 

Quality improvements to pitches and facilities

Funding

 

$$400,000 annually

 

Provide adaptable facilities that encourage active lifestyles for all

Manage our sports grounds for wider community use and fitness

Funding

Counties Manukau District Health Board

$1,100,000 annually

 

Promote Papakura as a destination for sporting competitions

Study the economic benefits of hosting major sports events

Funding

Partnering

ATEED

$50,000

 


Outcome: Well-connected and easy to move around

We like to live in Papakura because it is so well-connected by road, rail and bus and has lots of safe cycling and walking links.

 

Papakura has good road connections to the rest of Auckland and the upper North Island, which is important for attracting new businesses to the area. However, more improvements are needed to the busy road system because of congestion and traffic delays. Roads and public transport are provided and funded by either the council, through Auckland Transport; or central government, through New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and Kiwi Rail.

 

Recent junction improvements on SH1 at Papakura and the early 2015 electrification of the rail service will improve the speed of these connections. We successfully campaigned for improvements at the Takanini interchange and widening of SH1 up to Manurewa, which will help people travelling by car. The bus services in south Auckland will also be changed and improved in 2015.

 

It is slow going for cars along Great South Road and not very safe or attractive for walking and cycling. At Takanini the new housing, the development of Bruce Pulman Park and Southgate shopping centre is based on access by car, even though the rail line runs through the area. To improve safety and ease of movement, we will push Auckland Transport to build bridges over rail crossings on Manuroa Road and Walters Road. This will strengthen connections between Takanini junction and housing growth areas. We will also push for a new rail station near Southgate (at Glenora/Walters Road) and for better joined-up bus services so people can move west to east. In the longer term, there will also need to be a station at Drury because of the housing and jobs growth proposed in the Unitary Plan.

 

Children and young people need to be able to get around for school, sports, shops and leisure. Improved bus services, easy to understand information and safe walking and cycling routes will give young people the transport choice and independence they need. It’s also important for older people, mothers with pushchairs, and people with disabilities to be able to move along footways safely and easily. Wider and well maintained ‘inclusive’ footways, good sign posting, low-floor buses and good service information will all help. All the information we have tells us that Māori have lower car ownership than other households. This means that public transport is important to them for access to schools and jobs, and to help whānau from out of town to visit.

At the moment, there is no joined-up plan for a cycling and walking network in the town, or across the south of Auckland. We will work with others to put together a greenways plan for the south and, while that is being done, we will continue to fund new links through parks and along coastal esplanades. We will work with Auckland Transport to improve space for cyclists within the town so that cycling is a safer choice for people travelling to school and work. As part of the master plan for the ‘metropolitan centre’ we will look to make better walking connections between the town centre and the rail/bus hub at the station. We will also push for mobility scooter charging points in the town centre, low-floor buses and better travel information.

 

What you told us

 

·    “Glenora Station and having Walters Road and Taka Street grade separated are my biggest wishes to happen” (Takanini resident)

·    “We support continued roll out of cycle lanes...such as along Great South Road...however we need to focus on providing separated lanes that are much safer” (Generation Zero)

·    “I am not anti-car but we do need to remove the dominance of the car out of aspects of our local environment” (Takanini resident)

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

A safe cycling and walking network across the south

Greenways Plan for the south

Funding

Champion

Auckland Transport

Greenways Project

Developers

$50,000

 

Links in cycling and walking network and coastal routes

Funding

Champion

Auckland Transport

To be scoped

Clear links between town centre and rail station

Funding

Champion

Auckland Transport

To be scoped

Inclusive footways to meet the needs of people with disabilities, the elderly and mothers with pushchairs

Champion

Auckland Transport

No cost to local board

Better and safer connections by road and rail

Advocate for:

·    a new rail station at Southgate (and at Drury in the long term)

·    bridges over rail crossings in Takanini, prioritising Walters Road and Manuroa Road

·    belter and more joined up bus services, travel information and low floor buses

Champion

Auckland Transport

No cost to local board

 


 

Outcome: Treasured for its environment and heritage

We value and protect the land of our ancestors and the shores of Pāhurehure. We love our well designed streets and buildings.

 

Papakura is in a great location on the Manukau Harbour and over time many people have chosen to make it their home. Originally, local people had access to beaches, clean water for gathering food, and land that could be farmed to feed the local population. The cultural and spiritual values of local Māori are bound up with the land and the water that has given them life. They want clean water, access for swimming and waka launch points, and to be able to gather food from the sea (kai moana). Kaitiakitanga, or guardianship of the environment, is a responsibility we all share.

 

As the town has developed, we have gained some fine commercial buildings, which give the town centre its character. The town will continue to grow and change but it is important that we protect the cultural and natural heritage of Papakura, for future generations and out of respect for our ancestors.

 

The young people we talked to before putting this plan together were environmentally aware. They thought it was important to protect the special character and feeling of the town for their own children to enjoy. Older people who talked to us often said they felt that something has been lost and that it is time to rediscover Papakura’s heritage.

 

The Auckland Plan and the Unitary Plan propose lots of population and housing growth that will change the face of Papakura. This growth must be done in an environmentally sensitive way, so we do not damage more of our heritage. In recent times, as the population has grown, with new housing and industry, people have lost touch with the land and the water has become polluted by wastewater and stormwater discharges, both directly into the harbour and into local rivers that run into the harbour.

 

We want to try to leave a better environment for future generations. One way of doing this is to support a recycling network, so that more waste is re-used and not thrown into landfill. We are already funding a scoping study, along with other local boards in the south, to identify how a network of community recycling centres could be set up. This study will tell us what actions we need to fund in future and who we need to work with to set up the network.

We will also champion green drainage systems such as new wetlands, which provide a more natural way of dealing with stormwater. We will continue our work to improve access to beaches and to the foreshore. We will investigate using some of our local funds to prioritise regional programmes in the Manukau Harbour catchment.

 

Sites of historic and cultural significance will need to be identified and protected – they are part of what makes us proud of Papakura. We will support joint projects with mana whenua and with the Papakura museum and local volunteers to identify any important sites and buildings.

 

Manukau Harbour

Through the Manukau Harbour Forum, we work with eight other local boards to protect and restore the coastal environment and provide walkways. We believe that, working in partnership with mana whenua, the forum will become a stronger voice to create a better future for the harbour. As part of the forum, we will push for the removal of wastewater and other pollutants from the Manukau Harbour and all its tributaries. We will also push for the special importance of the Manukau Harbour to be recognised, as is already the case with the Hauraki Gulf and Kaipara Harbour. This will bring greater protection, action against pollution and funding to set up special management arrangements.

 

What you told us

·    “With respect to the Manukau Harbour it is our view that the desecration of our food bowl and the home of our taniwha must stop” (Te Ara Rangautu o te iwi o Ngati Te Ata Waiohua)

·    “Please ensure existing bush reserves and streams are well maintained, these are part of our heritage” (Papakura resident)

·    “High importance is mangrove removal. Everyone wants to live and play by the sea and to restore our coastal areas will entice people to want to live in Papakura” (Papakura resident)

Contents

 


 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

Environmentally sensitive use of the Manukau Harbour

To recognise the special importance of Manukau Harbour

Funding towards Manukau Harbour Forum work programme

 

Champion

Manukau Harbour Forum

Mana whenua

Government departments

 

 

 

$15,500 p.a. in 2015/2016 and 2016/2017

Improve the health of Manukau harbour and its catchment streams

Funding

Champion

 

To be scoped

Mangrove and pacific oyster removal

Funding

 

$400,000

 

Reduce the amount of waste taken to landfill each year from Papakura

Establish a network of recycling centres

Funding

Champion

 

To be scoped

Protection of Māori cultural heritage

Identify wāhi tapu and other taonga.

Funding

Champion

Mana whenua

 $25,000 p.a.

Beautiful streets and a sense of place

Identify   heritage buildings and areas

Funding

Champion

Papakura Museum

 $25,000 p.a.

Outcome: Strong, safe and healthy communities

We have good places for communities to meet and great places to play in. Our young people get a great start in life and we value the wisdom and experience of our older people.

 

People want to live in strong, resilient, self-reliant communities and many identify most strongly with their own local neighbourhood and streets. In day to day living, playing and going to school, it is the local facilities, feeling safe and a sense of belonging that affect people’s wellbeing.

 

In some older parts of town, families have poor housing, low incomes and high unemployment. In some newer parts of town people have little connection with each other and travel elsewhere for services. Good places to meet, hold events and come together are as important as having great play spaces.

 

Health and housing are important for the welfare of our people and we will work with other agencies such as Counties Manukau District Health Board to improve people’s health; or Housing New Zealand and other agencies to upgrade existing housing. Papakura has the second highest rate of smoking in Auckland – one in five adults. We recognise the harm that smoking causes and we will commit to prioritising smoke free environments. Our parks, playgrounds and reserves are already going smoke free, and by 2015 this will also extend to outdoor shared spaces. We will raise awareness through signage and publicity and make all our events, sports clubs and outdoor dining areas smoke free.

 

We support the sinking lid policy to reduce gambling venues and machines and will commit to reducing gambling related harm within our communities. We will support groups and initiatives that aim to reduce the harmful impacts of gambling. We will continue to resist new or extended hours liquor licences and we will continue to campaign against the sale and supply of psychoactive substances in our communities.

 

We have said elsewhere in this plan that we’ll encourage more jobs, skills and training to help communities become more prosperous. A key part of our approach will be support for community and social enterprises, which put money back into communities and provide resources for social, environmental, economic and cultural benefit. .

Pride in their culture and learning within their community are important to local Māori. Papakura marae and some of our community houses are good bases for providing health and social services. Māori also want space for mahinga kai (growing food) in their local communities. We can provide land or funding for community gardens, or maara kai, so people have access to healthy food and can rediscover their connection with the land.

 

In Karaka, there is land at Clotworthy Park which has been set aside for future open space and play facilities. We will also establish a community garden and teaching garden within the park.

 

We can provide more and better children’s play areas in the older parts of town and work with housing developers to make sure new neighbourhoods have good play facilities too. Papakura Youth Council has prepared a strategic plan to 2020, which contains ideas for developing young people as leaders in local activities and decision making. We will continue to fund the youth council to help it draw up and deliver on a more detailed business plan, which will be an important foundation for when it is seeking funding opportunities outside of Auckland Council for youth and community initiatives.

 

People over 65 years of age are continuing longer in work than ever before. We will ensure local libraries and community hubs provide space for lifelong learning so that older people can gain new skills and continue to access local jobs. We will support and develop an environment that is accessible for people of all abilities, ages and cultures to enjoy and participate in.

 

In developing and expanding parts of town, we will provide new multi-purpose facilities such as the community hub and library we plan at Takanini. Additionally, some of our council-owned community houses and halls, such as the one in Smiths Avenue, need to be brought up to modern standards. While providing new and improved facilities, we can explore how they can become community and learning hubs to make sure they are widely used by a range of groups and social/community enterprises.

 

..

 

What you told us

·    “We want to develop a youth centre that encompasses careers, cultural, sporting, recreation and performing arts...this should be in the town centre and might include a youth run cafe” (Papakura Youth Council)

·    “I would really like to see (the Takanini library) built in an area which is easily accessible to children, to encourage reading and love of learning” (Takanini resident)

·    “Research undertaken within your local board area shows the public want all public places to be smoke free now, not only those included in phases 1 and 2” (Te Ara Hā Ora)

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies

Potential cost

 

Help our young people to contribute, prosper and thrive

Implement youth initiatives

Funding

Champion

Papakura Youth Council

$90,000

 

Provide good and accessible play facilities

Funding

 

$500,000 annually

 

Provide space for growing healthy food and places for organising local events

Community and teaching gardens at Karaka

Funding

 

$20,000

Grants to local groups for community based activities

Funding

 

?

Provide multi-purpose community hubs

Takanini library and community hub

Funding

Partnering

Developers

Local trusts

 

 

$? For scoping and finding a site

Improve Smith’s Avenue reserve

Funding

 

?

Indicative budget and funding sources

In each of our local board plan outcomes we include a list of key initiatives to deliver the outcome. Some of these initiatives are funded in the council’s Long-term Plan for 2012-2022 (LTP). The remaining initiatives are not currently funded.

 

There are a number of ways that local board activities can be funded:

·    through general rate funding. The governing body decides on the share of general rate funding provided to local boards. The governing body also makes decisions on investment in new facilities and major upgrades of facilities.

·    by reprioritising our budget to either delay or cut existing projects and activities

·    by the local board proposing that the governing body sets a targeted rate in the local area

·    through fees and charges paid by users of our facilities

·    by leveraging involvement of other partners such as the private sector and other public sector agencies.

We will prioritise which projects we put forward for funding in the next draft LTP, taking into account what you told us.

 

The indicative budget for the three years from July 2015 to June 2018 is set out on the following pages. When reading this budget it is important to note that the local board’s actual budget will look quite different over the next three years for a number of reasons:

·                     The council is preparing the next draft LTP for 2015-2025. This includes a review of funding for all projects which may affect some local board projects that are currently funded. How local boards are funded has also been reviewed. This will affect local board budgets in the draft LTP.

·                     The budget is indicative only. It does not contain all of the detailed projects or activities that the local board may carry out over the next three years. These will be developed through the local board agreement that is part of the council’s annual plan for each financial year.

·                     The local board’s actual budget for each year, including how it is funded, is subject to agreement with the governing body as part of the discussion on the annual local board agreement.

Indicative budget tables

Expenditure for Papakura local board area for 2015 - 2018

$000

Budget

Budget

Budget

Financial year ending 30 June

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

 

 

 

 

Net Operating Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

1,091

1,078

1,147

Local built and natural environment

41

0

0

Local community services

1,164

1,239

1,307

Local economic development

346

293

324

Local governance

1,330

1,411

1,633

Local libraries

2,474

2,661

2,884

Local parks services

6,719

7,080

7,627

Local recreation services

2,031

2,123

2,231

Total net operating expenditure

15,196

15,885

17,153

 

 

 

 

Net Capital Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

162

182

89

Local built and natural environment

0

0

0

Local community services

670

217

229

Local economic development

0

55

0

Local governance

0

51

0

Local libraries

2,496

3,867

25

Local parks services

2,667

7,493

1,914

Local recreation services

109

95

140

Total net capital expenditure

6,104

11,960

2,397

 

 

 

 

Financial statements are based on the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, including approved changes made during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 financial years, annual planning processes and agreed capex deferrals from 2014/2015.  Budgets are indicative only as they will be reviewed through the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (due for adoption in June 2015) and allocated in accordance with the Local Board Funding Policy.  

 


Your Papakura Local Board members

 

Photo

Members details

Photo of Bill McEntee, Papakura Local Board chair

Bill McEntee – Chair

Phone: 021 831 639

bill.mcentee@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Photo of Michael Turner, Papakura Local Board deputy chair

Michael Turner – Deputy Chair

Phone: 021 287 9922

michael.turner@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Photo of Stuart Britnell, Papakura Local Board member

Stuart Britnell

Phone: 021 837 979

stuart.britnell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Photo of Brent Catchpole, Papakura Local Board member

Brent Catchpole

Phone: 021 390 430

brent.catchpole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Photo of Graham Purdy, Papakura Local Board member

Graham Purdy

Phone: 021 285 4666

graham.purdy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Photo of Katrina Winn, Papakura Local Board member

Katrina Winn

Phone: 021 827 948

katrina.winn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Papakura Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/23532

 

  

Purpose

Providing an opportunity for the Board to receive reports that have been referred from Governing Body Committee meetings or forums for the information of the Local Board. 

 

The following reports were referred for information from the Governing Body committee meetings or forums:

 

No.

Report Title

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Forum

1.

Gambling Working Party - new regulations for the distribution of class 4

(pokie) gambling grants to communities

7 August 2014

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

2.

2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report to Local Boards

27 August 2014

Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

 

3.

Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage

11 September 2014

Auckland Development Committee

 

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board note the following reports referred for information from the Governing Body committee meetings or forums:

 

No.

Report Title

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Forum

1.

Gambling Working Party - new regulations for the distribution of class 4

(pokie) gambling grants to communities

7 August 2014

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

2.

2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report to Local Boards

27 August 2014

Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

3.

Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage

11 September 2014

Auckland Development Committee

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Trish Wayper - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term

 

File No.: CP2014/22642

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a updated register of achievements of the Papakura Local Board for the 2013-2016 Electoral Term.

Executive Summary

2.       Nil.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report entitled “Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2013-2016 Electoral Term” be received.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Achievements Register 2013-2016

225

    

Signatories

Authors

Trish Wayper - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt - Relationship Manager

 


Papakura Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

AC new logo_horz_cmyk 


PAPAKURA LOCAL BOARD

ACHIEVEMENTS REGISTER 2013-2016 ELECTORAL TERM

 

Date

ACHIEVEMENT

7 November 2013

Inaugural Meeting

-           Election of Chair, Bill McEntee and

-           Deputy Chair, Michael Turner

8 November 2013

Fireworks Spectacular

9 November 2013

Spring Clean

19 November 2013

Citizenship Ceremony

28 November 2013

Appointment of Board Members to Outside Organisations

28 November 2013

Appointment of Portfolio Allocations, Urban Design Champion, Business Improvement District (BID) Executive Committee and Resource Consent Public Notifications.

30 November 2013

Supported the Papakura Santa Parade

11 December 2013

Board agrees to release of Draft Annual Plan 2014/2015 including the draft Papakura Local Board Agreement 2014/2015 for public consultation

13 December 2013

Supported the Papakura Carols in the Park

29 January 2014

Appointment of Board Youth Portfolio Lead  to the Papakura Youth Connections Steering Group

29 January 2014

Formal establishment of the Pukekiwiriki Paa Joint Management Committee

29 January 2014

Position Paper on Draft Psychoactive Substances approved

29 January 2014

Approved position statement to the Auckland Council submission on the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

11 February 2014

Papakura Local Board Public Engagement – Local Board Plan – Papakura Library

15 February 2014

Papakura Local Board Public Engagement – Local Board Plan – Smiths Avenue and Papakura Library

18 February 2014

Papakura Local Board Public Engagement – Local Board Plan – Takanini Stores

27 February 2014

Papakura Local Board Public Engagement – Workshop – Local Board Chambers

1 March 2014

Movies in the Park

2 March 2014

PIPs Canoe Day

8 March 2014

Southern Regional Hui – Local Board Plans

8 March 2014

Rosehill Family Fun Day

18 March 2014

Citizenship Ceremony

19 March 2014

Papakura Local Board Psychoactive Substances Regulations Submission feedback to form part of the Governing Body Submission to the Ministry of Health

19 March 2014

Papakura Local Board Objection to Liquor Licence Application – Harpreet Kaur Limited

29 March 2014

Papakura East Neighbourhood Policing Team Day

30 March 2014

Takaanini Reserve Neighbourhood Event

5 April 2014

Joint Papakura and Manurewa Elderly and Disability Engagement Session in collaboration with Counties Manukau DHB

16 April 2014

Approved the Papakura Local Economic Development Plan and Commerce and Industry Programme

25 April 2014

Attended ANZAC Day Services at Papakura and Drury

29 April 2014

Advocacy presentation to the Governing Body

 

Council Controlled Organisations feedback submitted

 

Funding Policy Review feedback submitted

30 April 2014

Inaugural Meeting Pukekiwiriki Paa Joint Management Committee

21 May 2014

Community Group Funding of $80,364.00 awarded in funding Round 2 of the 2013/14 financial year

23 May 2014

Members attended Liquor Licencing Hearing - BottleO

29 May 2014

Dawn blessing of Takaanini Reserve and Ihaka Takaanini Plinths

 

Advocacy from the Board on the Takanini Interchange and motorway upgrade

 

Advocacy from the Board on Psychoactive substances leading to the temporary withdrawal from the market.

18 June 2014

Approved the Papakura Local  Board Community Development, Arts and Culture Work Programme 2014/2015

18 June 2014

Adopted the local content for the Annual Plan 2014/2015 including the Papakura Local Board Agreement 2014/2015

18 June 2014

Approved the Draft Local Board Plan 2014 for consultation

18 June 2014

Support for a joint scoping study with Southern Local Boards for the establishment of community recycling centres in the south.

18 June 2014

Approval of $15,000 funding to establish an annual Papakura Sports Awards

26 June 2014

Papakura Careers Expo

1 July 2014

Local Alcohol Policy Information Event - Stall

 

Active promotion of Auckland Transport Parking Strategy consultation

 

Active promotion of Long Term Plan youth engagement ‘My Vote Rule’

5 July 2014

Papakura Draft Local Board Plan Engagement Drop-in Session – Papakura Library

8 July 2014

Papakura Draft Local Board Plan Engagement Drop-in Session – Papakura Library