I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 13 October 2014

1.00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brenda Steele

 

Deputy Chairperson

Steven Garner

 

Members

James Colville

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Thomas Grace

 

 

Beth Houlbrooke

 

 

John McLean

 

 

Phelan Pirrie

 

 

Greg Sayers

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Raewyn Morrison

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

7 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3399

Email: raewyn.morrison@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Snells Beach Residents and Ratepayers Association                                     5

8.2     Mahurangi Presbyterian Church                                                                        6

8.3     Taonga on the move project - Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust                 6

8.4     Springboard Community Works                                                                        7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

12        Rodney Local Board Discretionary Community Funding – 2014/2015                   9

13        Adoption of Rodney Local Board Plan 2014                                                            69

14        Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara Housing Project Funding Request 2014/2015 131

15        ARST Funded Project 'Taonga on the Move' Report 2013                                  143

16        Auckland Transport Update to Rodney Local Board, October 2014                  165

17        Community hall fees and charges variation delegation                                        177

18        New Road Name - Madden Avenue and Lockyer Road                                        179

19        New Road Name - Awanui Crescent                                                                       185

20        New Road Name – Tara iti Drive                                                                              191

21        Proposed changes to establish committees                                                          197

22        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                      205

23        Long-term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal                                 223

24        Draft Community Grants Policy                                                                               225

25        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                             299

26        Application for retrospective landowner approval - Omaha Beach Golf Club signage                                                                                                                                     309

27        Rodney Local Board Scholarships                                                                          315

28        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                      317

29        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) 341

30        Update on member's attendance at Local Government New Zealand Conference 355

31        Ward Councillor Update                                                                                           357

32        Deputation/Public Forum Update                                                                            359

33        Rodney Local Board Workshop Records                                                               363

34        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

35        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               369

C1       Helensville Basement and Mezzanine Project Approval                                      369

C2       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   369  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of the Local Board Plan Hearings – Rodney Local Board, held on Tuesday, 2 September 2014 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 8 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

8.1       Snells Beach Residents and Ratepayers Association

Purpose

1.       Representatives from Snells Beach Residents and Ratepayers Association will be in attendance to address the Rodney Local Board on issues relating to the Snells Beach area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank the representatives from Snells Beach Residents and Ratepayers Association on their presentation regarding issues relating to Snells Beach.

 

 

8.2       Mahurangi Presbyterian Church

Purpose

1.       Representatives from Mahurangi Presbyterian Church will be in attendance to address the Rodney Local Board in regard to the activities of the church in the Warkworth area. In particular the representatives will discuss:

·    The provision of social support for the migrant community in the Mahurangi area.

·    The operation of an after-school care – homework club for primary aged children.

·  The management and delivery of a programme for at risk college aged girls “Girl Programme” run in conjunction with Mahurangi College’s counselling staff.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank the representatives from Mahurangi Presbyterian Church for their presentation on the activities of the church in the Warkworth area.

 

 

 

8.3       Taonga on the move project - Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust

Purpose

1.       Representatives from Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust will be in attendance to highlight the success of the “Taonga on the move” container which was funded from the Rodney Local Board’s Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) fund. The representatives will discuss what the project has done for the hapu and the wider community.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank the representatives from Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust for their presentation on the ‘Taonga on the move’ project which was funded by the local board from the Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) fund.

 

 

 

 

8.4       Springboard Community Works

Purpose

1.       Representatives from Springboard Community Works will be in attendance to present their “Rodney Youth Connections across Auckland, Situational Analysis/development plan and proposal” to the Rodney Local Board. Springboard will outline the situational analysis they carried out in the South Kaipara area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank the representatives from Springboard Community Works for their presentation on the document entitled “Rodney Youth Connections across Auckland, Situational Analysis/development plan and proposal.”

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Rodney Local Board Discretionary Community Funding – 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/17886

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present applications received for the Rodney Local Board Discretionary Community Funding Programme 2014-2015.  The Rodney Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       For the 2014-2015 financial year, the Rodney Local Board set a total community funding budget of $25,110.  This is the only round for the financial year. 

3.       Nineteen applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $72,621.

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      consider the applications listed in Table 1 and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

 Table 1: Rodney Local Board Discretionary Community Funding Applications

Organisation

Funding for

Amount requested

The Scout Association of New Zealand

Towards the production of cloth commemorative badges for 100 years of Warkworth Scout Group between November 2014 to December 2014

 $      1,000.00

Nor-West Community Patrol Trust

Towards the running costs of the two patrol cars, fuel, oil, registration, Warrants  Of Fitness, repairs and maintenance, annual service and communication costs between November 2014 to April 2015

 $      6,674.00

Helensville Women and Family Centre

Towards resource costs: kai, venue hire, stationery, professional development training, guest speakers, crèche for the Wahine Toa and Wahine Rangatira groups between November 2014 to October 2015

 $      5,000.00

OnBoard Skate Incorporated

Towards programme delivery, training, mentoring and operational costs for the skate safe programme to be run at Snells Beach, Helensville, Riverhead School, Huapai School and Wellsford School between November 2014 to April 2015

 $      5,000.00

Literacy North Shore Incorporated

Towards the tutor wages for the Rodney literacy and numeracy programmes between February 2015 to September 2015

 $      3,600.00

South Kaipara Community Patrol Trust

Towards the purchase of cones, jackets and lighting for the community patrol between November 2014 to December 2014

 $      2,384.00

North Shore Community Health Network Incorporated (Raeburn House)

Towards facilitator, venue hire, refreshments, materials, design and promotion and administration and accountability costs for the Resilient Community Worker and Leader Toolkits/programme between November 2014 to June 2015

 $      4,448.00

Kumeu Children's Art Club Incorporated

Towards the purchase of paint and brushes for the Kumeu Children's Art Club between February 2015 to April 2015

 $      1,348.00

Highfield Garden Reserve Advisory Committee

Towards the purchase of concrete, timber, brackets, belts, plaque and miscellaneous costs for the building and an installation of a picnic table/bench on the Highfield Garden Reserve

 $      2,505.00

Women's Centre - Rodney Incorporated

Towards the costs for flooring, plumbing, building costs and purchase of bathroom fixtures for 10 Morpeth Street, Warkworth between November 2014 to March 2015

 $      8,000.00

Mahurangi Dive Club Incorporated

Towards the purchase of two outboard motors for the Dive Club boat between November 2014 to December 2015

 $      8,625.00

Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated

Towards advertising, tutor fees and materials for creating a public sculpture between January 2015 to May 2015

 $      7,224.00

Hibiscus Coast Senior Moments Charitable Trust

Towards the purchase of a banner, storage cupboards, whiteboard, craft supplies, paper, printer ink cartridges, paint brushes, tableclothes and bingo game for a new seniors programme in Warkworth between November 2014 to December 2014

 $      1,448.00

Mahurangi Action Incorporated

Towards concept drawings for the Mahurangi River Restoration Wharf Shed between November 2014 to May 2015

 $      1,173.00

Show Me Shorts Film Festival Trust Board

Towards administration, marketing, programming, staff costs/travel and mileage for the Festival Director for the Show Me Shorts Films Festival in Matakana between November to December 2014

 $      3,319.00

Te Rito Rodney Family Violence Prevention Project

Towards facilitation, supplies, coordination and overheads for the Stand Up programme at Kaipara College, Orewa College, Mahurangi College and Rodney College between January 2015 to December 2015

 $      6,100.00

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Trust New Zealand

Towards the cost of the monthly newsletter and delivery and the salary for the outreach worker between January 2015 to December 2015

 $         824.00

Forest Bridge Trust

Towards a report for the Kaipara Forest Bridge Project between November 2014 to March 2015

 $      2,500.00

Warkworth Brass Band Incorporated

Towards the purchase of a new PA system for the Warkworth Brass Band between November 2014 to December 2015

 $      1,449.00

 

 

 $    72,621.00

 

 

Comments

4.       In March 2014, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee resolved to continue the interim community funding approach for the 2014-2015 financial year (REG/2014/36).

5.       One community funding round is scheduled for this financial year. This round closed on 15 July 2014.

6.       Through community grants, the local board recognises the vital role that community groups and organisations play in developing strong, sustainable communities. The Rodney Local Board Community Discretionary Fund aims to assist groups to provide activities, projects, programmes, initiatives and events that make a positive contribution within the local board area.

7.       When reviewing applications, the local board should be guided by the following aims of the fund (these are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to help the local board when considering the merits of each proposal):

·   support vibrant local communities

·   ensure a wide range of community activities, projects, programmes, initiatives are supported at a local level

·   provide seed funding to make things happen in community development

·   support proposals that align with the Rodney Local Board Plan priorities and the needs identified across the Rodney Local Board area.

8.       This fund is allocated at the local board’s discretion. In accordance with its fiduciary duties, the local board is to act honestly, avoid conflicts of interest and act in what the local board believes to be the best interests of the community.

9.       Round one of the Rodney Local Board Community Discretionary Funding closed on 15 July 2014. The fund was advertised through local community networks, local media and on the Auckland Council website.  

10.     For the 2014-2015 financial year, the Rodney Local Board set a total community funding budget of $25,110.  None of this budget has been allocated to date.

11.     Nineteen applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $72,621.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Local board feedback on the community funding applications was sought at a workshop with the Rodney Local Board.

Maori impact statement

13.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori. Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.

Implementation

14.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

15.     Following the Rodney Local Board allocating funding for round one, Community Development, Arts and Culture will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A: Rodney Local Board Discretionary Community Funding - 2014/15 Application Summaries

13

      

Signatories

Authors

Kim Hammond - Community Funding Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

























































Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Adoption of Rodney Local Board Plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23073

 

  

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Rodney Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

3.       The draft Rodney Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014. The Rodney Local Board heard and considered the submissions from the SCP at is deliberations workshop in September.

4.       The Rodney Local Board Plan is attached to this agenda.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the Rodney Local Board Plan.

b)      delegates to the Chairperson the approval of any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

 

Comments

 

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

6.       Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies

·    works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

7.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

8.       The local board is required to use the SCP to consult on the draft local board plan. The SCP was held from 7 July to 6 August 2014. There were 396 submissions on the draft Rodney Local Board Plan.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The local board plan has been developed by considering a range of strategic issues, as well as the Auckland Plan and other regional strategies and policies.  Advice from subject matters experts, community views and public submissions has also been important in developing the plan.

10.     The local board heard submissions and deliberated on the SCP in September 2014.

11.     The Rodney Local Board Plan is attached to this agenda as Attachment A.

Key Priority Areas

12.     The draft Rodney Local Board Plan proposed a wide suite of initiatives based on the current Rodney Local Board Plan 2011, initiatives raised by communities over the last three years and feedback received at the local board plan expos earlier this year.

13.     During deliberations the Rodney Local Board indicated a preference to determine a set of clear priorities to focus decision making and crystalise the strategic direction in the 2014 local board plan.  The local board noted that although the local board plan is an aspirational document, it should also be realistically achievable. Therefore projects would need to be prioritised and some removed from the plan.

14.     Overall each of the outcome areas were supported and the local board does not intend to remove any outcomes.

15.     Submissions clearly indicated that council need to empower communities to help themselves and as such this is a key focus of the local board.  Transport, particularly the sealing of rural roads and footpath/cycleway connections on roads and parks also remain a top priority to communities.  In terms of recreation, multisport facilities and a swimming pool for Warkworth will remain key areas of advocacy and leadership for the local board.  Communities also indicated their support for mainstreet upgrades and upgrading of town centre toilets.  The local board noted that funding for arts did not feature highly in submissions and as such will not be a key priority area for the local board.  However, there is still support to contribute to the upgrade of the Kumeu Arts Centre to make it fit for purpose.

Transport Outcome

16.     With regard to transport a number of submissions received commented on the following:

·     Sealing rural roads

·     Providing public transport

·     Providing safe footpaths

·     Maintaining roads to a safe standard

·     Upgrading the Wellsford Centennial Park intersection including safe pedestrian access to Centennial Park

·     Upgrading the SH16, Muriwai Road intersection at Waimauku

·     Completing the agreed Warkworth roading projects such as Hill Street, Mansel Drive bridge and Mckinney Road intersection.

17.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to retain the advocacy matters in the transport outcome and alter the outcome heading to refer to ‘safety’.  Additional references to be added include transport infrastructure to serve future industrial/business zone at Silverdale West and undertaking safety improvements to Coatesville Riverhead Highway.  The importance of pedestrian access at the Centennial Park Road/State Highway 1 intersection in Wellsford has also been noted.

Parks and Recreation Outcome

18.     In the parks and recreation area multisport facilities, greenway plans, walkways/fitness/cycle trails, sealing carparks in parks and a swimming pool in Warkworth received a number of comments in submissions.  It is noted that recent surveys on boat ramps, access and swimming pools may have impacted on the reduced number of submissions on these topics.  Additionally there were no significant comments regarding outdoor hardcourt facilities, however, this has been an issue raised repeatedly by communities over the last three years.

19.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to retain the majority of initiatives in the parks and recreation outcome, acknowledging that significant partnering is required with the community to drive and fund some projects. Those projects that are to be removed, due to a lack of support in submissions or available funding, include sealing carparks on local parks, advocating for Parakai Hot Springs to be included in free swimming access for youth and skateparks in Snells Beach and Wellsford.  Consideration was given to including the reference to the Corry Block, Wellsford in the plan and it was considered that linking existing walkways and fitness trails through a greenway plan was a more appropriate as a recreational outcome.  The Kaukapakapa River dredging outcome has been moved to the environment outcome of the plan.  Additional references to be added include a needs assessment for Diamond Jubilee Park Reserve, Matakana and reference to the importance of Smokefree initiatives.

Planning Outcome

20.     In the planning area mainstreet upgrades, gateways, community planning toolkit assistance and infrastructure planning for growth areas and infrastructure planning for Wellsford received a number of comments in submissions.

21.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to retain the majority of initiatives in this outcome and strengthen the concept of ‘empowering communities’ to help themselves.  Upgrading of mainstreets has been recognised as a potential key funding area.  Those projects that are to be removed, due to a lack of support in submissions or available funding, include completing reserve management plans, undertaking a Rodney area plan, drinking fountains in town centres, specific reference to heritage initiatives, bilingual signage and identification of sites of significance to manawhenua. Some of these matters are covered in the ‘Valuing Our Local Māori Identity’ section of the plan. An initiative to consult with the Kumeu community prior to more detailed planning has also been noted in this outcome.

Environment and Infrastructure Outcome

22.     In the environment and infrastructure area a number of submissions were received supporting initiatives relating to biosecurity and biodiversity, waste minimisation, community led environmental restoration, implementing ecological survey actions, improving water quality and ensuring clean safe drinking water. 

23.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to retain the majority of initiatives.  A reference to empowering and encouraging community stewardship has been added as well as reference to the Mahurangi Action Plan. 

Halls, Libraries and Facilities Outcome

24.     In the halls, libraries and facilities outcome area a number of submissions were received supporting the upgrade of town centre toilets, using the former Wellsford Library for community uses and supporting volunteer libraries.

25.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to retain the majority of initiatives and concepts in this outcome.  Upgrading town centre toilets has been recognised as a potential key funding area.  Those projects to be removed, due to a lack of support in submissions or available funding, include the extension of library hours and financial support for private halls.  Upgrading halls signage, external lighting and heating has been removed as this is underway in the current financial year. Requests for a new town centre toilet in Waimauku have not been added due to funding constraints.

Economic Development Outcome

26.     In the economic development outcome area the majority of submissions supported the establishment of business improvement districts (BIDs).  There was also support for projects that contribute to growth in tourism and for a Rodney Economic Development Action Plan. Overall there was not huge support for economic development funding compared with other outcome areas.

27.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to focus on the business community driving this outcome and prioritise focus and funding to other outcomes of the plan.  However, mainstreet upgrades which have been noted in the ‘planning’ outcome are considered to have an economic benefit to communities and are a focus for the local board over next three years. The local board proposes to advocate to Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) for the delivery of Youth Connection programmes as well as tourism and exporting business initiatives.  The Rodney Economic Development Plan and Business Improvement District (BID) establishment initiatives are proposed to remain in the plan. Silverdale West (within Rodney) has been added to the list of areas to advocate for live business zones.

Arts Culture and Events Outcome

28.     In the area of arts, culture and events a number of submissions were received supporting arts facilities in Warkworth, Kumeu and Helensville, operational support for arts centres, community grants and support for volunteers.  However, as noted earlier in this report, there were fewer submissions supporting spending on arts, culture and events and some directly suggesting that this is not an area that the local board should be funding.

29.     Based on submission feedback and subsequent discussions during deliberations, the local board proposes to prioritise focus and funding on other outcomes of the plan.  Arts, events and volunteers remain important aspects of our communities, however it is proposed that the emphasis will be on providing seed funding, limited grants funding and a small amount of operational funding. This will be a starting point for communities to raise further funds. It is proposed to retain the Kumeu Arts Centre upgrade initiative as their current building requires some work to be fit for purpose. Those projects that are to be removed, due to a lack of support in submissions or available funding, include English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL), non-specific community development initiatives, and undefined youth advisory panel projects. The Ngati Whatua housing initiative has been noted in the ‘Valuing Our Local Maori Identity’ section of the plan. 

Māori impact statement

30.     Many of the outcomes included in the plan are of interest to Mãori.  These range from involvement in planning, valuing and preserving the area’s historic heritage, promoting bilingual signage and continuing to care for and improve the natural environment to employment and training opportunities for youth and community events.

31.     When preparing the draft the local board held two hui with mana whenua in Rodney where many specific initiatives in the local board plan were discussed.  Letters were also sent to iwi during the submission period to provide a further opportunity for comment. The local board plan contributes to improving wellbeing in Mãori communities, as well as the community in general.

32.     The local board continues to support ongoing engagement with mana whenua as part of its Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi commitment and will work towards a new Memorandum of Understanding with mana whenua.

Implementation

33.     The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities. The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Rodney Local Board Plan 2014

75

     

Signatories

Authors

Kathryn Martin – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 



Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Rodney Local Board Plan 2014

Mihi

Tēnā ngā mihi te tukuna atu nei ki a koutou e nga mana whenua

e kapekape tonu nei i nga ahikā roa e horapa mai nā

ki te taha whakararo o te tipua tāone nei o Tāmaki Makaurau.

Kia pāorooro tēnei karere mā runga i ō maunga whakahī.

Kia tīmata ake au i te Kumeū ka rere whakawaho ki te one tapu o Muriwai.

Kia hoki ake ki uta ko Tauwhare ki te rāwhiti,

a Tarawera ki te raki,

ko Tuhirangi rāua ko te Atuanui ki te taha whakaroto.

kia kauhoe ngā mihi mā te moana ki te Araparera

ko koe tēnā e Taranaki ka kapi ngā pou tauawhi i a te Kaipara

i hua ai te kōrero

“E tupu i wīwī, i wāwā, tūria i te wera,

piri ki te rito o te rengarenga, waiho me whakapakari ki te hua o te kawariki.”

Ināianei me māwhiti aku kupu ki Kaiwaka, ki Pukekaroro ki te raraunga o te tini i mate,

te aroha tonutia i muri nei. 

Kia tahuri iho rā ia ki Matakana, ko Tamahunga tērā e tū mai rā i te pae. 

Ka hīkoi aku mihi mā ngā kāhiwi kia heke iho ki te awa o Pūhoi

kia rere aku mihi ki te tuawhenua i nohoa e te iti me te rahi.

Kia ū mai anō taku haere ki Huapai ā-tangata, ā- whenua.

Nō rātou te whiwhi, nō mātou te whiwhi,

kia kī ake ai tātou katoa, he rohenga tangata, he iwi tōpuni, mōwai tonu te whenua e takoto nei e.

 

Our greetings and salutations to mana whenua

who tend the historical fires that encompass this great city of Auckland.

May this message echo across your noble mountains.

Let me begin at Kumeū and turning outwards to the sacred sands of Muriwai .

To the east is Tauwhare,

with Tarawera to the north,

inland stands Tuhirangi and and Atuanui.

Let this greeting travel the inland sea to Araparera

where Taranaki completes the guardians of the Kaipara,

who inspired the proclamation

“The people will grow here and there, upright in the heat,

hiding like the shoots of the rengarenga and maturing like the fruit of the kawariki.”

Now let my words cross to Kaiwaka and Pukekaroro, the scene of past losses

that are still mourned today.

Turning then to Matakana, where stands Tamahunga on the horizon.

Let this greeting follow the ridgeline down to the Pūhoi River

where it can return inland to the valleys where the original settlers came.

Our journey ends at Huapai, of people and land.

Their good fortune is our shared providence

so the axiom the community are people in communion, and a calm lies over the land.

 


 

Contents

Mihi 1

Message from the chairperson. 4

Our vision. 6

Creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level 6

Our outcomes. 8

Rodney Local Board area. 9

About local boards. 11

Working with Māori 11

About local board plans. 12

How we got your feedback. 13

Our engagement activities. 13

Outcome: Roads, paths and public transport enable us to get around easily and safely. 14

Outcome: Parks and sports facilities are easy to access and enjoy. 18

Outcome: Communities are empowered and plan for their own futures. 24

Outcome: Our environment is healthy, cared for and enjoyed. 29

Outcome: Local halls and libraries are familiar, valued and well used community spaces. 34

Outcome: Local economies are strong and growing. 38

Outcome: Arts, culture and events enhance our communities and express who we are. 42

Valuing our local Māori identity. 45

Indicative budget and funding sources. 49

Expenditure for Rodney Local Board area for 2015 - 2018. 51

Your Rodney Local Board members. 54

 


Message from the chairperson

We are pleased to present the 2014 Rodney Local Board Plan. This is your plan. We realise that prioritising projects will always be a balancing act, but we have listened to you and drafted a plan to reflect what we heard. We recognise the financial limitations and will ensure that we deliver “best bang for your buck” on your behalf.

 

We have focused on what you told us was the priority, this has meant due to the feedback that we have had to cut some projects from the plan in some areas. We will also support and work collaboratively with those local communities who are progressing initiatives themselves.

 

If you take one thing away from this plan, I hope it is that we want to support and help communities to help themselves. We know there is great work going on as community groups drive sports and arts projects, volunteers support our libraries, reserves and halls, and environmental groups work in our natural areas. These groups are the heart of Rodney and we want to ‘keep the door open’ and work in partnership with them.

 

Growth pressure is upon us as some of our green areas become housing. The seven outcomes in this plan were developed with this in mind. Three years ago we hadn’t heard of Special Housing Areas and we didn’t know where our new urban boundaries would fall. Now we need the infrastructure to support this growth.

 

Transport remains a top priority in Rodney as we strive to have key projects progressed. We have heard that walkways, footpaths and cycleways are also a priority to many of you. Sport and recreation facilities, like a swimming pool and multisport centre, have now gained some traction and are being progressed as a priority through community partnerships. Businesses are now taking the lead in the economic space by establishing Business Improvement Districts which links with our focus of progressing mainstreet and toilet upgrades.

 

Now that we have a clear direction and vision, we look forward to delivering this combined vision with the community over the coming years and seeing progress on the ground.

 

Brenda Steele

Chairperson, Rodney Local Board

 

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Our vision

Creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level

In Rodney we treasure what we have. We are proud of our small close-knit communities who are willing to get out there and help themselves. We love our stunning beaches, sparkling harbours, rolling country hills and the rivers that form the backbone of our rural areas.

 

Our beautiful land is vast. With almost half of the land mass of the Auckland region within our boundaries it is important that we are well connected. We need to be able to get around easily using roads, paths and public transport. For the safety and health of Aucklanders, our roads must be sealed and motorway extensions completed.

 

We love the lifestyle and relaxed country feel that we have in Rodney; small towns and villages encircled by native bush and farmland on the gentle east and wild west coasts. This creates a treasured lifestyle and communities that are culturally rich and creative. Warkworth and Kumeū/Huapai will be growing in population and these communities need to be able to plan for their own futures. We need clarity about what new facilities are wanted and needed and when infrastructure will be provided.

 

Rodney people have time and again shown they have the determination to just roll up their sleeves and get things done. This drive to carve their destiny by working together to plan or volunteer is a part of who we are. Volunteers make our places special by running community events like Christmas parades that put smiles of the faces of our children. By helping out in libraries or on hall or reserves advisory groups, we make these facilities familiar, valued and well-used community spaces. Together through Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) local businesses help our economies to be strong and grow, and contribute to an Auckland of prosperity.

 

Community groups are keen to fundraise for key local assets so that parks and sports facilities are easy to access and arts facilities enhance community relationships and express who we are. Be it a multisport centre, an arts centre upgrade or a swimming pool, these projects can be realised together in partnership, with support and seed funding. We want to create a healthy and creative Auckland by providing locally some of the facilities the rest of Auckland enjoys.

 

As we work together for ourselves, our families and future generations, we do so instinctively in partnership with iwi and with our natural environment in the forefront of our minds. We are a green Auckland and will continue to ensure our environment is healthy, cared for and enjoyed by all. We acknowledge mana whenua as kaitiaki and know that our communities are enriched through the six marae in our area.

 

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Our outcomes

The Rodney Local Board Plan works towards creating the world’s most liveable city at the local level. Creating the world’s most liveable city is the vision of the Auckland Plan. Our local board plan takes into account the outcomes in the 30-year Auckland Plan to help deliver this vision.

 

Rodney Local Board Plan Outcomes

 

The Auckland Plan

 

Roads, paths and public transport enable us to get around easily and safely

Parks and sports facilities are easy to access and enjoy

Communities are empowered and plan for their own futures

Our environment is healthy, cared for and enjoyed by all

Local halls and libraries are familiar, valued and well-used community spaces

Local economies are strong and growing

Arts, culture and events enhance our communities and express who we are

Title: Arrow pointing leftTitle: Arrow pointing right

Vision

To become the world’s most liveable city

Outcomes

·    a fair, safe and healthy Auckland

·    a green Auckland

·    an Auckland of prosperity and opportunity

·    a well-connected and accessible Auckland

·    a beautiful Auckland that is loved by its people

·    a culturally rich and creative Auckland

·    a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world .

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Rodney Local Board area

Rodney Local Board which includes the communities of Muriwai, Riverhead, Coatesville, Parakai, Kaukapakapa, Shelly Beach, Puhoi, Snells Beach/Algies Bay, Kawau Island, Matakana, Leigh and Te Hana.

Note:  Maps to be updated in final copy.

Title: Map iof Auckland showing the location of the Rodney Local Board area.

 

Title: Map of the Rodney Local Board area - Description: Map of Rodney Local Board which includes the communities of Muriwai, Riverhead, Coatesville, Parakai, Kaukapakapa, Shelly Beach, Puhoi, Snells Beach/Algies Bay, Kawau Island, Matakana, Leigh and Te Hana.

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About local boards

Auckland Council has a unique model of local government in New Zealand, comprising the governing body (made up of the mayor and 20 ward councillors) and 21 local boards. The governing body focuses on the big picture and on Auckland-wide issues and decisions.

 

Local boards provide local leadership and make decisions on local issues, activities and facilities, such as local parks, libraries and community halls. Local boards can also fund other organisations through community grants and other funding arrangements, for activities such as events and community programmes.

 

Local boards engage with and represent their communities, provide important local input into Auckland-wide strategies and plans and work with others to build strong communities. Many council activities that are important to local communities are the responsibility of the governing body and council-controlled organisations (including Auckland Transport). Local boards act as champions and advocates for their communities when others have the decision-making role.

 

Local boards also play an important role in delivering at the local level on Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori.

Working with Māori

Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. As part of this commitment the council is working towards an agreed understanding with local iwi Ngāti Manuhiri, Te Uri O Hau, Te Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara and Ngāti Wai in the first instance, acknowledging that there are 14 iwi with an interest in Rodney.

 

This agreement will set the framework for engaging rangatira ki te rangatira or chief to chief, to share information and work together. Our local board plan describes some of the ways we will work with Māori in our local area.

 

About local board plans

This plan is about the Rodney Local Board area. It expresses what we have heard from you.

 

The plan sets the framework that will guide our decision-making and actions for the next three years. It informs the board’s decisions on local activities, and enables us to represent your interests and preferences on regional strategies and plans. It also provides the flexibility to cope with changes that will happen during the next three years. During this time we will continue to work closely with all sectors of our community to understand your ongoing needs, issues and priorities.

 

ABOUT LOCAL BOARD FUNDING

The local boards funding policy in the long-term plan (LTP) sets out how local boards are funded.

 

Some local board funding relates to local assets and facilities. The governing body makes the initial investment decisions and then local boards oversee the budgets and operations. Local boards are also allocated funding to deliver local programmes and initiatives. The actual budget for each year is agreed with the governing body as part of discussion on the annual local board agreement.

 

This local board plan contains indicative budget tables for the next three years. This budget is based on the LTP 2012-2022, with adjustments to reflect annual plans and other budget changes since then.

 

The actual budgets for the next three years will be different. This is because they will reflect recent amendments to the local boards funding policy, and because the council is preparing the draft LTP 2015-2025. This preparation includes a review of funding for all projects, which may affect some local board plan projects that are currently funded.

 

Our draft local board plan showed the funding status of key initiatives to deliver each plan outcome. This funding status is not included in this final local board plan, because it could change as the LTP 2015-2025 is developed.

How we got your feedback

Engaging with our communities has been an important part of developing this plan. You have told us your views on many issues over the past three years as part of the development of a wide range of council plans.

 

As well, we undertook further specific engagement in developing of this plan. We listened to your views at meetings and gathered information informally though other means. Formal consultation then followed, where you made written submissions. We held hearings, considered all submissions fully and made changes to our plan based on your feedback.

Our engagement activities

During the development of this plan we held community expos in Kumeū and Warkworth. We asked community groups to come along and show everyone what they were working on. We also asked the council and CCO (Council-Controlled Organisation) staff who work in our area to showcase what we have been doing. These were great events with fun activities, presentations and workshops. The opportunity to chat and share ideas about our future was extremely valuable. We sincerely thank all those involved and look forward to continuing to work alongside our community groups to make Rodney even more special.

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Outcome: Roads, paths and public transport enable us to get around easily and safely

Our communities will be well connected by transport links and have a range of transport options available to them.

Rodney has a land mass totalling 46 per cent of Auckland, 37 towns and villages and two state highways travelling the length of each coast. Connecting our area is both a challenge and an opportunity. The focus is on completing the major projects on our roads, sealing roads and providing alternatives to private vehicles so that we can get around safely and easily.

Most transport projects are funded by the governing body and central government.  Projects are then delivered by Auckland Transport and NZTA. Other than a small local fund of about $370,000 annually, the local board doesn’t make decisions on transport matters. It is important that we speak out loud and clear about the transport areas that need attention.

 

Quality roads

Rodney has 1476km of roads, of which 674.8km are unsealed. We need a funding commitment of ten million dollars per year over the next ten years to get more Rodney roads sealed. This is in addition to the small fund for road sealing that is also available as a result of the Araparera Forestry Joint Venture. Reducing dust will improve our health and quality of life. Sealed roads also increase safety and make it easier to get around. There will also be an economic benefit if our roads are safe, particularly to businesses transporting goods and those relying on tourists. Our roads must be well maintained for public safety.

 

Public transport

In 2013, 69 per cent of Rodney residents owned two or more vehicles, compared with an Auckland-wide average of 58 per cent. We have never had a choice in Rodney, but our aging population needs transport and our youth want to access education in the city.

 

Regular public transport services must extend into Rodney. We want to be part of Auckland and have access to the same opportunities as other Aucklanders. In the east of Rodney we need new connecting services between towns and to the city. In the west we need to increase the frequency of our services and again consider using rail.

 

 

Walkways and cycleways

Our rural areas are beautiful and productive areas between our towns and villages, but without a car they can be a barrier for residents to go about their daily business. Walkways and cycleways are a healthy alternative to vehicles. They provide safety for cyclists and students travelling to school. They are also fitness trails and a low-cost way for people to connect with each other without having to get into a car.

 

Many of our rural villages have incomplete networks of footpaths that we need to complete. Footpaths are not a luxury but a basic need that will make a huge difference to our daily lives and that is why this is a key focus of this plan.

 

Connections through Auckland

The Puhoi to Wellsford motorway will provide a direct connection to and through Auckland. It will make travelling through Rodney safer and more efficient. This road with off ramps at Puhoi is a priority for Rodney residents, businesses and visitors.  We also need to maintain the existing rail network and enhance the northern rail corridor.

 

Safe local networks

State highways weave their way up both the east and west coasts of Rodney, in and out of many towns and villages. As traffic volumes have increased these roads struggle to accommodate the traffic, often dividing small villages in two. Road safety issues and congestion are the result.

 

Our communities want to see a number of key projects completed on our roads, so that traffic flows safely around local networks with ease. We know that some of the key projects are:

·    Complete projects on Warkworth roads, including Hill Street intersection, the western collector from McKinney Road and Mansel Drive Bridge

·    Build a link road from State Highway 1 to Matakana Road

·    Upgrade the Centennial Park Road and SH1, Wellsford intersection including safe pedestrian access to Centennial Park Road.

·    Upgrade the SH16, Muriwai Road, Waimauku intersection by constructing a roundabout

·    Undertake transport planning to accommodate growth in the Kumeū/Huapai/Riverhead area

·    Provide transport infrastructure to serve the future industrial/business zone at Silverdale West

·    Undertake safety improvements to Coatesville Riverhead Highway.

 

Car parking

Many of us will always need to drive a private car to get around. This is unavoidable for those of us who live in rural areas and many of our towns due to the lack of public transport. When we come into town we don’t want to fight to get a parking space and we also don’t want to pay. It is not what Rodney is about.  We want parking close to shops, which is why we need the next level of the car park building in Warkworth to be constructed.

 

What you told us

·    “SH1 Puhoi to Wellsford needs to go through. Traffic on weekends and holidays is horrific in Warkworth.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “More regular public transport to Albany especially to the University.” (Anon)

·    “The single most neglected aspect is THE HILL STREET intersection.” (Sandspit resident)

·    “The rural roads are a disgrace and a health hazard. Sealing needs to be a priority.” (Kaipara Flats resident)

·    “It's one of the main issues of our time! Rodney could support kids cycling safely to school!” (Waimauku resident)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

Being well connected through safe well maintained roads and paths, with the option of using accessible public transport to get us places will help us the world’s most liveable city.

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Walkways and cycleways are a healthy and safe alternative

 

Build footpath and cycleway extensions in and between towns and villages to provide connectivity

Advocacy and decision maker

 

NZTA, Auckland Transport and community groups

$2 million (over 3 years) local board funding in addition to Auckland Transport Funding

Progress  walkway/cycleway  connections between Warkworth and both Snells Beach and Matakana within five years

Advocacy

Auckland Transport and Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Project not costed and requires community funding

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

**This will be delivered by other agencies with no direct cost to Auckland Council.

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Outcome: Parks and sports facilities are easy to access and enjoy

Our communities, young and old, will have increased access to a wide range of recreation opportunities for health, well-being and enjoyment.

We want to make the most of what we have. We have 202 local parks and two holiday parks covering 1021 hectares and nine regional parks covering 3748 hectares. We have stunning esplanade reserves next to sparkling coastal waters. We have arguably the best rugby fields in Auckland, in one of our sports grounds. What we need now, is to focus on improving and creating facilities for all. We have no public swimming pool and a lack of multisport facilities. We have opportunities galore and community groups ready to lead the charge.  So we will partner with communities on key projects requiring community funding, such as the Warkworth Showgrounds multisport centre and the swimming pool facility.

 

All-season sports facilities

Rodney people love sports. Rugby, netball, hockey, soccer, equestrian, touch, athletics, swimming – you name it, we do it. Our population is growing, along with the pressure on facilities.  We want to improve fields so they don’t have to close in winter and install floodlights on fields so we can train later. We need to work together to upgrade hard courts and we need indoor sports facilities and shared clubrooms so that we can continue with sports all year round. It will take time to progress some projects like the Atlas site development in Warkworth, but we would like to make some progress. All of these things strengthen communities and bring us one step closer to having the same facilities as the rest of Auckland.

 

Swimming pool access

Rodney is the only local board area without access to a public swimming pool, except for Great Barrier and Waiheke! Free swimming access for under-16s is a great idea, but is currently no good to us. We want our children to learn to swim and they also want somewhere to go and have fun. Our older people need pool access for health reasons.

 

Swimming facilities are important and a facility must be provided in Warkworth.

Walkways, cycleways and bridleways

We have kilometres of reserves next to beaches and rivers, and hundreds of parks. What we need to do is make sure that we can get to them. We need walkways to picnic spots or from school to home. With a bit of planning we can link reserves together better and link existing walkways, providing fitness and bridle trails and access to areas many communities don’t know are public land.

 

Valued rivers and coastal areas

Our beaches and rural areas make our area the best place to live in the world! Access to these areas is a priority, be it boat ramps, car parking or by navigational dredging of key rivers. Aucklanders love to tow their boats up to Rodney to use our boat ramps and beaches. We are looking at the ‘pinch points’ and listening to communities to find the best way to improve launching access. Keeping what we have is also important as coastal erosion makes seawalls all the more important.

 

Family-friendly parks

Parks are for everyone. We all want to use and enjoy our parks. We need to engage with youth on playgrounds and support community initiatives like projects in parks. We also support Smokefree environments in our parks and facilities; it’s especially important for our children.

What you told us

·    “Parks are a big draw-card to this area both for locals and visitors. They need to be fun (not ridiculously safe).” (Snells Beach resident)

·    “More challenging playgrounds.” (Anon)

·    “We NEED a swimming pool.” (Anon)

·    “We need a big indoor facility.” (Anon)

·    “Walking and cycling trails would be great in the Kaukapakapa…a means of getting out and doing exercise for locals.” (Kaukapakapa resident).

 

 

 

 

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

Improving opportunities to get involved in sport and recreation will accelerate the prospects of our young people and help us become the world’s most liveable city.  We will do this by working together to provide access to future indoor recreation facilities close to home and linking our walkways to increase opportunities for families to get out and about easily.

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Our people have the use of all-season facilities for sports activities

Implement the Warkworth Showgrounds development plan

Decision-maker

Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Inc

$3.1 million

 

Partner with the community to design and build a multisport facility at the Warkworth Showgrounds

Advocacy

Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Inc

$8-10 million

External funding will be required

Design and plan for the upgrade and expansion of indoor sports facilities at Centennial Park, Wellsford in partnership with the community

Decision maker

and partnership

Wellsford Districts Sport and Recreation Collective

$20,000

 

Consult with the community to understand their needs for an indoor sports facility in theKumeū/Huapai/Helensville/ Riverhead  area and investigate options

Decision maker  and partnership

Community groups

$15,000

 

Improve our sportsfields through sand field construction and floodlighting provision

Decision-maker

Sports groups

$900,000

(over 3 years)

 

Work with neighbouring local boards to progress a reserve management plan for the future recreation reserve at Green Road, Dairy Flat

Advocacy

Governing body and other local boards

$150,000

Regional funding required

 

Upgrade local community hard courts

Decision maker

Community groups

$600,000 

(over 3 years)

 

Undertake consultation to assess open space needs in Matakana to determine the future use of Matakana Jubilee Park

Decision maker

Community groups

$10,000

Everyone has access to a local swimming pool

Undertake a feasibility study, planning and design for a swimming pool/aquatic facility in Warkworth

Advocacy

Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Inc

$30,000

Walkways, cycleways and bridleways are used for leisure, health and well-being

Construct recreational walkways, fitness trails and bike trails and undertake plans to identify key linkages to determine areas of priority*

Decision-maker and partnership

Community groups

$450,000 

(over 3 years)

 

Rivers and coastal areas are valued and able to be enjoyed and accessed with ease

 

Support community efforts to dredge the Mahurangi River for navigational access by providing assistance with technical and consenting matters

Advocacy

Mahurangi River Restoration Trust

Project not costed and requires community funding

Build and maintain coastal seawalls, initially Algies Bay and Shelly Beach

Decision-maker

-

Project not costed

Enhance coastal access by implementing actions from the boat ramp, launching and mooring facilities study

Decision-maker

-

Project not costed

Our parks are family friendly and enjoyed by all

Create challenging playgrounds by enhancing the existing ones and developing new ones

Decision-maker

Rodney youth

$440,000

(over 3 years)

 

Partner with community groups to facilitate the design and build  of new playgrounds in Kumeū/Huapai and Warkworth based on population growth

Decision-maker and Partnership

Youth in Kumeū/Huapai and Warkworth

$200,000

Community funding required for these projects

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

 

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Outcome: Communities are empowered and plan for their own futures

Our communities know what they want for their futures. Communities are empowered by council to work together to make projects happen. Local people will plan for their own areas and determine what is important.

We know that the populations of Kumeū/Huapai and Warkworth are going to increase faster than we ever thought a few years ago. Kumeū/Huapai/Riverhead is already growing fast with an additional 3000 houses going into this area in the next few years. The Auckland Plan indicates that Warkworth is set to grow to 20,000 people by 2040. We have issues of remoteness and we have an aging population. There was 49 per cent growth in the number of residents aged 65 plus in Rodney between 2006 and 2013.

 

Our area also has a lot of smaller towns and villages under growth pressure. We have a local board area the equivalent size of 19 urban local board areas. Local people need the chance to plan for their local areas and decide what they need to make their areas more liveable.

 

Communities lead the planning

Rodney communities will play their part in implementing the Auckland Plan and Unitary Plan by accommodating growth. We must ensure that this is supported through more detailed planning such as structure planning acknowledging the existing structure plans. We need to have a say in what social, transport or servicing infrastructure we think is needed. It is important we all work together when we plan for towns. Communities should lead the planning process in partnership with the council, rather than the other way around.

 

Some towns and villages that are not growth areas, such as Opahi Bay, are ready to create a shared vision for their areas. Providing tools and skills will assist communities to develop visions themselves. These vision statements can be owned by communities and will be clear expressions of what they want for the future of their areas.

 

Empowering Communities

Community groups often have access to resources that council doesn’t and can make projects happen quickly with volunteer support. Communities need support to undertake projects they consider important, from playgrounds in Waimauku or Kaukapakapa to sports facilities in Matakana. Council can help in the planning and land provision and communities take the lead in funding and implementing projects.

 

Main streets are focal points

Our main streets are focal points for community events and economic activities. To make sure our township’s main streets were looking good, we had a programme of upgrades. These plans were created some time ago for many areas, but works have slowed and funding has not been available. We want to reactivate these plans so we can be proud of these areas once again.

 

We are prepared

Local civil defence emergency management volunteer groups need support to be able to help us. Together we can be aware of, and prepared for, the worst, just in case.

 

Youth voice

Youth are our future and they need to be heard. The Rodney Youth Advisory Panel is keen to get involved and be the voice of youth in Rodney. We need to support them and include them in planning and projects.

 

Iwi relationship

The local board would like to have an enduring, positive relationship with our treaty partners. We acknowledge mana whenua as kaitiaki. A memorandum of understanding between iwi and Auckland Council is being drafted. The local board will also continue to have hui with local iwi.

 

What you told us

·    “We need to be proud of our town centres …keeping them clean, tidy and looking pretty, makes for a proud community spirit.” (Helensville resident)

·    “Please support the completion of the Warkworth streetscape rejuvenation.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “Bring all sectors of the community together to have an input and coordinate - be the facilitators not the managers!” (Snells Beach resident)

·    “The focus must be on quality streetscape enhancements in both Parakai and Helensville e.g. street seating, planting.” (South Head resident)

·    There needs to be a welcoming gateway entrance into Kumeu…instil a sense of pride in our towns.” (Waimauku resident).

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

We will be the world’s most liveable city when we are all empowered to make things happen and have ownership in our futures. Communities leading projects raises the quality of urban living and enhances wellbeing.

 


What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Communities lead the planning for their own futures

 

Undertake consultation in Kumeu/Huapai to understand community values and perceptions prior to developing a comprehensive plan

Decision maker and partnership

Local communities and mana whenua

$60,000

 

Develop a comprehensive plan (similar to a structure plan) for the Kumeu/Huapai area within the next two years.

Advocacy

Local communities and mana whenua

Project not costed

Develop a comprehensive plan for Warkworth within three years

Advocacy

Local communities and mana whenua

Project not costed

Assist communities to implement a community visioning toolkit and template for  their areas**

Decision maker

Local communities and mana whenua

$45,000

($15,000 per year)

 

Support communities to undertake gateway enhancement projects at town entrances *

Decision-maker

Local communities and mana whenua

$60,000

($20,000 per year)

 

Provide local cemeteries close to towns and villages

Advocacy

Local communities

Project not costed

We are proud of our main streets and they act as focal points for community events and economic activities

 

Partnering on main street upgrades at Warkworth, Wellsford, Kumeū/Huapai Helensville and Te Hana

Advocacy

Local businesses, BIDS, Auckland Transport and New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA)

$1m

(over 3 years)

Youth in Rodney have a voice

Determine and implement a clear process for engaging with youth via the Rodney Youth Advisory Panel

Decision maker

Rodney Youth Advisory Panel and other Rodney youth

$18,000

($6,000 per year)

 

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

** this tool does not apply to the growth areas of Kumeu/Huapai and Warkworth as these are being dealt with under separate initiatives.

 

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Outcome: Our environment is healthy, cared for and enjoyed

Local community groups take ownership of the quality of their environment. River and stream water quality will be improving, pest species reduced and waste minimised. Our wastewater servicing will be reliable and environmentally friendly.

 

Our rolling green hills, bush-clad slopes, wild west coast surf beaches, gentle east coast white sand bays and pristine harbours make Rodney special to us all. We love our piece of paradise and the lifestyle it offers. This is why we are so passionate about looking after what we have.

 

Care for our environment

With more than 1,000km of coastline in Rodney, a vast land area of more than 2,246km², three harbours (Mahurangi, Kaipara and Whangateau) and nine regional parks, it is no small task to care for our environment.

 

Protecting our native birds, animals, insects and plants is a good first step. We can work together on projects like the North West Wildlink and implementing the Mahurangi Action Plan to make a difference to our environment. We need to empower and encourage community stewardship, and keep up the momentum, on eradicating pest species. We also need to be involved in the Kaipara Harbour and Hauraki Gulf marine spatial plans.

 

Water quality

We want to improve water quality in our waterways and harbours, and we know how to do it. Planting stream banks and fencing off waterways helps reduce the sediment going into our waterways. Through grants and funding initiatives, such as the sustainable catchments programme, we can help landowners and community groups get involved.

 

Community success in environmental initiatives

Communities are valued as key to the success of environmental and sustainability initiatives.

 

Many community groups have recently received support and resources from the local board to undertake environment projects. We all benefit from leaving a light footprint on the earth, and working together we can do a lot with a little. Sustainable living initiatives, such as energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reduction, will help us learn with our neighbours.

 

Working together

The Joint Kaipara Harbour Political Committee brings together a number of councils and iwi to ensure a consistent approach to governing and managing the harbour. This committee should be involved in the early stages of the Kaipara Harbour Marine Spatial Plan and any future plans for the harbour.

 

Wastewater services

We provide wastewater servicing in all sorts of ways. Whether people provide their own service on site or are serviced by a council system, we need to ensure wastewater services are reliable and environmentally friendly. Some septic tanks in our rural and coastal areas are polluting our environment. We need to find a solution, and also plan and fund key infrastructure upgrades to cater for population growth.

 

Water supply

We can’t survive without clean drinking water, it’s a basic need. The quality of water in our townships is improving as we move from river to bore supply in some areas and improve treatment plants in other areas. This improvement must continue.

 

Waste management

We generate waste everywhere, but communities including schools, volunteer groups and recycling depots are doing something about it and sharing the message. We will support these groups to undertake waste minimisation practices and initiatives through regional grants. We will also support the upgrade of the community recycling centre in Helensville to form part of the regional resource recovery network and cater for the roll-out of the new inorganic collection in Rodney.

 

What you told us

·    “Any threat to the natural environment is a threat to the value of this area.” (Anon)

·    “Noxious weed clearance needs to be a high on-going priority.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “Coastal and river erosion is destroying the harbours.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “Need for better partnership models between council and landowners for protection and conservation.” (Anon)

·    “More back up for local groups who are doing sterling voluntary work eradicating pest plants from the berms and parks.” (Sandspit resident)

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

The world’s most liveable city is a green Auckland with a strong commitment to the environment. This means that we are all have the opportunity to get involved in looking after our harbours, rivers, coasts and native bush areas.

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people          

Potential cost

We care for our environment

 

Support biosecurity and biodiversity initiatives

Advocacy

Community groups

Project not costed

Implement actions identified in the completed ecological survey to protect and enhance biodiversity*

Advocacy

Auckland Transport

Project not costed

Prioritise the Kumeū,Helensville and Kaukapakapa river flood protection projects

Advocacy

Local communities

Project not costed

Water quality in our streams, rivers and harbours is improving

Support communities to get involved in improving water quality in our rivers and harbours*

Advocacy

Community groups

Project not costed

Communities are valued as key to the success of environmental and sustainability initiatives

Support community groups to undertake environmental restoration and preservation*

Decision maker

Community groups and mana whenua

$150,000

(over 3 years)

 

Support sustainable living initiatives in the community

Decision-maker

Community groups

$30,000

(over 3 years)

We work together to achieve environmental outcomes

Joint Kaipara Harbour Political Committee*

Advocacy

Mana whenua, neighbouring councils and the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group

Project not costed

Wastewater services are reliable and environmentally friendly

Support community-led projects to improve septic tank systems and community education on best practice

Advocacy

Community groups and local residents

Project not costed

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

 

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Outcome: Local halls and libraries are familiar, valued and well used community spaces

Our halls and libraries meet the needs of local communities. They are highly valued, welcoming, friendly spaces in which local residents take pride and have a sense of ownership.

 

We are proud of our halls and libraries. All 23 council-owned halls, numerous privately owned halls, five libraries and four volunteer libraries are well loved by their users. People make these places special, not bricks and mortar, although that helps!

 

Libraries

Wellsford has an impressive new library and with a growing population in Rodney, we must to focus on the next area of need. The size of the Warkworth library is inadequate for the current population, let alone catering for future growth, so we want to plan now for its expansion.

 

Community facilities

Throughout history our halls have been the central meeting point for communities. They have hosted weddings, dances, fundraisers, markets, karate classes, and even welcomed people back from war. One thing we did right was make sure most of our communities had a place to gather. These halls and the people who support them continue to have a central role in community life.  As a part of this we recognise the role that self-sustaining community owned halls play.

But as we shiver in winter in halls without heating and squeeze into buildings too small for the rising population, we know they need more than ‘a lick of paint’. This goes for our town centre toilets as well. They looked great when they went in, but we now wonder whether tourists would really detour to use our facilities. They need some love and attention. We all want our community facilities to be fit for purpose and responsive to local needs and interests. Upgrades are under way with the Warkworth Town Hall and Helensville War Memorial Hall. Now is the time to consider what we will need in the future and improve what we have.

 

 

 

Advisory groups and library volunteers

People on our advisory groups, will tell you that things have been a bit up in the air with the new Auckland Council. Our library volunteers might also say that they can’t do some of the things they used to. What we all know without a doubt is that these roles and the people who do them are absolutely essential. We need some clarity about where to from here, and we need to listen to the locals who know their areas.

 

What you told us

·    “Warkworth Town Hall is desperately needed and local board support to assist the community in the fundraising necessary.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “Maintain them properly and ensure that they are available for the community at minimal cost - they should not be a profit-making exercise.” (Algies Bay resident)

·    “Our libraries are important meeting points and they serve the community well with their holiday programmes etc.” (Kawau Island resident)

·    “Warkworth library is not fit for purpose …take over whole council building to provide adequate children’s area, computer area and staff offices.” (Anon).

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

The world’s most liveable city locally means looking after our local libraries and community halls and supporting the volunteers who give their time to make them special places with a local flavour.

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Libraries meet community needs

Expand the Warkworth Library within 10 years

 

 

Advocacy

Local communities

Project not costed

Community facilities are fit for purpose and responsive to local needs and interests

Provide community facilities in Helensville

Decision-maker

Community groups

$660,000

 

Re-open the former Wellsford Library building for community uses under an economically sustainable model*

Advocacy

Wellsford community

$45,000  

(over 2 years)

Complete stage one of the Warkworth Town Hall upgrade

Advocacy

Warkworth Town Hall Advisory Group

$3.037 million

Support community to raise $1million for stage two of the Warkworth Town Hall upgrade within two years

Advocacy

Warkworth Town Hall Advisory Group and Warkworth Town Hall Restoration Trust

Project not costed

Upgrade of town centre toilets in Wellsford, Kumeu and Warkworth

Advocacy

Business associations, BIDS and Community groups

$350,000

(over 3 years)

 

Volunteers are valued as key to the success of community facilities and services

Determine and implement an appropriate structure for Rodney halls and reserves advisory groups

Decision maker and partnership

Halls and reserves advisory groups

Project not costed

Volunteers are valued as key to the success of community facilities and services

Support volunteer libraries

Decision-maker and partnership

Communities running volunteer libraries in Leigh, Point Wells and Tapora           

$21,000

(over 3 years)

 

Volunteers are valued as key to the success of community facilities and services

Support and encourage volunteers in our libraries

Decision maker and partnership

Library volunteers

$9,000

(over 3 years)

 

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

 

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Outcome: Local economies are strong and growing

Our local economy will strengthen and businesses will thrive through working together.

 

A growing economy will provide more jobs for local people

Rodney’s economic base is diverse. We have a strong rural production sector, a growing tourism market, a thriving construction industry and emerging research and technology businesses. Retail, service and industry activities in our towns and villages are also expanding. Rodney needs a local economy with focus and direction to support the initiatives of local business groups.

 

Businesses work together to grow our economy

As mentioned by one resident, “Local businesses give jobs, wealth, and vibrancy to us”. Growing our economy is more than businesses getting bigger. We all benefit from a growing economy. Rodney towns will be some of the fastest-growing areas in Auckland. This suggests a rapid expansion of economic potential.

 

Huge possibilities exist in the rural sector to add value to the economy. Our strengths also include niche manufacturing such as wine making and boat building. To consider all this and provide clear direction, we will complete a Local Economic Development Action Plan. In partnership with business groups, we will then implement actions that result in a growing economy.

Business associations work tirelessly to promote their areas and drum up business. If we all work together as business improvement districts (BIDs) and visitor strategy groups, we can do even more great work. We know Rodney’s growing population expands demand for local services. Now is the time to work together to strengthen and grow our local economy, as seven areas have done in the west of Rodney. In combining forces to create one BID (those areas being Helensville, Parakai, Kumeū, Huapai, Riverhead, Kaukapakapa and Waimauku).

 

Greater visitor numbers

Employment in the tourism sector has increased by 32 per cent in the 10 years to 2012. Tourists have flocked to shop and eat in our pretty villages and splash in the water at our beautiful beaches. To build on this, we will support the community to deliver projects that contribute to growth in the Rodney tourism market through support for BIDs. It also means providing facilities and amenities (like toilets) and making our towns more attractive to enhance the visitor experience.  Upgrading our mainstreets not only makes us proud of our home towns, but increases tourism and strengthens our economies.

 

Export business thriving

Rodney has an increasingly productive agriculture, forestry and fisheries base, with particular strength in dairy production, forestry, horticulture and viticulture. We also have strong regional, national and international supply chains. Opportunities exist to scale up activities in internationally competitive sectors and increase export potential within businesses. We also need the government’s rural broadband initiative delivered to be connected nationally and internationally.

 

Work-ready labour force

The Rodney economy is characterised by small-scale operations, with a high number of small businesses and self-employed people. For businesses to grow, we need a labour force that is work ready. Through the Youth Connections programme we can understand the staffing needs of businesses, improve access to training opportunities and assist in the transition of people (often youth) from education to the workforce.

 

Business land

We need to be ready with a supply of business land for development before opportunities arise, not after they are lost. Additional land zoned for business purposes is needed in Warkworth, Wellsford and Silverdale West, which lies west of the motorway in the Rodney local board area. We will continue to advocate on this point so that we are ready and waiting, ahead of the game.

 

What you told us

·    “If businesses do well, the whole community prospers.” (Matakana resident)

·    “More jobs for the young people.” (Helensville resident)

·    “Help promote Rodney as a tourist destination.” (Anon)

·    “Local jobs, if people in our community are not working they can't participate or afford petrol to travel – isolated.” (Waimauku resident)

·    “Assisting local business communities to work together to build business is important.” (Kaukapakapa resident)

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

The world’s most liveable city is one where businesses can work collectively to create an prosperity and opportunity through business improvement districts focusing on what is needed locally. We can raise living standards for everyone and accelerate the prospects of our young people by working together on an economic development plan for Rodney.

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Businesses work together to strengthen and grow our local economy

 

Complete and implement the Rodney Local Economic Development Action Plan*

Decision maker and partnership

Local businesses and associations, Auckland Tourism, Events & Economic Development (ATEED) and mana whenua

$27,000

 

Support Warkworth and Wellsford/Te Hana to establish BIDs

Decision maker

Local businesses and business associations

$85,000 

(over 3 years)

 

Businesses are thriving

Advocate for ATEED to work collaboratively  with  business associations, BIDS on tourism and export initiatives

Advocacy

ATEED

Project not costed and requires ATEED resourcing

We have a work-ready labour force

Implement actions identified in the Rodney Local Economic Development Action Plan*

Decision maker and partnership

BIDs, business associations and ATEED

$30,000  (over 3 years)

 

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

 

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Outcome: Arts, culture and events enhance our communities and express who we are

Our communities will celebrate, learn and grow through arts, culture, events and a variety of community-led initiatives. These activities will strengthen communities, provide opportunities for people to connect with each other and build a sense of pride.

In Rodney we like to help ourselves; we don’t wait for handouts. We knuckle down with like-minded people and get things happening. Be it creating art centres, running community events, providing healthy homes or creating community gardens, it all begins with an idea and a bit of passion.

There is limited funding available to support the initiatives in this outcome. The emphasis is on providing seed funding, limited grants funding and a small amount of operational funding. This will be a starting point for communities to raise further funds.

 

Events

When it comes to events you name it, we do it. Our communities know how to run great events. We love events like the Kōwhai Festival, the Helensville A&P Show, kids triathlons, the Matakana Fruitloop and the Mahurangi Regatta. They reflect who we are and celebrate our identity.

 

But event organisers are finding it hard to meet the compliance costs and regulations. We need to work together to create a streamlined process that saves us all time and money. We also have huge potential to create a regional event that attracts thousands of people to Rodney. But we need to make a little funding will need to go a long way. Last year we shared $52,000 in grants between 22 events and had requests from 36 groups.

 

Arts

Access to arts and culture activities and facilities needs to be Rodney wide. We have the potential to create arts hubs in our main centres, but we need to prioritise funding to fix up what we have first. The Kumeū Arts Centre building needs a lot of work and the Helensville Community Arts Centre is moving into a new space in the Helensville War Memorial Hall. These centres are run by the community for the community. With professional displays, education, classes and sales, they can support themselves in time and become a real attraction to the area. It is recognised that there is a need and indeed a passion for a community arts space in Warkworth.  This will be largely dependent on the community to drive and fund this project.

 

Volunteers

We rely on people who are willing to give their free time to make our communities better, safer, cleaner and friendlier. Volunteers are valued as key to the success of community facilities and services. None of the seven outcomes in this plan would be possible to achieve without community backing and drive.

 

Let’s say thanks to halls and reserves advisory groups, volunteers in libraries, environmental groups, resident and ratepayer groups, business associations, volunteer fire fighters, civil defence volunteers and other volunteer groups. Let’s celebrate the good work we do.

 

What you told us

·    “Arts and culture can add depth and meaning to local communities.” (Anon)

·    “The west traditionally attracts artists, writers and creators. Let’s build the longest sculpture gallery in the world up Highway 16.” (Kaukapakapa resident)

·    “Social housing in our area or lack of it is a pressing concern for our communities.” (Warkworth resident)

·    “Support local communities to help them with local initiatives thus reducing overall costs of projects.” (Whangateau resident)

·    “Teddy bear picnics for kids, family festivals, fun things for families to do and get together as a community.” (Anon)

 

The Auckland Plan – Creating the world’s most liveable city locally

The world’s most liveable city is where we can express who we are what is important to us through events and the arts.  Our lives are enhanced and the quality of urban and rural living is raised when it is easy to run and take part in events that celebrate life.  We can give our time together for a common good.

 

 

What we want to achieve

Key initiatives

Local board role

Other key agencies or people

Potential cost

Events reflect who we are and celebrate our identity

Support community events in Rodney through grants

Decision maker

Local community groups and mana whenua

 $180,000

(over 3 years)

 

Everyone can take part in arts and culture activities from local arts hubs

 

Work with the Kumeū Arts community to expand the Kumeū Arts Centre facility

Advocacy

Kumeū Arts Centre

$290,000

Provide ongoing operational support for Rodney arts facilities

Decision maker

Kumeū Arts Centre, Helensville Community Arts Centre

$180,000 (over 3 years)

Community-led initiatives strengthen our communities

Celebrate and acknowledge volunteers in Rodney

Decision maker and partnership

Community volunteers and organisations

$4,000 

(over 3 years)

 

* Initiative of particular interest to mana whenua.

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Valuing our local Māori identity

Working together

As part of its Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi commitment, the Rodney Local Board will uphold the principles of the former memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the legacy Rodney District Council in a new MoU with Auckland Council.

 

Regular hui will take place with iwi (Ngāti Manuhiri, Te Uri O Hau, Te Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara and Ngāti Wai). These hui will be engaging rangatira ki te rangatira or chief to chief, to share information and work together.

 

Working in partnership on papakāinga housing, economic development, the creation of local jobs and the improvement of the health of our waterways is important to all. Enabling and supporting mana whenua and Māori residents’ aspirations and providing opportunities for them to contribute to the future well-being of the area are key priorities in the Auckland Plan.

 

Reflecting our Māori heritage

Our rich cultural history and vibrant local communities make us all proud. We will work with mana whenua in the naming of new local roads, parks and council-owned facilities, as we did with the Wellsford War Memorial Library, Te Whare Pukapuka o Wakapirau He Tohu Whakamaharatanga Ki Ngā Pakanga. This will go some way to ensuring that our cultural heritage is reflected locally. We also support council assistance in identifying sites of significance to iwi throughout Rodney.

 

Māori social well-being

Social well-being has been raised as an area that requires us to work together. We acknowledge the six marae in Rodney and their important place in maintaining community connections and traditions. We can partner strategically with iwi for the long-term retention of land within mana whenua rohe for the benefit of the wider community.

 

Definition of mana whenua rohe: the meaning reflects identified tribal boundaries of the tribe who has total power/authority; no recognition of this status is given to any other external group or organisation.

 

Papakāinga

Providing safe, warm, healthy houses for Rodney will directly achieve the Auckland Plan transformational shift. This will significantly lift social and economic well-being, accelerate the prospects of Auckland’s children and substantially raise living standards. The local board has supported through seed funding the Ngāti Whātua Ngā Rima o Kaipara housing initiative to re-fit houses for local iwi using youth interested in skill development and training.

 

Affordable housing and home ownership are priorities in Rodney, but we have multiple shared owners of Māori land unable to put housing on their land due to planning rules. We need to work with iwi to resolve these issues and progress the housing initiative.

 

Māori economic well-being

Mana whenua wish to play a key role in the Rodney Local Economic Development Action Plan. This is timely as iwi are considering their economic strategies following recent treaty settlements. We can work together in many ways towards our economic well-being. We also continue to advocate for local people getting council contracts in our local areas and wish to formalise this in council tender criteria.

 

Youth employment continues to be an area of partnership and the local board supports the Youth Connections model and local skill development initiatives.

 

Environment

We recognise and will continue to support our local iwi and hapū in their customary kaitiaki role. We will work with mana whenua on projects that align with environmental priorities for protecting and restoring our sites of significance and cultural value, waterways and harbours. Ensuring the mauri of our reserves, waterways and harbour is in optimal health respects the cultural and spiritual values of iwi/hapū. Enhancing biodiversity and improving water quality in our streams, rivers and harbours is a particular priority for all Rodney communities.

 

Regional parks

We have nine regional parks in Rodney, many with sites of cultural significance. Mana whenua involvement in managing these parks is limited. We support investigating opportunities for co-managing aspects of these parks so that we can discuss and manage them jointly. These include issues like cattle on parks versus planting to protect pā sites.

 

What you told us through iwi engagement

·    “Interested in co-management relationship on regional parks.”

·    “Purchasing back land that is in our mana whenua rohe is important and takes time.”

·    “The northern rail link to Whangarei is important.”

·    “A Māori economic strategy will now be completed following treaty settlements.”

·    “Our people are returning to live on our land but papākainga rules are too restrictive.”

·    “Coastal management plans are a priority.”

 

Joint Kaipara Harbour Political Committee

A joint governance group was set up in 2012 to ensure a consistent approach to managing the Kaipara Harbour for better environmental outcomes. This Rodney Local Board initiative brings together four councils and iwi including Te Uri O Hau and Te Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara to share the governance and discuss issues facing the harbour.

Parakai Recreation Reserve Board

The Parakai Recreation Reserve Board was set up as a result of the Ngāti Whātua Ngā Rima o Kaipara treaty settlement. This new board makes decisions about the Parakai Recreation Reserve on behalf of the community and is a great example of a shared governance model that works. The next big project is to talk to the Parakai community and prepare a reserve management plan.

 

Local Māori identity

Treaty partners have an effective and respectful relationship, Māori aspirations are realised and Rodney communities are enriched through knowledge sharing. We acknowledge mana whenua as kaitiaki. We prioritise working in partnership with iwi to build a sound and enduring relationship.

 

Projects and initiatives of particular interest to iwi have been woven through the plan. They are acknowledged by an *asterix next to each initiative in the tables for each outcome.

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Indicative budget and funding sources

In each of our local board plan outcomes we include a list of key initiatives to deliver the outcome. Some of these initiatives are funded in the council’s Long-term Plan for 2012-2022 (LTP). The remaining initiatives are not currently funded.

 

There are a number of ways that local board activities can be funded:

·    through general rate funding. The governing body decides on the share of general rate funding provided to local boards. The governing body also makes decisions on investment in new facilities and major upgrades of facilities.

·    by reprioritising our budget to either delay or cut existing projects and activities

·    by the local board proposing that the governing body sets a targeted rate in the local area

·    through fees and charges paid by users of our facilities

·    by leveraging involvement of other partners such as the private sector and other public sector agencies.

 

We will prioritise which projects we put forward for funding in the next draft LTP, taking into account what you told us.

 

The indicative budget for the three years from July 2015 to June 2018 is set out on the following pages. When reading this budget it is important to note that the local board’s actual budget will look quite different over the next three years for a number of reasons:

·    The council is preparing the next draft LTP for 2015-2025. This includes a review of funding for all projects which may affect some local board projects that are currently funded.

·    How local boards are funded has also been reviewed. This will affect local board budgets in the draft LTP.

·    The budget is indicative only. It does not contain all of the detailed projects or activities that the local board may carry out over the next three years. These will be developed through the local board agreement that is part of the council’s annual plan for each financial year.

·    The local board’s actual budget for each year, including how it is funded, is subject to agreement with the governing body as part of the discussion on the annual local board agreement.

 

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Expenditure for Rodney Local Board area for 2015 - 2018

 

$000

Budget

Budget

Budget

Financial year ending 30 June

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

 

 

 

 

Net Operating Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

558

576

608

Local built and natural environment

167

35

36

Local community services

1,136

1,223

1,285

Local economic development

752

626

666

Local governance

1,576

1,571

1,634

Local libraries

3,276

3,379

3,532

Local parks services

13,144

14,110

14,951

Local recreation services

94

95

98

Total net operating expenditure

20,703

21,615

22,810

 

 

 

 

Net Capital Expenditure

 

 

 

Local arts, culture and events services

293

151

171

Local built and natural environment

0

0

0

Local community services

854

400

465

Local economic development

242

0

0

Local governance

0

64

0

Local libraries

200

101

128

Local parks services

8,828

4,341

2,573

Local recreation services

0

0

0

Total net capital expenditure

10,417

5,057

3,337

 

 

 

 

Financial statements are based on the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, including approved changes made during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 financial years, annual planning processes and agreed capex deferrals from 2014/2015.  Budgets are indicative only as they will be reviewed through the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (due for adoption in June 2015) and allocated in accordance with the Local Board Funding Policy.  

 

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Appendix one – Rodney Local Board area map

Note:  Map to be updated in final copy.

Title: Rodney Local Board area map

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Your Rodney Local Board members

Note: Group photo to be inserted and individual photos removed.

Photo

Members details

Title: Brenda Steele - Description: Photo of Brenda Steele, Rodney Local Board chairperson

Brenda Steele – Chairperson

021 283 5835

brenda.steele@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: Steven Garner - Description: Photo of Steven Garner, Rodney Local Board deputy chairperson

Steven Garner – Deputy Chairperson

021 720 744

steven.garner@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: James Colville - Description: Photo of James Colville, Rodney Local Board member

James Colville

021 243 1357

james.colville@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: William Flaunty - Description: Photo of William Flaunty, Rodney Local Board member

Warren Flaunty, QSM

021 287 1555

warren.flaunty@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

86 Red Hills Road, Taupaki, RD2, Henderson 0782

Title: Thomas Grace - Description: Photo of Thomas Grace, Rodney Local Board member

Thomas Grace

021 464 446

thomas.grace@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

1581 State Highway 16, Woodhill RD2, Helensville 0875

Title: Beth Houlbrooke - Description: Photo of Beth Houlbrooke, Rodney Local Board member

Beth Houlbrooke

021 839 413

beth.houlbrooke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: John McLean - Description: Photo of John McLean, Rodney Local Board member

John McLean

021 114 9092

john.mclean@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: Phelan Pirrie - Description: Photo of Phelan Pirrie, Rodney Local Board member

Phelan Pirrie

021 837 167

phelan.pirrie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Title: Greg Sayers - Description: Photo of Greg Sayers, Rodney Local Board member

Greg Sayers

021 285 9900

greg.sayers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara Housing Project Funding Request 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/23146

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the progress of the Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara Housing Project (the housing project) in the 2013/2014 financial year and consider the allocation of further funding in 2014/2015.

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board allocated funding of $40,000 in 2013/2014 to Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara Trust (the Trust) to assist with overall support and development of the housing project.

3.       The Trust is requesting further funding of $50,000 in 2014/2015 to cover the costs of employing a Training and Retrofitting Coordinator and assistance in securing a suitable land site to accommodate the houses for retrofitting.

4.       Attached is a report on the housing project outlining their progress and achievements in 2013/2014 and their request for funding in 2014/2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara Housing Project Funding Request 2014/2015 report.

b)      consider whether or not to allocate funding in 2014/2015 to the housing project.

 

Discussion

5.       There are many families living in sub-standard housing in South Kaipara. The purpose of the housing project is to provide improved housing for these families by relocating and retrofitting surplus houses from Hobsonville Point and making them available at an affordable price.

6.       The housing project will also create new opportunities for local skills development and employment, particularly for young people. In the next phase, there is an emphasis on forming partnerships with training institutes to develop a training programme with qualifications, using the retrofitting work to enhance practical skills.

7.       The Rodney Local Board provided funding of $40,000 in 2012/2013 to complete the initial scoping stage of the housing project. This was done in association with Beacon Pathway Incorporated who acted as a fundholder and key support partner.

8.       Further funding of $40,000 was allocated in 2013/2014 to Ngati Whatua Nga Rima o Kaipara to develop and support Phase Two of the housing project. Key outcomes and deliverables were:

·    Improve capacity of Nga Rima for delivery of the project

·    Develop partnerships, commitments and security of funding

·    Complete needs analysis work to support a wider programme of housing development

·    Secure land for retrofitting further houses

·    Progressing the retrofit demonstration programme including an evaluation and assessment

·    Showcasing the project to the wider community.

9.       The pilot retrofit of two ex-Hobsonville homes at Kaipara College was completed in June 2014 and the houses have been blessed and opened (see further information in the Trust’s report (Attachment A). The houses will be used to provide short term supported accommodation for people with housing difficulties.

10.     The experience, process, costings and outcomes from the pilot retrofit have been used to develop a broad housing model for South Kaipara.

11.     The Trust has built relationships with suppliers, developed a good understanding of council consent processes and the infrastructure issues associated with an initiative of this nature. It is now in a sound position to develop the initiative further.

12.     In addition to the funding provided by the local board, the Trust secured the remainder of the funding required to complete Phase Two of the project from Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara.

13.     Based on their experience with the retrofit pilot and information gathered through a series of community workshops, the Trust has developed a Rural Affordable Housing Model. This model sets out a framework that includes:

·    Retrofitting 30 Hobsonville houses a year and shifting them on to suitable land for South Kaipara families

·    A housing navigator role to assist families with processes such as utilising Maori land and securing mortgages

·    A training leader role to develop training and employment opportunities associated with the retrofit of the houses.

14.     The Trust is seeking funding of $50,000 from the Rodney Local Board for a Training and Retrofitting Coordinator. The purpose of this role is to coordinate training and skills development programmes and manage implementation of the retrofit of the houses.

15.     There may be some resourcing available in the community-led environmental action budget and the relationships with community/iwi budget to support this project.

16.     The Trust is also seeking assistance with securing a suitable land site. Either through the provision of council land, funding of a lease agreement, or applying flexibility to the zoning rules pertaining to Maori land. Staff are currently looking at ways they can support the Trust to obtain a suitable site.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.     The purpose of this report is to obtain local board feedback and input.

Māori impact statement

18.     This project ensures sustainable futures by supporting papakainga development, investing in a Maori organisation to develop their infrastructure in implementing the project.

Implementation Issues

19.     None

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ngāti Whātua Nga Rima o Kaipara Housing Project

135

     

Signatories

Authors

Sue Dodds - Senior Community Development Project Leader

Tony Rea - Manager Community Development & Partnerships – West

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 








Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

ARST Funded Project 'Taonga on the Move' Report 2013

 

File No.: CP2014/21405

 

  

Purpose

1.       To table a report on Taonga on the Move 2013 by Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust.

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board confirmed the funding allocation of $53,000 to the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust (formerly Manuhiri Omaha Kaitiakitanga Ora (MOKO) Trust Board) from the Auckland Regional Services Trust Fund (ARST) Stage 2 on 9 July 2012. Resolution RD/2012/149.

3.       The funding contributed to the first year of development and delivery of a project called Taonga on the Move, from July 2012 to July 2013.

4.       The purpose of the funding was to customise and set up a container as a mobile facility, known as an “art container” or “art pod”.

5.       Based on its success, the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust has secured other sources of funding and continues to deliver Taonga on the Move as an on-going project.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Taonga on the Move Report 2013 (dated 25 October 2013).

 

 

Comments

 

6.       The Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust received funding to deliver the Taonga on the Move project from Rodney Local Board on 9 July 2012. The funding came from the Auckland Regional Services Trust Fund (ARST) Stage 2. Resolution RD/2012/149.

7.       The funding contributed to the first year of development and delivery of the project, from July 2012 to July 2013.

8.       The Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust has secured other sources of funding and continues to deliver Taonga on the Move as a successful, on-going initiative.

9.       The purpose of the funding was to customise and set up a container as a mobile facility, known as an “art container” or “art pod”. The project enabled youth, the community and visitors to experience local Maori art, tradition and customs and to learn about the environment and history of the local area. Positioned in various locations including schools and parks, the art container promoted and showcased the work of local and established artists and provided employment for local people.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.     An update on ARST funded projects was provided to the Rodney Local Board at a workshop in June 2013.

11.     The Rodney Local Board Plan 2011 states that arts, culture and events enhance our communities and express who we are.

12.     The purpose of the ARST fund is to support significant projects in the area of arts and culture taking place in the Rodney Local Board area.

Māori impact statement

13.     The Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust represents Ngāti Manuhiri hapu. The Taonga on the Move project benefited both Ngāti Manuhiri and the public through its engagement with parks, schools and the community. The project allowed Ngāti Manuhiri to share their historical and cultural knowledge with others and to raise awareness of their cultural significance to the identified tribal land boundaries including outreaching islands of Te Moana Nui a Toi.

Implementation

14.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A - Taonga on the Move Report 2013

145

     

Signatories

Authors

Naomi Singer – Arts and Culture Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development, Arts and Culture

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 





















Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to Rodney Local Board, October 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22507

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities.

Executive summary

2.       The report provides an update on transport matters for the information of the Rodney Local Board and a register of transport issues in the local board’s area, as collated by Auckland Transport’s (AT’s) Elected Member Relationship Manager North.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update to the Rodney Local Board for September 2014.

Comments

Chip Seal

 

3.       AT is about to embark on its annual road resealing programme and, wherever possible, chipseal will be used as it provides a cost effective and durable road surface which is well suited to Auckland’s flexible road pavements. 

 

4.       Resealing the road waterproofs the surface and improves its skid resistance to ensure that the road stays in good condition.  This regular maintenance means the road does not need to be totally reconstructed, with the road surface generally lasting between 10 - 15 years. 

 

5.       In general a typical reseal will follow the timeline below:

 

·    Some weeks prior to reseal, any road failures are repaired (localised road pavement repairs).

·    A few days prior to the reseal a letter drop is made to advise residents of the work about to take place.

·    On the day of the reseal, traffic management is set up, the road is swept for debris, then the seal is applied to the road surface and rolled to bed it in.

·    Within a few days of the reseal the excess chip is swept off the road and road marking reinstated.

·    A week or so after the reseal the road surface is checked, swept again to pick up any excess loose chip and traffic management is removed.

·    If necessary, an additional sweep is carried out 3 – 4 weeks after the reseal to remove any remaining loose chip.

 

6.       During the course of the work the contractor responds to any Call Centre service requests relating to the chip sealing.

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

 

7.       The Auckland Council Infrastructure Committee has agreed to changes proposed by Auckland Council (AC) and AT relating to the eligibility of projects funded under the LBTCF. Until now, the eligibility of projects has been guided by a March 2013 decision of the former Strategy and Finance Committee which specifically precluded AT from using the LBTCF to undertake works outside the road corridor. A number of local boards felt that this rule created unnecessary rigidity in the use of the fund, and earlier this year the Budget Committee re-examined the issue and referred it to the Infrastructure Committee for decision. On 3 September, the Infrastructure Committee resolved to allow works funded by the LBTCF to be undertaken on Council- or CCO-controlled land outside the road corridor, providing the body controlling the land was also in agreement with the proposal.      

8.       This is expected to have greatest application on land controlled by AC Parks, where in particular walking and cycling infrastructure that connects with the Auckland Cycle Network or Local Board Plans will be able to be funded. For every project that is undertaken outside the road corridor, a specific agreement with the agency controlling the land will be required, covering the ownership of the asset (this will usually be transferred to the agency controlling the land by AT) and the budget from which ongoing maintenance costs will be sourced (usually this will be covered within the budget of the agency controlling the land).

9.       The changes are effective immediately. Some local board projects have been advanced in anticipation of the changes being made, and these should be able to move forward quickly now that the decision has been formalised.

10.     A reminder that local boards should now be identifying new project proposals for the LBTCF budgets allocated to them for the remainder of the term so that subsequent initial assessment, detailed design, consultation and statutory approvals (where required), and construction can be completed by 30 June 2016.

Update on the Rodney Local Board’s LBTCF Projects

 

11.     Construction of the following LBTCF projects identified by the Rodney Local Board has been completed:

 

·    Mountable kerb outside 336 Mahurangi East Road, Snells Beach (Project 118);

·    Footpath extension on Fordyce Road, Parakai (Project 174);

·    Extending the loose metal bridle trail on the northern side of Coatesville-Riverhead Highway from east of Glenmore Road to 264 Coatesville-Riverhead Highway (Project 179);

·    New footpath on Mahoenui Valley Road opposite the school to its intersection with Coatesville-Riverhead Highway (Project 180);

·    New footpath on Rodney Street, Wellsford (Project 190);

·    Construction of local access road improvements, 338 – 382 Main Road, Huapai (Project 175).

 

12.     The construction of Project 177, a new footpath on the eastern side of Coatesville-Riverhead Highway, Elliot Street to the bridge, is almost complete. AT’s Road Corridor Maintenance Team recently constructed a small section of retaining wall very close to the bridge abutment and contractors returned to the site recently after the relocation of services, to carry out the final stage of the work. A small amount of top soiling is now all that’s required to complete the project.

13.     The local board has confirmed construction of the following projects based on the allocation of funds shown:

 

·    Project 113, Puhoi Pedestrian Bridge - $170,000. The design for the bridge, the consents and the contract schedule are now being finalised and it is expected the project will be tendered in October, providing consents are granted. The local board’s Transport Portfolio Leads have requested a copy of the design and this will be circulated on its completion.

·    Project 163, a 1.8 m wide footpath on the western side of Oaia Road from Waitea Road to the distance that $95,000 will allow (estimated at 225m). The extent and design of this new path was investigated in August/September and discussions are now taking place with AC stormwater regarding possible stormwater improvements to be addressed as part of the project. The physical works will be tendered when these matters have been resolved.

·    Construction of a footpath on the eastern side of Puhoi Road from Puhoi Library to Krippner Road Bridge (Project 162) will be carried out in conjunction with construction of the Puhoi Pedestrian Bridge (Project 113), commencing at the beginning of the 2014/2015 summer construction period. A design of the footpath will also be circulated to the local board’s TPLs when this becomes available.

 

14.     At the Rodney Local Board’s meeting on 8 September with respect to Project 205, construction of a 1.8m wide footpath on Point Wells Road, from Waimanu Place to approximately No. 30/32 Point Wells Road, it was resolved (Minute No. RD/2014/200):

That the Rodney Local Board:

 

(a)  revoke resolution RD/2014/102 a) ii) which approved construction of “Footpath, Point Wells Road 1.8m wide on the berm from Waimanu Place to approximately No. 30/32 Point Wells Rd (Reference number 205) $53,000, subject to consultation with affected residents.”

 

(b)  approve the construction of a footpath 1.8m wide from 30 Point Wells Road to the Point Wells General Store at 14 Point Wells Road, to the value of $53,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, subject to consultation with affected residents.

 

15.     Informal consultation with residents affected by the new proposal will now take place.

16.     AT staff met with the local board’s TPLs on 28 July to further discuss Project 116, construction of a footpath on Mahurangi East Road, Snells Beach, from Arabella Lane to the existing footpath. The project is currently on hold pending further information becoming available on the timing of slip repair works in this vicinity and discussion on how safety improvements, funded by the local board, may be delivered as part of these repairs.

17.     It is intended that AT staff will meet further with the local board’s TPLs when this information comes to hand.

18.     The local board requested a detailed design and a firm cost estimate for a new 200m long footpath on Waitoki Road, Waitoki, from the corner of Kahikatea Flat Road (Project 161). The design work for this was postponed pending release of decisions as to which footpaths will be funded through AT’s Community Transport New Footpaths’ budget 2014/2015; however, it has now been confirmed that this project is not included in the list of those projects which will proceed. Design options are therefore now being investigated and discussions taking place with AC stormwater staff regarding possible stormwater improvements, without which it may be impractical to build the footpath.

19.     Following a request from Member Garner, a seat has been made available from surplus stock for installation on Alexander Road, Algies Bay (Project 294), with the local board providing the installation cost of $2,000 from its LBTCF. This funding was approved at the local board’s meeting on 14 July and installation will proceed on receipt of advice from Member Garner as to where the seat should be located.

 

Issues Update

 

20.     The following Issues Update comprises issues raised by Elected Members and Local Board Services staff to 26 September 2014:

Location

Issue

Status

1

Riverhead General

Requests from the Riverhead Residents' and Ratepayers' Association.

Member Garner forwarded a letter from the Riverhead Residents' and Ratepayers' Association on 8 April 2014 which requested a range of improvements in the Riverhead area. Details of previous responses have been recorded in Issues Updates to the local board in May, June, August and September. On 26 August in relation to the provision of additional car parking at War Memorial Reserve, the local board's TPLs were advised that additional parking had recently been provided close to the tennis courts. It is also not ideal to have vehicles reversing onto Coatesville-Riverhead Highway at this location as this poses a risk to cyclists and pedestrians. After construction of a footpath from Edward Street to the Memorial Hall, currently being designed and considered for future funding, AT can review the crossing points and desire lines for pedestrians, in addition to the placement of pram crossings. In relation to congestion during special events, AT is not responsible for the provision of traffic control or parking for special events, which should be the subject of a specific traffic management plan granted approval for the event by Auckland Council’s Events Department.

2

Falls Road, Warkworth

Request for signage and maintenance repairs on Falls Road, Warkworth.

Cr Webster requested on 9 May 2014 that recent damage from heavy vehicles in the vicinity of Falls Road bridge, Warkworth, be investigated and addressed. Cr Webster also asked that signage indicating that the road/bridge is not suitable for trucks and/or trailers be installed to prevent the risk of further damage and accidents. With regard to the signage requested, Cr Webster and Rodney Local Board TPLs were advised on 25 August that Unsuitable for Heavy Vehicles signs will be installed adjacent to the ford and at relevant intersections leading to the ford to discourage heavy through traffic by mid-November 2014. On 9 September Cr Webster and the Local Board's TPLs were advised that the design for repair of the slip in the vicinity of the ford is almost complete and work to repair the drop out will begin before the end of the year.

3

Valley Road, Kaukapakapa

Request for enhancement of barrier preventing vehicles access the paper road portion of Valley Road, Kaukapakapa.

Member McLean asked on 6 June 2014 for the implementation of additional measures, such as heavy duty lockable gates, concrete barriers and/or signage, to prevent vehicle access to the paper road portion of Valley Road, Kaukapakapa.  On 1 July the local board's TPLs were advised that an initial review and site visit has been undertaken, but that further detailed investigation was needed to ensure a comprehensive review of the suggestions made. This investigation will be completed in October 2014 and the local board will then be advised of the outcome and any recommendations resulting from the assessment. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

5

Waitea Road, Muriwai

Request for safety improvements on Waitea Road, Muriwai.

On 26 June 2014 Member Pirrie requested an investigation into the installation of NSAAT restrictions and cautionary signage on Waitea Road, Muriwai. On 11 July the local board's TPLs were advised that Road Corridor Operations staff acknowledge that Waitea Road is narrow in places where use of parking restrictions may be of benefit for vehicle, pedestrian and cyclist access. The suggestions made will be considered during further investigations into all possible options and possible consultation with residents. On 11 September Members Pirrie and Garner were advised of a proposal to install NSAAT restrictions on Waitea Road and asked for their feedback on this proposal. Member Pirrie advised that he was happy for the proposal to proceed to public consultation.

6

Hauraki Road, Leigh

Maintenance required on retaining wall on Hauraki Road, Leigh.

Member Houlbrooke advised on 10 July 2014 that the retaining wall on the road frontage from the Leigh Fire Station (28 Seatoun Road) to the entrance to Leigh School (26 Seatoun Road) is rotting away and allowing the bank to fall onto the footpath. Trees were also hanging over the footpath. With the overgrowth the school entrance is blocked and motorists have very poor visibility of both school entrance and pupils waiting to cross the road. It was also considered a shabby look to the entrance of Leigh Village. On 17 September advice was sent direct to Member Houlbrooke that the Ponga retaining wall outside Leigh School surrounds a planted garden and is therefore the responsibility of AC Parks to maintain. The request for maintenance has therefore been referred to AC Parks for action.

7

Pakiri Road, Leigh

Safety improvements for pedestrian access to the Sawmill from Leigh Village.

On 10 July 2014 Member Houlbrooke forwarded the concerns of people who walk to the Sawmill on Pakiri Road, Leigh, that the paved surface is falling off both sides of the road, that there is no way of avoiding traffic because of this and that street lighting is also urgently needed. On 2 September the local board's TPLs were advised that the request for a footpath for Pakiri Road will be retained for consideration as part of future years New Footpath programmes, the 2014/2015 programme having been oversubscribed. With regard to additional lighting for Pakiri Road, AT street lighting staff agree that this is justified but due to budget restraints it is not possible to include this in the programme at this stage. The Local Board may therefore wish to consider funding the project from its LBTCF.

8

Leigh and Ashton Roads, Whangateau

Complaints about the surface of Leigh Road, and about recent repair work undertaken on Ashton Road, Whangateau.

Member Garner forwarded complaints from a Whangateau resident on 11 July 2014 about the seal on Leigh Road and recent repair work on Ashton Road, Whangateau. On 28 August the local board's TPLs were advised that smoothing work was completed on Leigh Road last year financial year and more work is proposed during 2014/2015 over the 600m section south west of Quintal Road.  The very weak subgrades and deep open water channels result in the requirement for patching on a regular basis, much the same as Sandspit and Matakana Roads, which are of a similar subgrade. Ashton Road was recently inspected and reflected the high recent rainfall, being wet in places particularly where the road surface is not exposed to the sun.  The hill section is very damp and shaded with no drying during winter due to surrounding trees. However, the road had recently been metalled and graded to cut out the potholes.

9

Matakana and Leigh Roads, Sandspit and Mahurangi East Roads, and Rodney roads in general

Request for information on upgrades programmed for Matakana and Leigh Roads, Sandspit and Mahurangi East Roads, and Rodney roads in general.

Having considered information on programmed rehabilitations/upgrades for the Leigh road (i.e. Matakana and Leigh Roads) and the Warkworth – Snells Beach road (Sandspit and Mahurangi East Roads), at their meeting on 9 July 2014, the Rodney Local Board’s TPLs asked when these roads and other roads throughout the Rodney Local Board area are programmed for major upgrades (i.e. installation of footpaths, kerb and channel, shape correction etc.) to bring them up to the standard now required because of the increased volumes of traffic being experienced. Referred to Capital Development.

10

Amreins Road, Taupaki /Waitakere

Request for costs of maintenance on Amreins Road, Taupaki/Waitakere.

Member Flaunty asked for the cost of maintenance required on Amreins Road late 2013/early 2014 in the area of a clean fill operation on 28 July 2014, having been advised that stabilising work was to be carried out in the area of the properties located at 37, 31, 15 and 10 Amreins Road (Waitakere) that should address his previous concerns about damage to the road from the clean fill operation. Member Flaunty advised that a new resource consent had been granted for the property located at 110 Amreins Road and he was concerned about continuing damage to the road and the cost to ratepayers. On 9 September the local board's TPLs were advised that the maintenance repairs undertaken in the vicinity of the properties located at 37, 31, 15 and 10 Amreins Road in December 2013 were at a cost of $137,483.48. It should be noted however that not all these costs can be directly attributed to the clean fill operation located at 110 Amreins Road, and that normal road usage and on-going pavement degradation through the life cycle of the roading asset must be considered a contributing factor.

11

Muriwai Road and SH16, Waimauku.

Request for safety improvements on Muriwai Road and SH16, Waimauku.

Further to information provided previously to the TPLs and noted in the September Issues Update, on 11 September the TPLs were advised that, following intervention by the Prime Minister, construction of the Waimauku roundabout by NZTA will now be scheduled over the period 2015-2018. NZTA has also advised that additional improvements will be made on SH16, including kerb build outs, a pedestrian safety fence (to encourage the use of the pram crossing points) and the kea (school patrolled) crossing, providing the school commits to operating this before and after school. There is also a need to move the existing bus stop and extend the carriageway to accommodate these changes. However, these projects are not included in NZTA’s minor safety works budget for next financial year and construction will therefore not occur for at least 12 months. Should the local board wish to contribute to the cost of construction, there is a possibility that the work could be brought forward. NZTA has therefore agreed to provide facts and figures for the local board's consideration of a contribution through its LBCT Fund.

12

Guy Road, Kaipara Flats

Use of Guy Road, Kaipara Flats, by logging operation.

Member Garner requested comment on concerns expressed by a resident of Guy Road, Kaipara Flats, who had been made aware of an application to Auckland Council by a logging company to use the road as an alternative to Kaipara Flats Road when harvesting logs from a forest situated at the cul-de-sac end of Guy Road. Comments with regard to the safety of the operation were provided on 7 August and noted in the September Issues Update to the local board. With regard to maintenance of the road, the local board's TPLs were advised on 28 August that AT's contractor carries out cyclic inspections on a regular basis to ensure the road is kept to the contracted specifications and in response to customer requests received. The road will be monitored once logging commences and additional metal will be applied if necessary. Maintenance issues as a result of the logging operation can be referred to AT’s 24 hour Call Centre on 09 355 3553 or to info@aucklandtransport.govt.nz.

13

Ngarewa Drive, Mahurangi West

Concerns regarding maintenance and lack of seal on Ngarewa Drive, Mahurangi West.

On 11 August 2014 Local Board staff forwarded a resident's complaint about the standard of Ngarewa Drive, Mahurangi West, noting that it was a mud track where some potholes were filled with metal and the road was recently given a quick scuff up by a grader. They asked that they be advised when the road would be sealed or at least given a proper metal upgrade. By return staff were advised that Ngarewa Drive is in the 31 – 100 band for seal extension, so it will be several years before the current level of funding made available to AT provides for this. On 28 August the local board's TPLs were advised that the road had been metalled and graded since the issue was raised. It is noted however that the unsealed segment has sections which are very shaded due to adjacent tree canopies and thus are damp or wet for extended periods during winter. Residents should therefore refer any urgent issues they have about maintenance of the road to AT’s 24 hour Call Centre on 09 355 3553 or to info@aucklandtransport.govt.nz.

14

Austin/ Kahikatea Flat Roads, Dairy Flat

Request for road marking and signage at the intersection of Austin/Kahikatea Flat Roads, Dairy Flat.

Member McLean asked on 13 August 2014 that road marking and signage be provided at the corner of Austin/Kahikatea Flat Roads, Dairy Flat, where the absence of these makes the school bus drop-off/pick-up dangerous for children. On 16 September the local board's TPLs were advised that an Auckland Transport engineer had visited the site and undertaken an initial review of the issue raised.  Further detailed investigation needs to be undertaken and this has been prioritised and programmed for review, with an expected completion date of mid-December 2014. An update providing information on the outcomes and recommendations from the more detailed investigation can be expected by late January 2015. With Road Corridor Operations staff.

15

Dairy Flat School, 1220 Dairy Flat Highway

Request for footpath for Dairy Flat School, 1220 Dairy Flat Highway.

A new bus stop has been installed at Dairy Flat School, 1220 Dairy Flat Highway and Member McLean asked on 14 August whether it was possible for a new footpath to be constructed between the bus stop and the school. On 26 August the local board's TPLs were advised that, as this year’s New Footpath Programme was fully committed, the request will be included for consideration in future programmes. Should the local board be eager to progress the project in the shorter term, it could consider it as a candidate for funding from its LBTCF.

16

Waitakere Road, Taupaki

Feedback requested on route treatment road safety works along Waitakere Road, Taupaki.

Documentation explaining route treatment road safety works along Waitakere Road, Taupaki and Waitakere, was forwarded to the local boards TPLs on 22 August 2014 with a request for feedback no later than Monday, 8 September. No comments were received from members.

17

Unsealed Roads - Franklin Local Board area

Request for information on unsealed roads in the Franklin Local Board area.

Member Sayers asked for the names of unsealed roads in the Franklin Local Board area. On 25 August 2014 Member Sayers and the local board's TPLs were forwarded information detailing unsealed road lengths by region and a spread sheet showing the names of unsealed roads by local board area.

18

Wainui and Kowhai Roads, Wainui

School bus stop upgrade at the intersection of Wainui and Kowhai Roads, Wainui.

Documentation explaining a proposed school bus stop upgrade at the intersection of Wainui and Kowhai Roads, Wainui, as a result of concerns raised by parents, the bus operator and the Police, was forwarded to the local board's TPLs on 26 August 2014 with a request for feedback no later than Friday, 26 September.

19

Alexandra Street, Riverhead

Illegal dumping on the paper road section of Alexandra Street, Riverhead.

Member Pirrie advised on 21 August 2014 that rubbish has been dumped on the paper road section of Alexandra Street, Riverhead, asking that this be cleared. On 8 September Member Pirrie was advised that his request had been forwarded to Auckland Council's maintenance team which has responsibility for the removal of solid waste, under reference number 802483.

20

SH16 Helensville - Parakai

Poor standard of footpath maintenance on SH16 Helensville - Parakai footpath.

The local board’s TPLs advised on  21 August 2014 that the standard of maintenance on the footpath that stretches from Helensville to Parakai is very poor, with the footpath being no more than a goat track in places. They asked that that repairs and improvements be investigated. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

21

Warkworth

/Matakana/

Snells Beach areas

Request for repairs/maintenance in the Warkworth/

Matakana/

Snells Beach areas.

Local Board staff forwarded a list of repairs /maintenance required in the Warkworth /Matakana/Snells Beach areas (specifically Morpeth and Elizabeth Streets, Sandspit, Mahurangi East, Matakana and Sharp Roads) submitted by a representative  of the Snells Beach Residents' and Ratepayers' Association in support of the Association's Local Board Plan submission. In a partial response (CAS-385959-M7P6J6) on 22 September 2014 Local Board staff were advised that the area on Mahurangi East Road programmed for resealing during this 2014/2015 financial year is the section from James Street to Muncaster Road.  There is also an additional area near Martins Bay Road. In addition, the section adjacent to Lawrie Road was water cut late last financial year.
Balance of requests with Road Corridor Maintenance.

22

Ashton Road, Whangateau

Complaints regarding the response to previous complaint about the standard of maintenance on Ashton Road, Whangateau.

Local Board staff forwarded a complaint from a Whangateau resident not happy with the response to previous queries about the standard of maintenance on Ashton Road, Whangateau, on 5 September 2014. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

23

Matakana Road, Matakana

Interim safety measures proposed for bridge on Matakana Road at Matakana township.

A proposal to narrow the existing traffic lanes to provide 1.2-1.5m of temporary footpath separated by safe hit posts, and to install warning marking and signage on the northern approach to the bridge at Matakana township to slow vehicle speeds and allow opposing vehicles to pass safely, was sent to the local board's TPLs on 5 September 2014 with a request for response by 15 September. The proposed measures will be installed as a trial during which vehicle behaviour will be observed, issues identified and the scheme modified if required. Member Houlbrooke indicated her support for the proposal on 10 September 2014. No other comments were received.

24

Puhoi Village

Safety in Puhoi Village and environs.

Representatives from the Puhoi Road Safety Group made a presentation to the Rodney Local Board on 8 September 2014, noting that the group has been working with AT's Road Corridor Operations and Community Transport staff  towards achieving safety improvements in the area of Puhoi Village. The aim of the presentation was to seek the local board’s support so that the group can achieve its goals of making it safer on rural roads for all users (equestrians, cyclists, walkers/runners, trucks, buses, cars), connecting different areas of the village for pedestrians, establishing a slow speed (30km/h) environment in the village centre, and using gateways to slow traffic down to the speed limit. The local board's TPLs were advised on 22 September that AT staff had been invited to meet with a local constable and the road safety group whose main concern was the speed of traffic and the effect this had on school bus drop-off and pick-up times. AT staff are now investigating possible speed reduction measures in Puhoi/Ahuroa Road and will produce sketches of potential improvements with a view to the group discussing these further with the local board. The proposals being investigated are simple and relate to road surface and lining treatments, suggested locations for planting, relocation of warning signage and the installation of gateway signage. It will be up to the local board as to whether it is willing to support the group to achieve its objectives as most of the proposals will not currently be budgeted for by AT. Improvements are also being progressed by AT by way of the provision of ridden horses signs on Ahuroa Road, together with road marking (arrows) in the vicinity of the cheese factory and cemetery to remind drivers to keep to the right side of the road. These requests have been raised previously by residents local to the Puhoi area. AT’s Community Transport staff recently met with a representative of the Puhoi Road Safety group for a second time to discuss taking AT’s “Love Your Local” speed campaign to Puhoi, an initiative used in the Helensville area.  AT staff are now seeking approval and sign off from management and it is hoped the campaign can be implemented over the period 1 December 2014 - 31 March 2015.

25

2 Matakana Valley Road, Matakana Village

Repairs required to wooden planking on footpath at 2 Matakana Valley Road, in Matakana Village.

Cr Penny Webster's governance support advisor advised on 15 September 2014 that a pedestrian had tripped and fallen on damaged wooden planking which forms the footpath outside the property at 2 Matakana Valley Road, in Matakana Village, requiring medical attention as a result. On 16 September she was advised that AT’s contractors had made the area safe and were now sourcing suitable replacements for the rotten planking. It was noted that untreated pine had been used in the original construction so the replacement pine will be treated. 

26

Haruru and Tahekeroa Roads, Makarau (Signage)

Request for wildlife and one-way signage on Haruru and Tahekeroa Roads, Makarau.

On 16 September Cr Webster's governance support advisor requested the installation of two signs for wildlife on Haruru Road where there are straying turkeys, deer, cows, goats, pigs, pheasants etc. and a one way sign between Monowai and Mick Dillon Roads where the road reduces to one way and wildlife signs on Tahekeroa Road.

Referred to Road Corridor Operations.
 

27

Haruru and Tahekeroa Roads, Makarau - Maintenance

Request for maintenance on Haruru and Tahekeroa Roads, Makarau.

On 16 September Cr Webster's governance support advisor advised that Haruru Road has been reduced to one way for a period of three months, asking when the road would be repaired, She also advised that cones had been in place on the side of Tahekeroa Road Between Haruru and Mick Dillon Roads for three months, asking what was happening at this location. In addition she advised that Tahekeroa Road requires maintenance, asking when this will happen. Referred to Road Corridor Maintenance.

28

Alexander Street Road Reserve, Riverhead

Request for permission to carry out work on unformed legal road.

A request from members of the Riverhead Community for permission to remove rubbish and beautify an area of unformed paper road in Alexander Street Road Reserve, Riverhead, was forwarded by Board Chair, Brenda Steele, on 22 September 2014. Member Steele was advised that all the expense involved, including removal of the rubbish and purchase and installation of bollards, together with on-going maintenance costs of the area, will need to be funded by the local board or the community group involved as AT has no funding for improvements to and on-going maintenance of unformed legal roads.  Referred to Road Corridor Operation staff.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     This report is for the Local Board’s information.

22.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Māori impact statement

23.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

Implementation

24.     There are no implementation issues.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Ellen Barrett – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

 Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Leader

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Community hall fees and charges variation delegation

 

File No.: CP2014/21151

 

  

Purpose

1.       To delegate any decisions needed on the waiver or adjustment of fees for the community halls in the Rodney Local Board area to Rodney Local Board Members Brenda Steele and Steven Garner.

Executive summary

2.       A recently introduced new fee structure for council-managed community venues had raised issues within the Rodney Local Board area. There are eight halls in the Rodney Local Board area that are managed by Auckland Council. 

3.       The new fee structure has resulted in unexpected fee increases for a number of user groups.  Council staff and local board members are working together to resolve the issues.  It has become clear that a delegation is required to enable timely and appropriate decision making around any variation to the agreed fee structure. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to local board members Steele and Garner to make decisions on the waiver or adjustment of fees charged to groups using council-managed community halls in Rodney. 

b)      request that the community facilities team prepare a template form that will be used to seek a decision from the delegated local board members and keep a record of any variation made.

 

Comments

 

4.       Local boards were recently asked to consider the introduction of a new fee structure and increased fees for the hire of council-managed community venues, centres and arts facilities. A report came to the Rodney Local Board business meeting on 14 April 2014.

5.       The local board did not agree to an increase in the fees charged for 2014/2015 financial year. The local board was concerned they did not have enough information to make this decision and worried about potential impacts to community groups in the area. 

6.       The final resolution made was RD/2014/69.

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      confirms the activity types eligible for priority discounts for hire of local council-run facilities as per Attachment A (dated 1 April 2014) to the agenda report.

b)      request that staff report back to the local board detailing usage statistics, asset data, operational costs and other relevant information across all the halls and facilities in the Rodney Local Board area to enable the local board to assess future fees and charges in future financial years.

c)           notes the administrative changes to facilitate implementation.

7.       The new framework was implemented on 1 July 2014.  At around this time a number of users groups approached Rodney Local Board members and the media to express their concern about an apparent increase in their fees.  Further investigation revealed that a letter had been incorrectly sent to regular hall users advising that the hall hireage fees were to be increased.  This error was corrected by a subsequent letter sent to users advising that the Rodney Local Board had not agreed to increase fees.

8.       As issues continued to arise over the July and August period it became evident that a number of existing users of the council-managed community halls had specially negotiated rates outside of the hireage framework.  This meant that although the fees had not been increased some user groups were in fact presented with charges higher than they had previously been paying. 

9.       A transition to the new fee structure has been proposed by the Community Development, Arts and Culture department.  Representatives from the department will continue to work with local board members to implement the changes. 

10.     It has been acknowledged through this process that there will be circumstances where variations to the agreed fee structure will be required.  As any variation to the fee structure affects the local board budget bottom line it is agreed that decisions of this nature should be made by local board members rather than council staff.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     A meeting was held in August between the local board community development portfolio holders and council officers from Community Development, Arts and Culture to understand the issues currently facing staff and the community with the new fee structure.

12.     In order to ensure appropriate and timely decisions are made around the waiver or variation of fees and charges for hall users going forward it was agreed that a delegation should be put in place to allow local board members to make decisions.  The purpose of this report is to put that delegation in place.

Māori impact statement

13.     Providing access to the use of community halls in the Rodney Local Board area benefits the local community as a whole, including Maori. The recommendation in this report is procedural and Maori residents within Rodney Local Board area are not adversely impacted by this decision. 

Implementation

14.     Putting this delegation in place will simplify for council staff the process of allowing variations to the agreed fees structure.  Council staff will contact the delegated local board members to seek opinion and/or approval of any proposed variation.  The decision will be sought and recorded using a template form that will need to be developed by the community facilities team.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Morrison - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

New Road Name - Madden Avenue and Lockyer Road

 

File No.: CP2014/22513

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek the Rodney Local Board’s approval for a new road name in the Westward Properties subdivision off Gilbransen Road, Kumeu.

Executive summary

2.       A condition of the subdivision consent required the applicant to suggest to council a name for the new roads within the subdivision which will vest in council.

3.       The applicant wishes to name two roads within the 19 lot residential subdivision, one currently 115m long and the other 140m long with planned extensions to development in the future.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 of Madden Avenue and Lockyer Road for the Westward Properties subdivision off Gilbransen Road, Kumeu, council reference R59845.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       The applicant is Westward Properties and the site address is 34-40 Gilbransen Road. The council reference is R59845.

5.       This 19 residential lot development was approved in 2013 and development works are currently nearing completion on the site. 

6.       As required by the resource consent the applicant has suggested that the northernmost road be named Madden Avenue and the southernmost road be named Lockyer Road. These two roads are planned to be extended in the future though future development of the site. Daniel Lockyer Madden, is the owner of the site and the operator of Westward Properties. Daniel wishes to continue his legacy within the site through this road naming.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       A decision is sought from the Rodney Local Board to approve the new road names under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Māori impact statement

8.       The applicant has corresponded with Glenn Wilcox of Ngati Whatua o Kaipara. Glenn had no objection to the road names.

Implementation

9.       The Land Information New Zealand database confirms that there are no similar road names in the surrounding area, while it is noted there is a Madden Street in central Auckland. It is felt that this will not produce any confusion due to the separation distance and locality reference.

10.     If and when the name is approved the developer will be advised and they are responsible for erecting the new road name sign.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

181

bView

Locality Map

183

     

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Senior Subdivsion Advisor

Authorisers

Bonnie Lees – Resource Consents Team Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

New Road Name - Awanui Crescent

 

File No.: CP2014/22451

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek the Rodney Local Board’s approval for a new road name in the NV Investment Group Limited’s subdivision off Matakana Valley Road, Matakana.

Executive summary

2.       A condition of the subdivision consent required the applicant to suggest to council a name for the new road within the subdivision which will vest in council.

3.       The applicant wishes to name the 375m crescent shaped road Awanui Crescent that will provide access to 35 residential lots.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 of Awanui Crescent for the NV Investment Group Limited’s subdivision off Matakana Valley Road, Matakana, council reference R61993.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       The applicant is NV Investment Group Limited and the site address 224 Matakana Valley Road. Council reference R61993.

5.       The applicant wishes to name a soon to be formed crescent shaped road that will access 35 residential losts as per a condition of consent R61993. The applicant wishes to name the road Awanui Crescent, in reference to the Awanui trees, or flowering cherry that will be planted along the road. Furthermore, the name refers to the Matakana River as a large river or awa nui.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.       A decision is sought from the Rodney Local Board to approve the new road name under section 319(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Māori impact statement

7.       Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable trust has a vested interest in this area. Fiona McKenzie of the trust has discussed the proposed road name with the kaumatua and he supports the use of Te Reo and the name Awanui.

Implementation

8.       Land Information New Zealand confirms that the name is appropriate and unique to this region.

9.       If and when the name is approved the developer will be advised and they are responsible for erecting the new road name sign.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

187

bView

Locality Map

189

     

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Bonnie Lees – Resource Consents Team Leader

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

New Road Name – Tara iti Drive

 

File No.: CP2014/22436

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek the Rodney Local Board’s approval for a new road name in the Tara-Iti Holdings NZ subdivision off Pacific Road, Te Arai.

Executive summary

2.       The applicant has proposed a name to council for a newly created private access road for the proposed golf course. The road will be surfaced with stabilised sand to blend with the natural dune landscape within which it sits.

3.       The applicant wishes to name the road that will access the golf club Tara-iti Drive.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the new road name of Tara iti Drive for the Tara-Iti Holdings NZ subdivision off Pacific Road, Te Arai Point, council reference L61627.

 

 

Comments

 

4.       The applicant is Tara-Iti Holdings NZ and the site address 140 Pacific Road. The council reference is L61627.

5.       The applicant wishes to name a newly created private access road that will service the Tara Iti Golf Club house at Te Arai Point.

6.       The New Zealand Fairy tern, also known as the Tara Iti in Te Reo, is a small, highly endangered bird that nests along the dunes with the development. Throughout the project Darby partners have ensured that the design protects and enhances the natural habitat for this endangered bird. Due to the significance of the fairy tern in the area the applicant has proposed the road name is Tar iti Drive in recognition of this.

7.       It is noted that through consultation with iwi, Te Uri o Hau have a vested interest in the area, and that in order to use this name correctly and for it to be appropriate it must be two words, i.e. Tara iti Drive.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       A decision is sought from the Rodney Local Board to approve the new road name for this private access road.

Māori impact statement

9.       Te Uri o Hau has a vested interest in this area. Mikaera Miru of this Iwi confirms that that name has the approval and is deemed appropriate by the kaumatua.

Implementation

10.     The land information database confirms that the name is unique in New Zealand.

11.     If and when the name is approved the developer will be advised and they are responsible for erecting the new road name sign.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Scheme Plan

193

bView

Locality Map

195

     

Signatories

Authors

Frank Lovering – Land Surveyor, Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Bonnie Lees – Resource Consents Team Leader

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 



Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Proposed changes to establish committees

 

File No.: CP2014/22525

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek the Rodney Local Board’s approval to rationalise the current portfolio structure and create two committees to deal with a wide range of matters including community development, parks, transport, infrastructure and economic development.

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board has discussed in workshops transitioning from a portfolio structure to a committee structure and establishing two committees to deal with matters relating to community development, parks, transport, infrastructure and economic development.

3.       To enable a smooth transition the report is seeking to create the two committees and a period of transition to enable the new committees to confirm their terms of reference and matters relating to decision-making allocations. With the transition period if there is any uncertainty or the allocation is unclear then the matter should be referred to the whole local board for consideration.

4.       The existing arrangement for matters relating to local board comments on resource consent will remain the same. Member Garner will continue to consider matters from the Warkworth/Wellsford area and Member Flaunty from the West/Dairy Flat area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      agree to establish two committees:

i)        Parks Culture and Community Development Committee

ii)       Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee

b)      confirm that the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee will deal with matters relating to the following:

i)        Parks, Stormwater, Community Facilities, Halls, Recreation Services, Biosecurity, Environment, Conservation, Community Leases, Pools and Multisport Facilities, Reserve Management Plans, Environmental Community Grants, applications for special exemptions under the Swimming Pool Act 1987, Arts, Culture, Events, Community Development, Libraries, Heritage, Iwi, Grants and Event Funding, Youth Advisory Panel.

c)      confirm that the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee will deal with matters relating to the following:

i)        Transport, Infrastructure, Waste Management, Auckland Transport, New Zealand Transport Agency, Watercare and Special Housing Areas, Street Environments, Town Centres, Built Environment, Main Street Upgrades, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED), Buisness Improvement Districts (BIDs), Gateways, Urban Design, Urban and Town Centre Planning and Engagement, Communications and Engagement, Civil Defence and Emergency Management.

d)      appoint members xxxx, to the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee.

e)      appoint members xxxx, to the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee.

f)       appoint member xxx as the chairperson of the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee and member xxx as the deputy chairperson of the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee.

g)      appoint member xxx as the chairperson of the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee and member xxx as the deputy chairperson of the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee.

h)      agree that the first order of future business for the two committees will include the preparation of a terms of reference for the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee and the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee.

j)        will further consider future delegations to the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee and the Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committees in early 2015.

k)      disestablish the Rodney Local Board Swimming Pool Exemptions Committee at the end of 2014 and consider all applications for special exemptions under the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 as part of the Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee.

l)        disestablish the current Rodney Local Board portfolio structure and agree that the chairpersons of the relevant committees be given the former portfolio responsibilities with the deputy chairperson of the relevant committees being the alternate(s).

m)     agree that existing delegations to portfolio holders (as per Attachment A to the agenda report) will be transferred to the relevant committee.

n)      agree that for the avoidance of doubt, any matter not covered by the above resolutions remains the decision of the full local board.

o)      agree that local board comments on resource consents shall continue to be considered by Member Garner for the Warkworth/Wellsford area and Member Flaunty for the West/Dairy Flat area.

 

Comments

 

5.       The current portfolio structure is as follows:

 

Portfolio

Portfolio Holders

 

 

Lead

Alternate(s)

Local planning, policy and governance (includes relationship with Kawau Island representatives)

Chairperson Brenda Steele

  

Deputy Chairperson Steven Garner

 

Iwi

Brenda Steele

 

Phelan Pirrie

Arts and culture

Greg Sayers

Phelan Pirrie

Events

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Warren Flaunty

Community services and facilities

Steven Garner

 

 

James Colville

Brenda Steele

Libraries

Warren Flaunty

Steven Garner

Recreation services (pools multisport facilities)

Greg Sayers

 

Beth Houlbrooke

Parks

Brenda Steele

 

James Colville

Phelan Pirrie

Steven Garner

John McLean

Built and natural environment

Thomas Grace

Phelan Pirrie

Economic Development

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Steven Garner

Brenda Steele

Street environment and town centres

Phelan Pirrie

John McLean

Transport

Steven Garner

Thomas Grace

Phelan Pirrie

John McLean

James Colville

Regulatory – resource consents

Warren Flaunty (West/ Dairy Flat), 

Steven Garner (Warkworth/ Wellsford)

N/A

Regulatory - Bylaws

Steven Garner

All Members

Communications and engagement

Phelan Pirrie (South)

Beth Houlbrooke (North)

 

Finance

Steven Garner

Phelan Pirrie

Civil defence/ emergency management

Phelan Pirrie

Warren Flaunty

Special Housing Areas

Phelan Pirrie (Southern area), 

Steven Garner (Northern area)

N/A

 

6.       The above portfolio structure will be replaced with committees.

7.       It is proposed that the committees comprise the following:

Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee:

Responsibilities: Parks, Stormwater, Community Facilities, Halls, Recreation Services, Biosecurity, Environment, Conservation, Community Leases, Pools and Multisport Facilities, Reserve Management Plans, Environmental Community Grants, applications for special exemption under the Fencing of Swimming Pool Act 1987, Arts, Culture, Events, Community Development, Libraries, Heritage, Iwi, Grants and Event Funding, Youth Advisory Panel.

Transport, Planning and Infrastructure Committee:

Responsibilities: Transport, Infrastructure, Waste Management, Auckland Transport, NZTA, Watercare and Special Housing Areas. Street Environments, Town Centres, Built Environment, Main Street Upgrades, ATEED, BID’s, Gateways, Urban Design, Urban and Town Centre Planning & Engagement, Communications & Engagement, Civil Defence and Emergency Management.

8.       It is envisaged that the transition would involve workshop meetings of the committees before commencing business meetings in 2015. The committees will not have decision making until it has been determined what matters are to be delegated from the local board to the committees and what the terms of reference are. The existing delegations that have been given to portfolio holders will transfer to the relevant committees (see Attachment A).

9.       It is proposed that the local board will continue to hold full local board meetings once a month which would deal with regular business matters with the following responsibilities:

Responsibilities: Local Board Plan, Long-term Plan, Annual Plan, Local Board Agreement and other general local board planning processes, as well as Bylaws, Finance, Consent Feedback, Policy Feedback (unless agreed it should go to a committee), Deputations (unless relating specifically to a committee), and Public Forum.

10.     One of the first items of business for the committees will be to work on their terms of reference.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

11.     This report reflects the views of the Rodney Local Board

Māori impact statement

12.     The Rodney Local Board moving from a portfolio structure to a committee structure will allow the local board to continue to have hui with iwi and ensure that effective decision-making will take into account the views of Māori.

Implementation

13.     Once the local board has resolved to have committees it will need to be determined how often meetings will be held. Business meetings are open to the public and will be publicly advertised.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Delegations to new committees

201

     

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Morrison - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 




Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/21434

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      determine if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

 

Comments

 

8.       This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendations in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August 2014 entitled "Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025."

207

     

Signatories

Authors

Andrew Duncan – Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker – Manager Financial Planning Policy and Bylaw

Andrew McKenzie – Chief Financial Officer

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

















Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Long-term Plan 2015-2025 Feedback on Mayoral Proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/22963

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the Long-term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities.  

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the Mayoral Proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

Background

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the LTP 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The Mayoral Proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the Mayoral Proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the LTP 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October to discuss responses to the Mayoral Proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the Mayoral Proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the governing body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      consider the Mayoral Proposal and whether to provide feedback on the implications of the proposal.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh – Financial Planning Manager Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Karen Lyons – Manager Local Board Services

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Draft Community Grants Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/22073

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Community Grants Policy (Attachment A) and provide an overview of public feedback on the policy for members’ consideration. The report also briefly outlines the key components of the draft policy, proposes a transitional approach to establishing a multi-board grants programme, and discusses the budgetary implications of the policy.

Executive summary

2.       On 3 July 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) endorsed a new draft Community Grants Policy (CGP) for local board engagement and public consultation.

3.       The draft CGP has been developed to guide the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders. It covers grants for community development, arts and culture, events, sport and recreation, environment and heritage.

4.       The draft CGP proposes a new community grants programme aligned to Auckland Council’s governance structure, with:

a)      a local component (21 local grants programmes and a ‘multi-board’ grants programme, governed by local boards and aligned with local board plans), and

b)      a regional component (six regional grants programmes aligned to strategic directions in the Auckland Plan, with governing body decision-making).

5.       Community grants are a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and the council’s core regional strategies, policies and plans. The draft CGP provides a regional framework for grant-making by Auckland Council, while ensuring flexibility for local boards to shape their own grants programme to respond to the specific needs and priorities of their communities. To reflect this, and give effect to local boards’ decision-making role in relation to local grants, staff propose that each local board be supported to develop an individual schedule to the CGP that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

6.       The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. However to achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff propose that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year. Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same.

7.       Once adopted, the CGP will replace an interim community funding programme that has operated since amalgamation, consisting of more than 50 local and legacy ‘city-wide’ grants schemes and a small number of regional grants schemes. The community grants budgets inherited from the legacy councils are currently over-subscribed, especially at the regional level. To fully implement the CGP and deliver on the transformational shifts, staff propose additional investment of $2 million p.a. be considered through the Long-term Plan process 2015-2025. This will increase the amount of funding for regional grants to a more viable level, without reducing the existing funding envelope for local and multi-board grants.

8.       Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October. Public feedback on the CGP was invited between 14 July and 11 August, and a summary of this input is provided as Attachments B and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      endorse the Community Grants Policy as a regional framework for the Auckland Council community grants programme, noting that the local board will be supported to develop an individual schedule to the policy that sets out the specific outcomes, priorities and structure of their local grants programme.

b)      provide feedback on any policy provisions of specific interest or concern to the local board, for consideration during the review and finalisation of the Community Grants Policy.

c)      indicate whether they support the proposal to participate in an interim ‘multi-board cluster’ with Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, Kaipatiki Local Board, and Upper Harbour Local Board to consider jointly supporting projects and activities of mutual benefit, noting that if this is agreed:

i)        staff will work with participating local boards to agree funding priorities and terms of reference for the cluster;

ii)       participating local boards will continue to hold their funds separately within the cluster, and can choose whether or not to allocate funds towards individual grant applications on a case-by-case basis;

iii)      additional multi-board clusters can still be explored, and will be supported wherever feasible;

iv)      the cluster is a transitional arrangement and would exist for the duration of the 2015-2016 financial year only, unless otherwise agreed by the participating local boards.

Comments

 

Background

9.       A discussion paper outlining the key elements, issues and options for a new Community Grants Policy (CGP) was work-shopped with local boards during March and April 2014. Workshops were also held to test draft approaches with the governing body and key stakeholders in May. A summary of the feedback received is provided as Attachment D.

10.     Feedback on the discussion paper informed the preparation of a draft CGP, which was reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (the Committee) on 3 July 2014. The Committee endorsed the draft CGP for local board engagement and public consultation.

11.     Staff attended local board workshops to discuss the draft policy during July and August 2014, to support the provision of formal local board feedback on the CGP during September and October.

Summary of draft Community Grants Policy approach

12.     The draft Community Grants Policy proposes a framework for a new Auckland Council community grants programme with two main components: a local grants programme (incorporating multi-board grants) and a regional grants programme.

Local grants programme

13.     Local grants are a key tool local boards can use to implement the vision set out in their local board plans, and provide a direct, tangible way of supporting local community aspirations and responding to local needs and opportunities.

14.     At the local level the CGP is not intended to be prescriptive, but rather to provide a framework and guidelines that will assist local boards to deliver best practice in grant-making. This approach responds directly to feedback received from local boards during consultation on the draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012.

15.     The draft CGP proposes that each local board is supported to operate their own local grants programme under the broader umbrella of the CGP, and can award grants to groups and organisations, projects, services, events and activities that benefit residents in their local board area. Boards will be supported to develop specific funding priorities for their grants programme, drawing on the priorities set out in their local board plans.

16.     Two grant schemes are proposed to operate through the local grants programme:

a)      Fast Response Local Grants (up to $1,000)

Applicants for Fast Response Local Grants will complete simplified application and accountability processes. Funding rounds are proposed to be held more regularly, and timeframes for decision-making and payment will be kept as short as possible to ensure responsiveness to the community.

b)      Local Grants (over $1,000)

Local Grants are for larger amounts and are proposed to be distributed only once or twice per year, to enable the local board to consider how best to allocate their limited grants budget to deliver the local outcomes they are seeking. Applicants for Local Grants will complete application and accountability processes proportionate to the size of the grant they are seeking. Grants can be ‘one-off’ awards, or a commitment to fund over multiple years (up to a full political term).

Local board grants programme schedule

17.     A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June 2014 to provide an overview of the proposed policy and discuss next steps ahead of reporting to the Committee.

18.     At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Although the policy does provide sufficient flexibility for local boards to exercise this decision-making, it was felt this authority needed to be made more explicit. Following further discussion, it was agreed that this could be achieved by working with local boards to shape the structure and intent of their individual local grants programmes. Once the local board has agreed and adopted their programme, this can become a schedule to the policy. This approach was endorsed by local board chairs at the Chairs Forum on 28 July.

19.     Each individual local board grants programme schedule could include:

a)      Outcomes sought through the local grants programme (driven by local board plans) Any specific local funding priorities

b)      The types of funding opportunities available through the local grants programme

c)      Any specific eligibility criteria or exclusions that are additional to the baseline provisions of the CGP

d)      Any other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

20.     Staff will work with local boards between February and April 2015 to develop and adopt their local grants programme schedules, and an implementation plan will be prepared for each local board to sit alongside the schedule (outlining key operational aspects such as the number and timing of funding rounds).

21.     Local boards will be able to review and update their schedules over time as strategic priorities and budgets change.

 

 

Proposed multi-board grants programme

22.     The draft CGP proposes that local boards be supported to form a range of new, outcome-driven multi-board clusters. These clusters will invite applications from, and award grants to organisations, services, projects, events and activities that benefit residents across their combined areas. Local boards could participate in more than one cluster.

23.     Multi-board clusters may be:

a)      Groups of local boards with contiguous boundaries, for example southern local boards wanting to support events in the Southern Initiative area

b)      Local boards that share a common characteristic or interest, for example high populations of older people, or bordering the Hauraki Gulf

c)      Local boards that want to address a common issue, for example by supporting employment programmes targeting marginalised young people.

24.     Staff will engage with local boards to scope and establish appropriate clusters, which may be in response to a need or opportunity identified by their communities, or to deliver strategic outcomes they have mutually identified in their local board plans. Once local boards have instigated (or agreed to participate in) a multi-board cluster, council staff will work with the participating boards to understand the outcomes sought, and design a grants programme to deliver these.

25.     Applicants seeking support from a multi-board cluster will make one combined application to all participating local boards in the cluster, will receive a single decision notification and grant award, and will submit one accountability report when their funded activities have been completed.

Implementation of the multi-board grants programme

26.     To achieve a smooth transition from the interim funding arrangements to the new grants programme, staff propose that the existing joint funding committees and subcommittees form the basis of four multi-board clusters for the 2015-2016 financial year.

27.     Although this would mean that the current ‘membership’ of these clusters would continue for the first year, this is the only aspect that would remain the same. Participating local boards would agree new funding priorities and terms of reference with the other local boards in that cluster, have discretion over the amount of their local funding to set aside for considering multi-board applications, and support applications on a case-by-case basis.

28.     This phased approach would enable a multi-board grants programme to launch in 2015 alongside the new local grants programmes with minimum additional preparation, given that the joint funding committees and subcommittees have some existing structure in place that could be used as a guide (e.g. delegated local board representatives, approximate schedule of funding rounds, and an existing pool of applicants). Staff could work with these existing multi-board clusters to develop appropriate funding priorities for the transitional year. This approach would be a good test for the model and enable refinements to the process to be agreed with local boards, while minimising any initial impact on community organisations.

29.     The current geographical clusters of local boards (i.e. the joint funding committees aligned to the former city and district council areas in the Auckland region) are:

a)      Northern cluster: Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipatiki, Upper Harbour (Northern Metro Subcommittee) Hibiscus and Bays, Rodney (Former RDC Subcommittee)

b)      Southern cluster: Franklin, Howick, Mangere-Otahuhu, Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe, Papakura (note that suitable arrangements would need to be developed with the southern local boards, as they have not been operating as a cluster)

c)      Western cluster: Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

d)      Central cluster: Albert-Eden, Great Barrier (optional), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Orakei, Puketapapa, Waiheke, Waitemata

30.     In addition, if boards wish to establish and resource other clusters, this could also be supported where feasible.

31.     If this approach is agreed, the transitional arrangements would be reviewed prior to the financial year commencing 1 July 2016. At this time, the clusters could either continue, or additional and/or alternative clusters could be established.

Regional grants programme

32.     It is proposed that the governing body of Auckland Council, through its various committees, will award grants to regionally significant organisations, services, events and activities that benefit residents across Auckland. At the regional level the CGP proposes six activity-focused grants programmes aligned to strategic directions outlined in the Auckland Plan.

33.     The proposed regional grants programmes are:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme

b)      Regional Community Development Grants Programme

c)      Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme

d)      Regional Events Grants Programme

e)      Regional Historic Heritage Grants Programme

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

34.     Each of the proposed regional grants programmes is conceived and will be promoted as a key mechanism to implement the relevant regional strategy, policy or plan (e.g. the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme will support the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan). These regional strategies enable – or will enable – the council to determine where it will target its resources in the medium to long term.

35.     The draft CGP proposes that most of the regional grants programmes provide for two distinct grant types: single-year project grants, for standalone initiatives, and multi-year strategic relationship grants. Project grants of varying size will be awarded through a contestable process at least once per year, while the strategic relationship grants will enable the council to enter multi-year funding relationships with a small number of organisations operating at the regional level. The majority of organisations receiving strategic relationship grants will have an existing relationship with Auckland Council and be able to demonstrate a clear track record of achievement at this level.

36.     To be considered eligible for regional grants, applicants must be able to show that their service, project or activity:

a)      Primarily addresses regionally determined priorities, and it would therefore be unreasonable to expect local boards to meet the cost, and is:

b)      Regional in terms of scale and/or significance, and/or is

c)      Regional in terms of impact and/or reach.

37.     The regional grants programmes are described in schedules to the Draft Community Grants Policy, as it is anticipated these schedules may be reviewed and updated over time as strategic priorities change.

Feedback from public consultation

38.     Public consultation on the CGP was undertaken from 14 July – 17 August 2014 and included:

a)      provision of accessible and easy-read versions of the policy summary document

b)      distribution of information packs and fliers at all Auckland Council service centres, community centres, local board offices and libraries

c)      provision of information via ‘Shape Auckland’ and a dedicated webpage on the Auckland Council website

d)      advertisement in ‘Our Auckland’

e)      advertisement through community and ethnic newspapers

f)       promotion via Council’s social media channels (e.g. Facebook)

g)      provision of a dedicated community assistance email account to allow people to make enquiries and submit feedback

h)      distribution of online survey to the following audiences:

·        those who provided feedback during previous consultations

·        all community grant applicants since amalgamation

·        community networks via Council’s advisory teams (CDAC, PSR, IE)

·        other stakeholder networks as appropriate

i)        provision of hard copy consultation material and submission forms by request

j)        five public workshops (Rodney, north, central, west and south)

k)      local board public workshops as requested (Orakei and Maungakiekie-Tamaki)

l)        two Mataawaka hui (west and south)

m)     presentations at southern and northern mana whenua hui and a regional environmental sector hui.

39.     At the regional local board briefing on 30 June, some members expressed interest in seeing feedback from their communities prior to providing their own feedback on the policy. To enable this staff agreed to extend formal reporting to local boards so that a summary of public input could be provided.  This is now attached for the local board’s consideration (Attachments B and C).

Financial implications of the CGP

40.     The CGP will be a critical tool to implement Auckland’s vision as set out in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and core regional strategies, policies and plans, and it is important that there is sufficient funding to effectively resource the new programme for this purpose.

41.     The legacy grants budgets inherited at amalgamation (or created subsequently) total c. $8.3 million p.a., or around $6 per head of population, with the majority supporting groups and activities that are either local or multi-board (via the legacy ‘city-wide’ funds). These funds are already oversubscribed – on average the value of requests is three times the available budget, and in some cases considerably more.

42.     Of the total community grants budget, c. $2.4 million is currently targeting regional groups and activities. Current baseline funding for each of the regional grants programmes is as follows:

a)      Regional Arts and Culture grants programme (c. $650,000)

b)      Regional Community Development grants programme (No regional budget: all current grant schemes for this activity are administered by local boards, with some regional groups receiving interim allocations via the Annual Plan)

c)      Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants programme (up to $545,000)

d)      Regional Events grants programme ($400,000)

e)      Regional Historic Heritage grants programme (up to $345,000)

f)       Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme (c. $500,000)

43.     The existing grants programmes at this level are not able to meet current demand, and in some cases include funding tagged to specific recipients, or funding for regional outcomes that is being provided through local grants schemes. While contestability will be introduced for all funding schemes, there is little ‘headroom’ to support new applicants or address emerging priorities. For example, there is an expectation that a number of major events dropped from ATEED’s portfolio will now need to be funded through the Regional Events Fund from 2015/16, at an additional cost of $170,000 against the existing budget of $400,000.

44.     Many regional organisations have been waiting for implementation of the new CGP to access regional funding, and in some cases their need has become so urgent that the governing body has allocated emergency funding through the annual plan as an interim measure.

45.     Additional investment in the regional grants programme of $2 million p.a. is proposed as an option for governing body consideration through the LTP process 2015-2025. Staff consider a minimum of between $600,000 and $800,000 is required for each regional grants programme if the CGP is to support meaningful progress against the council’s stated priorities in these activity areas and deliver on the transformational shifts. The level of investment requested will support an average fund size of $750,000 (the exact distribution of budget between the six programmes would be proposed alongside the final policy).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

46.     The design of the new grants programme proposed in the CGP has been strongly influenced by local board feedback received during consultation on the first draft Community Funding Policy in May 2012, and during more recent engagement.

47.     A discussion paper on the new CGP was prepared in February 2014 and discussed in specially convened local board cluster workshops in March 2014, which were attended by representatives of all local boards. The paper outlined the basic elements of the proposed grants programme and sought feedback on specific policy issues. A summary of the feedback received during the cluster workshops and how this has been reflected in the draft CGP is provided as Attachment D.

48.     A regional briefing for local board chairs and portfolio holders was held on 30 June to provide a further overview of the proposed policy and to discuss next steps.  At the briefing, questions were raised about the policy’s recognition of local boards’ decision-making allocation in this area. Staff met with local board chairs on 28 July and agreed a process to address this concern (see ‘Local board grants programme schedule’ paras 16-20).

49.     Staff attended workshops with local boards during July and August 2014 to discuss the draft policy and support the provision of formal local board feedback requested via this report.

Māori impact statement

50.     Community grants have the potential to make a significant impact on Māori through supporting the outcomes in the Māori Plan. Under the proposed principles for the CGP, all grants programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing, as outlined in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and regional strategies, policies and plans, by providing grants to organisations delivering Māori outcomes locally and regionally.

51.     There is already some dedicated funding for Māori outcomes at the regional level, currently focused on papakainga and marae development across Auckland. Te Waka Angamua will be working with mana whenua and mataawaka to explore how best to target this and/or other funding allocated for Māori outcomes in future, e.g. determining eligibility criteria and the most appropriate forums for priority-setting and decision-making.

52.     During workshops in March/April 2014, staff discussed options with local boards for creating dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level, or embedding Māori outcomes as a ‘standing priority’ across all proposed grants programmes at the local and regional level. Local boards expressed interest in dedicated Māori funding schemes at the local level if regional funding was made available to them for this purpose, but otherwise felt it was more appropriate for any targeted spending to be at each local board’s discretion, driven by local board plan priorities. The CGP’s intent to align grant-making to strategic priorities should ensure funding is allocated to groups and projects delivering Māori outcomes.

53.     The current interim funding programme includes one grants scheme dedicated to Māori outcomes (the Marae Development Fund in the former Manukau City area), and this particular scheme, along with all others operating through the interim programme, will cease to operate once a new CGP is adopted. Regional marae development funding may provide some capacity to meet this need going forward, and Te Waka Angamua will release details of the application and decision-making process for that funding for the next financial year.

54.     However local boards also have full discretion to provide grants for any purpose that benefits their local communities, and this is likely to include supporting marae especially where grants have been provided for this purpose in the past. The draft CGP provides flexibility for decision-makers to award grants to community groups that are not formally constituted charitable organisations, where appropriate, and staff understand this should increase access to funding for some Māori organisations, such as marae, who may not previously have been eligible.

Implementation

Budget alignment

55.     Existing funding arrangements and grants schemes were rolled over for the 2014/2015 financial year. If adopted, implementation of the CGP will begin from 1 July 2015 to align with the new LTP 2015-2025 and implementation of the Local Board Funding Policy (LBFP). This will enable the finalised budget structures to be implemented alongside the policy.

56.     Existing grants budgets categorised as ‘local’ will form part of the overall locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget allocated to local boards through the LBFP formula. Local boards will then set aside a budget to support their local grants programme from their LDI funding envelope through the Local Board Agreement process.

57.     Staff will propose an overall budget structure for the new grants programme when the final policy is tabled with the committee in November 2014, outlining the treatment of any inherited (and new) community grants budgets and funding arrangements that will support the CGP going forward. This should enable staff to take into account the outcome of LTP deliberations in the second half of 2014 and present budget structure options accordingly.

Operationalisation of the CGP

58.     The draft CGP has been developed with substantial input from the relevant operational departments to ensure that it is able to be delivered.

59.     The proposed implementation timeframe should provide operational teams with adequate time to design supporting systems and business processes, and to produce public-facing collateral that outlines the structure and requirements of the new grants programmes in detail. This will include:

a)      Working with all decision-makers to schedule an annual calendar of funding rounds for each level of the programme

b)      Working with local boards to assist them in developing their local board grants programme schedules

c)      Producing new promotional materials for the council website, marketing and promotion through media channels and to support public information sessions

d)      Designing new online application forms and guidelines for prospective applicants

e)      Ensuring support will be available for prospective applicants requiring assistance or capacity building to access the grants programmes, working with specialist colleagues where appropriate

f)       Developing business processes and templates to enable consistent assessment and reporting to elected members, and to support their decision-making

g)      Updating funding agreements, accountability forms and other legal documentation to ensure they are fit-for-purpose, and developing processes to deal with any grant recipients in breach of their agreements

h)      Ensuring payments processes and associated financial controls are robust, efficient and fit-for-purpose.

60.     If the CGP is adopted on schedule towards the end of 2014, grant applicants / recipients will also have more than six months to prepare for the changeover to the new policy and manage any implications. Staff will work with previously funded organisations to support them to access the new grants programmes during subsequent years, and provide advice to elected members if there is a need to consider transitional arrangements in individual cases.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Community Grants Policy

235

bView

Summary of feedback from public consultation

283

cView

Summary feedback, Rodney Local Board

289

dView

Key feedback provided during political engagement

295

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebekah Lauren - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

















































Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 







Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 







Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 





Rodney Local Board

13 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22850

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

 

 

 

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G