I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Seniors Advisory Panel will be held on:

 

Date:††††††††††††††††††††††

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 13 October 2014

1.00pm

Ground Floor Board Room
Auckland Town Hall
Auckland

 

Seniors Advisory Panel

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Devlin

 

Deputy Chairperson

Russell Rigby

 

Members

Dr Judy Blakey

 

 

Janet Clews, CNZM,QSO, JP

 

 

Roger Fowler, QSM

 

 

Joan Lardner-Rivlin, QSM

 

 

Sonny Niha

 

 

Richard Northey, ONZM

 

Council Liaison

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Barbara Watson

Democracy Advisor

 

6 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 307 7629

Email: barbara.watson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

 

ITEM†† TABLE OF CONTENTS††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† PAGE

1††††††††† Apologies††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 5

2††††††††† Declaration of Interest†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 5

3††††††††† Confirmation of Minutes†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 5

4††††††††† Extraordinary Business††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 5

5††††††††† Significance and Engagement Policy††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 7

6††††††††† Engagement on the Draft Community Facilities Network Plan†††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 57

7††††††††† Approaches to communication and engagement including accessibility and positive imaging†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 129

8††††††††† Seniors Advisory Panel Work Programme Update†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† 181

9††††††††† Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1††††††††† Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2††††††††† Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3††††††††† Confirmation of Minutes

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday 22 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

4††††††††† Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

ďAn item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)††††††† The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b) †††††† The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)†††††††† The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)††††††† The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.Ē

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

ďWhere an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a) †††††† That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i) ††††††† That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii) †††††† the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b) †††††† no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.Ē

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/22519

 

Purpose

1.†††††† To provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy and to gain feedback on engagement guidelines.

Executive summary

2.†††††† A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy committee on 4 September 2014 for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014.

3.†††††† The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues.† Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood projects up to large regional plans and strategies.† An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

4.†††††† The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)††††† receive the draft policy and suggest other ideas of how the council could encourage feedback on the draft from older persons

b)††††† provide feedback on current engagement guidelines.

Comments

5.†††††† The Local Government Act (2002) sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow when consulting.

6.†††††† Additional principles have been included within the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Aucklandís diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

7.†††††† The draft Significance and Engagement Policy also sets out guidance on the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue.

8.†††††† The changes to legislation mean that some of the current requirements for formal consultations could be relaxed. How the council manages formal submissions and hearings is something that the council is currently looking into in preparation for the Long-term Plan consultation in early 2015.

9.†††††† Advice from the Seniors Advisory Panel about what would make formal processes more user-friendly for seniors would be welcome.

Consultation on the draft policy

10.†††† Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in councilís consultation processes.

11.†††† Consultation will largely be focused online through the councilís website ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

12.†††† In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the Peopleís Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy.

13.†††† Communities will be asked to provide their feedback on what topics they are interested in having their say on, how they wish to be communicated and engaged with and to suggest improvements to our existing processes.† Demographic questions are being asked to help monitor how well we reach Aucklandís diverse communities.† Those who are particularly interested will be asked to provide feedback on the draft policy but all feedback will be analysed, either for the policy itself or to improve and update the guidelines.

Updating Engagement Guidelines

14.†††† Inclusive engagement guidelines and an events checklist were developed in partnership with the Disability Strategic Advisory Group.† These are attached and feedback on them would be welcome.

15.†††† Suggestions made at a previous Seniors Advisory Panel meeting have been noted as:

∑†††† Bring younger and older people together for discussions

∑†††† Hold the events in a community house or centre

∑†††† Facilitate meaningful discussion about the issues

∑†††† Community advisors / co-ordinators there for support

∑†††† Face to face Ė build trust

∑†††† Shoulder tap people to encourage their participation

∑†††† Use the University of the Third Age to disseminate information as well as Grey Power and Age Concern.

16.†††† Past feedback on engagement with older people has highlighted issues around the use of digital technology and suggested partnerships with Senior Net and other potential training providers.

17.†††† Other suggestions or advice on how to improve engagement with older people would be appreciated.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.†††† Local boards have a statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council.

19.†††† An initial discussion took place with the Local Board Chairs Forum on 28 April 2014. Local board members were invited to a workshop to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August and workshops are taking place with many individual local boards.† Formal feedback has also been requested on the draft policy.

Māori impact statement

20.†††† Auckland Council recognize that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy was presented to the Independent Māori Statutory Board for discussion and feedback. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

21.†††† Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.


 

Implementation

22.†††† Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

∑†††† a consultation and engagement guidebook

∑†††† a guide on Engagement with Māori

∑†††† a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

∑†††† an internal network which is used to share case studies

∑†††† an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

23.†††† Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Aucklandís culturally and demographically diverse communities.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

11

bView

Inclusive Engagement Guidelines

29

cView

Accessible events checklist

45

†††††

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Senior Specialist, Engagement and Consultation

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communications and Engagement Director

Greg Morgan Ė Lead Officer Support


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

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Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

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13 October 2014

 

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Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

Engagement on the Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/22312

 

Purpose

1.†††††† To seek the Seniors Advisory Panelís feedback on the draft Community Facilities Network Plan.

Executive summary

2.†††††† The purpose of the Community Facilities Network Plan is to guide councilís provision of community facilities for the next 10 years and beyond.† The key drivers are to:

∑†† Optimise the use and efficiency of existing facilities

∑†† Address gaps and needs for community facilities now and into the future

∑†† Meet current and future demand arising from population growth and changing user expectations.

3.†††††† In March 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved the development and scope of the network plan (REG/2014/37) to address future provision of community centres, venues for hire, arts and cultural facilities, aquatic and leisure facilities.

4.†††††† A draft Community Facilities Network Plan (network plan) has been developed (Attachment A).† There are three key components of the draft network plan:

∑†† Strategic framework Ė specifies the outcomes council is seeking from its investment in community facilities aligned with the Auckland Plan, Local Board Plans and other strategic priorities; and articulates the councilís key objectives for future provision.

∑†† Provision framework Ė guides councilís approach for the provision of community facilities in the future.

∑†† Action Plan Ė over 50 recommended actions to investigate areas where potential gaps in provision have been identified and to investigate existing facilities where issues affecting their performance have been identified.

5.†††††† Most of the recommendations in the network plan will require detailed community or sector based investigation to determine the appropriate response.† It is proposed that any future investment in community facilities will be determined following detailed investigation which provides clear evidence of need, options analysis and a robust business case.

6.†††††† The draft network plan is an aspirational plan with actions for implementation over the next 10 to 20 years. The ability and timeframe to implement these actions is dependent on the decisions made by council through the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) on the budget available for investment in community facilities.

7.†††††† Engagement with local boards, advisory panels and key external stakeholder groups on the draft network plan is being undertaken in August and September.† Feedback will be incorporated into the final plan which is scheduled to be reported to the governing body by December 2014.

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)††††† note that at its 8 August 2014 meeting the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee endorsed the draft Community Facilities Network Plan for stakeholder engagement

b)††††† provide feedback on the draft Community Facilities Network Plan.

Comments

8.†††††† Community facilities contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing space for people to connect with each other, socialise, learn skills and participate in a range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities.† Community facilities contribute to improved lifestyles and a sense of belonging, identity and pride among residents.†

9.†††††† To realise Aucklandís vision to be worldís most liveable city, the network of community facilities will need to improve, evolve and increase to keep pace with Aucklandís growth and diverse population.† The network plan has been developed to guide councilís provision and investment of community facilities to meet community needs, both now and into the future.

10.†††† The draft network plan aligns with strategic directions and transformational shifts outlined in the Auckland Plan, and has been informed by local board plans and relevant strategic action plans, including the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan, Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, Thriving Communities Strategy and Children and Young Peopleís Strategic Action Plan.

11.†††† The scope of the network plan includes community centres, venues for hire (community or rural halls), arts and culture facilities, aquatic and leisure facilities.† The network includes facilities owned by council and facilities owned by third-parties which are supported by council and are available for community use.

12.†††† There is a wider picture of community facility provision which also contribute to meeting community needs.† Delivering a successful network of community facilities will involve identifying opportunities to work across all providers, looking for partnership opportunities and solutions to best meet community needs.† While facilities like libraries, sport clubs, community leases, schools, churches and marae are not included in the recommendations of the network plan, these facilities will be considered fully in the localised and detailed assessments undertaken in the implementation of the network plan.

13.†††† The first stage in developing the network plan was a review of the current state to identify what facilities we have, who uses them, how they are used, how they are operated and key issues associated with this provision.† The key findings from the current state review are included in the draft network plan and have informed the proposed provision frameworks and actions. The full current state report is a companion document to the network plan and available on request.

14.†††† Key challenges that the network plan seeks to address are:

∑†† There are gaps and duplication in provision across the region which will require decisions on where new facilities should be developed and potentially where underperforming facilities which are no longer meeting community need could be divested or repurposed.

∑†† Some facilities are not fit for purpose due to the quality, design or layout.

∑†† There are a number of aging facilities that will require investment to remain operational or divested if they are no longer suitable to meet community needs.

∑†† Across the board there is a need to improve the financial sustainability of community facilities to reduce the overall cost of provision.

∑†† There are a variety of other providers of community facilities across Auckland which needs to be considered as part of future provision.

∑†† There is a need for thorough and consistent planning to properly understand community needs and determine the most appropriate response to these needs.† In some cases a facility response may be not the best solution and other options such as partnerships, programming or marketing may achieve the desired outcomes.

∑†† Auckland is growing and becoming more diverse and the network of community facilities will need to be flexible enough to respond to changing community needs.


 

Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

15.†††† The draft network plan sets out a strategic framework for community facilities to articulate why council invests in the provision of community facilities, the desired outcomes from this investment and the key objectives for future provision.† The strategic framework is aligned with the Auckland Plan, local board plans and relevant strategic action plans.

16.†††† Proposed common purpose for community facilities: Vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of where and how communities connect and participate.

17.†††† The draft network plan sets out four proposed key objectives to guide and underpin the future provision of community facilities:

∑†† Undertake robust and consistent planning to ensure future decisions on the provision of community facilities are based on clear evidence of needs and assessment of all options.

∑†† Maintain, improve and make the best use out of existing community facilities where they continue to meet community needs and investigate the future of facilities that no longer meet community needs.

∑†† Provide flexible and multi-purpose facilities that are co-located and/or integrated with other community infrastructure.

∑†† Look for opportunities to leverage and support partnerships.

Future Provision Framework

18.†††† The draft network plan proposes provision frameworks for each type of community facility to guide councilís approach to the provision of new facilities in the future.

Community Centres

19.†††† The proposed provision approach for community centres is to continue to maintain and deliver community centres at the local level across the region, recognising the important role they play in meeting local community need for spaces to deliver a wide range of community, recreation, learning, events, and arts and culture activities.

20.†††† It is proposed community centres will serve local catchments of up to 5 km (approximately 15 minutes travel time) with a minimum population size of 20,000 residents. This reflects the current levels of provision and is in keeping with international benchmarks.† New community centres should be sized between 600-800 metre2 to ensure they have the flexibility to accommodate a wide range of activities and need. In rural areas, where there is lower population size, existing halls could be activated with programming.

21.†††† Based on this proposed provision framework, the following potential areas of need for new community centres have been identified for further investigation:

∑†† Ormiston (Flatbush)

∑†† North-West corridor (Westgate, Massey North, Hobsonville Point)

∑†† North Pukekohe

∑†† Manurewa (quality and level of existing provision is low)

∑†† Papakura (Takanini, Hingaia)


Venues for hire

22.†††† There are a wide range of providers of venues for hire and many existing venues have low utilisation and/or issues impacting on their performance.† In order to optimise the overall community facility network, it is proposed the council does not invest in any more stand-alone venues for hire.† Instead, it is proposed that bookable space is included in flexible multi-purpose community centres (new or existing/redeveloped), guided by community needs assessments. Other options should be explored including partnerships or encouraging other organisations (such as schools, sports clubs and churches) to make bookable spaces available for community use.

23.†††† Venues for hire is an area of the community facility network where there is potential for divestment or repurposing for other activities.† Repurposing could include introducing programming to create a community centre, arts and culture facility or youth facility, converting to a community lease, or transferring the asset to a community organisation.

Aquatic and Leisure Facilities

24.†††† The proposed provision framework for aquatic and leisure facilities is through a hierarchy of local, destination and regional facilities to support participation in a range of sport and recreation activities from casual play through to competitive sport.† The provision framework is supported by actual catchment analysis of councilís aquatic and leisure facilities.

25.†††† At the local level, it is proposed facilities should serve catchments up to 5km in distance.† Potential gaps for investigation are identified in areas outside the catchments of existing facilities, where overall participation is less than the Auckland average and where population density meets target thresholds as outlined in the plan. It is proposed to develop an affordable design model to reduce the design and build costs without compromising the quality or viability of new facilities.

26.†††† Destination and regional facilities will serve larger catchments 10km plus and only a limited number of facilities are required to serve the region.† These facilities should be assessed on a case by case basis where there is clear evidence of demand.

27.†††† Based on the proposed provision framework the following potential areas of need for new aquatic and leisure facilities have been identified for further investigation:

∑†† Western corridor from Mt Albert to Glen Eden Ė aquatic and leisure facility

∑†† Ormiston (Flatbush) Ė aquatic and leisure facility

∑†† North-west corridor (Westgate, Massey North, Hobsonville Point, Kumeu) - aquatic

∑†† Central city area Ė investigate partnership opportunities for leisure facility

∑†† Warkworth and surrounding area Ė aquatic and leisure facility (noting the small population size may impact on demand and type of facility required)

∑†† Waiheke Island - aquatic facility (noting the small population size may impact on the demand and type of facility required)

∑†† Indoor court facilities across the region to provide for indoor sports

∑†† Regional aquatic and indoor sport facility.

Arts and Culture Facilities

28.†††† It is proposed the future provision of arts and culture activity at the local level will focus on enabling local expression through programming rather than building dedicated arts facilities.† Future provision will be included as part of flexible multi-purpose community centres (new or existing/redeveloped) guided by community needs assessment.† Focus will be placed on integrating appropriate space and programming within the existing network, or partnering with others to provide suitable space.


29.†††† For destination and regional facilities, it proposed that council supports a network of facilities to meet sector and audience demand. The future provision of both destination and regional facilities should be determined by robust investigation on a case-by-case basis. In particular, council should only intervene when the private sector does not and opportunities for partnerships with sector, private and government should be explored.

Action Plan and Implementation

30.†††† The draft network plan includes over 50 recommended actions to undertake investigations for the future provision of community facilities. This includes actions related to existing facilities as well as potential new facilities.

31.†††† All recommended actions will require detailed community or sector based investigation to determine the appropriate response. It is intended that any future investment in community facilities will be determined following detailed investigation which provides clear evidence of need, options analysis and development of a robust business case. Detailed process guidelines to ensure a consistent approach to these investigations have been developed (Appendix 2 of draft network plan: Community Facilities Development Guidelines). The guidelines are consistent with the gateway process being developed by the Enterprise Project Management Office to be rolled out across council.

32.†††† For some existing facilities, investigation is required to understand in more detail how the facility is operating and meeting community needs and to determine the appropriate response. There are a variety of responses the investigation could identify:

∑†† Changing the way the facility is managed or operated such as new programming, marketing or new management model.

∑†† Identifying the facility is no longer required for the original activity and could be re-purposed for a new activity or function.

∑†† Identifying the facility is no longer required and could be divested.

∑†† Identifying the facility needs to be redeveloped or improved and should be considered for investment.

33.†††† For potential areas for new facilities, a similar investigation process is required to understand needs, test the feasibility of different options and assess the business case for a facility.† The outcome of this investigation may identify a non-asset solution is required such as a partnership or supporting a non-council facility.

34.†††† The actions in the draft network plan have been ranked according to the urgency of completing the investigation, which is based on consideration of the following factors:

∑†† Urgency to address condition issues with existing facilities.

∑†† Need to respond to major catalysts impacting on existing facilities.

∑†† Opportunities for rationalisation or partnerships.

∑†† Identified as an existing gap in the network.

∑†† Timing and scale of projected growth.

∑†† Located in a spatial priority area.

35.†††† Feedback from the governing body, local boards and stakeholders may change the ranking of actions in the final plan.† The ability and timeframe to implement the actions is dependent on the level of budget available through the councilís LTP.†

36.†††† As council will not have the capacity to invest in all community facility projects, the draft network plan also provides prioritisation criteria to assist the governing body prioritise investment into community facilities once the investigation process has identified the appropriate response.† The criteria will be used to assess the strategic benefits of the project, the importance of investing in a specific area and the project outcomes.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

37.†††† Cluster workshops with local boards were undertaken in March and April.† The purpose of the workshop was to provide an overview of the network plan, present information on the current state and to seek feedback on key components of the network plan.† Key feedback themes from the local board cluster workshops were:

∑†† Need to maintain and improve current network of community facilities, taking care of existing facilities as the first priority

∑†† Local boards strongly support the need and intent to be fully involved in the facility planning process

∑†† Decisions for investment in community facilities needs to be based on clear evidence of need

∑†† Planning for community facilities needs to take a holistic view across all provision and providers, looking for opportunities for partnerships and to coordinate delivery

∑†† There was a range of views on needing to address gaps, population growth, capacity issues and failing assets

∑†† Some local boards felt that different delivery models are appropriate for different communities to achieve the best results

∑†† Community facilities need to be accessible and inclusive for all sectors of the community

∑†† Community facilities need to be multi-purpose, flexible and integrated to deliver multiple community outcomes or benefits

∑†† Recognise that community facilities contribute to building a sense of place and making Auckland a more liveable city

∑†† Identified a range of operational issues that need to be addressed.

Māori impact statement

38.†††† The provision of community facilities contributes to improving wellbeing among Maori communities by providing spaces to connect, socialise, learn skills and participate.†

39.†††† Community facility user surveys and catchment studies has collected a range of information from all types of users including Maori users, which has informed the network plan and proposed actions.† The network plan has also been informed by submissions and feedback received on the strategic action plans for community development, arts and culture and sport and recreation.† The consultation process for these strategic action plans included a number of hui with iwi, which has provided input on the provision of community facilities.

Implementation

40.†††† The draft network plan is an aspirational plan for the next 10 to 20 years which outlines what needs to be investigated and undertaken to deliver a network of community facilities to meet community needs.† The ability and timeframe to implement the actions is dependent on the level of budget available through the councilís LTP 2015-2025.

41.†††† Through the LTP process, the governing body will consider the amount of funding available for investment in community facilities. To deliver the network plan this will need to include both operational funding to undertake the required investigation (needs assessment, feasibility and business case) and depending on the outcome of each investigation, capital funding or operational funding to implement the recommended response.

42.†††† It is proposed that any capital funding for major upgrades or building new community facilities should be held in a regional investment fund and allocated to specific projects once a business case is approved.

43.†††† The next steps for the network plan are engaging with local boards, advisory panels and key stakeholder groups (such as regional sport organisations) who have an interest in councilís community facilities.† Given the context of the network plan and the information and feedback already received through the user surveys and strategic action plans, it is not proposed to undertake any specific engagement with facility users or the general public.

44.†††† The engagement process will be completed by October.† Depending on the level of feedback to be incorporated, the final plan will be reported to the governing body in December 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

65

†††††

Signatories

Authors

David Shamy - Policy Analyst

Anita Coy-Macken - Principal Policy Analyst Ė Central

Authoriser

Greg Morgan Ė Lead Officer Support


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

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Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

Approaches to communication and engagement including accessibility and positive imaging

 

File No.: CP2014/20307

 

Purpose

1.†††††† This report responds to the Seniors Advisory Panelís work programme objectives to ensure that councilís communications and engagement include:

∑††††††† intergenerational and inter-ethnic conversations

∑††††††† positive imaging of older people.

Executive summary

2.†††††† Auckland is a diverse city covering a wide range of ages, cultures, languages, literacy levels, and physical disabilities.† One in five Aucklanders have some kind of access need, for example, visual or hearing impairments, low literacy levels or language barriers.† Per the 2013 census data, a significant proportion of Aucklandís population is made up of older people, for example, 16.3% of Aucklandís population is over the age of 59.

3.†††††† The Communication and Engagement department (formally Communications and Public Affairs) recognise that accessible communications play an important role in making Auckland the worldís most liveable city. Over the last two years, the department has dedicated resource to building in-house council capability in this area, such as in our design studio and through our marketing and communication specialists.

4.†††††† In addition, we have conducted regular research to provide insight into the needs and views of our varied audiences and this insight is used to inform decisions regarding accessibility, content and channel selection. We have also established business relationships with a number of providers who are regularly engaged as subject matter experts, or to provide professional services, for example, to translate or convert information into accessible formats for our audiences.

5.†††††† This report provides an overview of the current and future communication initiatives we undertake to ensure that:

∑††††††† generational and ethnic needs are met through various council interactions

∑††††††† council communications are inclusive and representative of all Aucklanders

∑††††††† imagery is inclusive and representative of all Aucklanders

∑††††††† all Aucklanders have timely access to information

∑††††††† all Aucklanders have the opportunity to interact and communicate with the council.

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)††††† note the contents of the paper

b)††††† advise how the panel wish to engage with and provide advice to Communication and Engagement (C&E) in the future.

 

Comments

6.†††††† Examples of current and future communication initiatives relating to accessibility and positive imaging:

Category

Current initiatives

Future initiatives

Guidelines/ Policies

Communication and Engagement guidelines:

∑††† Auckland Councilís Editorial Policy outlines a requirement for written communication to respond to what Aucklanders say they want to hear from council. This is guided by regular research. The policy also states that photography be inclusive of all Aucklanders.

∑††† Accessible Information and Communication Guidelines have been developed (see attachment) and are promoted across council by C&E.

∑††† Accessibility requirements are also outlined in the Digital Brand Guidelines and in our written style guide (Our Voice).

∑††† Engagement guidelines are being updated to support the adoption of a new Significance and Engagement Policy.

∑††† Accessible Engagement Guidelines and an Accessible Venues Guide was workshopped with the Disability Strategic Advisory Panel and are in the process of being finalised.

∑††† On-going review and improvement of all guidelines to reflect the changing needs of Aucklanders and improving accessible technology.

Research

∑††† We access research on demographics of the Auckland population (age, ethnicity, education level etc.) which ensures our communication and engagement initiatives are insights based.

∑††† Our research programmes enable us to analyse the demographic data of our audiences and identify the needs of different groups Ė for example, by age or ethnicity.

∑††† Online surveys specifically designed so that they can be read with a screen reader.

∑††† Current consultation on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy includes a request for feedback about how we improve engagement with Aucklandís diverse communities. Analysis will be carried out to identify differences between demographics.

∑††† Research has just been conducted through the Peopleís Panel on the differences between demographics in terms of how they prefer to be engaged. The research findings will be used to tailor how we communicate and engage with different age/ethnic groups.

 

Imagery

∑††† Auckland Councilís Editorial Policy outlines a requirement for photography to be inclusive of all Aucklanders.

∑††† Our image library holds more than 2000 photographs of images coded with one or more of the following: elderly, pensioner, kaumatua, older people, elder, senior.

∑††† We would appreciate advice from the panel as to how we can improve our imaging of senior Aucklanders across all our major communication channels, including OurAuckland and the Auckland Council website.

 

 

 

Advisory Panels and community consultation

We engage with various advisory panels to better understand the needs of specific community groups. For example:

∑††† We consulted with the Disability Advisory Panel when writing the Accessible Information and Communication Guidelines.

∑††† The engagement team ran workshops with pacific and other ethnic communities to consult on the Auckland Plan.

∑††† We held Unitary Plan events targeting older people and offered tutorials in how to access and use the e-plan.

∑††† We welcome the establishment of the Seniors Advisory Panel and look forward to engaging closely with them in future.

Staff/Training

∑††† Following the recent department review, creating accessible communications became a core capability in the job descriptions of C&E department members as of July 2014.

∑††† Accessibility training is available for C&E members.

∑††† The internal design studio has basic training in creating accessible design material.

∑††† We have established a team of accessibility champions across the business.

∑††† A successful inclusive engagement expo was hosted by the C&E department in June 2014.

∑††† Our internal communications team attended training to improve the accessibility of our internal communications.

∑††† We will work with P&C (People and Capability) to increase awareness and adoption of accessible communications across council with new employees (induction programme).

∑††† We have suggested P&C establish a regular council-wide accessible communications training programme and offered to assist in developing it.

∑††† Refresh training for internal studio is planned for this quarter.

∑††† We aim to grow our accessibility champion network across council.

∑††† The C&E team will run an accessible communications training workshop in the induction programme for councilís new agencies.

Continuous improvement in accessibility

We support a programme of continuous improvement across our core communication channels. A few examples of recent accessibility initiatives:

∑††† Providing a variety of channels to access OurAuckland information including:

-†† the OurAuckland smart phone app (accessible features in the app include the ability to resize text)

-†† monthly content available through the Telephone Information Service run by the Blind Foundation (Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind)

-†† the October 2013 launch of a large print A4 version of OurAuckland for those with impaired vision.

∑††† The OurAuckland team carefully balance content and photography to reflect a range of ethnicities, ages and genders.

∑††† We offered a New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) submission process for both the Unitary Plan and the Significance and Engagement Policy.

∑††† The Annual Plan was posted on the Blind Foundation website.

∑††† Applications for the Disability Advisory Panel were sought in NZSL via the DeafRadio network.

∑††† Various council departments offer access to Language Line to improve communications for non-English speaking Aucklanders.

∑††† Providing subtitles in Auckland Council videos is strongly encouraged and becoming standard.† This improves accessibility to modern communication formats for those with impaired hearing.

∑††† Demonstrating expertise in accessible communications was a requirement in the recent RFP for Auckland Councilís lead creative, digital and media agencies.

∑††† Complying with our guidelines and contributing to the growth of our centre of excellence in accessible communications is a core KPI of our new agencies. This includes providing ideas and examples of best practice from elsewhere.

∑††† Working with Be.Accessible to ensure that self-service kiosks in councilís services centres are accessible.

∑††† A review of accessibility (design) of the printed version of OurAuckland to improve readability.

∑††† Our internal studio have committed to up-skilling designers to create an accessible PDF version of OurAuckland within this quarter.

External experts

∑††† Council have established relationships with key external experts including Be.Accessible, the Blind Foundation, DeafRadio and NZ Translation Services.

∑††† We consulted with the Blind Foundation and Age Concern (Manukau) when developing the large print version of OurAuckland.

∑††† We recruited Long-term Plan (LTP) focus group participants through Grey Power and Age Concern networks Ė this allowed us to test proposed new approaches with the older community before the draft LTP was finalised prior to public consultation.

∑††† For the rates campaign, we engaged Auckland Grey Power and Age Concern networks and prepared targeted information for them on issues of most relevance.

∑††† We regularly invite Grey Power and Age Concern contacts to key consultation events, including the Unitary Plan consultative forum and the community stakeholder discussion on the new draft Significance and Engagement Policy.

∑††† We plan to create an accessibility information pack to make it easier for council staff to engage external experts for accessibility initiatives. The pack will include information such as an overview of services available, indicative costs and timeframes involved and information on the internal assistance available to facilitate the process.

Looking ahead

7.†††††† We welcome suggestions from the panel as to how we can optimise our approach to accessibility and ensure we are delivering communications that are engaging, accessible and valued by all Aucklanders.

8.†††††† We would appreciate advice from the panel on how to improve our imaging of older people. We will share the panelís advice with other business units which will help improve this aspect across council communications Ė for example, the digital services team who also have influence over images used on the website.

9.†††††† We are keen to explore options for regular consultation and mechanisms for receiving feedback from the panel and seek the panelís advice on how best to engage with them.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.†††† Our data enables us to determine demographic patterns or clusters on a local board level.† For example, ethnicity or age clusters Ė this means we can tailor language, imagery and information to suit the specific needs of local board areas.

Māori impact statement

11.†††† The C&E department is committed to ensuring te reo Māori is used appropriately and words and phrases are correct.

12.†††† OurAuckland aims to support Auckland Councilís efforts to promote te reo Māori and includes bilingual translations in every issue.

13.†††† Examples of key documents that C&E have translated into te reo Māori recently include:

o† Waste Campaign printed and online material

o† Unitary Plan summaries.

Implementation

14.†††† No impact.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Accessible information and communication guidelines

135

†††††

Signatories

Authors

Sophie Bostwick - Manager Brand and Communications Channel

Authorisers

Greg Morgan Ė Lead Officer Support


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 














































 


Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

Seniors Advisory Panel Work Programme Update

 

File No.: CP2014/23340

 

Purpose

1.†††††† To receive up-to-date information regarding the Seniors Advisory Panelís work programme.

Executive summary

2.†††††† This monthly update allows the panel to note and discuss the progress of its work programme.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)††††† receive the Work Programme update as at October 2014.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Work Programme Update: October 2014

183

†††††

Signatories

Author

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Greg Morgan Ė Lead Officer Support



Seniors Advisory Panel

13 October 2014

 

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