I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 October 2014

6.30pm

Whau Local Board Office
31 Totara Avenue
New Lynn

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Catherine Farmer

 

Deputy Chairperson

Susan Zhu

 

Members

Derek Battersby, QSM, JP

 

 

Ami Chand, JP

 

 

Duncan Macdonald, JP

 

 

Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel

 

 

Simon Matafai

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

 

Riya Seth

Democracy Advisor

 

9 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 826 5103

Email: riya.seth@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Ward Councillor’s Update                                                                                            5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     James Sutherland - Foundation for Youth Development                                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Whau Local Board Chairperson, Catherine Farmer's report                                   7

13        Business Innovation & Sustainability Conference report - Member Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel                                                                                                                      9

14        Local board member update reports                                                                         25

15        Local Board member attendance at the 2014 Making Good Decisions Programme - Tue 4 Nov and Wed 5 Nov 2014                                                                                            27

16        Auckland Transport Update Report – Whau Local Board                                      31

17        Whau Bridge Signage / New Lynn Gateways                                                           45

18        Waterview Connection Project - Design Approval                                                  67

19        Update on SH16/20 Waterview expenditure plan                                                     97

20        Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme 2014/2015 101

21        Whau Local Board Community Group Funding - Round One 2014/2015           125

22        Renewal of community lease to The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale                                                                            187

23        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014                                                                                                                             193

24        Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025                                      209

25        LTP 2015-2025 Feedback on mayoral proposal                                                     241

26        Local Board Feedback on the Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)                                                                                                                                      243

27        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                             327

28        Deliberation and Adoption of the Whau local board plan 2014                           339

29        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                      345

30        Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference                    369

31        For Information: Governing Body Reports                                                            373

32        Confirmation of Workshop Records: September 2014                                         401  

33        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

34        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               411

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   411  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         Confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

b)         Confirms the minutes of the Local Board Plan Hearings – Whau, held on Wednesday, 3 September 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Ward Councillor’s Update

 

An opportunity is provided for the Whau Ward Councillor to update the board on regional issues he has been involved with since the last meeting. 

 

8          Deputations

 

8.1       James Sutherland - Foundation for Youth Development

Purpose

1.       James Sutherland, (Business Development Manager) of Foundation for Youth Development (FYD) will be in attendance to present to the local board on how the funding support from board has enabled FYD Auckland to help support the local community.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Receives the presentation from James Sutherland, Business Development Manger of Foundation for Youth Development and thank him for the presentation.

 


9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Whau Local Board Chairperson, Catherine Farmer's report

 

File No.: CP2014/23647

 

  

 

Long Term Plan

1.       Initial Governing Body and Local Board Long-term Plan workshops and discussions have been ongoing in the last month. To support the Mayor’s Proposal of a 2.5% rates increase and a lower than planned rates increase in the next ten years council staff have been working on identifying potential ways to reduce council spending.

2.       Significant reductions have been proposed for Parks and Community Development budgets. These budget cuts could see less frequent mowing in parks, also a push for communities to provide their own services are part of the forecast change. All local boards are facing similar issues.  Should local service levels decline our ratepayers will be asking us to fix it.  Our only avenue would be to spend local board budgets to top up these services, these budegts are not sufficient.  When these run low a proposal is that they could be replenished by imposing a targeted rate which would an extra rate on top of your general rate.

3.       One of the advantages we have in Whau is that Avondale and New Lynn are in a proposed Auckland Council Inner West Triangle Spatial Priority Area. A priority area is likely to benefit more than other areas in the long term plan council spend because it is a priority in a region wide list.

Avondale Town Centre

4.       The Avondale Town Centre regeneration and rebuild is not yet funded in the long term plan and we are working with our Councillor, Ross Clow, to highlight to the Governing Body how important it is to get funding.  At our last public meeting in Avondale, we heard too from you, how we have all waited so long for Avondale to move ahead.  You can support us by making submissions to the long term plan which opens for consultation in January next year.

Housing New Zealand

5.       We met informally with Housing NZ chief executive Glen Sowry.  He and his team gave us a presentation on their housing provision in Whau. Many new houses have been built in Rosebank and more are planned for New Windsor. Our housing portfolio lead Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel arranged this meeting for us.

Do not delete this line

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Receives the Whau Local Board Chairperson, Catherine Farmer’s report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Author

Whau Local Board Chairperson - Catherine Farmer

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Business Innovation & Sustainability Conference report - Member Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel

 

File No.: CP2014/23638

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity for Member Manukia-Schamkel to give an update on the Business Innovation & Sustainability Conference which she attended in Auckland, 17th – 19th September 2014.   The focus of the conference was business change, transformation, and on innovative and sustainable business models.

Executive summary

2.       I attended a two day “Business Innovation & Sustainability” Conference organised by the Sustainable Business Network (SBN) at AUT Auckland, Sir Paul Reeves Building.

3.       The theme of the conference was about: “New Zealand the Project & the Big Shift”. New Zealand “the Project” and the “Big Shift” is the need to get everyone on board to work towards achieving innovation and sustainability.

4.       The conference provided an excellent forum for changing the mind-set and approach of our businesses and organisations. To realise that if something is not working, to change it up, and change the approach in resolving issues and championing the challenges.

5.       The conference provided an excellent opportunity to network and build strong relationships with key businesses, organisations, entrepreneurs, pioneers and innovators from different business markets ranging from economic, social, environment and education.

Day One

Introduction - Exploring the Big Shift:

6.       Ted.com – Support leaders and pioneers to make the big shift. The kind of shift is a massive collaboration. Get involved in projects by massive collaboration. Be pioneers for change.

Keynote Speakers

7.       Bernard Hickey, Economic and Finance Commentator – talks about “Setting the Scene for Sustainable Business in New Zealand”

8.       Shifting our thinking: to make an investment decision instead of a consumption decision. How we can convince our bosses about making choices of consumption to choices of investment.

Suggestions

9.       Investing for growth - Look at the long term implications of what we are doing (i.e Council’s LTP). Income distribution has a stronger impact on how long growth lasts than other factors

10.     Investing in people – Like reducing inequality to produce growth

11.     Investing to cut costs – Flick Electric Co. was launched to inform you of how much power you’re using. Flick Electric Co. is a bit like expedia.com. It changes the way you think and changes incentives of how to spend electricity. It changes the way we use power (investment vs consumption)

12.     Investing to sustain – An inequality chance by Gini Coefficient (Treasury, 2011), NZ measured the most inequality in the OECD. At least 2000 kids in NZ are living in poverty: and are at least sick, poor, or unhappy and not going to be effective members of society. Source OECD (2008) and Statistics New Zealand (2011). Solution: invest in their education and health. Use opportunities to change how economy operates in the long run

13.     Investing in youth – Our elderly in NZ has done quite well but our younger age groups have struggled (i.e. direction for Youth Connections). Think about policy choices in businesses that affect the young. The shift of poverty has shifted from the elderly to the young. Do we borrow from the old? How do we find the money (equity, borrow from banks, etc.).  Over time interest rates have fallen and as the population gets older they invest more in bonds. How do we fund investment in sustainable machines? We need to invest in the elderly because they have the money to invest in the young

14.     Stephanie Draper, Deputy CEO, Forum for the Future – talks about “Launching the Big Shift & Tackling the Big Challenges for Business”

a.       Think about it from a wider perspective model economy – look at all the assets NZ has in the pot. Look at the land and conservation

b.       Look at the assets for the (i) People: human, social and community & (ii) Government – these two really aren’t working together both strategically and sustainably

15.     Forum for the future – is a global non-profit that works with Businesses, Government and others to solve complex sustainability challenges. They have businesses all over the world

Functions

16.     Operate in 2 ways: leading (i) Company Transformation and (ii) Innovation Coalitions

17.     Focus on transforming key systems – came up with the Big Shift. Changing the key systems upon which we rely. The Big Shift is about being smart about how we make the big change

18.     Shaping our Operating Context: looking at big picture trends, business drivers and business results

19.     Wider Context: transforming new ideas, innovation, change and shifting a whole system

20.     How – 6 Steps: 1. Experience the need for change, 2. Diagnose the system, 3. Create pioneering practices, 4. Enable the tipping, 5. Sustain the transition, 6. Set the rules of the new mainstream

The Process

21.     What is the shift – a set of interventions that lead to a shift in the whole system (a sector, a city, an economy) to a sustainable path

22.     A business ad market based approach: shaping the context for a brighter future, innovating to win on that path. Eg. Nike has been on this path for a long time. Overtime they have evolved to competitive innovation, collaborative innovation and systems innovation

23.     Nike used 3 Steps: 1. Standardised measurement – Higgs Index. 2. Making information attractive and useable to key audiences and designers – 3. Encouraging a wider innovation supply chain and adding various initiatives. This was changing the nature of their business

24.     Sustainable Shipping Initiative (SSI) – used a large scale coalition creating an industry of wide change. SSI in a nutshell: the whole shipping value chain, focused on demonstrating leadership on sustainability, across the social, environment and economic pillars, adding up individual action and addressing the bigger barriers systematically

25.     Diagnose Stage – asking why things are the way they are? See how things can develop over time and use world systems, maps and data in comparison

26.     Use System mapping, future scenarios, sustainability frameworks, people centred research, change potential chart, visioning, etc.

27.     We do this by using our innovation approach: challenge, diagnose, inspire, create, build, and scale (i.e. the aggregation of marginal gain)

28.     Leads to different ways of operation: i.e. Glocal Mallorca pilot case looks at potential for “localism”. (good for Youth Connections & local employment)

29.     Choose your combination, i.e. increased generation to access, generate better products and services, build and enable markets

30.     Look at how you design change to deliver the Big Shift – Systems Thinking (see the whole picture, constantly learning about the system and how to be effective in it, seek to make effective interventions by understanding patterns in the system, consider different time scales short and long term, identify connections between different parts of the system, engage different systems, etc.)

Where does NZ Sit – Are we a Model Economy? Deep Conversations are involved: Where is NZ sitting on the path to becoming a model economy?

Ngarimu Blair, Director, Ngati Whatua of Orakei – talks about “A Model NZ, Aotearoa Economy from a Maori Perspective”

Facts/Statistics

31.     Maori Population Increase - If NZ is to become a model economy we must transform these statistics (51% of male prison population is Maori)

32.     Maori Economy $40bn

33.     Numerous eggs in one basket for Maori Stats

34.     Maori Authorities carry relatively low levels of debt

35.     Areas of work: education, housing, restoration

36.     Having realistic expectations – everyone else is allowed to have a pendulum, why can’t Maori?

Derek Handley, Entrepreneur in Residence, The B Team – talks about “Civil Rights, Votes for Women, Fascism, and Dictatorship. Did New Zealand play a part in this? Looks at ‘Where we are in the world and Whether New Zealand is a Model?’ ”

Food for Thought

37.     Low productivity - tourism

38.     Housing stock and population growth – earthquakes and housing commodities, etc.

39.     How do we make this change?

40.     Entrepreneurship – no infrastructure for technology entrepreneurship

41.     Focus on building a business that solves things for people or the planet

42.     Funding – G8 collaborate with a number of countries

43.     Capital – Government or private sector

44.     Corporate Sector – NZ is struggling in this sector. There is no leadership there. CEOs average tenure of 3 years. Corporations need to educate CEOS ‘how to generate growth in their businesses.’ A collection of businesses together can probably figure this out

45.     Non-Profits, Public Sector, Social Sector, Civil Society – Re think the word and framing. Creating in a room where all the sectors are present. People are thinking more about working together. A systems effort is a great start

Alex Hantan, Chief Executive, Akina Foundation – talks about “the Transition of Social Enterprise and a Model Economy”

Food for Thought

46.     Model Economy? Doughnut Economics, Kate Raworth, 2013 Chart

47.     Social Enterprise – simple, Social & Environment purpose, stakeholder value. All businesses have to profit, who are we creating value for? Shareholders or Stakeholders?

48.     Externalise Benefits, Externalise Costs

49.     What do we want more of? Good business, Social enterprise to leverage the benefits. Examples of Good businesses:

Te Whangai Trust – environmental benefits, provides work experience

Guayaki – strength of coffee, health benefits of tea, euphoria of chocolate

Ghalkle – six degrees of education, talking learning out of the classroom

Grameen Danone - social business enterprise designed to provide children with key nutrients

Growing pains: 1. Blueprint, 2. Validate 3. Prepare 4. Scale

Investment Capability – Markets (Big Society Capital, Social Venture Market)

Demand (NZ Post Group, Kiwibank)

Contact Launchpad ‘Akina Foundation’, growing social enterprise

50.     What if? Local resources, joined-up pathways and learning networks, social procurement, skilled volunteering, co-investment & JVs (Collaboration)

Gael Surgenor, General Manager of Southern Initiative (SI), Auckland Council – talks about “Southern Initiative and her experiences”

51.     SI exists because the current system is not working for everyone

52.     A Model Economy – nature, people, economy, business, government, community, (Source: the natureofbusiness.org)

53.     Generating Life – generating value for people and the planet

54.     Role of Government – about people, a network of relationships, looking for a different way

55.     Mind Shift – focus on bringing about change and not providing services

56.     Innovative, Energetic, Mobilised, Dare to be different, Mind Shift, Less Control & Management but more Enabling and Mobilising

57.     Corruption Perceptions Index 2013

 

Master Class Sessions – From Pioneering Practices to Enabling Tipping Point (Two Sessions)

 

A.      Session One: Business Lab – Stephanie Draper, Deputy CEO, Forum for the Future

58.     Why-scale and urgency: Level 1: Product Improvement, Level 2: Redesign Product, Level 3: Function Innovation, Level 4: System Innovation (Stage Model of Ecodesign Innovation, Brezel Chart)

59.     The way of innovation – Choose your combination: Generate better products and services; Build and enable markets; Market acceleration; Drive product and service innovation; Increase access to solutions; Create end-user demand; Create catalysing collaborative platforms; Create standards and ratings; Develop business models for replication; Reshape supply; Advocate in enabling context.

60.     By pioneering practice we mean examples that demonstrate a new way of doing things. This includes new technologies, services, projects, platforms, etc.

61.     Inspire and challenge your assumptions by thinking about the process. Use scenarios, trends, people-centred research, weak signals, videos, seeing is believing. Show people what works and to give them good thoughts and inspiration. For example, Spark, Bupa – We used one of our favourite inspire approaches in spark. In conducting their people centred research the Bupa teams met, chatted, observed and hung out with a bunch of people that were extremes in their carbon use.

62.     Generate lots of ideas and concepts to solve the challenges. For example, Future Scrapes & Sony projects bring together a range of expert thinkers, designers, futurologists, writers and the public to explore the opportunities and challenges of life in 2005, and consider the potential contribution that technology and entertainment can make in shaping a better, more sustainable future. Some of the ideas that emerged from the project have been taken through to ‘Build Stage’ (Future Scapes).

63.     Test and improve your concepts in a low risk environment and start small. For example, use the Wandular concept. How? This is the true cutting edge of Innovation for Sustainability to Grow, Replicate, Diffuse and Influence.

64.     Options for exploration - is the process of creating pioneering practice, and aspects to increase your chances of scale, and the culture of breakthrough innovation.

65.     Exercise “Framing” and “How we might question” – Generate ideas like how we might lever the problem to encourage others to get on board. Start small and focus on one particular problem that we can solve then leverage out to wider systems and networks for support. Look for management structures that spot and protect breakthrough innovations that enable innovation in our organisations.

B.      Session Two: Government Innovation Lab – Gael Surgenor, General Manager, Southern Initiative, Auckland Council

66.     Gael’s employment history - use to work for Skip, Family Violence and Youth Connections. Quotes: “Sometimes there is innovation by necessity and innovation by accident”

67.     Innovation Impact Horizons: Improving today; Creating tomorrow; Involves optimising; Improving; Evolving; Inventing; Transforming of policies; Services; Systems and processes that exist; Inventing policies, services, systems and processes that do not exist; Transforming values and models.

68.     Innovation Enabling Governance/Goventional Governance: Tract outputs; Adherence is scope; Reduce risks and escalations; Deliverable milestones; Track ROI return on investment; Seek proof and precedent; Project management rigour; Track schedule and budget.

69.     Innovation Governance: Track values and purpose; Check for discovery; Check for fast and cheap fail and learn experiments; Experiment milestones. Track ROI: return on insights and ideas, seek what it is? Analogous learning, Innovation practice rigour, and Track schedule.

70.     Youth Employment Action Plan: A Traction Plan, not an Action Plan because more of the same won’t work. A new possible and necessary approach because not enough is happening to support our young people to find jobs or mobilise businesses to achieve their skills and resource needs.

71.     The situation today: is it one of Urgency, Activity and Success, Emergency Understanding, Not enough impact. Who is responding? Everyone – High levels of activity across the board reflecting together but not really working together. Need to map out the Wider Ecosystem. 10 Local Boards are interested in Youth Connections. The failure is from a Systematic Approach. So we need to Diagnose from a different approach.

72.     What is Auckland Missing – Definitely Cohesion: Need Alignment; Impactful Momentum; An outside in view. (Need Employment Pledges from employers to work with young people).

73.     The number one issue for young people is to obtain a driver’s license (Working with ACC, MSD, MOE, Department of Corrections) to support young people to get a driver’s license and keep out of trouble.

74.     The risk of doing more of the same is a traction problem (Silos and complexity that fuel unintended completion and patch protection). Young people lack fragmentation on a clear pathway.

75.     From an Unilateral focus to a Holistic focus – User Perspective, Development Perspective, Capability Perspective. Creating a ‘Traction Hub’ to do it is part of the innovation. Different conversations happen and the power of Colocation i.e. from Christchurch traction. Need connection traction with education to make a difference.

76.     We need to do capability exercises ourselves and not hire independent contractors, to turn things around and get the contractors to coach a new team of work to get the capability scope.

77.     Mature Organisational Conditions for Innovation. Leadership & Governance, Skills & Expertise, Environment & Infrastructure, Processes & Practice, Values & Identity (Think Place).

78.     We need to cultivate the type of leadership for innovation in government. People need to feel comfortable to innovate for change in government positions. Value and identity are important. The value set should be in sync and appropriate with innovation practice. Currently, the public sector system wanting change is not set up for change.

Day Two

Exploring Issues about the Big Shift: Investing in our Youth

·        Song/Entertainment from Diocesan School of Girls

·        The Roots Creative Entrepreneurs - Inspiring youth to be leaders, to stand up and be proud of whom they are. The Roots counters the negative issues facing youth in Otara, South Auckland. The Roots are a Creative Business, a Network and a Movement inspiring the next generation through creativity. The Roots Philosophy & 5 Principles are: 1. Roots, 2. Intergenerational, 3. Creativity, 4. Sustainability, and 5. Community.

79.     The Need to Change the Existence: Interventions to create a Shift in a System, Sector or Society are for example -

a)      ECover Powered by Nature  – Responding to global trends, Some things are harder to predict, ECover R & D, Testing Incubation

b)      Glocal experiment and explore with live prototyping, Glocal Hub, Enabling a value network, Mallorcan pilot case supports tourism industry

c)      Satellite mapping, Resources flow, Bioconversion, Product innovation, Business model innovation, Satellite network

d)      Centralised infrastructure and ownership – energy efficiency, fuel fossils

e)      Renewal energy is mature and small scale energy preservation

f)       Farm Power putting agriculture on the grid for renewable energy to generate energy and income

g)      How we can measure energy – the research phase: what’s happening already, what’s the appetite? What’s the potential for change?

h)      Build a coalition – be united around shared, vision, and understand broader groups

i)        Galvanise other groups with shared vision and facilitate workshops to share vision and bring to life

j)        We’re tackling two key barriers: Information – partnering with Farmers weekly and offering academic courses in online forum; Grid Access – sharing the risk and cost

k)      How we can stimulate market shared demands

l)        Community Energy Fortnight Coalition

m)     The 3 ingredients of our approach: 1. Influence champions; 2. Engage influences with mass ownership; 3. Approach the co-operative and those that sit outside traditional engagement

n)      A ‘seeing is believing’ ministerial tour to Germany

o)      20/20 vision for community energy in the UK and UK Cooperatives started a community energy revolution

p)      Community Energy Strategy: Full Report by 2015

q)      Shift policy landscape and support for community ownership

r)       People are important in community energy

s)       Welcoming new organisations into the coalition

t)       We need to build on the learning available to us

u)      The 3 companies to kick start the Big Shift: 1. Glocal, 2. E Cover, 3. Community Energy Fortnight Coalition

 

What’s happening in New Zealand Right Now in the Big Shift?

Colmar Brunton New Zealand – Guest Speaker: Jacqueline Ireland, CEO – talks about “Monitor of New Zealand’s Perceptions, Attitudes and Behaviours around Sustainability”, The Better Business Report – 2014

Statistics

80.     82% care about sustainability and what happens to the planet

81.     Younger generations are accepting the responsibility to drive change

82.     79% believe it is important for NZ to grow and market food that’s organic and GE free

83.     76% agree what they do is personal

84.     70% kiwis want to work for a sustainable company

85.     56% agree that the biggest single problem is climate change

86.     Biggest change is how big is sustainability

87.     Kiwis are concerned about social and health issues before the environment

88.     At a macro level, the gap is closing on the issues that we are most concerned about across generations

89.     Health concerns - are the impact of processed foods

90.     Environment concerns – purity of our water, pollution of lakes and rivers

91.     Economic concerns – less of a concern

92.     Demand for sustainable products continues to increase, driven by younger generation

93.     Consumers are increasingly welcoming sustainable products in their lives

94.     Sustainability are increasingly influencing purchasing behaviour across all categories

95.     Sustainable products are improving over time

96.     72% supports organic products towards sustainable living and appealing for consumers

97.     Over half of consumers say they will pay a bit more to ensure sustainable products

98.     Baby boomers and the young generation are prepared to pay more for the best

99.     Generation X born between the early 1960s and the early 1980s are more sustainable

100.   84% buy eco-friendly cleaning products

101.   63% in 2013 & 2014 cannot name any organisation that are sustainable leaders

102.   Whittakers continue to move up the list of brand leaders in sustainability

103.   What does it all mean? BrandZ top 100 Global Brands 2014: 14% Brand Value - the growing influence of Generation Y on the shape of categories, Focus on 3 Forces: 1. Purpose, 2. Beyond, 3. Profit – people want to associate with brands they feel good about.

Statistics

104.   In a post-recession world there’s plenty of evidence that new values are driving consumer choices and behaviour

105.   For current generations - generosity, kindness and humility are competitive advantages: such as Microsoft, Toms, Air NZ, Meridian, KidsCan, Environment Trust, One for One, Microsoft Elevate America

106.   Sustainability is a branding challenge, and the same rules apply

107.   Different brands grow their financial value faster and longer

108.   Be Meaningful - define the shared value that connects your brand with its largest consumer, the territory of sustainability is a rich opportunity

109.   Be different - Authentic, True & Inspiring

110.   Be Salient - be bold, tell people what you’re doing, market your brand in a relevant and engaging way

Project NZ and Sustainable Business Network (SBN)/The Big Shift in Action

Guest Speakers

Rachel Brown, CEO SBN – talks about “Making New Zealand a Sustainable Country: by Making a 21st Century income from Clean, Green New Zealand; Making the most of our natural advantages by adding value in imported ideas”

Key Themes in New Zealand

111.   Transformation – Renewables, Restorative, Community, Mega Efficiency

112.   System Innovation Focus & Projects: Economy, Transport, Social Value, Food Systems

113.   Diagnose “the Big Shift”

114.   Seeking the pioneers - understand challenges and seize opportunities

115.   Identify Scale - identify ideas and initiatives to scale, promote members and influence investors (sustainable kiwi saver survey)

116.   We don’t have enough investment in New Zealand

117.   Promote members and influence investors

118.   Collaborate projects e.g. Million Metres Streams – Restore New Zealand’s Waterways: Identify issues like carbon and waterways; Diagnose key players, challenges and activities; Pioneer to review and find solutions; Scale best initiatives and how to speed it up

119.   Labs, coalition, business designs, campaign, system shift

120.   Keep the opportunity alive and get out of the little pond and into the big pond

121.   James Griffin, SBN – talks about “The Circular Economy” – As opposed to the linear “Take, Make, Waste” Model. In a Circular Economy - Companies manage resources as valuable assets. The lifecyle length of products is maximized, utilization optimized and at the end of the life of a product all materials are fully reutilised.

122.   Why accelerate the Circulate Economy – to optimize our resources and create the Big Shift. The early movement advantage has arrived in New Zealand and we need a Model base to measure longevity and volume by resources.

123.   Identified 6 key tools to unlock longevity and create a Circular Economy:

· Design

· Demand

· Infrastructure – look at scale and make infrastructure viable

· Ownership – in the manufacturing industry

· Emerging Technology – disruption technology

· Legislation – leads to a frugal economy

124.   Matt Ayers, SBN – talks about “Smart Transport” (An incredibly exciting area). He looks at New Zealand transport energy efficiency by 2050 - Introduction of electric vehicles in New Zealand and a lot of experiments to be done in New Zealand. Technology is now within range for competition. Travels the country to talk to organisations to see what people are interested in: Electric Cars, Trip Sharing (Car Pooling), Smartphones – shift as a hub of transportation and how people access transport rather than having their own transport.

125.   What’s stopping us from getting it right: services, integration and experience? We have aggregated a lot of ideas from the country: Model Fleet – electric vehicle fleet; Parked Cars – how do we utilize this; Find a Truck – energy use.

126.   Julia Jackson, SBN – talks about “Social Value in Business” – she looks at the risks of deaths among children; the pathway and journey of businesses to help create solutions to social issues.

127.   What do we mean by embedding social values into business models: 2 Critical Elements: 1. Social Value – Strategy, figure out strategy and systemic problems. Finding where those alignments are and wider stakeholder groups, 2. Social Value – Challenges, figure out what the overarching challenges are in business, where the business impacts are, and 3. Social Value – Emerging Solutions.

The 5 “Ps”

a.       Procurement

b.       People

c.       Place

d.       Partners

e.       Product and Service

128.   Emily Dowding-Smith, SBN – talks about “Restoring New Zealand’s Food System” - Transforming our Food System. She looks at the changing practices and perceptions of the young generation and realising the huge potential of IT and the role it plays (Restorative foods).

Group Discussion

129.   Shifting a traditional fossil fuel business to a pioneer in renewables – Mike Bennetts, Chief Executive Officer, Z Energy

130.   Quote: “Top management’s job is to design context rather than invent content – Gary Hamel”

131.   Z Energy bought Shell NZ – Our “given” context:

·     The middle of the problem

·     30% share of NZ’s transport fuels

·     Significant contribution to business and individual carbon footprints

·     Sustainability costs

·     What we do is green wash

132.   Our “generated” context: generation is key to generate context and not create and invest only content -

·     The heart of the solution

·     Climate change is real

·     Opportunity to make a difference for a more sustainable future

·     Customers will back us, as long as we admit when we have got it wrong or are stuck

133.   You don’t always need a plan before you commit to what matters to you – Have a Sustainability Plan:

·     Use less and Waste less

·     Reduce carbon emissions of Z Energy

·     Reduce New Zealand’s reliance on fossil fuels

·     Support New Zealand

134.   What is predictable?

·     Losing sight of why we are doing this

·     Personal values trump both organisational values and strategy every time

·     Results do not match expectations

·     Public statements introduce a different type of accountability

135.   What required leadership – focusses on using less and selling less to achieve more, a shift to a pioneer in renewables from the traditional fossil fuel business?

·     Continually generate context

·     Change the game, lead or be active

·     Paradigms that challenge past based thinking

·     Delivering on basic stakeholder expectations

·     Generating networks and offers of support

·     Be straight up on failures, misses and challenges

 

136.   Results lead to opportunities:

·     $21m investment in biodiesel

·     Feasibility study for woody biomass

·     One of NZ’s largest private recyclers

·     Pilot technology for reducing fuel consumption

137.   Finally Climate Summit:

·     Energy Independence

·     Preserve Rainforests

·     Sustainability

·     Green Jobs

·     Livable Cities

·     Renewables

·     Clean Water and Air

·     Healthy Children

Deep Conversations/Techniques for realising opportunities

Bernard Hickey, Moderator

Mike Bennetts, Z Energy – Focus on Context rather than Content

138.   Rachel Taulelei, Founder of Yellow Brick Road – work with fishermen who fish daily for fish in NZ. Focus on sustainable responsible fishing and catching of fish. Work primarily with Ministry of Primary Industries & Fisheries. Very small but has a big voice. Yellow Brick Road is a small and dynamic business built around conservation and commerce.

139.   Nick Astwik, Kiwibank – focus on making change sustainable through ‘People and Culture.’ Leadership Challenge is the Environment. Change is really cut and there is no guarantee in it and you need to stay the course. Need to define the role and how to enable the enablers. Get momentum to get a really good outcome. Need clarity to make sure purpose is on track. Ultimately it comes back to a leadership challenge and how to be bold and take risks for a sustainable country. For example,

140.   Robb Donze, INZIDE Commercial – is living proof that sustainable design pays. It is a company that focuses on Interface and sets high standards. It is all about business collaboration. Having goals set are crucial and we need to have goals set for 2020.

Key Highlight

Master Class: Mapping the system - Smart Transport: Projects/Accelerating Smart Transport in New Zealand (See Smart Transport – Project NZ Conference PowerPoint)

Key Questions & Responses

141.   How do we bring others along the journey?

·     Focus on the context and get people involved in the conversations

142.   How do we deal with pressures on organisations?

·     Focus on leadership and the mind-set (i.e. Strategy & Approach, Purpose and Culture)

143.   How do we change the mind-set?

·     Be a fan of leading by doing and be serious about creating value and benefit for everyone

144.   How do we align business concepts and values within our organisations?

·     Encourage ownership and realise the value of it (i.e. Value of owning vs. renting)

145.   How do organisations hire and recruit people for value & sustainability?

·     Focus on the brand, customer and consumer perception, and ask the right questions

146.   How do we create an environment for diversity?

·     Include things in the software or equation that involve inclusion and make it comfortable for diversity. The physical environment is built around value and a lot is valued around design. Look at the duality of what this means for “me and my family” as opposed to what does this mean for “my family only”. Think about the psychology of people and families and how we galvanize purpose

Overview

147.   Rachel Brown, CEO of SBN sums it up by concluding “What’s Next” – the Overview? New Zealand the Project: We need to make the “Big Shift” in promoting Change, Innovation, Sustainability, Efficiency, Renewables and Collaboration in our businesses and organisations.

Conclusion

148.   What does this mean for me - What’s Next?” I need to advocate for Change and work collectively with others in support of a model New Zealand economy that focusses on the “Big Shift” in promoting Innovation, Sustainability, Efficiency, Renewables and Collaboration.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Receives the report from Member Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Smart Transport – Project NZ Conference PowerPoint

21

     

Signatories

Author

Member Ruby Manukia-Schaumkel – Whau Local Board

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 




Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local board member update reports

File No.: CP2014/23758

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide Whau Local Board members with an opportunity to verbally update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         Receives local board member verbal reports.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local Board member attendance at the 2014 Making Good Decisions Programme - Tue 4 Nov and Wed 5 Nov 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22432

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity for board approval for a Whau Local Board member to attend the 2014 Making Good Decisions (MGD) programme – Tue 4 November and Wed 5 November 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       The purpose of MGD programme is to help board members to make better decisions under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  It provides RMA decision-makers with the skills needed to run fair and effective hearings, and to make informed decisions.

3.       The “Making Good Decisions Programme (MGD) - Foundation Course” covers 10 modules and is run over two days. An assessment is required to be completed prior to attendance and an assessment completed within 1 month post attendance. 

4.       The Programme contains the following modules:

·           Module 1 - Natural Justice and Ethics

·           Module 2 - Principles of RMA Decision Making

·           Module 3 - Considerations Relating to Māori

·           Module 4 - The Planning Framework and Hearings

·           Module 5 - Consent Hearings

·           Module 6 - Roles of Participants in Hearings

·           Module 7 - Procedures for Hearings under the RMA

·           Module 8 - Managing Hearings

·           Module 9 - Considering, Testing and Weighing Evidence

·          Module 10 - Deliberation and Preparing Decisions                        

5.       The programme will be held at Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, Auckland. More information is attached to the report

6.       Registration fee per attendee for the “MGD – Foundation Course” is $1,906.09 excl GST.

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         Considers nominating a local board member to attend the 2014 Making Good Decisions (MGD) programme – Foundation Course - Tue 4 November and Wed 5 November 2014.

b)         Approves the payment of registration fees from the Whau Local Board professional development budget.

c)         Agrees that any additional expenses including mileage claim for attending the 2014 Making Good Decisions (MGD) programme – Tue 4 November and Wed 5 November 2014 be provided for in line with Auckland Council's Elected Members' Expense Rules.

d)         Requests that following completion of the programme the local board member leads a workshop discussion with Whau local board members and provide a written report at 10 December 2014 board meeting to share learnings and insights.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

2014 Making Good Decisions (MGD) programme – Tue 4 November and Wed 5 November 2014 - Programme

29

     

Signatories

Author

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report – Whau Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/22873

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport’s activities in the Board area.

 

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves the cost estimate of $2 million to construct an 80m bridge that is 3.5m wide and separated from the rail bridge, as part of the New Lynn to waterview shared path. 

b)      Confirms that the construction funding to come from it’s Local Board Transport Fund, years 2012-2013, 2013-2014, 2014-2015 and part of the 2015-2016 funding.

 

Comments

 

Discussion

LOCAL BOARD TRANSPORT FUND APPLICATION

 

NEW LYNN TO WATERVIEW SHARED PATH AND THE OPPORTUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE TO A STAND-ALONE PART OF THE PROJECT

2.       The New Lynn to Waterview Shared Path was originally developed in concept in 2002. The Investigation has progressed for the scheme assessment to determine a preferred route within the next five months. The route options cross the Whau River next to the Kiwirail Rail Bridge. The proposed shared path bridge would be a key link in the West providing a new connection to the west on a completely active mode basis. The Whau Shared Path Bridge would be a stand-alone legacy project that would serve the people of New Lynn for many years to come. The proposed bridge presents an opportunity for the Local Board to fund the bridge construction as a stand-alone construction project. The construction funding could be used from 2012-2013 funding and the forward years funding of the board for the 2013-2014, 2014-2015, 2015-2016. The preliminary cost estimate for such a bridge is $2million for construction and would include a 3.5m structure on an 80m bridge separate from the rail bridge. The current funding available is $2,071,016.

 

Background

3.       The New Lynn to Waterview Shared Path Project will be implemented under the Auckland Cycleway Network between New Lynn Town Centre and the SH20 Waterview Shared Path. The Project would unlock the wider benefits of the individual investments of walking and cycling in New Lynn, Tiverton Corridor, Avondale and the SH20 area. This link provides a southern east west link parallel to SH16 the North Western Shared Path.

4.       The project would complete a 2.5km gap between New Lynn and SH20 Waterview Shared Path and provides a high quality regional shared path link. See Figure 1 below which shows the key features for the shared path along the rail corridor between New Lynn and Soljak Place (Waterview Shared Path over Rail Bridge)

 

 

Strategic Fit

5.       Regional connection for active modes: Improve local road networks by investing in walking and cycling is a strategic objective set out in the Auckland Transport GPS (Government Policy Statement) 2012(2012/13-2021/22) for Land Transport funding. This connection will make a contribution to economic growth, productivity and health benefits. 

6

 

7

 

5

 

4

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

6.       Figure 1 illustrates the approximate location of the proposed cycleway.  The following key features and connections are identified in the figure:

1.   Connection to Soljak Place rail over bridge under design by the Waterview Cycleway design Consultant;

2.   Connection to Avondale town centre via Trent Street;

3.   Connection and interface with Avondale train station;

4.   Connection to the Tiverton-Wolverton corridor;

5.   Proposed Shared Path Bridge over the Whau River

6.   Connection and interface with New Lynn train station;

7.   Termination of cycleway west of the rail trench.

7.       The project is being progressed to align with the Waterview Shared Path with the aim of achieving a Notice of Requirements within 9 months and to fast track the construction to align with the Waterview shared path so as to unlock over 5km of benefit in one large package. The commitment from the Local Board to contribute towards the bridge construction cost is required to keep the benefit cost ratio greater than 4 to ensure the project attracts regional NZTA funding.

 

 

 

RESPONSES AND PROGRESS REPORTS

 

ENCROACHMENTS ON LAND OWNED BY AUCKLAND TRANSPORT - THE WHAU BRIDGE ON GREAT NORTH ROAD.

8.       A request for Auckland Transport to investigate the encroachments.

 

Response

9.       Some Auckland Transport and Auckland Council land near the bridge is currently used by private businesses and property owners. Auckland Transport is unable to locate any records to see whether the private properties have got licenses to occupy Auckland Transport land near the bridge. However, AT has sent a letter to the property owners requesting them not to use Auckland Transport land for parking. A follow up inspection will be conducted in the near future to ensure the area is cleared of encroachment.

10.     This further investigation does require more time, and as such there will be an update regarding this matter by end of October 2014.

 

REQUEST FOR SPEED CALMING MEASURES ON RIMU STREET

11.     A request for Auckland Transport to look at installing speed calming on Rimu Street.

 

Update

12.     Auckland Transport needs more time to complete its investigation as currently there are rehab works occurring on Rimu Street and this means that it would be difficult to get accurate results on the tube count that is required. The rehab construction works is taking longer than expected to complete, after which time AT will be able to carry out the required tube counts. An update will be available by the mid of October 2014.

 

VICTOR STREET SPEED TABLE

13.     Auckland Transport has received a request from the Avondale Police to look at the Speed Table on Victor Street, as it is causing major confusion to pedestrians and motorists alike, and there has now been a traffic accident resulting from that confusion.

 

Update

14.     Auckland Transport received the counts from the surveyor have assessed the warrant. The numbers were insufficient to justify converting the facility into a zebra crossing. It meets a warrant for a refuge island which is currently already there with side islands. Based on the survey results Auckland Transport cannot make any further changes to it.

 

CONVERTING THE ST GEORGE STREET, ST JUDE ROAD & GREAT NORTH ROAD AVONDALE ROUNDABOUT TO TRAFFIC LIGHTS

15.     A request has been received from the Local Board requesting Auckland Transport to investigate the possibilities of converting the St George Street, St Jude Road & Great North Road Avondale roundabout to traffic lights.

 

Response

16.     Auckland Transport has investigated the feasibility of converting the roundabout intersection of St George Street, St Jude Street and Great North Road into a signalised intersection.

17.     Auckland Transport investigations has found that converting this intersection from a roundabout to a signalised intersection will require closing one of the legs, and require significant cost for this upgrade.

 

18.     The cost-benefit analysis of signalising this intersection is not favourable, as Great North Road does not experience significant delays due to having to give way to other approaches. Rather the delays experienced are due to the high traffic demand city-bound and west-bound and due to the railway line on St Jude Street. We have not observed any major congestion issues at the roundabout off-peak hours however the demand exists on the main arterial: Great North Road.

19.     Auckland Transport has added the potential signalisation of this roundabout onto our Signals Programme, however due to the reasons outlined above and the significant costs associatedwith this proposal, the priority of this intersection is low and unlikely to go ahead, when compared to other intersections with more serious safety issues that are waiting for signalisation.

 

PARKING RESTRICTIONS OUTSIDE 125 AND 127 BLOCKHOUSE BAY ROAD REQUEST

20.     A request has been received from the Local Board to investigate at the parking restrictions outside 125 and 127 Blockhouse Bay Road.

 

Update

21.     Auckland Transport is looking at revisiting the current time restrictions, changing it from the current P60 to a P15 restriction. However, this will need to go through the consultation process with affected parties.  This will be reported back to the Local Board the outcome of consultation once completed.

 

47 TITIRANGI ROAD BUS STOP - CHANGE OF LOCATION

22.     Due to the Local Board advocating for the local dairy owner about the installation of the above bus stop outside the dairy and the difficulty that has occurred for the shop owner’s business Auckland Transport is looking at changing the location of the bus stop outside 47 Titirangi Road.  Auckland Transport has presented the amended site to the dairy owner for information.  Auckland Transport is now required to undertake consultation with the affected parities before AT can progress with the change of location.  AT will report back to the Local Board after the outcome of the consultation with the next steps.

 

WAYFINDING SIGN FROM TRANSIT STATION IN NEW LYNN

23.     The Local Board has requested Auckland Transport to look at the signs associated with the Transit Station in New Lynn.

 

Update

1.       Auckland Transport is investigating the request.

 

CHANGE OF PARKING RESTRICTION OUTSIDE 125/127 BLOCKHOUSE BAY ROAD.

24.     A request has been received by a Local Board member to consider changing the parking restriction outside 125/127 Blockhouse Bay Road from P60 to P15.

 

Update

25.     Auckland Transport has passed on additional information regarding the parking restriction change outside 125/127 Blockhouse Bay road to our parking design team. They have reinvestigated the issue and reviewed your request with the additional information.

26.     Therefore, Auckland Transport will arrange to change the current P60 to a P15 time restriction to allow for additional turnover and availability of these parking spaces. This process will need to go through a public consultation and legal resolution process, which can take some time (between 4-6 months). Auckland Transport will update the Local Board once consultation is completed.

 

 

 

 

NEW WINDSOR ROAD FOOTPATH RENEWAL REQUEST

27.     A request has been received through the Local Board Chairman for Auckland Transport to investigate doing repairs for the New Windsor footpath.

 

Response

28.     Auckland Transport has included this request to the Footpath Renewal programme for assessment.

 

GREAT NORTH ROAD/BLOCKHOUSE BAY SLIP LANE SIGNALIZATION

29.     Auckland Transport is proposing  signalising the left turn slip lane into Blockhouse Bay Road from Great North Road.

30.     The objective of the project is to improve the pedestrian safety and provide connectivity for pedestrians across the existing pedestrian signals on Great North and Blockhouse Bay Road.

31.     The left turn slip lane into Blockhouse Bay Road is a free left turn and does not have a safe pedestrian crossing facility to access the existing pedestrian signal across Blockhouse Bay Road. Traffic turning left into Blockhouse Bay Road is relatively high especially during evening peak hours as majority of the vehicles are commuters from the SH16 motorway. Vehicles were also observed turning left without indicating and at high speeds due to the lack of opposing movements which creates ambiguity for pedestrians waiting to cross the slip lane and results in safety risks.  During the site visit pedestrians were observed having to wait a significant amount of time before crossing and near misses were observed between pedestrians and left turning vehicles. Pedestrians have difficulties crossing the slip lane and requested a formal pedestrian facility to be installed on the slip lane.

32.     Signalising the left turn slip lane will not have adverse effects on the Great North Road westbound approach as this approach will never have green if the slip lane is on red hence, the traffic on Great North Road will not be affected.

33.     Auckland Transport is in the process of making some improvements to the pram crossings across the other approaches which initially were not considered as part of the project but will not affect the design of the slip lane.  

 

Local Board Response

34.     The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal in principal.

 

PROPOSED ALTERNATIVE CYCLE ROUTE FOR TIVERTON-WOLVERTON

35.     As part of the Tiverton-Wolverton corridor upgrade project, Auckland Transport is proposing an alternative cycle route for cyclists to travel between Wolverton Street and Maioro Street (linking into the existing shared paths on these two roads). This provides a route for cyclists to travel between Wolverton St and Maioro St who are not comfortable travelling on road along busy routes. Due to the limited road width available and the provision of high and low level access roads, it was not feasible to provide shared paths or cycle lanes along Tiverton Rd and therefore create a cycle route along the main route.  

36.     This project includes the installation of shared pedestrian/cycle paths on Blockhouse Bay Road and New Windsor Road (the two busiest sections of road along the route), as well as some new speed tables, pedestrian refuge islands, bus stop relocations and street light upgrades.

 

Local Board Response

37.     The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal in principal.

 

 

 

GREAT NORTH ROAD AND SABULITE ROAD  CAR PARKING ISSUES

38.     A request has come from the Local Board for Auckland Transport to looking at the cars been parked on road reserve on the cnr of Great North Road and Sabulite Road.

 

Update

39.     Auckland Transport is looking into this and will report back its findings once completed.

 

EXTRA PEDESTRIAN CROSSING AT MAIORO STREET REQUEST

40.     Auckland Transport has been had a request from the Local Board to investigated installing an extra pedestrian Crossing on Maioro Street.

 

Response

41.     Auckland Transport is unable to install a crossing facility on Maioro Street at this stage as it doesn’t meet a warrant for a crossing facility.  The pedestrian numbers were not sufficient to justify installing a crossing facility checked against Auckland Transports standards warrant system.

42.     It is also difficult to fit a refuge island on Maioro Street due to the close proximity of driveways and vehicular tracking issues.  However it is understood that it’s difficult to cross the busy stretch of Maioro Street hence a refuge island has been proposed on our program of Minor Safety Improvements.  Due to the low priority of this project when compared to many across the region on the list it is awaiting further prioritisation.  The final location of the crossing facility will be determined during the design stage depending on the most feasible location according to pedestrian desire line and site constraints.

 

REQUEST FOR BUS STOP RELOCATION TO THE KELSTON COMMUNITY HUB FROM 68 ST LEONARD’S STREET

43.     A request has come through the Local Board for the bus stop at 88 St Leonard Street to be relocated to be in front of the Kelston Community Hub on Sabulite Road.

 

Update

44.     Auckland Transport is investigating this request.

 


 

 


LOCAL BOARD’s ISSUES FOR INVESTIGATION BY AUCKLAND TRANSPORT

Subject Name

Location

Description

Auckland Transport Response

3107-3119 Great North Road Footpath Repair

Great North Road,  between Thai Gardenia and Cycle Shop, north end of shopping area

Short-term repair of footpath surface and holes.  Currently in bad state of repair. Water blast and re-sand bricks

Currently under review on timeline. Footpath, water blasting repairs has been action due to safety concerns.

St Leonards Road Footpath Replacement

St Leonards Road: shops opposite Kelston Boys High School

Repair of hotch/potch paving along footpath in front of shops;

The footpath in regards to the shops is on private property.  Auckland Transport has considered this request and unfortunately is not in our next 5 year programme.

Lynwood Road, Kelston Kerb and Channel Request

Lynwood Road, Kelston

Install Kerb and Channel on small section from 44 Lynwood Road back towards Great North Road on one side of road.

Local Board to request through the Local Board Transport Fund process.

Corner of Archibald and St Leonard Road Pedestrian Crossing

Corner of Archibald and St Leonard Road

Request for Pedestrian Crossing.  Local Board will be consulting with Kelston Boys if they still require it.

Local Board to discuss request with the School.  Auckland Transport will put through to our Safety Team for assessment

Corner of St Leonards and Archibald Road down to Albert Road Footpath Extension

Corner of St Leonards and Archibald Road down to Albert Road

Request for a footpath extension from the corner of St Leonards and Archibald Road down to Albert Road

This request is currently in design stage.  Auckland Transport needs to wait until the budget is finalised before this project can go any further.

Adshel Bus Stop Removal from outside the Bay Café & Icoco Café

Blockhouse Bay Road outside

Bus Stop upgrade – possible narrowing of bus stop to free up paving space outside The Bay Café & Icoco Café.

Auckland Transport is in the process of moving the Adshel from outside the café.  Time line to be confirmed shortly.

Blockhouse Bay TC Paving Matchups

Blockhouse Bay Village and Blockhouse Bay Road

Match up the paving outside shops

Auckland Transport is aware of the work that is required at the Blockhouse Bay Village and due to budget restraints and the necessity of priority of works in the Western Ward areas this work is not in our next 3 year programme.

2004-2016 Great North Road Tree Base

Between 2004 & 2016A Great North Road, Avondale Town Centre

There is a tree landscaped into the sidewalk/footpath.  The concrete at the base of the tree is lifting and may prove hazardous to passers-by. Request that pathway around this tree be fixed.

Areas that have been identified as being unsafe have been actioned and Auckland Transport is still in consultation with Parks on what will occur with Trees on walkways.

New Lynn Traffic Light Review And Re-phrasing

SH20 to Clark St

Local Board has suggested that 7 sets of lights not required, needs review and re-phasing.

Auckland Transport has held a workshop shop with the Local Board updating on progress to date.  AT to arrange a site meeting on key sites of concern with Local Board Members.

Rosebank Road Pavement Rehabilitation

Rosebank Road from the corner Blockhouse Bay Road down to Great North Road

 

Work is now in progress by Auckland Transport

Slippery Pavers

Avondale Town Centre

on exposed Slopes

Auckland Transport recommended removing the glaze from the Pavers as the best solution at this stage.  This has been completed

 


 


ISSUES PENDING

Subject Name

Description

Date Requested

Due Date

Roading Corridor Weed Control In The Whau Ward

The Local Board has requested information on weed control in the road corridor.  Auckland Transport will arrange a workshop with the Local Board to discuss weed control in the Whau Ward.

19 February 2014

November 2014

Antisocial use of Cars in Lansford Crescent

Auckland Transport is processing a Bylaw “Car Curfew” which will assist the police to undertake enforcement in the commercial areas to mitigate the antisocial use of cars.

25 November 2013

November 2014

Avondale Town Centre Parking Assessment

A request from the Local Board that they be part of the assessment process in regards to the Avondale Parking Plan.

4 February 2014

November 2014

Proposed Waterview To New Lynn Shared (Cycle and Pedestrian) Path

Auckland Transport program for the New Lynn to Waterview Shared Path

April 2014

Workshop took place in September with recommendation going to Local Board to allocate funding from the Local Board Transport Fund to this project

Blockhouse Bay Town Centre Parking Management

Auckland Transport in conjunction with Auckland Council will be undertaking a workshop with the Local Board on this request in the near future.  Auckland Council is reviewing town centres parking management currently.

March 2014

November 2014

Roading Network Totara Avenue Road Completion

The Local Board would like an update on this project.

 

November 2014

Delta Avenue and Stock Street, New Lynn

Private Use of land. Keep as a Public asset from the Local Board.  Auckland Transport Properties and AC Parks are working through this.

March 2014

November  2014

 


 

ISSUES COMPLETED

Subject Name

Decision Description

Date Requested

Completion date

Proposed Bus Stops Outside 77 Avondale Road And Outside 9 Avondale Road, Avondale

Auckland Transport is proposing to install a new bus stop outside No. 77 Avondale Road. The Transport Portfolio Leads support the improvements been indicated by Auckland Transport.

August 2014

September 2014

Patiki Road – Traffic Capacity Improvements

Auckland Transport (AT) and New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) have investigated journey time delays that have been experienced along the north-western motorway during the evening peak as a result of the string of capital works projects currently underway to construct the Western Ring Route.   Patiki Road has been identified as a critical constraint.  The Transport Portfolio Leads support the improvements been indicated by Auckland Transport.

August 2014

September 2014

Proposed Bus Stops And Shelters – 49 And 50
 Connaught Street, Green Bay

Auckland Transport consulted in May 2014 on two new bus stops outside 49 and 50 Connaught Street. Based on the feedback received it has been decided that a new layout is required for the proposed bus stops. The proposed bus stop outside 49 Connaught Street is unchanged. The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

August 2014

September 2014

Proposed Bus Stops And Shelters – 75 And 76 Stottholm Road, Green Bay

Auckland Transport has recently completed a review of bus routes in the Titirangi and Green Bay area to simplify existing routes and introduce new routes. The new routes became operational on 3 August 2014. As a result of the bus route changes a number of gaps in the network were identified which required either new bus stops or upgrades to existing bus stops. The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

August 2014

September 2014

Proposed Bus Stop – 22 Binsted Road, New Lynn

Auckland Transport is proposing to realign the existing kerb line and install a bus stop outside 22 Binsted Road, New Lynn.  The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

 

August 2014

September 2014

Ash Street Mid-Block Signal

Auckland Transport has received multiple requests by the community regarding a pedestrian facility on Ash Street in the vicinity of the racecourse due to high pedestrian demand generated from neighboring schools, racecourse and the Avondale Sunday markets. The pedestrian signal would only be called when there is a demand. Capacity of the proposed facility has been checked using SIDRA and the results indicate that traffic volumes can be accommodated without creating significant delays.   The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

 

August 2014

September 2014

Rosebank Road Refuge Consultation

Auckland Transport is proposing to install a 1.8 m wide raised refuge island within the flush median near no. 661 Rosebank Road to prevent motorists from using the flush for overtaking as well as providing a pedestrian crossing facility outside the local shops. Please note that some footpath upgrade works will be required to be able to install a pram crossing at an appropriate grade and to ensure adequate drainage is maintained.  The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

August 2014

September 2014

Proposed P5 Pick Up And Drop Off Zone Along 131 Godley Road, Green Bay

Auckland Transport (AT) has been working with the Green Bay Primary School and the Local Community Constable to look at some appropriate time restrictions outside this school. The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal.

August 2014

September 2014

35 Kelwyn Rd, Kelston Speed Hump Removal

Auckland Transport will be replacing the cushion with a low profile speed hump which will be installed across the full width of the lane to avoid issues with vehicles being “tilted” as they drive over this calming device.  Auckland Transport has completed testing at the bus depot to confirm it is an acceptable solution.

July 2014

August 2014

Kelston Cluster Footpath Issues

The Local Board has requested investigation be undertaken on several footpath issues in the Kelston area

July 2014

September 2014

No Stopping At All Times (Broken Yellow Lines) –

The Transport Portfolio Leads support the proposal

     July 2014

August 2014

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Great North Rd/Blockhouse Bay slip lane signalisation

43

     

Signatories

Author

Owena Schuster - Elected Member Relationship Manager - West, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Whau Bridge Signage / New Lynn Gateways

 

File No.: CP2014/14735

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report identifies four proposed signage elements on the Whau Bridge as part of the New Lynn Gateways program. It requires the Whau Local Board to approve the designs so that the four signage elements can be constructed (Auckland Transport has granted its consent as road controlling authority).

Executive summary

2.       Gateway features such as the four proposed signage elements assist in reflecting the history, character and aspirations of an area, such as the Whau.

3.       The initial New Lynn Gateways project plan proposed that gateway features be designed in three hierarchical levels being:

·   Main arterial road entrances.

·   Key precinct locations.

·   At a pedestrian level within defined precinct localities (as identified in the New Lynn Urban Plan 2010-2030).

4.       The Whau Bridge is understood to be the geographical boundary marker between Avondale and New Lynn and is located on a main arterial being Great North Road.  The four signage elements are proposed to be constructed on the four main pillars of this bridge.

5.       A locational map is included at Attachment A.

6.       Significant engagement on the proposal has been undertaken with the local community, stakeholders, Mana Whenua and Auckland Transport.

7.       The signage proposal complies with relevant planning, Auckland Transport, and Transpower regulations.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves the four signage element designs so that they can be constructed on the Whau Bridge in accordance with the Signage New Lynn Gateways capital works budget.

 

Comments

Background

8.       In September 2013 the Whau Local Board requested the assistance of North West Planning in its New Lynn Gateways Project.

9.       A project team made up of staff from Community Development Arts & Culture; Auckland Transport; Whau Local Board Services; City Transformation; and the New Lynn BID Manager assisted in this work. Key findings from this team included:

·   Main arterial road entrances were seen as priority locations for potential gateway elements. Eleven main arterial road entrances to New Lynn were discussed. The Whau Bridge was selected as the key priority location. This decision was based on: The Whau Bridge being a key gateway into New Lynn; the potential to incorporate both an Avondale and New Lynn connection; the Whau River being a key geographical feature and a Taonga of Te Kawerau A Maki; and the feature if designed appropriately would be easily recognisable to both pedestrians and vehicle users. The ten other arterial road entrance localities could have gateways constructed in the future depending on funding and further community engagement.

·   Ten precinct locations identified in the New Lynn Urban Plan 2010-2030 were also discussed. The majority of these precincts require further development before gateway elements could be incorporated at the precinct level. 

 

10.     The ideas noted above were presented to Whau Local Board in workshops in the later part of 2013 and gained the Boards’ support.

11.     In February 2014 a decision was made by the project team to partner with Unitec in delivering this project. The advantages to this relationship are:

·   Building stronger relationships with Unitec, a key business and education stakeholder based in Mt Albert and Henderson.

·   Having the assistance of Paul Woodruffe, an academic landscape architect leader at Unitec, who is a specialist in collaborative practices and multi-disciplinary project management.

·   A five-person student design team committed to the project with their work going toward their degree programmes.

·   Cost savings to the project that would be considerably less then receiving the design outcome from a consultant.

Engagement

12.     A concept design board was completed by the students and this is included at Attachment B. This was utilised for the engagement phase of the project.

13.     Venues for the engagement phase included:

14.     New Lynn Library; Lynn Mall Shopping Centre; Avondale Community Action’s Community Hub 1881 Great North Road; New Lynn Community Centre Hall; New Lynn Night Markets; and Saint Ninians, 17 St Georges Bay Road, Avondale.

15.     Feedback received included ideas on:

·   Illustrating the multicultural make up of New Lynn and Avondale such as incorporating Pacific, Asian, and European styles in any renderings.

·   A Maori motif or Maori representation to illustrate the historical and cultural significance of the Whau River to Maori.

·   Incorporate local kids’ art and design ideas.

·   Janet Frame’s written works on the ‘Wow’ or Whau River and Oakley Mental Hospital.

·   The importance of Eels, Flat Fish, the Te Whau Tree, the Avondale Spider in the Whau Local Board area and representing these.

·   Acknowledge the brick and clay history (such as Crown Lynn pottery) in any design.

·   Acknowledge the past maritime importance of the Whau River.

·   Think about ways to link each of the pillars to each other.

·   Think about the palette of materials that could be used in the design such as: mosaics to provide colour and fun; use of metal bricks with kids art work blazoned on them; subtle use of light to provide an interesting visual impact at night; and use of orange and brown colours to represent the historic brick and clay works.

Final Design

16.     Subsequent to the engagement feedback noted above the final four signage element designs were completed and these are included at Attachment C.

17.     In summary, the designs convey the following information:

·   Are in the shape of chimneys and also have side elevations with a brick pattern to reflect the iconic and historic brick works of the area.

·   Using the colours of clay to represent the iconic pottery past of the area.

·   Represents the cultures of: Maori utilising Maori motifs provided from Te Kawerau A Maki; Pacifica through the use of stingrays illustrated in Polynesian patterns; Asia through the use of koi fish, and European through the use of the flat fish motifs.

·   Includes the words: The Whau – Avondale or The Whau – New Lynn on the bottom of each of the signs.

·   Will be internally lit at night providing a translucent glow.

Auckland Transport

18.     Auckland Transport has considered these signs under their road controlling authority status.

19.     Auckland Transport consent was granted on 1 September 2014. A copy of their approval is included at Attachment D.

Transpower

20.     The proposed signage elements will comply with Transpower’ s requirements as noted in their Minimum Approach Distances Near 220kV Transmission Lines on Towers (Pylons) Table (Attachment E). The signs will have the required clearance of 10 metres beneath the conductors and 14 metres clearance to the side of conductors.

Planning

21.     The Auckland Regional Plan: Coastal is the relevant planning document that controls signage on the Whau Bridge.  Under Rule 34.5.1 (Permitted Activities) signs are to provide: necessary public information; comply with any Maritime Safety Authority or Civil Aviation Authority Guidelines or any relevant law; the sign shall not be flashing, revolving or otherwise moving unless necessary for navigation purposes; not be located where it will be a hazard to navigation; and have a maximum surface area of 3 square metres.

22.     The concept designs at Attachment C will comply with Rule 34.5.1 as a permitted activity.

Building Act

23.     Section 42A of the Building Act 2004, Schedule 1, lists exemptions where building works do not require a building consent. 

24.     Item 39 Signs is listed under Schedule 1 as being exempt under the following condition:

·   “Building work in connection with any sign (whether freestanding or attached to a structure), and any structural support of the sign places no restriction on size or height above the supporting ground as long as the design of the sign, including mounting and any foundation details, has been carried out or reviewed by a chartered professional engineer”.

25.     The signage elements are being designed and will be reviewed by a chartered professional engineer.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     The Whau Local Board has considered this project at workshops on 11 December 2013, 23 April and 25 June 2014.  The Board’s feedback has influenced various stages of the project including the final designs.

Maori impact statement

27.     Te Kawerau A Maki (as Manawhenua) and specifically Edward Ashby, Heritage & Environment Manager, has been involved with this project since its inception.  One of the signage pillars contains two Maori designs provided by Te Kawerau A Maki. One design acknowledges the Tainui Waka. The separate kowhaiwhai design is an adaptation of the one used at the Arataki Visitor Centre and elsewhere in Waitakere.

Implementation

28.     The New Lynn Gateways capital works project budget of $27150.00 is held by the Whau Local Board. This budget has been retained for the 2014 / 2015 financial year and has not been deferred. This budget is sufficient to complete the design and construction phase of the project.

 

29.        The four gateway signage elements will be constructed within two months of the Whau Local Board recommendation to grant consent to them.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Locational Map

49

bView

Engagement Concept Design Board

51

cView

Four Signage Element Designs

53

dView

Auckland Transport Approval 1 September 2014

61

eView

Transpower Pylons Table

65

     

Signatories

Author

Douglas Sadlier - Principal Planner Area Spatial

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 









Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Waterview Connection Project - Design Approval

 

File No.: CP2014/21140

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to update the local board on design decisions made to date for Council owned or operated assets constructed or affected by the NZTA Waterview Connection Project and to present the resultant Open Space Restoration Plans for approval.

Executive summary

2.       The Board of Inquiry that approved the designation for the Waterview SH20 proposal, included a number of consent conditions intended to recognize and offset the impact of the project on the surrounding community and council assets. One of those conditions is a requirement that the designation holder (NZTA) be required to fund and undertake the restoration of a number of Council reserves affected by the construction works.

3.       The general scope of the restoration design was established by the Board of Inquiry and documented in the draft Urban Design landscaping Plans (UDLPs). The design detail was to be determined and approved through the development of Open Space Restoration Plans for each affected reserve.

4.       The Board of Inquiry decision also required the establishment of Community Liaison Groups to act as an ongoing vehicle for community and stakeholder engagement, including input into design processes such as required for the Open Space Restoration Plans. These liaison groups include delegated representatives from the Local Boards.

5.       Given the practical problem that construction works are required to run in parallel with this design process, and in consequence, certain design decisions will need to be made prior to the formal submission of the Open Space Restoration Plans, the Whau and Albert Eden Locals Boards have previously given delegated authority for their representatives to provide design sign offs.

6.       The Urban Design Landscaping Plans which established the concept plan and key features of the main assets was signed off by the Local Boards in 2013.

7.       This report provides the Whau Local Board with the final design in the form of the Open Space Restoration Plans and design details of the key assets within those areas that Council will own or operate.

 

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves the Open Space Restoration Plan for Alan Wood Reserve.

b)      Approves the Open Space Restoration Plan for Valonia Reserve.

c)      Approves the design of the skatepark, basketball court, sportsfields, volleyball courts, car parks, toilets, changing rooms and other open space  features embedded within these Open Space Restoration Plans, subject to any final changes or refinements being  approved by the parks portfolio holder.

 

 


Comments

 

Consultation

8.       The Board of Inquiry decision determined that the designation holder should establish Community, Education and Working liaison groups to provide stakeholders with opportunities for review and comment on the implementation of the project.

9.       The Working Liaison Group meetings have a specific membership: Council, Housing New Zealand Corporation, Te Kawarau Iwi Tribal Authority, Ngati Whatua o Orakei, Kiwirail, Department of Conservation, Ministry of Education and the Local Boards.

10.     The regular Community Liaison Group (CLG) meetings which include Local Board representatives are open to all interested parties within the project area. They have been supported by a large number of community design workshops, under the umbrella of the CLG, but linked to specific design issues. This has allowed individual stakeholders or community groups to target their input and attendance.

11.     A sub group has been operational for the heritage area at Great North Road Interchange.

12.     A skate park and BMX design reference group was established with skaters and design professionals to ensure the design met the needs of the eventual users.

Local Board responsibilities in Alan Wood Corridor

13.     The May 2012 meetings of the Albert Eden and Whau Local Boards confirmed the design process for the open space corridor which formerly consisted of Hendon Park, Valonia Reserve and Alan Wood Reserve, needed to be managed jointly by the two boards.

14.     The Oakley Creek forms the boundary between the Whau and Albert Eden Local Board areas.  Oakley Creek has been re-routed as part of Waterview Connection project and there are some areas and assets in Alan Wood Reserve in the Whau local board area which are now on the Albert Eden side of the creek.  Now the design is substantially agreed, a determination will need to be made by the Governing Body on where the future governance and operational responsibilities will lie.   A separate report on this matter will be brought to the boards later this year.

15.     In advance of that determination, for the purposes of this report it has been assumed the Whau Board will be responsible for the extended Valonia Reserve including:

·        The two Valonia sport fields

·        Valonia carpark area and associated ablution block

·        Valonia skate park and basketball court

·        Areas accessible to public around the two stormwater ponds.

·        The three Oakley Creek bridges and all open space areas to the south of the final motorway alignment between Richardson Rd and the Oakley Creek bridge that services the Methuen Road lookout.

16.     All other areas will be the responsibility of the Albert Eden Local Board.

Regulatory framework for design decisions

17.     The designation conditions require design and approval processes to be predominantly managed through three work streams:

Urban Design Landscaping Plans (UDLP):

18.     These were originally submitted during the BoI and are required to be updated by the designation holder and signed off by Council’s regulatory team. These plans set out the proposed general arrangement of the reserves, including the location of key recreational facilities, paths, bridges etc.  The area covered by these plans include a mixture of Council and NZTA assets.

19.     The UDLP’s for Alan Wood Reserve, Waterview Reserve and Rosebank Domain have already been signed off by their local boards.

Outline Plan of Works (OPofW):

20.     A detailed design of the two tunnel portal areas was required to be developed and subjected to community consultation prior to sign off by Council's regulatory team. These areas contain mainly NZTA assets.  Council regulatory staff sign off of these areas has already taken place following consultation with the Community Liaison Group.

Open Space Restoration Plans (OSRP):

21.     The BoI required OSRP’s provide detailed designs for the final restoration of the following reserves:

·        Alan Wood

·        Waterview Reserve

·        Oakley Creek Esplanade (Waterview Glades)

·        Jack Colvin Park

·        Rosebank Domain

·        Harbourview-Orangihina Reserve

22.     The Council regulatory team subsequently determined that the tunneling methodology adopted by NZTAs contractor meant that the impact on Oakley Creek Esplanade was considerably less than envisaged during the Board of Inquiry. A waiver on the requirement for an OSRP was provided subject to targeted re-vegetation of the Oakley Creek Stream in this area.

Design approvals

23.     Copies of the OSRPs and additional restoration packages and selected design details of key assets are attached for approval.

24.     The drawings attached to this report have been selected to provide a suitable overview of the final reserve design and details of specific assets. A substantial design package consisting of the detailed drawings and design reports has also been placed in the Local Board offices.

25.     These designs are presented for approval on the understanding that many of the design decisions embedded within them have already been made and approved through the sign off of the UDLPs and the delegations provided to the Local Board representatives on the Community Liaison Groups.

26.     If there are further design approvals they will be progressed through the delegated Local Board representatives.

Design notes for specified items

27.     The following notes provide context for and/or design status for specified assets.

Asset

Status and notes

Valonia skatepark

Engineering design underway to ensure construction and maintenance issues are addressed.  This may result in minor changes to features.

Valonia ablution block

Council has negotiated an agreement with the contractor to take responsibility for the design process of this facility to ensure Council received value for money for the budget allocated to this asset.

Building design not likely to change but effects on car park layout are under examination.

Valonia stormwater pond

The Oakley Creek forms the boundary of the NZTA owned land. It is intended the footpath around the stream be part of park and that Council maintains area up to inside of footpath. NZTA will maintain the pond and surrounds.

Oakley Creek bridges

The balustrades for these structures were agreed to be a suitable site for art by design as required by the BoI. Council’s Public Arts team have helped the contractor with the process to brief, select and procure a suitable artist.

Some early design concept have been included in the attachments for information. The final results of this design process will be reported by the Public Arts team.

Temporary assets

A number of temporary facilities were required to be provided by the designation holder to ensure continuity of service during the progress of the project.

They are located off Hendon Ave and  consist of:

·    Car parking and access road

·    Basketball court

·    Volleyball court

·    Toilets

·    ½ size sportsfield

 

The ½ sport field is an existing field council had in use before the start of the project. The other assets have been constructed by the designation holder. All of these assets lie in KiwiRail land which council leases.

 

While there is no certainty at this time as to when/if a rail line would actually be implemented in this area, the design team believed it prudent to minimise construction of permanent assets in this area.

 

As these assets are able to provide some benefits in the period up to the time of a decision on a rail line implementation, staff have negotiated an agreement with the contractor that they are not now obliged to remove them at the end of the project.

·    The volleyball and basketball facilities  will be retained as is

·    The toilet is a temporary structure and will be removed

·    The sealed car park area will be “re-purposed” at some later date as the vehicle access to the car park will be lost as it currently crosses private land.

·    85% of the old sports field area will be retained, including its training lights and the ball fences. It is expected that this will provide an additional training resource in the area and a base for further investment if the rail line is not implemented.

 

Rosebank Domain

A predominant feature of this design is the changes to the access road. This decision needed to be made early in the design process to ensure earthworks could be scheduled. The feature was approved by the Whau Local Board representative in 2013, consents are in place and works are underway. 

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

28.     The design approval processes used to date were approved by the Whau and Albert-Eden Boards in May 2012.  At that time both boards endorsed the principle of joint management of future design decisions for Alan Wood Reserve.

29.     The Whau Local Board appointed board chair Catherine Farmer to work with officers on the Waterview Connect Project.

30.     The Local Board representatives appointed to the Community Liaison groups have taken an active role in developing the concept design in the named reserves formalised through approval of the UDLPs in 2013.

Māori impact statement

31.     Iwi groups with Mana Whenua for this area are include in the Community Liaison groups and have been involved in the Board of Inquiry process that established the managements framework  for these design decisions.

Implementation

32.     The designation holder through their contractors are obliged to manage the Open Space Restoration Plan processes for the named reserves and to undertake their construction and handover to Council as soon as possible.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Selected design detail

73

     

Signatories

Author

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

























Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Update on SH16/20 Waterview expenditure plan

 

File No.: CP2014/21144

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To update the local board on the expenditure plan for the compensation payments received from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) as part of the mitigation package for the State Highway 16/20 Waterview Connection project.

Executive summary

2.       Over the next five years Auckland Council will receive around $8 million from the New Zealand Transport Agency as part of the State Highway 16/20 Waterview Connection Project.  The income is generated from lease payments, compensation and property disposals within each of the three local board areas.  The estimated income for the Albert-Eden local board will be $2.6 million, in Whau $1.187 million and $3.05 million is expected in the Henderson-Massey local board area.  Additionally, there is $1,460,000 shared between Whau and Albert-Eden local boards.

3.       The projected income has been recorded in the annual plan and local board budgets for Henderson-Massey, Whau and Albert-Eden local boards.  These funds are either targeted to designation conditions, or are to be used for parks projects in communities impacted by the motorway development.

4.       The expenditure plan was endorsed by the Whau local board at its August 2013 meeting and approved by the Strategy and finance Committee at its September 2013 meeting.

5.       This report updates the expenditure to date and suggests two new projects to be funded, a master plan for Chamberlain Park and a contribution to a noise wall at Western Springs Gardens.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Agrees that the $100,000 originally planned for a play space at Valonia Reserve be allocated to the development of greenways.

 

Comments

6.       The Waterview Connection completes a motorway ring route around the city linking State Highway 20 with State Highway 16.  The new portion of the motorway is 4.8km long and includes a 2.5km length of tunnel. The project also includes widening of existing parts of SH16 and upgrades to existing interchanges. The construction work started in 2012 and is expected to be completed in 2017.

7.       The decision-making for the Waterview Connection was made through a Board of Inquiry Process.  The Waterview Connection Proposal Board of Inquiry (BOI) decision (June 2011) included a number of consent conditions intended to recognise and offset the impact of the proposal on the surrounding community and council assets.  These conditions include a requirement for the designation holder, the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), to fund and undertake the restoration of a number of council reserves directly affected by the construction works and provide cash compensation.  Additionally, over the construction period Auckland Council will receive income from NZTA in the form of lease payments for the occupation of public open space.

8.       The conditions in the BOI decision assigns some of the income to specific projects.  For the remainder of the income an expenditure plan has been developed through a process of workshops with the affected local boards.

9.       The key principles for expenditure have been endorsed by the local board and approved by the Strategy and Finance Committee.  These funds must:

·    be targeted to particular activities or areas where the designation conditions specifically require it (e.g. Howlett Reserve and Phyllis Reserve sports field)

·    be used in the local board area where they originate.

·    be used for parks and reserves related purposes

·    be approved by the governing body for decisions relating to revenue earned through land sale, land acquisition, sports field development, major upgrades and new facilities.

10.     The funds will be received at different stages of the project between 2012 and 2017 and are indicative values only, as the payments are linked to specific stages in the development of the motorway.

11.     The estimated income for the Whau local board is $1.187 million, additionally, there is $1,460,000 shared between Whau and Albert-Eden local boards and has been allocated to Alan Wood Reserve, which is in both local board areas.

12.     At the August 2013 the Albert Eden Local Board endorsed key joint projects for funding and they are outlined in the table below.

13.     The proposed Expenditure Plan for Whau Local Board is also outlined in the table below.

 

Project

Joint Albert-Eden and Whau funds

Whau Local Board funds

Estimated project cost

Anticipated financial year

Project lead

1.

Valonia Reserve land acquisition

$   900,000

 

$   900,000

2016/17

NZTA

2.

Trent Street to Harbutt reserve connection

$   250,000

 

$   250,000

2016/17

Auckland Transport

3.

Holly Street to Heron Park Boardwalk

$   310,000

$395,000

$   550,000

(includes $155,000 of joint funds)

2015/16

Whau Local Board

4.

New play space

 

$100,000

$100,000

2014/15

Whau Local Board

5.

Greenways development

 

$692,000

$692,000

2014/15/16

Whau Local Board

 

Total

$1,460,000.00

$1,187,000.00

$792,000.00

 

 

 

Valonia Reserve land acquisition

14.     The October 2013 meetings of the Whau and Albert Eden Local Boards endorsed the Valonia Street site for the skatepark and that it needed to be supported by the purchase of three NZTA properties in Valonia St to provide the site for the entranceway, car park and ablutions block. These properties (27, 29 and 31 Valonia St) were purchased by NZTA and have now been declared surplus  to requirements under the Public Works Act.

15.     At that time, it was proposed to fund the purchase by way of a land-swap for NZTA properties located off Barrymore Rd, with the difference in value provided by the joint Albert Eden/Whau NZTA funds.  This approach was also endorsed by the September 2013 Regional Development and Operation Committee.

16.     However, an unforeseen storm water problem with the Barrymore property has now resulted in alternative properties being proposed as the funding source.

17.     Two parcels of Council land near the southern tunnel portal are now required by NZTA:

·        Hendon entrance (adjacent to 71 Hendon Ave): Now required to provide vehicle access into the site for maintenance and operations of the southern portal building

·        Sun-strike land, parcels of land above the tunnel entrance are required to be planted with trees that provide sun strike protection for northbound vehicles.

18.     This revised approach has been discussed with the Albert Eden and Whau boards in workshop and agreed by their representatives on the Community Liaison Groups.  A report on this matter will be presented to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in November 2014.

Trent Street to Harbutt Reserve connection

19.     Auckland Transport are currently progressing a design for the Trent Street to Harbutt Reserve shared path.  The scope of this project has been extended to include a connection to New Lynn.

Holly Street to Heron Park boardwalk

20.     Preliminary design investigations have been undertaken for the Heron Park to Holly Street link.  The NZ Conservation Authority is expected to approve the Auckland Coastal Management Strategy late this year.  Once this is completed staff will begin the consenting process for this connection.

New play space

21.     This budget was allocated last year when the design of Valonia Reserve was not completed.  The design is now complete and there is no suitable area for a play space.  It is recommended this budget be reallocated to the Greenways development.

Greenways development

22.     The Whau Local Board have undertaken concept design and feasibility studies on 11 separate Greenway project schemes.  Funds from NZTA over the next three years will be allocated to consultation, design, consenting, project management and physical works of a number of these connections.  Additional NZTA funds are proposed to be allocated to the design development of the Whau Coastal Walkway project which aligns with sections of the Whau Greenway network.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     Staff hold regular meetings with the local board chair to discuss the progress on the implementation of the projects.

Māori impact statement

24.     Mana Whenua are included in the Community Liaison groups and have been involved in the Board of Inquiry process that established the management framework for these design decisions.  It is anticipated where any matters may have a significant impact on sites of significance to Mana Whenua that appropriate consultation will be undertaken.

Implementation

25.     The Heron Park to Holly Street link and the greenways plan are being delivered by Council’s Parks, Sport and Recreation team.  Some of the budget will be contributed to projects being delivered by Auckland Transport and NZTA’s contractors. 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/22428

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the 2013/2014 Community Waitakere-Auckland Council Shared Work Programme (SWP) and seek approval of the 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme and funding.

Executive summary

2.       Community Waitakere has completed almost all deliverables agreed in the 2013/14 SWP. The Annual Report on the 2013/2014 SWP submitted by Community Waitakere is attached (Attachment A).

3.       A draft Community Waitakere-Auckland Council SWP has been developed for the 2014/2015 financial year. A copy of the draft SWP is attached (Attachment B).

4.       Funding allocated for the SWP in the Whau Local Board budget needs to be released to ensure that Community Waitakere is able to meet financial obligations such as staff salaries in order to deliver on the SWP.

 

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme.

b)      Approves the release of $51,520 for the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme.

 

Comments

5.      A partnering agreement was signed between Waitakere City Council and Community Waitakere on 29 November 2006 and renewed in 2010.

6.      A shared work programme has been negotiated on an annual basis with associated funding allocated in the Long Term Plan 2006-2016.

7.       The following is an overview of the work that has been undertaken by Community Waitakere that meets the deliverables agreed for the 2013/2014 year:

Strengthening Community Development:

·    disseminated research, evaluation learnings and tools on website

·    supported capacity building e.g. Avondale Community Action resident-led organisation

·    inquiry report on potential future of the Wellbeing Collaboration Strategy Project completed and disseminated.

 

Community Infrastructure

·    Open Door Days have been well attended with sessions being held in different parts of the western local board cluster area

·    continued to convene Chief Executives Round Table meetings of local community and social service agencies

·    civic engagement through forums e.g. co-facilitated (with Auckland Regional Public Health Service) three community workshops on the Auckland Council’s Draft Local Alcohol Policy at community hubs and houses in Henderson, Avondale and Glen Eden; and co-hosted a workshop with council staff on Auckland Council’s Draft Community Grants Policy

·    Community Resource Centre: affordable offices for rent available to community groups (between 80 - 100% occupancy), meeting room hire has increased

·    Skills Capacity Building: 227 attendees at 12 training workshops

·    regular E-noticeboard reach continues to grow with almost 1000 subscribers.

 

Community Economic Development

·    continued to facilitate and support the Community Economic Development Network West

·    Enterprising Communities projects working across Massey and Glen Eden have been transitioned to Community Waitakere and Massey Matters.

 

Place Based Leadership

·    support provided informally to community through walk-ins, telephone and email with enquiries on a range of matters including training, room hire, services and events

·    support also provided informally to community organisations on issues such as strategy, funding, Charities Services registration, accounts and financial management

·    work with place based initiatives to provide support as needed e.g. New Lynn and Avondale town centres.

8.       In response to feedback from local boards, Community Waitakere has sought to orient deliverables where possible to the different local board areas. The vast majority of the SWP has been delivered during the 2013/14 year, other than the scoping of back office support. This work has therefore been prioritised for the 2014/15 SWP.

9.       The draft 2014/2015 SWP has been developed in consultation with representatives of all western local boards to align with Auckland Council’s Thriving Communities Strategic Action Plan and local board priorities. The SWP has two main focus areas: community and place based leadership, and community infrastructure.

10.     In previous years, funding for the SWP was held in a regional budget. Since the 2013/2014 financial year, this funding has been devolved to local board budgets, with an allocation of $83,520 in each of the Henderson-Massey, Whau and Waitakere Ranges Local Board 2014/15 budgets.

11.     The Whau Local Board has previously approved an advance of partial funds to Community Waitakere towards the 2014/15 SWP as noted in the resolution below:

That the Whau Local Board:

2. c) allocates the projected 2013/14 operational underspend of $148,000 to:

·    Partially support the 2014/15 funding agreements with Community Waitakere, Blockhouse Bay Community Centre, Green Bay Community House subject to completion of funding agreement documentation (up to $82,000).

·    Additional parks works including the Whau Bridge area ($46,000).

·    The balance partially support the 2014/15 funding agreements for community environmental activities for the Eco Matters Trust and the Whau River Catchment Trust.

d)       delegates authority to the Chair to sign off the final allocation made to each group as per resolution c).(res WH/2014/74)

12.     In accordance to this resolution, the Whau Local Board released $32,000 to Community Waitakere for the 2014/15 SWP, with the balance of the 2014/15 budgeted allocation to be made available in the 2014/15 financial year.

13.     The Whau Local Board has a balance of $51,520 available to be released to Community Waitakere for the delivery of the 2014/15 SWP.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     This report seeks local board approval of the SWP and associated funding. An operational review of the arrangement with Community Waitakere is currently underway. This process is due for completion in the first half of the current financial year and no decisions have been made at this time that could impact on delivery of the 2014/15 SWP.

Māori impact statement

15.     The deliverables in the SWP contribute to wellbeing for Maori residents in the area by Community Waitakere and council working within a Treaty of Waitangi framework.

Implementation

16.     Council staff will regularly liaise with Community Waitakere staff to provide additional support required to deliver the SWP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Annual Report: Community Waitakere - Auckland Council 2013/2014 Shared Work Programme

105

bView

Draft Community Waitakere - Auckland Council 2013/2014 Shared Work Programme (SWP)

119

     

Signatories

Author

Tony Rea - Manager Community development & Partnerships – West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 














Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 







Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Whau Local Board Community Group Funding - Round One 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/17889

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present applications received for round one of the Whau Local Board Community Funding Programme 2014-15.  The Whau Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       For the 2014-15 financial year, the Whau Local Board set a total community funding budget of $35,254.  This is the first round for the financial year. 

3.       Nineteen applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $79,049.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Considers the applications listed in Table 1 and agrees to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

 Table 1: Whau Local Board Community Funding Applications

Organisation

Funding for

Amount requested

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards the venue hire of the Lynfield Recreation and Youth Centre for the Safari Cultural Playgroup between January 2015 to June 2015

 $   3,150.00

Avondale Athletics Club

Towards the purchase of new throwing equipment, track equipment and marketing flags and badges between November 2014 to April 2015

 $   3,854.00

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Towards first aid training and the salary of the dancing tutors and coordination for the Chinese New Settlers Services Trust Cultural Learning Centre New Lynn branch between November 2014 to June 2015

 $   3,000.00

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Towards the purchase of four mobile whiteboards, four laptops a data projector and screen, promotion, teaching textbooks and visual resources and administration costs for the Education Programme at New Lynn Community Centre between November 2014 to June 2015

 $ 11,294.00

Dayspring Trust

Towards the clinical supervision cost for the Secure Beginnings programme between January 2015 to May 2015

 $   5,000.00

Encounter Hope Foundation

Towards the lease of 50 Rosebank Road, Avondale between November 2014 to October 2015

 $   8,000.00

Father and Child Trust

Towards operational costs including telephone/internet, rent, salaries for the support workers and general manager between November 2014 to November 2015

 $   4,000.00

Generation Ignite

Towards the purchase of outdoor bean bags, trestle tables, sports equipment, catering for the launch of Generation Ignite, catering for the Women's Refuge Breakfast, Food for the youth camping trip, and Christmas presents for youth at the Women's Refuge for the launch of Generation Ignite at the New Lynn Community Centre between December 2014 to January 2015

 $   4,490.00

Glendene Playcentre

 Towards operation costs including power, phone, water rates and lawn mowing between November 2014 to October 2015

 $   3,000.00

Glendene Playcentre

Towards the purchase and installation of a UV filter, outdoor power point, pump and tank and materials for the Glendene Play Centre between November 2014 to January 2015.

 $   2,500.00

Hannah Sport and Culture Association Incorporated

Towards one month’s rent at 44N Portage Road, New Lynn between November 2014 to December 2014

 $   2,204.00

Hannah Sport and Cultural Association Incorporated

Towards the purchase of chess equipment and tables between November 2014 and November 2015

 $   4,140.00

Pasifika Sway Trust

Towards tutor costs and fliers for Western Sway between January 2015 to November 2015

 $   5,000.00

Royal New Zealand Coastguard Boating Education Limited

Towards the purchase of life jackets, inflatable training boat, grab bag, throw ropes, certificates, bailer, fog horn, dummy flares, teaching aid kit and instructor training for the Safe Boating programme run at Dean Greenwood Swim School in New Windsor Primary between November 2014 to November 2015

 $   6,581.00

Synergy Community Trust

Towards the purchase of two new speakers for the Synergy Arts Group between November 2014 to March 2015

 $   4,899.00

The Diocese of Auckland - Church of the Saviour

Towards the purchase of equipment and resources from SPACE Trust NZ for the Support Parents Alongside Children's Education programme between February 2015 to November 2015

 $   2,301.00

The Parenting Place Incorporated

Towards subsidies, course handbooks and volunteers expenses for the Toolbox Parenting programme between November 2014 to October 2015

 $   2,636.00

West Auckland Community Toy Library

Towards the electricity, telephone and alarm monitoring costs for the West Auckland Toy Library between November 2014 to October 2015

 $   3,000.00

 

 

 $ 79,049.00

 

Comments

4.       In March 2013, the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) resolved to continue the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year (RDO/2013/32).

5.       Two community funding rounds are scheduled for this financial year. This first round closed on 15 July 2014.

6.       Through community grants, the local board recognises the vital role that community groups and organisations play in developing strong, sustainable communities. The Whau Local Board Community Discretionary Fund aims to assist groups to provide activities, projects, programmes, initiatives and events that make a positive contribution within the local board area.

7.       When reviewing applications, the local board should be guided by the following aim of the fund (these are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to help the local board when considering the merits of each proposal):

·   the benefit of the proposal to the local area

·   the group’s role in the local area

·   the alignment of the proposal with the priorities of the Board, such as:

o young people

o Maori

o the environment

o culture and arts

o social cohesion

o recreation and sport

o heritage

8.       This fund is allocated at the local board’s discretion. In accordance with its fiduciary duties, the local board is to act honestly, avoid conflicts of interest and act in what the local board believes to be the best interests of the community.

9.       Round one of the Whau Local Board Community Funding closed on 15 July 2014. The fund was advertised through local community networks, local publications and on the Auckland Council website.  

10.     For the 2014-15 financial year the Whau Local Board set a total community funding budget of $35,254.  None of this budget has been allocated to date. If the budget is split across the two rounds for the year, the budget for this round is $17,627.

11.     Nineteen applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $79,049.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Local board feedback on the community funding applications was sought at a workshop with the Whau Local Board.

Maori impact statement

13.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori. Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.

Implementation

14.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

15.     Following the Whau Local Board allocating funding for round one, Community Development, Arts and Culture will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A: Whau Local Board Discretionary Community Funding - Round One 2014/2015 Application Summaries

129

     

Signatories

Author

Kim Hammond - Community Grants and Support Officer West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



























































Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Renewal of community lease to The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale

 

File No.: CP2014/21208

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Whau Local Board approval to grant a renewal of community lease to The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated, located on part of Gittos Domain, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale.

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated (the Association) has a community lease with Auckland Council for a term of 5 years commencing 1 December 2004 with two 5-year rights of renewal.  The Association wishes to exercise its second and final right of renewal for the period 1 December 2014 until 30 November 2019.

3.       The Association wishes to continue leasing part of Gittos Domain that is also known as Avondale South Domain, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale, being Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 110548 contained within NA62A/1069 and parent title NA56/293 Part-Cancelled (Attachment A, aerial photograph).  The land is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation and classified as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve.  The land is vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for that purpose and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a Community Outcomes Plan.  The Association advises that they wish to continue their community lease on its current terms and conditions without variation.

5.       This report recommends the granting of a renewal of community lease to The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated for a term of 5 years commencing 1 December 2014.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves the renewal of lease to The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated on the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term: 5 years commencing 1 December 2014

ii)       Rent: $250.00 plus GST per annum

iii)      All other terms and conditions as contained in the existing lease dated 27 October 2005 excluding this right of renewal.

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated (the Association) has a community lease with Auckland Council for a term of 5 years commencing 1 December 2004 with two 5-year rights of renewal.  The Association wishes to exercise its second and final right of renewal for the period 1 December 2014 until 30 November 2019.

7.       The Association wishes to continue leasing part of Gittos Domain that is also known as Avondale South Domain, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale, being Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 110548 contained within NA62A/1069 and parent title NA56/293 Part-Cancelled (Attachment A, aerial photograph).  The land is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation and classified as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve.  The land is vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for that purpose and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

8.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a Community Outcomes Plan.  The Association advises that they wish to continue their community lease on its current terms and conditions without variation.

9.       The Association was registered as an Incorporated Society on 8 December 1949.  The Associations objectives are:

 

·    To provide a quality early educational play opportunity for young children (from birth to school age)

·    To provide a parent education programme to ensure quality Playcentre sessions and to foster quality family life

·    To advise, assist, encourage and co-ordinate the activities of existing affiliated Playcentres

·    To assist parents to co-operatively establish, organise, maintain, equip and supervise their own local Playcentre.  All such parents shall be required, as a condition of membership, to take an active part in such running of their Playcentre

10.     The Association which operates the Blockhouse Bay Playcentre is open Monday to Friday from 8.45am to 12.30pm and has a membership of over 50 made up of both parents and children.

11.     The Association is supported and licensed by the Ministry of Education as an Early Childhood Centre. It caters for children aged from birth to 6 years. Parents are offered free education through NZQA to further their Early Childhood Education qualifications.

12.     The Association are willing to share their facility with other Early Childhood Education providers.

13.     The Association has a shared lease of the carpark with Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Auckland Suburbs Branch Incorporated.

14.     Council staff have sought input from relevant council departments.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     Council staff have sought input from the local board portfolio holder on 8 September 2014, no objections were raised.

16.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

17.     The Association has a current community lease on the property. It is considered the granting of a renewal of community lease will not have any adverse impact for Maori.  Instead, Maori will benefit as members of the Association and users of the facility.

18.     Ensuring community facilities are well maintained and accessible for all members of the community, will be of benefit to all, including Maori.

Implementation

19.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

20.     There are no cost implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Aerial photograh - The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated, Blockhouse Bay Playcentre

191

     

Signatories

Author

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Aerial photograph – The Auckland Playcentres Association Incorporated, Blockhouse Bay Playcentre, 582 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23029

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Whau Local Board an overview Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2014.

Executive summary

2.       ACPL’s vision is to be a ‘centre of excellence’ that provides commercial expertise and value for money to the council in managing its property portfolio, acquisition and disposal activities, and the delivery of projects that implement council development initiatives.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six-months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

§ Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

§ Place-shaping projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

§ ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

§ Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

§ Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

§ Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

§ The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board six-monthly update 1 January to 30 June 2014.

 

Comments

 

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Whau Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from January to June 2014 is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages all Auckland Council or AT owned non-service properties. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six-months and now totals 1185 properties, an increase of 90 since our February 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the quarter ending 30 June 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $1.9 ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $25.4m against budget of $23.5m. During the quarter the average monthly collectable arrears rate and vacancies rate were respectively 2.1% and 2.4%. Well under the SOI targets of 5% and 3%.

10.     A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

§ Current ACPL managed commercial and residential property within the Whau Local Board

§ Each property’s classification or reason for retention

§ The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

§ The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported, e.g. regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to Auckland Plan outcomes by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

 

Performance

13.     January to June 2014 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$12.3m disposal recommendations

$14.8m

These recommendations include $5.6m of sites that are identified for development projects

14.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

15.     2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

These targets will include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net sales

 

Process

16.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with; council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Maori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

17.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Whau area are detailed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

24-26 Racecourse Parade, New Lynn

Development site. Transferred from ACPD as non-service in February 2014. Processed through the Rationalisation Process and cleared for sale by the governing body in April 14. Site recommended as SHA in September 14. See paragraphs 20 – 24 for more detail.

72B Delta Ave, New Lynn

Former access-way between 72 and 74C Delta Ave. Purchased for roading but no longer required for that purpose. Internal Expression of Interest phase commenced in August 2013. Whau Local Board indicated support of sale of this site in September 2013 on the basis that the public can access the walkway from further down Delta Ave once developed. Anticipated to progress to the Governing Body as recommended for sale late 2014 early 2015.

1815, 1817 & 1823 Great North Road, Avondale

This combined 3,000sqm site has been identified for potential residential housing. The group of properties was cleared for sale and development by the Governing Body in April 2014. See paragraph 28 for more details.

1B Rankin Avenue, New Lynn

Transferred to ACPL as non-service for review. ACPL began review of future use options via the Rationalisation Process in August 2013. Internal Expression of Interest phase drew out an EOI from AT regarding potential need of part or all of this site for the Western Rail Line Cycle Highway. Further review is accordingly on hold while concepts are developed to evaluate this potential requirement. AT to inform ACPL the outcome of the evaluation, noting that in September 2013 the Whau Local Board indicated their support for the council exploring retention of the site for open space and community facility use.

10 – 22 Totara Avenue, New Lynn

This property was purchased to help facilitate the regeneration of New Lynn and is the next stage in development. It forms part of Area C in the Council/Infratil Joint Development Agreement. ACPL progressing through the Rationalisation Process to evaluate future-use options and clear it of encumbrances for the purpose of clearing it for sale and development as part of the overall New Lynn project. Internal organisation wide Expression of Interest phase commenced in July 2014. Currently at the local board and mana whenua phase of the review process.

211 Blockhouse Bay Road, Avondale

Transferred from ACPD as non-service in June 2014. Residual land left from a parcel originally acquired by the former Auckland City Council in 1960 for street purposes. Part of the site was sold to an adjoining owner in 1978. Internal organisation wide Expression of Interest phase commenced in September 14. ACPL is in the process of booking a workshop date with the local board to seek their views.

 

Place Shaping and Housing Initiatives

Overview

18.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into around 48 council-driven place-shaping and housing initiatives region wide. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $400k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL lead developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

19.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Action Plan Group, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects with an affordable housing component over three years which would encompass Community Housing Organisation involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

Local Activities

20.     New Lynn Infratil Joint Development: The residential tower is complete, settlement and occupation is underway. A revised leasing strategy has been devised for the retail units to increase uptake. A full strategic review is underway.

21.     Racecourse Parade: This 3,500sqm site has been identified as holding development potential for housing outcomes. The properties were cleared for sale and development by the Governing Body in April 2014.

22.     The council recommended the site as an SHA (Special Housing Area) in September this year as one of 17 in tranche 4. The site is now subject to formal approval by Cabinet and a recommendation to the Governor-General. An Expression of Interest (EOI) phase to seek potential developers will follow.

23.     A master plan was undertaken by ACPL that included 24-26 Racecourse Parade, and adjoining properties, which showed how mixed use development with more intensive housing could be delivered to help initiate and support the regeneration of the Avondale town centre.

24.     24 and 26 Racecourse Parade has the potential to deliver at least 15 new homes over four years. The development will also provide a mix of housing types, matched to current shortages and has the potential to include one, two or three-bedroom units. The development adjoins Avondale Central Reserve and overlooks the Avondale race course.

25.     The land will be cleared for development and is zoned Town Centre under the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan. It is subject to a precinct overlay identified as Avondale 2 sub-precinct B. ACPL will give developers guidance to ensure the development delivers within the criteria set by Housing Areas and Special Housing Areas Act. It is intended that the first units will be ready for habitation by June 2016, with the entire development completed by the end of 2018.

26.     1 Trent Street, Avondale: This is a residential site capable of holding around 34 housing units. The site was designated as a Special Housing Area (SHA) in October 2013. The outcome sought is a good quality mixed tenure housing development on the site. A Sale and Purchase agreement has been agreed with NZ Housing Foundation for development of approximately 34 affordable homes. It is anticipated that a resource consent will be lodged for the development by the end of October 2014.

27.     Godley Road, Green Bay:  81a and 83b Godley Road, Green Bay were cleared for sale by committee on 6 June 2013 subject to the following provisions: conclusion of any required statutory processes; provision of an esplanade reserve; undertaking the sales process for the site in a manner that maximizes the opportunities to achieve quality urban design outcomes for the site; local board engagement as part of the master-planning exercise for the site.    

28.     Scoping work is underway to establish the feasibility of achieving both housing outcomes and upgraded elderly housing facilities.

29.     1815, 1817 & 1823 Great North Road, Avondale:  This combined 3,000sqm site has been identified for potential residential housing. The group of properties was cleared for sale and development by the Governing Body in April 2014, subject to relevant legislative processes including the formation of a 3.5m road widening reserve required by AT and conclusion of offer back requirements under Section 40 of the Local Government Act 2002. An EOI phase is intended to follow. The local board and council will be informed of the response to the EOI to ensure their aspirations for the site are met.

30.     Property Optimisation - an increasing focus for ACPL is property optimisation. In this we are keen to work with local boards on development opportunities that facilitate upgrades within the service portfolio. For example a community facility upgrade or build may be funded by incorporating the facility into a mixed-use development that makes better use of the overall site. We welcome the opportunity to review any such opportunities that may be identified by the Whau Local Board.

Acquisitions

Overview

31.     ACPL continues to support Council and Auckland Transport programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved Council or Auckland Transport budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

32.     By the end of the financial year 2013 to 2014 two hundred and seven property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $132.4m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

33.     Over the past six months 14 properties were acquired to meet council open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Whau Local Board area.

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

322 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

Community, Policy & Planning

Open Space

Waitakere-Ranges

51 Rimu Road, Oratia

Stormwater

Stormwater

Waitakere-Ranges

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

34.     72 properties were also acquired over the past six-months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects such as AMETI (30 acquisitions) Dominion Road (7 acquisitions) Te Atatu Road (9 acquisitions) and City Rail Link (16 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

35.     ACPL manages eight business interests region wide on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Whau Local Board area.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

36.     This report is for the Whau Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

37.     The importance of effective communication and engagement with Maori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 listed Tamaki region mana whenua groups for our core business activities. 

38.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of waahi tapu or joint management relating to Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. A high level overview of ACPL discussions with local mana whenua is outlined below.

39.     ACPL has additionally undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. The Improvement Planning Phase of this project is nearly complete. We anticipate finalising our MRP in September/October 2014.

Implementation

40.     There are no implementation issues.

 

 


Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

201

bView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the Local Board area

203

cView

Property movement in the Local Board area

207

     

Signatories

Author

Caitlin Borgfeldt - Local Board Liaison, Auckland Council Properties Limited

Authorisers

David Rankin - Chief Executive, Auckland Council Property Limited

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Financial Policies Issues for Long-term Plan 2015-2025

 

File No.: CP2014/22421

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report advises local boards on financial policy issues that may be considered in the development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025. It aims to support discussion of these issues at local board workshops in September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       Development of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is the council’s opportunity to consider if it wishes to consult on making changes to its financial policies.  A briefing setting out some of the matters that may be considered in the long-term plan process was provided to a workshop of the governing body on 5 August and to a local boards’ workshop on 18 August.

3.       The workshop identified a range of financial policy issues as possible matters for consideration in developing the draft long-term plan. These included the:

·        rating policy

·        standardisation of the remaining legacy fees and charges

·        development contributions.

4.       The key issues identified in regard to the rating policy were:

·        options for level of UAGC

·        proportion of rates paid by businesses including options for the long term differential strategy

·        proportion of rates paid by rural sector including options for farms and rural townships

·        affordability including consideration of additional support for superannuitants

·        options for further transition

·        standardising legacy rates remission and postponement policies (community, sporting and heritage remission and postponement policies).

5.       The remaining legacy fees and charges that have yet to be standardised are:

·        social housing rentals

·        street trading license fees and rentals

·        163 environmental health and licensing fees

·        some cemetery fees.

6.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 presents the council with an opportunity to consider if it wishes to amend its development contributions policy to reflect the changes made to development contributions in the Local Government (Amendment Act) Act 2014 alongside the changes the legislation requires.  Issues the council may wish to consider include refining its

·        funding areas

·        assessment of residential demand.

7.       The timetable for the development of financial policies for the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 is:

·        Budget committee workshop (including modelling of options) – 20 October (morning)

·        local boards workshop – 20 October (afternoon)

·        combined Budget committee and local boards workshop - 24 October

·        Mayor’s rating policy proposal 30 October

·        Budget committee workshop on financial policies – 31 October

·        Budget committee final decisions for draft Long-term plan (including financial policies) – 5 November

·        Budget committee workshop and meeting on rates transition – 17 November

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Determines if it wishes to make any recommendations for change to existing financial policies as part of development of the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

 

Comments

Significance

8.       This decisions sought in this report are not significant.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

9.       The purpose of this report is to facilitate the development and communication of local board views on the matters considered herein.

Māori impact statement

10.     The recommendation in this report have no impact on Maori.

Implementation

11.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations included in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Presentation to local boards on 18 August entitled “Financial Policies, Long-term Plan 2015-2025”

211

     

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 






























Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

LTP 2015-2025 Feedback on mayoral proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/23757

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the mayoral proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, as announced on 28 August 2014.

Executive summary

2.       On 28 August 2014, the Mayor announced a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025, outlining high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

3.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Considers the mayoral proposal and whether to provide feedback on the implications of the proposal.

 

Comments

Background

4.       In March 2014, the Mayor provided direction setting for the LTP 2015-2025.

5.       Between March and August, Auckland Council conducted a thorough assessment of its full work programme, prior to the Mayor announcing a proposal for the LTP 2015-2025 on 28 August 2014.  The mayoral proposal outlined high level funding envelopes and key priorities. 

6.       In response, the organisation considered the mayoral proposal at a more detailed project and local level, identifying what could be achieved within funding envelopes and options or trade-offs that may need to be considered.

7.       Local boards have been engaged throughout the LTP 2015-2025 process, including detailed briefings from departments between 23 September and 5 October to discuss responses to the mayoral proposal.

8.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the mayoral proposal, including departmental responses, to help inform draft budget and consultation decisions being made by the Budget Committee on 5 and 6 November 2014

9.       Local boards also have the opportunity to discuss feedback with the Governing Body on 17, 22 and 24 October 2014.

10.     Following Budget Committee decisions in early November, local boards will hold workshops to develop local consultation material and supporting information, for agreement in business meetings between 1 and 10 December 2014.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Kate Marsh - Financial Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - Manager Financial Plan Policy and Budgeting

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Local Board Feedback on the Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22650

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Endorses the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      Notes that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

 


Comments

Local board views and implications

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·    Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·    Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·    Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·    Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·    Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·    More public art outside the city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

· Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

· Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·    The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·    Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·    Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

· Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

· A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·    The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·    The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see highlighted points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

Next steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Arts & Culture Strategic Action Plan

247

bView

Local Board Feedback Summary

317

cView

Submissions Report

321

     

Signatories

Authors

Rebecca Kruse – Strategy Analyst

Maree Mills - Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes – Manager – Auckland Strategy and Research

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

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Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 




Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 






Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/22886

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Notes the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.

 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

 

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Māori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline

337

     

Signatories

Author

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager North West Planning

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Deliberation and Adoption of the Whau local board plan 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23645

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents further analysis of the submissions received to the Whau Local Board Draft Local Board Plan (the draft plan), the Board’s deliberations and seeks the adoption of the Whau Local Board Plan 2014.

Executive summary

2.       The Whau draft Local Board Plan was developed following informal community engagement. This was followed by formal consultation using the special consultative procedure (SCP) from 7 July to 6 August 2014 in particular asking residents their thoughts on the proposed priorities, initiatives and what was missing.

3.       314 submissions were received to the Draft Whau Local Board Plan 2014. Of these, 77 were proforma based submissions, 39 relating to heritage assessments and the balance were related to smokefree issues.  Thirty four of the submissions received were made to all draft local board plans.

4.       58 submitters requested the opportunity to speak in support of their submission at a public hearing with around 40 taking up the opportunity.

5.       A high level summary of the submissions received was presented in the ‘Summary of submissions to the Draft Whau Local Board Plan 2014’ report that the board considered when hearing oral submissions.

6.       There was a high level of support for the priorities. Whilst all four initiatives received a high level of support, the “Community, recreation and aquatic facilities” area was significantly higher than the others confirming past consultation that residents in the Whau are seeking investment in facilities from Council.

7.       The majority of submitters largely supported the draft plan.  Some of the submissions were for issues more appropriately referred to operational processes. Each local board is required to adopt a local board plan by 31 October 2014.

8.       The Whau Local Board considered the submissions from the SCP at its deliberations workshop in September and considered approximately 70 areas for change to the Plan

9.       The Whau Local Board Plan has been circulated as an attachment to this agenda.

 

Recommendations

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Agrees the areas of potential changes to the Whau Draft Local Board Plan.

b)      Adopts the Whau Local Board Plan.

c)      Delegates to the Chair to approve any minor wording changes that may be necessary following adoption.

 


Comments

 

Background

10.     The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires each local board to develop a local board plan every three years. The first local board plan was adopted in 2011. This second local board plan must be adopted by 31 October 2014.

11.     Local board plans are strategic plans for the following three years and beyond. The plans reflect the priorities and preferences of the community. They guide how the local board:

·    makes decisions on local activities and projects

·    provides input into regional strategies and policies

·    works with other agencies that play a key role in the area, including central government agencies and council-controlled organisations.

12.     The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year Long-term Plan. The plans also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for each of the following three financial years.

13.     The local board is required to use the SCP to consult on the draft local board plan. The SCP was held from 7 July to 6 August 2014. There were 314 submissions on the draft local board plan.

14.     All submissions received were entered into the Feedback Management System (FMS) and coded to the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives set out in the draft plan.

15.     The coding structure contained in the FMS was tailored to the content of the draft plan, with separate codes being created for each outcome, objective and key initiative.  This structure has enabled detailed analysis of the comments made on differing aspects of the draft plan. 

16.     Notwithstanding this detailed structure, coding is not a precise science.  For example, many submitters responding on the pro-forma submission form contained in the summary document, responded to question four, which asked if there were any items missing from the draft plan.  Many of the responses made to this question made comment on issues that were in fact included in the full draft plan, but which had not been included in the summary document. 

17.     Due to the largely hierarchical structure of the draft plan into outcome areas, objectives and key initiatives, it is also possible in most cases to code the same response to more than one element of the draft plan.

18.     In addition to considering the analyses tabled at workshops, board members referred to the detailed submissions when considering recommended changes they may wish progress. 

Consideration

19.     The local board plan has been developed by considering a range of strategic issues, as well as the Auckland Plan and other regional strategies and policies.  Advice from subject matters experts, community views and public submissions has also been important in developing the plan.

20.     There was a high level of support for the priorities. Submitters were asked to rank four initiative areas. A simple point allocation system indicated the following order of importance:

·    Community recreation and aquatic facilities

·    Revitalise Avondale town centre

·    Making new walking and cycling connections

·    Connecting to & cleaning the Whau River’s coastline

It is important to note that whilst all initiatives received a high level of support, the “Community, recreation and aquatic facilities” area was significantly higher than the others confirming past consultation that residents in the Whau are seeking investment in facilities from Council and the board’s advocacy.

21.     The local board deliberated on the SCP at its workshops in September 2014.  The following table summarises the key plan change areas considered by the Board in its deliberations and the recommended approach.

All Outcomes

Stronger focus on safety and accessibility

Strengthen text in plan

Great Communities

Kelston Neighbourhood Development project

Include in Plan

Add advocacy for review of street lighting & footpaths in Kelston

Include in Plan

New Windsor community development & facilities planning

Strengthen text in Plan

More support for youth programmes

Include in Plan

ECE plan for Whau or Avondale

Include in advocacy

Dialogue with CABx - migrant contract activities

Include in Plan and Note

Strengthen support for youth, children, pre-schooler text

Strengthen text in Plan

Statement for more smoke free promotion in parks

Strengthen text in Plan

Outstanding Development

Strengthen acknowledgement of importance of access to recreation & sport and facility/field developments

Strengthen text in Plan

Multi-party wider Avondale planning

Strengthen text in Plan

Avondale Town centre or wider Avondale planning

Strengthen text in Plan

Shift from support voluntary rental housing rating quality to advocate for compulsory

No change in Plan

Canoe and aquatic facilities on the Whau

Progress through Sport and Recreation Strategic Plan

Avondale branding

No change in Plan. Continue to work with local groups.

Hockey turf development plan

No change in Plan. Progress through Sport and Recreation Strategic Plan

Amenities in line with growth

Strengthen text in Plan

More Avondale affordable housing developments

Noted

Stronger local businesses

Link local products to local market

Strengthen text in Plan

Sustainable growth / Green Business

Strengthen text in Plan

Healthy Whau River & valued environment

Plastic bag ban / reduction promotion

Strengthen text in Plan

Expand school travel plans to cover sport facilities

Strengthen text in Plan

Separated cycle-ways

Note

Stronger enforcement of fines for dumping in coastal margin

Strengthen text in Plan

Non-toxic weed spray

Operational matter

Canoe path from Whau to Olympic park

Progress through Whau Coastal Walkway

10 year integrated weed & pest management plan for coastal margin & foreshore of Motu Manawa marine reserve

Note

More flowers in reserves – wild flowers – meadows

Note

Include focus more on “on”  and  “from”  river

Strengthen text in Plan

Add Keep Waitakere Beautiful to other key agencies

Strengthen text in Plan

Acknowledge importance and support public access to and enjoyment of Motu Manawa marine Reserve

Strengthen text in Plan

Strengthen desire for stronger community organisations and relationships with Council

Strengthen text in Plan

Promote shift to zero waste events

Strengthen text in Plan

20 minutes to all we need

Blockhouse Bay bus routes review

Note

More support for Motorised scooter (including shelters / chargers)

Strengthen text in Plan

More affordable public transport

Strengthen text in Plan

Increase road sweeper frequency in bush areas

Take up through operations

Identify high truck use local roads & deterrence options

Note

Arts Culture and heritage

Change order to heritage, arts and culture

Change in Plan

Expand built heritage text

Strengthen text in Plan

Add more activities that celebrate cultural diversity

Note

More park information plaques

Strengthen text in Plan

Support library and community oral history

Strengthen text in Plan

New Lynn character building assessment  in 2014/15

Progress in 14/15

Support development of a New Lynn history preservation strategy

Strengthen text in Plan

Support ceramic education centre development

Strengthen text in Plan

Develop heritage walking guide booklets

Strengthen text in Plan

That Officers take more strongly into account the pre-1944 whilst a full character assessment is progressed

Note and convey to Staff

Inclusion of artists in Avondale’s planning design and building

Include for all development in  Plan

Support for NZ Chinese history garden and/or museum

Note

Add to working with “working with Maori” text to build a working Treaty relationship with western Mataawaka

Include in Plan

Advocate / bylaw fines for smoking in public places

Note

Security cameras for some bus stops

Note

Support for Surf 10:20

Note

Fluoridation

Note

Advocate for sport support equity

Note

Increased street cleaning

Operational matter

Light pollution assessment

Operational matter in Parks design and renewals

 

 

Local board views and implications

22.     The local board’s views have driven the development of the plan attached to this report.

Māori impact statement

23      The local board plan contributes to improving wellbeing in Māori communities, as well as the community in general.

24.     The Whau Local Board has given consideration to Māori outcomes throughout the development of the Whau Local Board Plan; consequently the implementation of the plan has the potential to contribute to positive outcomes for Māori.

25.     The Whau Local Board invited mana whenua and mataawaka to meet with them during the early stages of the development of the local board plan.  Views expressed by mana whenua and mataawaka during these hui have been considered and helped inform the development of the plan.

26.     The outcomes, objectives and initiatives included in the plan will support the delivery of the Auckland Plan.  The entirety of the plan will benefit Māori as part of the board’s community.  As part of the draft plan the board intends to work closely with mana whenua on a number of initiatives such as those focusing directly on issues of importance to Māori such as improving and maintaining the natural environment e.g. improving stream water quality or town centre projects.  The board also intends to improve the ability of mataawaka to input into board decision making through the creation of a local Māori network.  Other areas of the draft plan such as its initiatives focusing on youth (employment, cultural and recreational) or public transport initiatives will particularly benefit Māori due to the Māori community’s demographic and socio-economic characteristics.

Implementation

27.     The long-term plan and the annual plans draw the local board plans together and prioritise the council projects into what is affordable and will best meet the strategic direction and needs of Auckland’s communities. The projects and initiatives contained in each local board plan need to be included in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 and annual plans if they are to be implemented. This requires discussion and agreement with the governing body though the local board agreement process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board Plan 2014 (To be circulated Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Author

Mark Allen - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23681

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy, but it must be expanded to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultation exercises each year, covering small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Provides feedback on the draft Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

Background

 

7.       As part of the Long-term Plan (LTP) 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the LGA2002 and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       This legislative change requires the council to expand its current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a ‘significant’ decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the draft policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a special consultative procedure (SCP). Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, Grey Power, Age Concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of local boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements, and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role in providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy approach to engagement

18.     The LGA2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities, and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultation exercises each year from small neighbourhood matters up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, the community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is ‘significant’.

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.            the thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.            the decision relates to strategic assets.

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or a group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole (rather than single assets), because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy, which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing, and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by inclusion of the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre, which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive CCOs as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s LTP and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy, that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.

Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

 


 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, IMSB

Regional Strategy & Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·     an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·     a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August; and

·     workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council recognize that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a mana whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·     a consultation and engagement guidebook;

·     a guide on Engagement with Māori;

·     a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2);

·     an internal network which is used to share case studies; and

·     an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

 

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through engagement advisors.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

351

     

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Senior Specialist Engagement & Consultation

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication & Engagement Director

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 



















Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference

 

File No.: CP2014/21514

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To update terms of reference for the Western Joint Funding committee with the inclusion of the facility partnership fund.

Executive summary

2.       The Western Joint Funding Committee (WJF)  is a joint committee established by the three Western local boards and has decision-making responsibility for the allocation of grants through the legacy community funding schemes.

3.       The terms of references were endorsed by three western local boards for the WJF committee in the beginning of the year and it has since been identified by staff that facility partnership fund was not included. This report seeks approval for updated terms of reference for the WJF committee.

 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Approves amended Terms of Reference for the Western Joint Funding Committee as per Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Amended  terms of reference for WJF Committee

371

     

Signatories

Author

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 

For Information: Governing Body Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/21757

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The following report is referred from Governing body Committees for the information of Whau Local Board:

No.

Report Title

Governing Body Committee or Forum

Meeting Date

1.

2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report

Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

27 August 2014

 

RESOLUTIONS FROM ECCNH COMMITTEE:

 

10.    2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report

 

Resolution number ENV/2014/1

MOVED by Member Wilson, seconded by Cr C Darby:  

That the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee:

a)      receive the 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary report.

b)      forward the 2013/2014 Safeswim Summary report to the Local Boards for their information.

c)      request officers to report back to the Environment Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee on Council’s plans for onsite wastewater management.

 d)      request Watercare Services to report back to the Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee on the frequency and scale of overflows and the management of discharges from the wastewater network.

e)      request that Maori view and values be included in the regional Safeswim review in 2015, including:

i)     establishing a process for the direct sharing of monitoring information and data with local mana whenua; and

ii)    investigating Maori based approaches to water quality monitoring that can be run in parallel to the Safeswim programme.

f)       request more information regarding the sources of contamination (the red dots) and recommended actions arising from the report.

CARRIED


 

2.

Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage

Auckland Development Committee

11 September 2014

 

RESOLUTIONS FROM AUCKLAND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE:

 

9.    Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage

 

Resolution number AUC/2014/105

MOVED by Chairperson PA Hulse, seconded by Cr LA Cooper:

 

That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)     endorse the completion of Stage 1 of the Housing Action Plan

CARRIED

 

Resolution number AUC/2014/106

MOVED by Chairperson PA Hulse, seconded by Cr LA Cooper:

 

That the Auckland Development Committee:

b)     agree not to proceed with the original Stage 2 Housing Action Plan, as this has been superseded by agreements and actions being undertaken under the Auckland Housing Accord

CARRIED

 

Resolution number AUC/2014/107

MOVED by Chairperson PA Hulse, seconded by Cr LA Cooper:

 

That the Auckland Development Committee:

c)     circulate the report to all local boards, the Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) and the advisory panels, for their information

CARRIED

Resolution number AUC/2014/108

MOVED by Chairperson PA Hulse, seconded by Cr LA Cooper:

 

That the Auckland Development Committee:

d)     prepare a report on Auckland Council’s future role in the provision of social housing for discussion at a workshop scheduled on 22 September 2014 and to inform a report to a future committee meeting.

CARRIED   

 

 

Copies of the reports are attached and can be located at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 


 

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      Notes the referral of the following report from the Governing body Committees:

No.

Report Title

Governing Body Committee or Forum

Meeting Date

1.

2013/2014 Safeswim Summary Report

Environment, Climate Change and Natural Heritage Committee

27 August 2014

2.

Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage

Auckland Development Committee

11 September 2014

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

2013/2014 Safeswim Summary (copy of report)

377

bView

Housing Strategic Action Plan – Stage 1 – Update and Next Stage (copy of report)

381

    

Signatories

Author

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





Whau Local Board

15 October 2014

 

 





















Whau Local Board

15 October 2014