I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 October 2014

4:00pm

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Denise Yates, JP

 

Members

Neil Henderson

 

 

Greg Presland

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Saffron Toms

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

Tua Viliamu

Democracy Advisor

 

17 October 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 813 9478

Email: tua.viliamu@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Update from Ward Councillors                                                                                    6

8          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

9          Item withdrawn                                                                                                              6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Auckland Transport Update Report – Waitakere Ranges Local Board                  9

13        Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) 21

14        Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme               105

15        Significance and Engagement Policy                                                                      129

16        Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014                                                                                                                             153

17        Waitakere Ranges Local Board Discretionary Community Funding - Round One 2014/2015                                                                                                                    165

18        Waitakere Ranges Local Board submission on the draft Signage Bylaw 2014 203

19        Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference                    209

20        Local Board member attendance at the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC)                                                                                                                     213

21        Portfolio update: Member Greg Presland                                                              219  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               221

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards   221  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

At its meeting on 28 November 2013, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board resolved (resolution number WTK/2010/5) to record any possible conflicts of interest in a register.

 

            Register

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

·       Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

Neil Henderson

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

·       Weedfree Trust – Employee

Greg Presland

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

·       Titirangi Residents & Ratepayers Group – Committee Member 

Steve Tollestrup

·       Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

·       Community Waitakere – Trustee

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

Saffron Toms

       NIL

Denise Yates

·       Ecomatters Environment Trust – Deputy Chair

·       Keep Waitakere Beautiful Trust – Board Member

·       Huia-Cornwallis Ratepayers & Residents Association – Co-chairperson

·       Charlotte Museum Trust – Trustee                                 

 

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council.

                                              

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

·       Living Cell Technologies Animal Ethics Committee – Member

Saffron Toms

·       Ark in the Park – Governance Group Member

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 9 October 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Update from Ward Councillors

 

An opportunity is provided for the Waitakere Ward Councillors to update the board on regional issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

8          Item withdrawn

 

9          Item withdrawn

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report – Waitakere Ranges Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/16302

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport’s activities in the Board area.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport’s Report for the Waitakere Ranges Local Board

 

Discussion

Monthly Overview and Implementation Issues Update

 

RESPONSES AND PROGRESS REPORTS  

 

CHIP SEAL

 

2.       Auckland Transport is about to embark on its annual road resealing programme.  Wherever possible chip seal will be used as it provides a cost effective and good durable road surface, which is well suited to Auckland’s flexible road pavements. 

 

3.       Resealing the road surface waterproofs the surface and improves the road skid resistance to ensure that the roads stay in good condition.  Regular maintenance of the roads means that they do not need to be totally reconstructed.  Generally the road surface will last between 10 to 15 years. 

 

4.       In general a typical reseal would follow this timeline:

Some weeks prior to reseal

•      Fix any road failures in the street – Localised road pavement repairs

 

A few days prior to reseal

•      Letter drop informing residents of the road reseal

 

Day of reseal

•      Set up traffic management

•      Sweep road for debris

•      Chip seal applied

•      Roll chip into road surface

 

Within a few days of reseal

•      Sweep excess chip off the road

•      Reinstatement of road marking


 

A week or so after reseal

•      Road surface checked

•      Further sweeping to pick up any excess loose chip

•      Remove traffic management

 

3 – 4 weeks after reseal

•      Additional sweeping if required, to remove any remaining loose chip.

 

5.       The Contractor responds to any Call Centre service requests relating to the chip sealing during the course of the work.

 

BETHELLS ROAD YELLOW NO-PARKING LINES REQUEST

 

6.       Auckland Transport has received a request from a resident at Bethells requesting the installation of broken yellow lines for people parking and walking to Lake Wainamu.

 

Update

 

7.       Auckland Transport has carried out consultation with the affected parties which closed on the 3 October 2014. We are in the process of going through the submissions received. Will report back to the Local Board once this is completed.

 

SAFETY CONCERNS AT CAPTAIN SCOTT ROAD AND WEST COAST ROAD

 

8.       The Glen Eden Business Association, through the Local Board public forum, requested that Auckland Transport investigate safety concerns at the corner of Captain Scott Road and West Coast Road.

 

Update

 

9.       More time is required to complete Auckland Transport’s investigation. A route optimisation has been done recently, however Auckland Transport now needs to do further investigation, such as traffic/pedestrian counts and traffic modeling, before determining if a problem exists and what solution is required.  The Local Board can expect to receive an update by mid-November 2014.

 

WALKING SCHOOL BUS AT TOWNSHIP ROAD, WAITAKERE

 

10.     A request has been made to Auckland Transport to investigate safety concerns at the designated crossing for the Walking School Bus,  at Township Road, Waitakere.

Response

 

11.     Auckland Transport will proceed with the request to install additional pedestrian warning signs to warn motorists of pedestrian activity in the vicinity of Township Road, and agrees that parking restrictions either side of the walking school bus crossing point will improve safety and visibility. Auckland Transport is currently progressing consultation with those parties who are directly affected by the implementation of the proposed parking restrictions. Subject to the consultation outcome, a report will be presented to Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee to legally implement the restrictions. Auckland Transport  expects that this report should be completed by the end of October and implementation of the lines will follow shortly after.


 

WAITAKERE ROAD ROUTE TREATMENT

 

12.     Auckland Transport is committed to improving road safety and reducing the number of people killed or injured on the roading network. Waitakere Road has been identified as an arterial route with a significant serious and fatal crash history.  In addition to the signage work completed recently, Auckland Transport is planning to carry out route treatment road safety works along Waitakere Road.

 

Waitakere Road New Guardrail Adjacent No 32 Waitakere Road

 

13.     The proposed scope of works along this section of road is the construction of a new guardrail along the Waitakere Road between the vehicle entry to Number 32 & 44 Waitakere Road, and Northfield Road.

 

14.     For more detail see the attached consultation plans: Reference Numbers 900-019-05-C027 Revision C and 900-019-05-C028 Revision C.

 

Waitakere Road New Guardrail Outside No 10 Waitakere Road

 

15.     The proposed scope of works along this section of road is the construction of a new 300m long guardrail along Waitakere Road outside Number 10.

 

16.     For more detail see the attached consultation plan Reference Number 900-019-05-C031 Revision C.

 

Waitakere Road New Guardrail South of No 609 Waitakere Road

 

17.     The proposed scope of works along this section of road is the construction of a new 140m long guardrail along Waitakere Road starting at the southern side of the vehicle entry at Number 609.

 

18.     For more detail see the attached consultation plans: Reference Number 900-019-05-C011 Revision C and 900-019-05-C012 Revision C.

Local Board Response

 

19.     The Local Board  have raised no objects to  this proposal.

 

WAITAKERE RANGES DESIGN GUIDELINE UPDATE

 

The Consultant being engaged on behalf of Auckland Transport has completed a draft of the guideline. The next stage is for it to be circulated to relevant staff in Auckland Transport and Auckland Council for feedback.  This will have already been sent out by the time you read this update.  AT is allowing a three week period for feedback to come back.

 

Once feedback is received Auckland Transport (AT) will update the document based on this feedback and commission work to add drawings/diagrams and photographs to illustrate the points. This is will take  up until November.  Once Auckland Transport has the illustrations included, AT will send a copy to the local board for it’s information. At this time, copies will also be sent out to other key stakeholders, in line with the Consultation and Engagement Guideline Matrix, for  their feedback (allowing 3 weeks for written feedback from stakeholders).

 

Auckland Transport will then revise the guideline taking feedback into account before coming back to the local board for a final workshop.

 

In summary AT is targeting the following dates:

 

Second draft of text

6 October 2014

Internal consultation with AT and AC Staff

End of October 2014

External consultation with Stakeholders

End of November 2014

Commission work

December 2014

Final draft, including illustrations / photos at Local Board workshop

Early 2015

 

LOCAL BOARD TRANSPORT FUND APPLICATIONS

 

Auckland Transport has received the following applications:

 

·        Project 1: Captain Scott Road streetscape improvement (section from West Coast Road to the eastern edge of Glenmall)

·        Project 2: Oratia LAP/Masterplan project – footpath on northern side of West Coast Road

·        Project 3: Oratia LAP/Masterplan project – footpath on southern side of West Coast Road

·        Project 4: Oratia LAP/Masterplan project – kerb build outs

·        Project 5: Oratia LAP/Masterplan project – parking review

·        Project 6: Western rail line cycleway: Sunnyvale – Glen Eden

·        Project 7: Western rail line cycleway: Glen Eden – Fruitvale

·        Project 8: Waitakere Ranges foothills walkway – Mountain Road to Opanuku Pipeline track to Henderson Valley Road 

for assessment :

 

Auckland Transport has requested a workshop to work through the applications.  This is to assist Auckland Transport to understand the scope of the applications.  The workshop has been booked for the 16th October 2014.

 

ISSUES PENDING

Subject Name

Description

Date Requested

Request Due Date

Swanson Park And Ride

Auckland Transport will not be commencing construction until August/September 2014, subject to weather permitting. The completion date for the car park is the end of 2014, with the main station enhancements to be completed in the 1st quarter of 2015.

 

 





ISSUES COMPLETED

 

Subject Name

Decision Description

Date Requested

Completion date

 

Swanson Oaks - NSAAT Restrictions

The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads were consulted on the proposal and were happy with what was being proposed.

 

August 2014

September 2014

 

Shaw Road, Oratia - No Overtaking Lines

 

Auckland Transport is looking to install No Overtaking lines on the approaches to the crest curves near 37 Shaw Road, Oratia. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads were consulted on the proposal and were happy with what was being proposed.

August 2014

September 2014

 

42 Kopiko Road, Titirangi - Nsaat Restrictions

Auckland Transport is proposing NSAAT restrictions opposite the driveway to 42 Kopiko Road, Titirangi. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads were consulted on the proposal and were happy with what was being proposed.

August 2014

September 2014

 

Piha Tennis Club - General Interest Sign Application

The Piha Tennis Club has applied for a General Interest Sign opposite their driveway on 21 Seaview Road, Piha.  The proposed signage will be identical to the existing signage for the Piha Bowling Club. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads were consulted on the proposal and were happy with what was being proposed.

August 2014

September 2014

 

Solea Road - Proposal To Implement A Stop Control

Auckland Transport is proposing to change the intersection of Solea Road and Seymour Road from a ‘GIVE WAY’ to a ‘STOP’ controlled intersection. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads were consulted on the proposal and were happy with what was being proposed.

August 2014

September 2014

 

Cat Eye’s Request On Henderson Valley Road, Henderson

Auckland Transport does not expect that the presence of cats’ eyes on the inside of the curve as well would increase the safety of this bend significantly.  However, it was noticed that the centreline and the inner edge line of the bend has faded and would benefit from re-marking. This will provide a better delineation around the bend which may be impeded currently.

July 2014

September 2014

 

Proposed Bus Stop – 112 Atkinson Road

These changes are planned to be implemented in late 2014. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads support the changes.

July 2014

August 2014

 

Proposed Bus Stop Relocation – 28 Captain Scott Road And Proposed Bus Stop Upgrade 41 Captain Scott Road, Glen Eden

These changes are planned to be implemented in late 2014. The Local Board Transport Portfolio Leads support the changes.

 

 

July 2014

August 2014

 

Dedicated Parking For Early Childhood Centre - Located Cnr Of Clayburn Road And Glenview Road.

Auckland Transport is of the opinion that “drop off pick up” restrictions are not a particularly effective measure and consider that as there is already an existing “drop off pick up” parking restriction on Glen View Road, an additional restriction is not justifiable. Auckland Transport has found that “drop off pick up” restrictions serve to attract parents to take their vehicle as close to the school as possible and as Auckland Transport can never meet the demand this leads to frustration. Instead Auckland Transport prefers parents to park a short distance from the school and walk to pick their children up.

June 2014

August 2014

 

Albionvale Road,Glen Eden Road Safety Concerns

Auckland Transport will not be installing speed humps/tables on this street at this stage, Auckland Transport is investigating options to improve visibility at the intersection of Albionvale Road and West Coast Road which is restricted by the power pole. Auckland Transport is considering short-term solutions while relocation of the power pole awaits further prioritisation. This potentially involves pushing the Albionvale Road limit line out with other road marking changes so that the power pole is not directly in the sight line and the visibility of the traffic from the east is improved.

June 2014

July 2014

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Route Treatment - General Layout Plan

13

      

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected Member Relationship Manager (West), Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 






Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP)

 

File No.: CP2014/22628

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and action areas.

Executive summary

2.       The Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan (ACSAP) is a core strategy to deliver on the Auckland Plan vision to be the world’s most liveable city.  It sets out a strategic direction for the next 10 years that will guide the planning and delivery of arts and culture activities in Auckland to meet the aspiration in the Auckland Plan to “integrate arts and culture in our everyday lives”.

3.       Public consultation on the draft ACSAP was held 23 June to 24 July 2014.

4.       A total of 440 submissions were received from key (external) stakeholders and the general public – 50 from arts and culture organisations, 109 from children and young people and the remainder from the general public.

5.       Feedback from local boards was generally positive. The draft ACSAP aligned well with the arts and culture aspirations in many of the local board plans.

6.       There was strong endorsement from key stakeholders and the general public of the draft ACSAP’s goals and action areas.

7.       However, feedback from local boards and key stakeholders indicated that considerable further work is required on the implementation section of the plan. 

8.       As a result of this feedback, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·  The ‘strategic section’ of the plan, which outlines the goals and action areas; and

·  An ‘implementation section’, which will provide detail on the specific actions to be delivered and by whom, timeframes and measures.

9.       The strategic section (goals and action areas) will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in October 2014.

10.     The implementation section requires further work and engagement with local boards and key stakeholders. This will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee for adoption in March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Endorse the Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan’s proposed goals and actions and recommend that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt them.

b)      Note that further work on the implementation section will be undertaken with local boards from November 2014 to February 2015.

 

 

Comments

Local board feedback

11.     To date, engagement with local boards has included portfolio holder briefings, workshops and meetings with local board members. Written and verbal feedback has been received (see attachment A).

12.     Local boards are generally positive about the draft ACSAP, its alignment with draft local board plans and its ability to support local board’s diverse arts and culture aspirations.

13.     Key themes emerged from local board feedback:

·     Community feedback on the draft plan needs to be reflected in the final ACSAP

·     Greater recognition of the importance of arts and culture in placemaking and urban design

·     Greater clarity on council’s role and what council will specifically deliver and support

·     Improve the affordability of hiring creative spaces

·     Improve Aucklanders’ access to and participation in arts and culture

·     More public art outside the city centre

·     Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture in rural areas

·     Greater use of digital tools, such as an arts and culture calendar, on-line tools to connect artists with funders, on-line access to and apps about the history of significant sites etc.

·     Recognise the importance of ‘local’ i.e. arts and culture by local communities, for local communities, in local communities.

14.     The areas of strong alignment between local board, key stakeholder and general public feedback include: the importance of arts and culture in placemaking; celebrating multiculturalism; and addressing affordability and accessibility issues for audiences and participants.

Public feedback

15.     Public consultation on the draft ACSAP took place from 23 June to 24 July. It was publicised through various channels. Local boards also promoted the consultation to their communities.

16.     A total of 440 submissions were received. Of these: 50 were from arts and culture organisations; 109 were received from children and young people; and the remainder were from the general public. (See attachment B for the feedback summary and submission numbers by local board area)

17.     A specific consultation with children and young people was undertaken during the school holidays, accounting for the high number of responses from these groups. Staff worked with Uxbridge Creative Centre, The Auckland Performing Arts Centre, Auckland Central Library, Auckland Art Gallery and schools to run visioning and imagining exercises and collect feedback via a specifically designed worksheet.

18.     Key themes from the public consultation were:

·     The importance of public art and arts and culture in placemaking

·     Sustainable funding of arts and culture

·     Affordability and accessibility to arts and culture for audiences and participants 

·     Honouring Māori culture and recognising the contribution of multiculturalism to Auckland’s identity

·     A strong desire from many individuals and organisations to partner with council to implement the ACSAP.

19.     Submitters strongly endorsed the six goals and 16 action areas in the draft ACSAP.

Adopting the ACSAP through a two-stage process

20.     Whilst there was general support for the goals and action areas, there was also strong feedback on how the detailed actions of the ACSAP will be implemented. Additionally, external stakeholders expressed a desire to be involved in delivery.

21.     The mayor’s proposal for the Long-term Plan 2015-25 requires refinement to the detailed actions and look closely at implementation.

22.     As a result of these issues, the ACSAP has been split into two parts:

·     The ‘strategic’ part of the plan, outlining the goals and actions areas. Staff seek local board endorsement of the proposed goals and action areas (below), and local board recommendation that the Arts, Culture and Events Committee adopt the goals and action areas at the October committee meeting. Prior to further consultation on implementation, it is important that the ACSAP goals and action areas are adopted to guide this discussion.

·     The ‘implementation’ part of the plan, with details on specific actions, lead organisations, timeframes and measures. This requires further work and engagement and will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015. Feedback from the consultation will be used to refine and inform this work.

ACSAP strategic section: proposed goals and action areas

23.     Early information and feedback from local boards and key stakeholders was used to develop the goals and action areas in the draft ACSAP. They have been confirmed through the consultation process, which also identified priority goals and action areas (see bold points in the table below).

24.     The proposed, final ACSAP goals and action areas are:

Goals

Action areas

All Aucklanders can access and participate in arts and culture

Place Aucklanders at the centre of arts and culture planning and delivery

Better communicate what’s on offer

Remove barriers to access and participants

Auckland values and invests in arts and culture

Grow and deliver strategic investment in arts and culture

Evaluate and promote the economic, social, cultural and environmental value of investment in Auckland’s art and culture

A network of vibrant arts and culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Foster arts and culture organisations and facilities that build and promote Auckland’s unique identity

Support arts and culture organisations and facilities to engage with Auckland’s diverse population in innovative and inclusive ways

Arts and culture organisations work together as a complementary regional system

Provide a regional spread of vibrant diverse and affordable creative spaces

Arts and culture are intrinsic to Auckland’s place making

Tell our stories by encouraging unique and distinctive public art that reflects and responds to our place

Make it easier to plan, create and deliver innovative art and design in public places

Engage more artists and Aucklanders in art in public places

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Celebrate Māori and their culture as a point of difference

Champion Auckland’s unique arts and culture

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

Foster a robust network of creative industries

Champion innovation to attract talent

Next steps

25.     Further engagement with local boards, key stakeholders, mana whenua and mataawaka on implementation will take place between October 2014 and February 2015. The implementation section will be reported to the Arts, Culture and Events Committee in March 2015 for adoption, and the ACSAP in its entirety will be finalised.

 

Consideration

Māori impact statement

26.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) is represented on the ACSAP steering group to provide guidance on content and process. The IMSB’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was a guiding document underpinning the development of the draft ACSAP.

27.     Māori aspirations and outcomes were clearly identified and addressed in the draft ACSAP with Māori actions woven through all the action areas; this will not change. The ACSAP acknowledges and celebrates Māori culture as Auckland’s point of difference, and mana whenua as Treaty partners in a multicultural Auckland.

28.     One of the key arts and culture actions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau was that council support a signature Māori event – this is included in the ACSAP. The mayor’s proposal on the LTP 2015-25 states his expectation that Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED) will deliver a significant Māori event (and ATEED refocus its current resources to achieve this).

29.     Further engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka is planned as part of developing the implementation section of the ACSAP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Board Feedback

23

bView

Consultation Summary

27

cView

Draft Arts and Culture Action Plan

33

     

Signatories

Authors

Maree Mills - Principal Strategy Analyst

Authorisers

Grant Barnes - Manager - Auckland Strategy and Research

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

 

Local Board Feedback Summary

Engagement undertaken in 2013-14

Theme/Issue

Placemaking

·    Recognises importance of arts and culture in place making

·    Would like more community involvement and input

·    Nurturing/building a distinct area identity through arts and culture

·    Incentivise developers to incorporate arts and culture into new developments

·    Involve creative people in the planning process - designers, architects working with planners

·    Heritage and place recognised e.g. Writer’s walk, sculpture trail

·    Incorporation of Maori and European history in the environment

·    Public art/cultural design integrated in capital project design/urban design

·    Local artists to be involved with chance to win commissions for council buildings

Funding

·    More clarity on funding streams

·    Governing Body financial commitment

·    Who is going to fund what

·    Business sponsorship for arts and culture events

·    Council investment in art should equate to investment in sport

·    Funding issues are a key for supporting local theatres/galleries/museums and groups. Uneven investment in facilities throughout the region

Council role in ACSAP

·    More clarity on council’s role – arts and culture community want to understand what council can deliver and support

·    Plan focus should be on how the council can support the organisations

·    Foster partnerships

·    Advocacy

·    Local boards role in guardianship

·    Role of CCOs in arts and culture

Capacity Building

·    Streamline council processes – ‘go to person’

·    Provide better climate for building creative relationships

·    More capacity needed to assist local boards to go beyond business as usual and develop what assets they already have – guidance/advice to help see the huge potential for arts and culture in our community and translate into our local board plans.

·    The key question for this Plan should be “How do we create an organisation (council) that fosters/allows creativity to flourish?”

Education and pathway into employment

·    Need to highlight the value of (creative) education

·    Profile creative students and activities in the community (more recitals)

·    Growing skills, creativity, entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship

·    Local boards have a part to play

Events

·    Clarity of process around growing local events to regional

·    Events portal to promote all events

·    A stocktake of what is currently happening to ensure that one event is not ‘cannibalising’ the audience of other events – establish the correct balance between city centre and local

·    Importance of local cultural events

·    Promotion of events – linking local and regional events/festivals into each other, good local promotion of events

Diversity

·    Highlight Asian community

·    Need to highlight more than ethnic diversity

·    Inclusiveness of all communities

Facilities

·    Organisations to work together not in competition

·    Funded to meet  diverse need – how to achieve equity, consistency and sustainability

·    CFNP as a tool to enable review of community arts and culture facilities

·    Grow maker spaces

·    Don’t just focus on city centre

·    Development of arts and culture precincts

·    Local art facilities – many saw a lack in their area

·    Need for smaller theatre spaces and performance venues in smaller centres. 

Maori

·    Development of Maori cultural centre for the arts – great development initiative for our youth

·    Marae as a youth hub providing arts opportunities for youth

Barriers

·    Coast of transportation and parking

·    Entry and ticket prices

·    Distance to regional facilities

·    Buses(public transport) stop operating after the event

·    Compliance costs, rules and regulations

Other

·    More local public art outside city centre

·    Regional institutions to deliver arts and culture out to rural areas – increase exposure

·    More art displays in the parks – digital, physical, more art-based activities to encourage people into regional parks

·    Include acknowledgement of economic significance

·    Good use of case studies in summary document

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

ARTS & CULTURE STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN 2014

Submissions Report

 

The draft ACSAP was publicised via various channels including:

 

·        Targeted stakeholders  (e.g. advisory panels, IMSB, CCOs, key arts and culture organisations)

·        Through 146 venues (e.g. CDAC facilities, RFA, marae, community centres, libraries, local board offices, service centres, commercial galleries, performing arts venues, tertiary institutions, art schools, private museums and philanthropic organisations) and at events (e.g. Kapa Haka Super 12s, Art Educators Conference AUT and Net Hui).

·        Presentations to Creative Coalition, Lunchtime Learning, Artist Alliance, Pacific Arts Cluster and Digital Live

·        Published through various media channels (e.g. Our Auckland, digital banners, NZ Herald advert, press release to media commentators, council website and Facebook and Twitter accounts)

 

Submission Type

Submitter Group

The graph below shows the format the submissions were received in.

182 submissions have been received via the online form, 108 via the hard copy form, 109 from the Youth worksheet, and a further 39 via email non form submissions.

The graph below outlines what ‘group’ submitters belong to.

275 submissions have been from individuals, 51 from some form of group or organisation, and 109 from the Youth worksheet.

 


Feedback regarding the ACSAP Vision

Submitters were asked to rank how important the vision is to them.  The graph shows the importance of the visions to submitters.

 

 


Feedback regarding the Goals

The graph outlines what importance submitters placed on each goal.  The table below outlines the labels used in the graph below.

 

Graph label

Goal

Access and participation

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Value and invest

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

Organisations and facilities

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

Design and development

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

Cultural identity

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

Creative economy

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

Feedback regarding the Actions

The graphs below show the priority given by submitters to action areas.

 

All Aucklanders can access and participate in Arts and Culture

Auckland values and invests in Arts and Culture

 

 

A network of vibrant Arts and Culture organisations and facilities meets Auckland’s diverse needs

 

 

Arts and Culture are intrinsic to how we design and develop Auckland

 

Auckland celebrates a unique cultural identity

 

 

Auckland has a robust and flourishing creative economy

 

 


Submission by Local Board Area

The table below indicates the total numbers of submissions received by the local board area.

 

Local Board

Individual submissions

Children and young people worksheet

Organisation submissions

Total submissions

Albert-Eden Local Board

45

4

4

53

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14

0

5

19

Franklin Local Board

4

0

0

4

Great Barrier Local Board

0

0

0

0

Henderson-Massey Local Board

9

15

1

25

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

6

2

3

11

Howick Local Board

12

34

2

48

Kaipatiki Local Board

16

5

2

23

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board

5

0

0

5

Manurewa Local Board

4

1

1

6

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

15

4

0

19

Orakei Local Board

17

0

1

18

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board

7

0

0

7

Papakura Local Board

9

0

0

9

Puketapapa Local Board

8

0

0

8

Rodney Local Board

7

1

1

9

Upper Harbour Local Board

3

1

0

4

Waiheke Local Board

1

2

2

5

Waitakere Ranges Local Board

10

0

0

10

Waitemata Local Board

43

19

18

80

Whau Local Board

16

3

0

19

Regional

1

0

3

4

Not Supplied

2

0

1

3

Outside Auckland

21

19

11

51

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 





































































Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2014/22427

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the 2013/2014 Community Waitakere-Auckland Council Shared Work Programme (SWP) and seek approval of the 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme and funding.

Executive summary

2.       Community Waitakere has completed almost all deliverables agreed in the 2013/14 SWP. The Annual Report on the 2013/2014 SWP submitted by Community Waitakere is attached (Attachment A).

3.       A draft Community Waitakere-Auckland Council SWP has been developed for the 2014/2015 financial year. A copy of the draft SWP is attached (Attachment B).

4.       Funding allocated for the SWP in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board budget needs to be released to ensure that Community Waitakere is able to meet financial obligations such as staff salaries in order to deliver on the SWP.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Approves the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme

b)      Approves the funding of $32,520 for the Community Waitakere-Auckland Council 2014/2015 Shared Work Programme.

 

 

Comments

 

5.      A partnering agreement was signed between Waitakere City Council and Community Waitakere on 29 November 2006 and renewed in 2010.

6.      A shared work programme has been negotiated on an annual basis with associated funding allocated in the Long Term Plan 2006-2016.

7.       The following is an overview of the work that has been undertaken by Community Waitakere that meets the deliverables agreed for the 2013/2014 year:

Strengthening Community Development

·    disseminated research, evaluation learnings and tools on website

·    co-led delivery of neighbourhood development workshops in Glen Eden with council staff

·    inquiry report on potential future of the Wellbeing Collaboration Strategy Project completed and disseminated.


Community Infrastructure

·     Open Door Days were well attended with sessions being held in different parts of the western local board cluster area

·     continued to convene Chief Executives Round Table meetings of local community and social sector agencies

·     civic engagement through forums e.g. co-facilitated (with Auckland Regional Public Health Service) three community workshops on the Auckland Council’s Draft Local Alcohol Policy at community hubs and houses in Henderson, Avondale and Glen Eden; and co-hosted a workshop with council staff on Auckland Council’s Draft Community Grants Policy

·     Community Resource Centre: affordable offices for rent available to community groups (between 80 - 100% occupancy), meeting room hire has increased

·     Skills Capacity Building: 227 attendees, 12 training workshops

·     regular E-noticeboard reach continues to grow with almost 1000 subscribers.

Community Economic Development

·      continued to facilitate and support the Community Economic Development Network West

·      Enterprising Communities projects working across Massey and Glen Eden have been transitioned to Community Waitakere and Massey Matters.

Place Based Leadership

·      support provided informally to community through walk-ins, telephone and email with enquiries on a range of matters including training, room hire, services and events

·      support also provided informally to community organisations on issues such as strategy, funding, Charities Services registration, accounts and financial management

·      work with place based initiatives to provide support as needed e.g. Greater Glen Eden.

8.       In response to feedback from local boards, Community Waitakere has sought to orient deliverables where possible to the different local board areas. The vast majority of the SWP has been delivered during the 2013/14 year, other than the scoping of back office support.  This work has therefore been prioritised for the 2014/15 SWP.

9.       The draft 2014/2015 SWP has been developed in consultation with representatives of all western local boards to align with Auckland Council’s Thriving Communities Strategic Action Plan and local board priorities. The SWP has two main focus areas: community and place based leadership, and community infrastructure.

10.     In previous years, funding for the SWP was held in a regional budget. Since the 2013/2014 financial year, this funding has been devolved to local board budgets, with an allocation of $83,520 in each of the Henderson-Massey, Whau and Waitakere Ranges Local Board 2014/15 budgets.

11.     The Waitakere Ranges Local Board has previously approved an advance of partial funds to Community Waitakere towards the 2014/15 SWP as noted in the resolution below:

Resolution number WTK/2014/72

That the Waitakere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Allocates any uncommitted balance of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board community response fund FY13/14 to Community Waitakere for the delivery of the 2014/15 partnering agreement.

12.     In accordance to this resolution, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board released $51,000 to Community Waitakere for the 2014/15 SWP, with the balance of the 2014/15 budgeted allocation to be made available in the 2014/15 financial year.

13.     The Waitakere Ranges Local Board has a balance of $32,520 available to be released to Community Waitakere for the delivery of the 2014/15 SWP.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     This report seeks local board approval of the SWP and associated funding. An operational review of the arrangement with Community Waitakere is currently underway. This process is due for completion in the first half of the current financial year, and no decisions have been made at this time that could impact on delivery of the 2014/15 SWP.

Māori impact statement

15.     The deliverables in the SWP contribute to wellbeing for Maori residents in the area by Community Waitakere and council working within a Treaty of Waitangi framework.

Implementation

16.     Council staff will regularly liaise with Community Waitakere staff to provide additional support required to deliver the SWP.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Community Waitakere - Auckland Council Shared Work Programme, 30 June 2014

107

bView

Auckland Council and Community Waitakere 2014-2015 Shared Work Programme

121

     

Signatories

Authors

Tony Rea - Manager Community development & Partnerships – West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community and Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 














Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 







Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/23190

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide background information on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy to support local boards in providing formal feedback.

Executive summary

2.       There have been changes to the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA2002). Council is now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement policy by 1 December 2014. Council already has a Significance Policy but the council must expand it to include engagement.

3.       A draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October 2014. 

4.       The legislation requires the policy to consider community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict the role of local boards in this regard.

5.       An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance.

6.       The policy will be supported by updated guidelines, case studies and templates providing more detail on engagement principles and good practice.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Significance and Engagement Policy

 

 

Background

 

7.       As part of the LTP 2012-2022 process, Auckland Council adopted a Significance Policy to provide a mechanism for establishing which decisions are significant with reference to thresholds and general criteria. This was a requirement under the LGA2002 and the policy requires all council reports to state the degree of significance. A significant decision triggers an automatic requirement to consult.

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 amended the LGA 2002, so that all councils are now required to adopt a Significance and Engagement Policy by 1 December 2014.

9.       The legislative change requires the council to expand the current Significance Policy to include engagement. The current Significance Policy has been used to provide the basis of the new Significance and Engagement Policy.

10.     The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 September for public consultation from 22 September to 19 October.

11.     Since the committee meeting, there have been some minor changes to clarify what constitutes a significant decision. The order of the significance section has changed as a result of this, while the criteria that related to engagement are now in section 6.1 under engagement methods.

Consultation on the draft policy

12.     Consultation on the draft policy will not follow a Special Consultative Procedure. Consultation will be targeted at interest groups and will seek out feedback from communities who are often not involved in council’s consultation processes.

13.     Consultation will largely be focused online through ShapeAuckland. A sign language submissions service has also been set up through Deaf Radio.

14.     A variety of stakeholder organisations have been contacted to help organise community workshops on the draft policy. This includes youth groups, ethnic groups, grey power, age concern, community organisations and networks.

15.     In addition, the council will use Our Auckland, the People’s Panel and social media as a way of further encouraging feedback on the draft policy. Local boards are encouraged to help encourage participation through their stakeholder newsletters and social media.

Role of local boards

16.     A core function of local boards is to understand, engage with and represent their local communities. They do this through a number of formal and informal mechanisms in relation to their local board plans and local board agreements and also to inform local board input into regional plans and policies. The development of the Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to constrain or restrict this role.

17.     While adoption of the Significance and Engagement Policy is a Governing Body decision, local boards have a role providing input to its development. The purpose of this report is to seek local board input on the attached draft policy.

Policy approach to engagement

18.     The LGA2002 sets out principles for consultation that all councils must follow.

19.     Feedback received from the community and stakeholders on Auckland Council consultation and engagement processes has highlighted a number of other important principles to consider when engaging with the community. These have been incorporated into the policy as a way of recognising the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities and the value that is placed on their involvement in decision-making processes.

20.     The legislation requires the policy to set out how the council will respond to community preferences about engagement on decisions relating to specific issues, assets and other matters. Auckland Council carries out hundreds of consultations each year from small neighbourhood issues up to large regional issues. A list of how the council will engage on each issue would be extensive and would not allow flexibility depending on the timing, community affected and likely level of interest on the issue. It would also limit the council’s ability to consider and refine approaches for engagement in response to community feedback.

21.     An overview of the kinds of methods that could be used depending on the significance of the issue has been compiled to provide guidance. These have been categorised as small and simple, medium or large and complex. The level of significance will be determined using the criteria in section 3 of the policy.  The criteria used to assess whether a decision is significant are also useful when considering which engagement methods should be used for a particular decision (if any).  (For the avoidance of doubt, the use of the criteria to assess the level of engagement does not replace the council’s assessment of whether or not a decision is “significant”).

Significance

22.     A decision is significant if:

a.       The thresholds related to an activity or group of activities are exceeded; or

b.       The decision relates to strategic assets

23.     A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant, it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

Strategic Assets

24.     Strategic assets are defined as assets or group of assets required for the local authority to maintain its capacity to achieve or promote any outcome that council determines is important for the present or future wellbeing of the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. The list of strategic assets should cover only those assets that are significant for an entity the size of the Auckland Council. The strategic assets are listed in the Significance and Engagement Policy which includes land or buildings owned by the council that are required to maintain the local authority’s capacity to provide affordable housing and equity securities held by council in a port company or airport company.

25.     The definition of networks included in the list of strategic assets has been updated by including the North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre and Q Theatre which Auckland Council acquired since the adoption of the Significance Policy in 2012. In addition, substantive shares in Watercare have been combined with shares in substantive CCOs as Watercare became a substantive CCO in 2012.

26.     The legislation provides that a decision to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the local authority may only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the council’s LTP and, from 2015, also included in the consultation document used to consult on the LTP.

27.     Decisions on assets not included in the list are subject to the normal provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 regarding decision making and consultation.  This ensures that interested or affected parties will have their views considered appropriately in decision making. The council would retain discretion to consult (including using the special consultative procedure) for these decisions if it wished.

28.     Strategic assets, as defined by this policy that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO are identified in the CCO Accountability Policy.

Thresholds

29.     As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

General Criteria

30.     The council has also identified a list of criteria to consider when deciding whether or not a matter is significant.


Timeline

31.     The high level timeline for the development of the policy is as follows:

 

Milestone

Description / steps

Timing

Developing the draft policy

Drafting the policy

Testing the policy internally, with key stakeholders and advisory panels

Gaining feedback on draft policy with local board members, local board chairs, IMSB

Regional Strategy & Policy for adoption prior to consultation

July – August

 

 

 

 

 

5 September

Consulting on the draft policy

Communications and engagement on the draft

Local board workshops

Local board reports / formal feedback process

Advisory panel workshops

Stakeholder discussions

Public engagement

 

September-October

Revising the draft policy

Analysing and reviewing feedback

Updating draft policy

 

October onwards

Adopting the policy

Budget Committee

Regional Strategy and Policy

Governing body for adoption

5 November

6 November

27 November

 

32.     This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and must be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy can be amended at any time.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

 

33.     This report is seeking the views of local boards on the draft policy.

34.     Local boards’ statutory role of identifying and communicating the views of the community on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws of the council has been taken into account during the development of the draft policy.

35.     Engagement with local boards to date has included:

·        an initial discussion at the Local Board Chairs Forum meeting on 28 April 2014;

·        a workshop for all local board members to discuss aspects of the draft policy on 22 August; 

·        workshops are being held with individual boards during September and October where requested.

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council recognize that Māori are a critical / important audience that need to be engaged in a meaningful way. The Treaty of Waitangi Audit 2012 and the Auckland Council Guide on Engaging with Māori were reviewed during the development of the draft policy. The draft policy has been presented for discussion to the Independent Māori Statutory Board. The results of a recent research study on Māori engagement with Auckland Council will be considered prior to finalizing the draft policy and to identify improvements with the engagement guidelines.

37.     Discussions on the draft policy and guidelines will also take place at a Mana Whenua forum during the consultation period.

General

38.     This report does not involve decisions that will trigger the council’s current Significance Policy.

Implementation

39.     Auckland Council does not currently have an adopted engagement policy. It does however have:

·        a consultation and engagement guidebook

·        a guide on Engagement with Māori

·        a staff training programme in community engagement through the International Association of Public Participation (IAP2)

·        an internal network which is used to share case studies

·        an annual awards event to celebrate good practice.

40.     Further work is taking place to improve the guidance that is available, in particular with respect to engaging with Auckland’s culturally and demographically diverse communities.

41.     It is expected that updated guidance, case studies and templates will be prepared alongside the development of the draft policy so that these are available for the purposes of engagement on the draft Long-term Plan and other processes as soon as practicable. This will include legal advice on the consultation document and other changes to requirements as a result of the LGA 2002 amendments.

42.     Local boards will be encouraged to input into the development of the updated guidance, case studies and templates through the engagement advisors.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

133

     

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Consultation and Engagement

Authorisers

Karl Ferguson - Communication & Engagement Director

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

 

 

Title: Auckland Council logo

Title: Consultation in library - Description: The image shows a member of the public receiving guidance on how to access online information about a plan and being shown supporting materials and maps.Text Box: Significance and Engagement Policy
Consultation Draft - September 2014


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Credit: Heidi Ping Xu


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

1.          Table of Contents

1       Context 4

2       Decision making. 5

3       Significance. 7

4       Approach to engagement 9

5       Applying the policy. 11

6       Schedule 1: Methods of engagement 13

 


1        Context

1.1      Introduction

For Auckland Council, engagement is a genuine dialogue between decision-makers, communities and stakeholders for the purpose of making better decisions, policies or programmes of action.

Public input into decisions, policies or programmes of action is an essential part of ensuring they reflect the aspirations of residents, iwi, community groups and businesses - everyone who is invested in Auckland's future being one of prosperity, equality and wellbeing.

This policy aims to enable a flexible approach to engagement that recognises and supports the needs of Auckland’s diverse communities to get involved in council and civic life, and demonstrates a commitment to building ongoing relationships and greater understanding of community views and preferences.

 

1.2      Policy purpose and overview

The purpose of this policy is to enable Auckland Council  and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities; and

·     to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different  issues, assets, or other matters; and

·     to inform the council from the beginning of a decision-making process about—

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

2        Decision making

One of the key roles of local government is to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities. At Auckland Council, decision-making for regional decisions is undertaken by the Governing Body and for local decisions by local boards. Local Boards also have a key role in identifying and communicating the views of local communities on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws.

While community and stakeholder engagement improves decision-making, it is not the sole input into a decision. As shown in the diagram below, there are a wide range of information sources and perspectives that will inform a council decision. The information sources and perspectives are harnessed and collated which helps make the decision ‘sustainable’ (i.e. unlikely to require re-visiting due to it being well-informed and well-considered). Decisions are based on a wide range of information sources and perspectives and it may differ from the prevailing public opinion.

Title: Decision making process - Description: Sustainable decision-making inputs: technical input and advice; financial costs, benefits and considerations; Auckland Plan and Local Board Plan outcomes;  Council strategy and policy; Government policy; other considerations; public / stakeholder opinions, concerns, ideas, needs, values, motivations and goals.

Inputs into public / stakeholder opinions: community and stakeholder engagement, for example stakeholder meetings and workshops, reference and advisory groups; consultation, for example feedback forms, Special Consultative Procedure; opinion research, for example representative surveys, focus groups.

 

 

 

 

2.1      The Mayor and Governing Body

The Mayor has a responsibility for ensuring there is effective engagement between Auckland Council and the people of Auckland, including those too young to vote. The Mayor has established a number of advisory panels to: provide strategic advice to council on issues of importance to their communities (youth, ethnic people, pacific people, seniors, disability, rural); and to advise on effective engagement by council with those communities.

The Governing Body, comprising the Mayor and councillors, focuses on region-wide strategic decisions and must ensure that consultation and engagement requirements are met when making those decisions.

2.2      Local boards

Local boards make decisions on local matters, provide local leadership and support strong local communities.

With regard to community engagement and consultation, local boards are responsible for:

·     making decisions about non-regulatory local matters, including negotiating the standards of services delivered locally;

·     making decisions about regulatory local matters delegated to it by the governing body;

·     identifying and communicating the views of local people on regional strategies, policies, plans and bylaws to the governing body;

·     providing local leadership and developing relationships with the community, community organisations and special interest groups in the local area.

 

2.3      Independent Māori Statutory Board

The Independent Māori Statutory Board has appointed mana whenua and matāwaka (Māori communities with no tribal affiliation in Auckland) representatives.

The board assists Auckland Council to make decisions, perform functions, and exercise powers by:

·     promoting cultural, economic, environmental, and social issues of significance for mana whenua groups; and matāwaka of Tamaki Makaurau; and

·     ensuring that the council acts in accordance with statutory provisions referring to the Treaty of Waitangi.

 

3        Significance

A decision is significant if:

a.   the thresholds related to an activity or groups of activities stated below are exceeded; or

b.   the decision relates to the strategic assets listed below.

A decision will also be significant where the council, having applied the criteria listed below, decides that it is significant. Where a decision is determined to be significant it will automatically trigger a requirement to consult.

3.1      Thresholds

As a general guide, the creation of a new group of activity, the cessation of a group of activity, or a 33 per cent increase or 20 per cent decrease in the nature of a group of activity, would be considered significant.

3.2      Strategic assets

The council’s strategic assets are those vital for the delivery of its services to the community. The council considers its strategic assets as whole single assets (a network) because it is the asset class as a whole that delivers the service. A network is deemed to include those components which are integral to the functioning of the network as a whole. There are also a few iconic assets which have strategic significance for the Auckland region. In addition the LGA 2002 provides that shares in a port company and an airport company and assets required to provide affordable housing are strategic assets.

The council’s strategic assets are set out below.

1.      Public transport network, including Britomart

2.      Roading network

3.      Stormwater network

4.      Water and wastewater network

5.      Parks network

6.      Network of swimming pools

7.      Network of community centres and halls

8.      Community library network

9.      Cemeteries, heritage scheduled buildings and structures

10.    Freehold interest in waterfront land held by the Ports of Auckland and the Auckland Waterfront Development Agency

11.    Shares in substantive CCOs

12.    Auckland Central Library and the historical library collection

13.    Civic Theatre, Aotea Centre, Zoo, Viaduct Events Centre, North Harbour Stadium, Bruce Mason Theatre, Q Theatre, Auckland Art Gallery (including the art collection owned by Regional Facilities Auckland), Mt Smart Stadium and the council's contractual rights and interests in Auckland City Arena (known as Vector Arena)

14.    Social housing network including housing for the elderly

15.    Shares in Auckland International Airport Limited (AIAL)

16.    Shares in Ports of Auckland.

Strategic assets, as defined by this policy, that are owned and or managed by a substantive CCO, are identified in the CCO accountability policy. CCOs must comply with the CCO accountability policy when making decisions in relation to strategic assets under their control.

3.3      General Criteria

The following general criteria will be applied to determine the degree of significance of a decision.

1.      The number of residents and ratepayers affected and the degree to which they are affected by the decision or proposal

2.      The likely impact/consequences of the decision or proposal from the perspective of those parties

3.      Whether this type of decision has a history of generating wide public interest within the local board area (for a local board decision) or the Auckland region or New Zealand generally (for a governing body decision)

4.      The impact of the decision on the governing body’s or local boards’ ability to deliver on the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural well-being of the local board area or Auckland region and any statutory responsibility

5.      The impact of the decision on intended service levels for a group of council activities, including a decision to commence or cease any such group of activity

6.      The degree to which the decision or proposal is reversible.

4        Approach to engagement

The extent to which the council will engage with communities and stakeholders about an issue or decision to be made will match how significant the issue or decision is. Engagement may be required at various stages of the decision-making process and may take different forms depending on the stage. Both significance and the form of engagement will be assessed on a case-by-case basis, relative to the criteria listed above. A guide to engagement methods is attached for further information.

 

4.1      Engagement principles

The following provides an overview of how council will meet the Local Government Act (LGA) principles.

 

Conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner; and give effect to its identified priorities and outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     conduct community and stakeholder engagement in a genuine effort to listen to, and consider with an open mind, community and stakeholder input;

·     when presenting options for community and stakeholder feedback, ensure the options are realistic and deliverable;

·     ensure that questions are objective (ie: not leading), allowing people to express their views freely;

·     allow enough time and provide adequate resources to ensure participants have been provided fair opportunity to understand the matter and contribute their views

·     allow time to allow for issues that might arise during an engagement process;

·     value contributions made and time given;

·     give timely feedback on the results of the public’s input and decisions made;

·     value, respect and give weight to local knowledge.


A local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all of its communities

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     build ongoing relationships with communities through a range of approaches such as through advisory panels, the People’s Panel and other reference groups and fora;

·     provide community members and stakeholders with a reasonable opportunity to present their views, and to participate in a way that suits them;

·     provide ways for the community to raise issues directly with the council so that it is a two-way relationship;

·     identify opportunities to work in partnership with community organisations and leaders to encourage greater community ownership and participation;

·     ensure good information sharing of community views and preferences within council.

 

When making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community's interests; and the interests of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them.

To meet this principle, the council will:

·     identify ways of reaching out to affected communities and stakeholders, including those who are typically heard from least often;

·     provide more than one way for people to participate;

·     when required, invest in community capacity building to enable participation;

·     use plain language and avoid jargon and acronyms.

 

A local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

To meet this principle the Council will actively consider through engagement:

·     the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tamaki Makaurau;

·     how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori.

Supporting Māori community infrastructure that enables:

·     early engagement with Māori in the development of appropriate plans and policies;

·     Māori to guide how they want to engage with Auckland Council.

Support Māori to fully engage with the council, for example through but not limited to capability and capacity building.


5      Applying the policy

5.1      Supporting information

·     Consultation and Engagement Guidebook - this provides more detailed guidance on engagement principles and good practice.

·     Guide on Engaging with Māori.

·     Quality Policy Advice guidelines

·     Templates and other related guidance such as the Accessible Communications and Information Guide.

 

5.2      Managing conflicts of interest

Auckland Council has processes in place for both elected representatives and staff on how to manage conflicts of interest, including within the community engagement and decision-making process.

 

5.3      Policy exclusions

This policy will not apply and engagement will not be required where:

·     in the opinion of the council, failure to make a decision urgently would result in unreasonable or significant damage to property, or risk to people’s health and safety, or the loss of a substantial opportunity to achieve the council’s strategic objectives. Other policy and legislative requirements will still apply.

·     Any physical alterations to strategic assets that are required to:

prevent an immediate hazardous situation arising

repair an asset to ensure public health and safety due to damage from an emergency or unforeseen situation

 

5.4      Other legislation

The Resource Management Act 1991 sets out processes for public involvement in certain decisions, for example for resource consents and when preparing and changing district plans. Not all of these decisions are required to be publicly notified but when they are, the council will follow the principles outlined above in determining the level and type of consultation required.

There are a number of other policies or bylaws that are also required under other legislation (e.g. Gambling Act) or enabled (e.g. Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act, Psychoactive Substances Act, Health Act).  Some of these are specific about the requirements and processes for engagement, but others refer back to the principles outlined above. 

 

 

5.5      Policy development, term and review

This policy is expected to be adopted by 1 December 2014 and will be incorporated into the Long-term Plan (in summary form). The policy will be reviewed every three years as part of the Long-term Plan process but can be amended at any time.

 

6        Schedule 1: Methods of engagement

Auckland Council uses a wide range of tools and techniques to engage with the community and stakeholders. The council uses the International Association of Public Participation spectrum as a framework for engagement which identifies the following levels:

·     Inform - to provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

·     Consult - to obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·     Involve - to work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

·     Collaborate - to partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

·     Empower - to place final decision making in the hands of the public.

During the development of a plan or policy, there might be a number of different stages of engagement with the community using a different level of participation at the different stages. This will vary depending on the decision but for complex issues, a targeted group of community and stakeholders might be ‘involved’ to aid the development of a draft document followed by wider ‘consultation’ on the draft document.

Joint Management Agreements, Memorandum of Understanding or other similar high level agreements will be considered when engaging ‘collaboratively’ with Māori.

Title: Timelines for consultation projects - Description: Simple process: step 1 developing draft plan or policy, step 2 draft of the plan released for engagement, step3 analysis of feedback and decision making.

Complex process: step 1 identify issues for development of a draft plan or policy, step 2 targeted engagement with key stakeholders to help develop the draft, step 3 draft of the plan released for engagement, step 4 analysis of feedback, step 5 hearings, step 6 decision-making.

6.1      Engagement methods

The following provides a guide to the different approaches to engagement that might be used. Other approaches may also be considered depending on the topic and population affected.

Where the decision or proposal is in relation to air, land or water, the council will take into account the relationship of Māori and their culture and traditions with those places.

The council will refer to the general criteria in section 3.3 to determine the level of engagement required. In addition, the council will consider who is affected by the decision, for example, the level of diversity in terms of geographic, cultural or other key demographics.

Prior to determining an appropriate approach, the council will consider how much is already known about the community views and preferences on the issue.

 

 

Significance

Description

Example approach

Small and simple

Eg redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements

The audience is very localised or relatively small in number or very targeted. They are easy to access and the issue or decision is relatively straight forward and is not of high general public interest. For example, redevelopment of libraries or community halls, park improvements.

Localised promotion, for example through display boards and local media. Targeted engagement with the relevant audience where appropriate. Promotion through e-newsletters and social media. Information online and through local libraries and service centres. Surveys and open days may also be appropriate. 

Medium

Eg action plans, local area plans

The audience is fairly broad or diverse: some segments are not easy to access. The issue is not straightforward and there may be mixed views from the community. For example, action plans and local area plans.

Targeted engagement with the relevant audience, online engagement which may include a survey and social media. Information available through libraries and service centres. Promotion through e-newsletters, the local media or through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland.

Large or complex

Eg Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan

The audience is large and diverse and the issue is of wide importance to the region or complex. Significant financial investment will be required. This is high profile, over-arching, touches every part of council / community. For example, Auckland Plan, Long-term Plan.

Large scale publicity and promotion. There could be an informal engagement / discussion phase plus a formal phase of consultation. There is likely to need to be consideration of different cultural styles and needs for engagement. Likely to include a range of events and a focus on online activities. Promotion through the council’s newsletter, Our Auckland and through e-newsletters.

 

6.2      Special consultative procedure (SCP) 

Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 specifies the use of the SCP for some plans and processes including:

·     Long-term Plan

·     Local Board Plans

·     Annual Plan

·     Bylaws of significant interest

 

The SCP can also be used where the governing body (for a regional decision) or local board (for a local board decision) deems the issue to be significant. Under the SCP, Auckland Council is required to:

·     develop a statement of proposal and make this publicly available (and make the summary of full proposal as widely available as reasonably practicable);

·     describe how people can have their say;

·     ensure people are given an opportunity to present their views to the council; and

·     given access to a record of the decisions.

The engagement methods listed above under ‘Large or complex’ will be considered when preparing for a SCP but large or complex issues will not automatically follow a SCP.

 

6.3      Consultation (Section 82)

Auckland Council is required to carry out consultation in accordance with or giving effect to Section 82 of the Local Government Act 2002 on certain matters (regardless of whether they are considered significant as part of this policy).

For all other issues requiring a decision, the council will determine the appropriate level of engagement on a case by case basis.

 

6.4      Informal engagement

Auckland Council may seek to develop ongoing relationships with the community on general matters, rather than purely on issues that require a decision. This will also allow the community to raise matters that are not currently under consultation. This could include having a presence at markets, events and in public spaces for the purposes of hearing community views and preferences.


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Title: University engagement event - Description: The photo shows a roadshow event at a university where there are information displays, documents and other materials for review and discussion.


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

 

September 2014

Title: Auckland Council logo


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Integrated bylaws review and implementation programme (IBRI) update – September 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/23195

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme, noting its progress towards delivering a set of bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland by October 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation (IBRI) programme is reviewing the set of legacy bylaws and supporting the adoption and implementation of new bylaws that are appropriate for Auckland, by October 2015.

3.       An investment proposal for funding for the 2014/2015 year was endorsed by the Budget Committee in May 2014. This ensures that the programme has adequate funding for its activities this year, including delivering several bylaws that are planned to come into force alongside the July 2015 start of the next long-term plan period.

4.       Progress has been made on the review and implementation stages for several topics. The final Navigation Safety Bylaw and Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw have now been adopted by the governing body and will come into force in the next few months. The Auckland Transport Board has also adopted changes to their Election Signs Bylaw that are now in force.

5.       Seven bylaw proposals were, or are, open for formal public consultation from August to October. These are the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, the Alcohol Control Bylaw, the Animal Management Bylaw (covering animals other than dogs), an amendment to the Health and Hygiene Bylaw, the Signage Bylaw, the Stormwater Bylaw and the Outdoor Fire Safety Bylaw. Consultation around these topics will ensure that a coherent view is presented to the public across these topics and in the context of other work.

6.       The Alcohol Control Bylaw proposal includes recommended delegations to local boards to allow a timely review of the current alcohol bans in each local board area.

7.       The 2014 programme for review of local dog access rules is well underway with the local boards that are proposing changes this year. Reports on the submissions have been prepared to support final decisions by summer.

8.       The new Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws and the Health and Hygiene Bylaw have now come into force and the changes that allow the council to operate these new bylaws have been successfully delivered. Media coverage for these has generally been positive. In particular the prohibition on use of sunbeds by those under 18 years old has received positive coverage (reflecting the council’s leadership on this issue).

9.       Detailed planning to support the coming in to force of the Navigation Safety Bylaw and the Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other upcoming bylaws, is underway.

10.     No formal requests for local board bylaws have been received over the period covered by this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Note the progress of the Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme towards its completion of the delivery of new bylaws by October 2015.

 

 

Comments

Background to the Integrated bylaw review and implementation programme

11.     Auckland Council inherited a set of legacy bylaws from the former councils, covering approximately 30 topics. These bylaws expire at the end of October 2015.

12.     The Integrated Bylaw Review and Implementation programme has been established to review these bylaws and prepare a new bylaw for each topic where appropriate, and to make and communicate the necessary changes so that the council can operate the new bylaws and achieve the outcomes sought from each bylaw. The programme will also work with affected parties where a legacy bylaw is not replaced by a new bylaw.

13.     Both local boards and the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee receive regular updates on the programme. The previous update was provided to local boards in April 2014. This report provides an update on the various topics included in the programme, and attachment A provides an overview of the timeline through to October 2015.

Funding for bylaw review and implementation

14.     A funding proposal for the IBRI programme was approved by the Budget Committee at its meeting of 8 May 2014 (refer resolution BUD/2014/24). This means that the programme will have sufficient resources to deliver its objectives over the 2014/2015 year. The majority of the bylaw topics included within the programme will be completed by the end of this financial year, with several bylaws expected to come into force alongside the start of the new financial year on 1 July 2015. It is expected that there will also be some programme activities through the first part of the 2015/2016 year.

Update on review stage for bylaw topics

15.     Table one and table two below show the current status of the review topics and provide further comments for particular topics.

16.     This includes bylaws that may be folded into or managed under other topics (Arkles Bay set netting, Orakei Basin), the ongoing local boards’ review of dog access rules, regional film fees, and the review that must take place within five years of any bylaw’s adoption.

17.     Local boards have recently provided input to the bylaw reviews for construction and transport for Auckland Council land (such as parks). Further engagement is underway or being planned for the next topics in the review including alcohol controls review, environmental protection and regional film fees.


 

Table 1: Summary of status and next steps for review of bylaw topics

 

Topic

Status and Progress – 7 stages

Comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Pre-consultation

3-Options

4-Write Bylaw

5-Adopt draft

6-Spec Cons Proc

7-Adopt final

 

Reviews completed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dog management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Election Signs

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

General administration

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Hazardous substances

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health & hygiene

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Offensive trades

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Public safety and nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Solid waste (Waste m/ment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Trade waste

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Transport (Auckland Transport)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Cemeteries and crematoria

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Election signs (amendment)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outdoor / rural fire safety

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading and events in public places

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Stormwater management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol control

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Animal management

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Health & hygiene amendment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boarding houses and hostels

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial sex industry

A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issues covered in unitary plan and other bylaws

Construction and development

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Onsite wastewater

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orakei Basin

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recreational and cultural facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (Parks / AC controlled land)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water supply and wastewater (reticulation)

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wharfs & marinas

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental protection

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review - local dog access rules

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Freedom camping

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkles Bay set netting

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional film fees

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See below

Five year reviews

B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Status summary codes

G

Green - Work is progressing as planned, due date will be met or any revised date will not have wider impacts

A

Amber – Original due date at risk of being missed and this may have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen.

R

Red - Due date has or will be missed and this will have wider impacts; or an issue has arisen that will have wider or significant impacts.

B

Blue - Not yet scheduled. However, background work is underway.

 

Table 2: Additional comments for particular topics in the bylaw review programme

 

Navigation safety (including lifejackets)

On track

G

Public submissions closed on 17 March and public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014.

 

The panel requested that a campaign be developed to communicate the changes introduced in the new bylaw and to support the bylaw’s objectives around safety on the water, particularly in relation to smaller boats and the wearing of lifejackets. Planning for this campaign is now underway to support the commencement of the new bylaw.

 

Cemeteries and crematoria

On track

G

Public submissions closed in June and the public hearings and deliberations were completed. The Hearings Panel report on the final form of the bylaw was considered and adopted by the governing body at its meeting on 31 July 2014. The final bylaw and code of practice included a number of changes arising from public consultation, including clarifying procedures around burial and plots and for scattering of ashes.

 

Election signs (amendment)

On track

G

The Auckland Transport board proposed a series of amendment to the Election Signs Bylaw to reflect issues that arose in the 2013 local body elections. These changes included limits on the times when signs can be displayed on private sites, allowing candidates to appear on both individual and team signs on a single site, and requiring contact information on signs to be readable. Submissions closed on 3 June.

 

Final changes were adopted by the board at its meeting of 24 June, and came into force on 18 July (just before the two month period that runs up to the general election on 20 September).

 

Trading and events in public place

On track

G

Both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have endorsed their proposed Trading and Events in Public Places bylaws. These apply to streets and footpaths and other public places. Public submissions were open from 4 August to 4 September, with hearings and deliberations to follow. It is expected any new bylaws could come into force for July 2015. This would allow any fee changes to also be put in place with the new long-term plan that will start then.

 

The bylaws cover a range of issues including street performances, mobile shops, outdoor dining and displays, markets and stalls and charity collections.

 

Signage

On track

G

A proposed Signage Bylaw was reported to the August meetings of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, the governing body and the Auckland Transport board. Public consultation is open from 3 September to 3 October 2014.

 

The bylaw covers a range of types of signs including portable, free standing, wall-mounted, veranda and window signage. It also addresses requirements for posters and for certain types of signs including signs in public open spaces, signage advertising commercial sexual services, real estate signage and event signage.

 

Any new bylaw could be in place for July 2015 and will work alongside Unitary Plan requirements that apply to specific types of signs.

 

Alcohol control

On track

G

The Alcohol Control Bylaw will allow the council to put alcohol bans (previously call liquor bans) in place. These bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places, at particular times. Alcohol bans can work alongside other regulatory and non-regulatory tools to help minimise the harm that can be associated with alcohol.

 

A proposed bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The proposal includes delegations allowing local boards to review, make, amend and revoke alcohol bans for local public places. The governing body would make these decisions for public places that are of regional significance.

 

The bylaw includes criteria to help evaluate any request for an alcohol ban, based on the requirements of the enabling legislation. It has also been designed to support a range of approaches to help communities manage problems associated with alcohol use.

 

The current proposal does not include a review of the existing alcohol bans or the making of new alcohol bans. Decisions on the existing alcohol bans will need to be made by local boards and the governing body after the new bylaw is adopted and before October 2015. Local boards are now receiving further information on how they can carry out their role for this review.

 

Animal management

On track

G

A proposed Animal Management Bylaw was adopted by the governing body on 31 July and was open for public consultation from 15 August to 15 September. The bylaw provides Aucklanders with the opportunity to own different types of animals for companionship, while minimising possible impact on their neighbours. Under the proposed bylaw, people that keep animals need to ensure the animals do not cause a nuisance, risk to public health and safety, or damage council land.

 

Specific provisions are included for urban properties relating to the keeping of bees and chickens or other stock (such as a rooster, goat, pig or sheep). There are also specific provisions related to horse riding in public places.

 

Issues relating to animal welfare, wildlife predation and dog management are addressed through national legislation and do not form part of this proposal.

 

Health & hygiene amendment

On track

G

The Health and Hygiene Bylaw 2013 was adopted by the council in 2013 and came into force on 1 July 2014. The bylaw and code, as adopted, requires pharmacists to obtain a licence under the bylaw if they offer commercial ear-piercing services.

 

The council has now received further information from industry representatives that shows public health is adequately protected through existing central government regulation and industry-based standards. Accordingly, the council is proposing an amendment to the bylaw that will exempt pharmacists from the requirement to obtain this licence under the bylaw when they provide commercial ear-piercing services. Public consultation was open from 15 August to 15 September.

 

Local dog access review

On track

G

The 2014 local board dog access review includes some areas within the following local boards: Kaipatiki, Orakei, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Puketapapa, and Hibiscus and Bays.

 

This is the first year of the new approach to reviewing dog access rules and means the council can consider requests for changes to dog access rules on an annual basis. This approach is more responsive to residents and the environment and enables robust consideration on specific public places to provide for public safety and comfort, the needs of dogs and their owners, and to ensure the practicality of dog access rules.

 

The council is required to advise registered dog owners about these proposed changes and this has been achieved by including relevant material within the annual dog registration package. This is the first year that this approach has been possible and it has reduced costs and ensured that dog owners receive a single combined communication from the council. This targeted advice has been supported by other communication including public notices, local newspaper advertising and initiatives planned by these local boards.

 

Submissions on the proposed changes closed on 23 July 2014. Panels established by the relevant local boards considered the submissions, held hearings and reported to their respective local boards who have adopted the recommendations and finalised the review process.

 

Further access review changes are planned for the next two years. Work is now underway for local boards that are involved in the 2015 review programme. The local boards that are receiving a report in September to confirm commencement of the review and define its scope are Rodney, Upper Harbour, Devonport-Takapuna, Waitakere Ranges, Waiheke Island, Albert-Eden, Puketapapa, and Waitemata.

 

Regional film fees

On track

G

There are around 500 permit applications for filming activity each year, including many on local parks. The Auckland Film Protocol expresses the council’s intention to welcome filming, support this activity and maximise the financial and other benefits it brings to Auckland. The protocol also includes measures to ensure filming’s impacts on communities are well managed.

 

When the Film Protocol was adopted in 2013 several local boards asked that further work be carried out to understand how local communities can get more benefit from filming. The regional film fees project responds to part of that request. It will review how fees for filming can be set and managed, and how council’s direct revenue associated with filming permits can be used to meet the costs of facilitating filming and to improve the public spaces (including parks and streetscapes) that are used by film-makers.

 

Further information is being provided to local boards through September and October.

Update on implementation stage for new bylaws

18.     Table three and table four below show the current status of implementation projects and further comments for particular implementation projects.

Table 3: Summary of status and next steps for implementation projects

 

Implementation project name

Status and Progress

Link to bylaw topics / Other comments

 

Status

1-Preparation

2-Planning

3-Implementation

4-Closure

 

Underway

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol licensing readiness

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Alcohol licensing fees

A

 

 

 

 

See below

Animals (Stage 1)

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Dog access review 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral Signs 2013

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Electoral Signs 2014

G

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental

G

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities

G

 

 

 

 

 

Food safety

G

 

 

 

 

Completed

Health protection

G

 

 

 

 

Health & hygiene bylaw and code of practice; See below

Marine

G

 

 

 

 

Navigation safety – see below

Public safety & nuisance

G

 

 

 

 

 

Revoked and lapsing bylaws

G

 

 

 

 

General admin; Offensive trades; Others

Signage

G

 

 

 

 

 

Stormwater

G

 

 

 

 

 

Street trading

G

 

 

 

 

 

Waste management

G

 

 

 

 

Solid waste bylaw

Animals (stage 2)

G

 

 

 

 

 

Alcohol controls

G

 

 

 

 

 

Air quality

G

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed future

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction

B

 

 

 

 

 

Transport (AC land)

B

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 4: Additional comments for particular implementation projects

 

Alcohol licensing fees

On hold

A

As part of reforming laws relating to the sale and supply of alcohol, central government updated licensing fees and also allowed each council to set its own fees for the licensing services it must provide. Auckland Council considered a report on the costs involved in this in August 2013, and endorsed adopting a bylaw to set its own alcohol licensing fee amounts, to take affect from 1 July 2014 (refer governing body meeting of 22 August 2013, item 13, GB/2013/83).

 

A further report has now been considered by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (7 August, item 11). The report provided an update on this matter, noting that revenue collected to date effectively covers relevant operating costs. The committee endorsed the council continuing to use the default licensing fees set by central government and that a further update should be provided early in 2015 (refer REG/2014/101).

 

Health protection

On track

G

The new Health and Hygiene Bylaw and code of practice are in force from 1 July 2014 and this project has now completed its closure phase after managing commencement successfully. The council’s leadership on prohibiting the use of sun-beds for people under 18 years of age was highlighted positively in the media.

 

Marine (including Navigation safety)

On Track

G

The new Navigation Safety Bylaw will come into force for the 2014/2015 summer. The bylaw includes key changes around the wearing of lifejackets on vessels under six metres in length. An education and information campaign is currently being prepared to support this and other changes that the bylaw introduces. This will include updating the signs at key boat ramps across Auckland and working with other water safety organisations to deliver these safety messages to the community.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     Local boards are involved in the review of each bylaw topic (consistent with the review’s principles). This report provides an update on the programme, but does not raise any issues specific to local boards apart from those already noted above.

20.     No proposals for local bylaws have been received through the above period.

Maori impact statement

21.     This report does not raise any specific issues relating to Māori. The review of each topic includes considering whether that topic includes any elements of special interest to Māori, and if so the appropriate way to seek a greater level of engagement. Where appropriate, consultation with Māori (on a particular topic) may be linked to consultation on other related topics through the Unitary Plan or other initiatives.

General

22.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the council’s policy on significance.

Implementation

23.     The programme includes implementation and delivery for each bylaw, as noted above. This includes working with internal and external stakeholders as relevant to each topic.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bylaw programme timeline

165

     

Signatories

Authors

Helgard Wagener - Team leader, Policies and Bylaws

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan – Manager Planning North/West

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Discretionary Community Funding - Round One 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/17891

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the applications received for round one of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Funding Programme 2014-15.  The Waitakere Ranges Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive summary

2.       For the 2014-15 financial year, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board set a total community funding budget of $22,631.  This is the first round for the financial year. 

3.       Eleven applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $30,755.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Considers the applications listed in Table One and agrees to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

 

 Table One: Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Funding Applications

Organisation

Funding for

Amount requested

First Precinct, Albionvale Road

Towards the purchase of mulch, fertilizer and herbicide for the Albionvale Road Community Green Space redevelopment between November 2014 to June 2015

 $    3,003.00

Glen Eden Community House Incorporated

Towards the purchase of first aid supplies and training, including staff wages, and advertising in the Western Leader for the Glen Eden Community House between November 2014 to June 2015

 $    2,854.00

Glen Eden Community House Incorporated

Towards costs associated with getting the Glen Eden Community House Incorporated accounts audited between November 2014 to January 2015

 $    1,725.00

Henderson Valley School

Towards the purchase of carving tools for the Henderson Valley School gateway project between November 2014 to December 2015

 $    2,700.00

OnBoard Skate NZ Incorporated

Towards coaching costs, staff planning, training and development, purchase of safety equipment and operating costs to run 'Safe Skate' sessions at Kaurilands Primary and Titirangi Primary between November 2014 to March 2015

 $    4,400.00

Piha Community Library Trust

Towards re-roofing the Piha Community Trust Library between January 2015 to July 2015

 $    3,000.00

Ranui-Swanson-Waitakere Community Patrol

Towards costs for volunteers to attend first aid training between November 2014 to February 2015

 $    1,040.00

The Titirangi Community House Society Incorporated

Funding for the design and implementation of a new website for Titirangi Community House between November 2014 to January 2015

 $    1,380.00

The Waitakere Ranges Protection Society Incorporated

Towards the salary for the Heritage Area Coordinator between November 2014 to October 2015

 $    5,000.00

VisionWest Community Trust

Towards the purchase of food for the VisionWest Community Trust food bank between November 2014 to October 2014

 $    3,000.00

Watersafe Auckland Incorporated

Towards the hireage of the Waterhole Swim School, advertising costs including flyers, certificates and the purchase of swimming bags for the Whanau Nui programme between December 2014 to March 2015

 $    2,653.00

 

 

 $  30,755.00

 

 

 

Comments

4.       In March 2013, the Regional Development and Operations Committee (RDOC) resolved to continue the interim community funding approach for the 2013/2014 financial year (RDO/2013/32).

5.       Two community funding rounds are scheduled for this financial year. This first round closed on 15 July 2014.

6.       Through community grants, the local board recognises the vital role that community groups and organisations play in developing diverse, strong, inclusive, connected and sustainable communities. The Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Discretionary Fund aims to assist groups to provide activities, projects, programmes, initiatives and events that make a positive contribution within the local board area.

7.       When reviewing applications, the local board should be guided by the following aim of the fund (these are not eligibility criteria; rather they are guidelines to help the local board when considering the merits of each proposal):

·        the benefit of the proposal to the local area

·        the group’s role in the local area

·        the alignment of the proposal with the priorities of the board; such as

o   young people

o   Maori

o   the environment

o   culture and arts

o   social cohesion

o   recreation and sport

o   heritage

8.       This fund is allocated at the local board’s discretion. In accordance with its fiduciary duties, the local board is to act honestly, avoid conflicts of interest and act in what the local board believes to be the best interests of the community.

9.       Round one of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Funding closed on 15 July 2014. The fund was advertised through local community networks, local publications and on the Auckland Council website.  

10.     For the 2014-15 financial year the Waitakere Ranges Local Board set a total community funding budget of $22,631.  None of this budget has been allocated to date. If the budget is split across the two rounds for the year, the budget for this round is $11,315.50.

11.     Eleven applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $30,755.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Local board feedback on the community funding applications was sought at a workshop with the Waitakere Ranges Local Board.

Maori impact statement

13.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori. Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.

Implementation

14.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

15.     Following the Waitakere Ranges Local Board allocating funding for round one, Community Development, Arts and Culture will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A: Waitakere Ranges Local Board Discretionary Community Funding -  Round One 2014/15 Application Summaries

171

     

Signatories

Authors

Kim Hammond - Community Grants and Support Officer West

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Acting Manager Community Development Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 


































Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Waitakere Ranges Local Board submission on the draft Signage Bylaw 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/24325

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to enable the Waitakere Ranges Local Board to formally record its submission to the Auckland Council and Auckland Transports draft Signage Bylaw 2014.

Executive summary

2.       The submission was submitted to the bylaws@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz on Thursday, 2 October 2014

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Endorses the submission that the local board provided on draft Signage Bylaw 2014 and submitted to the Bylaws Department at Auckland Council on Thursday, 2 October 2014, as detailed in the “Waitakere Ranges Local Board – submission on Signage Bylaw 2014” attachment.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

WRLB Submission on Signage Bylaw 2014

207

     

Signatories

Authors

Catileya Clark – Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

 

Waitakere Ranges Local Board – Submission on Signage Bylaw 2014

 

1.   The Waitakere Ranges Local Board welcomes the opportunity to review the proposed Signage Bylaw 2014 and submit the following submission.

2.   The Waitakere Ranges Local Board includes the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area which was established by the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008 (WRHA Act 2008).  This national legislation seeks to protect the environment, heritage and amenity values of the Waitakere Ranges.

3.   The board supports section 7(2)(c) Amenity of the proposed bylaw which states, ‘a person must not display any publicly visible signage on or in front of a scheduled building, site or item with historic heritage value without the approval of the relevant authority’.  It is imperative that this bylaw recognises the value of heritage areas such as the WRHA Act 2008, and therefore requires the approval of the relevant authority. The board would expect that when the bylaw refers to ‘approval of the relevant authority’, that this includes local boards approval. This is pertinent as local boards are best placed to make decisions that have the potential to impact their area, and also to uphold the key features and objectives of the legislation.

4.   Under section 5 Definitions for ‘events’, the board does not feel that political meetings should be included here if they are open to the public, and instead be included within community events.  Currently all sign rules for the West are controlled by the Auckland Council District Plan – Operative Waitakere Section, which lists political meetings open to the public, to fall within the provisions of community signs.  This allows the meetings to be advertised 21 days before and removed within 3 days after. 

5.   Under the definition for ‘community events’, currently it is defined as ‘an event that is not a major event or a regional event’.  The board feels this definition is too vague and would not distinguish between events organised by not for profit or non-government organisations, and those by commercial operators.  The definition should allow for those events which are free to the community, organised by not for profit or non-government organisations for the benefit of the entire community, to be specifically included. This would ensure community-based events which are accessible by all to be able to advertise their event under the provisions of table 9 community event signage.

6.   Under the definition for ‘conservation zone’, currently it is defined as ‘the same as in the Unitary Plan’.  The board has reviewed the Unitary Plan zoning categories and cannot find a zone named specifically ‘conservation zone’.  There is ‘public open space – conservation’ and ‘rural conservation’.  We would therefore seek clarification as to whether there is such a zoning within the Unitary Plan and if not, for this definition to be changed accordingly so it reflects what is written in the Unitary Plan.

7.   Under the definition for ‘signage and sign’, the board would like to see a further subsection incorporated into this definition to include the maintenance of signs, so they are kept to a certain quality or standard so as not to detract from the visual amenity of the building or area.

8.   Under section 21(1) Window signage, the board supports the maximum allowance of 25 per cent of the width and height of the window for sign coverage.  This of course not only reduces clutter but also improves the amenity appeal of the shop front.  We also agree that currently many shop windows such as dairies with large numbers of signage displayed, can impact negatively on shop occupants as it reduces the ability for passive surveillance outside to adjacent public space, and from the outside in. 

9.   Under section 23 Signage advertising commercial sexual services, the board does not support the ability for there to be a sign within a residential zone to advertise the name of the operator or registered business, street number and telephone number.  Currently the Auckland Council District Plan – Operative Waitakere Section does not permit a sign relating to a small brothel (that is being operated as a home occupation from a residential zone) to be advertised.  It only states that the relevant street number must be clearly marked.  By not permitting a sign to be made publicly visible within a residential zone, this could make it safer for those providing the service as they would be more inclined to make prior appointments with their customers, as opposed to random persons approaching the property after seeing the sign.  It would also protect children who live nearby from strangers randomly approaching the property.

10. Under section 24 Real estate signage, the board would like to have the following sentence deleted from paragraph (2) ‘or as close as practical to the property to which it relates’.  This is because the sentence is too loosely written and has the potential to lead to misinterpretation where signs could be placed away from the actual property for sale. Currently the council and board receives a large number of complaints from the community concerning signs which are placed on busy intersections which reduces the visual amenity of the area, and at times causing a safety issue with sight lines being obstructed. The intention of the rule controlling real estate signs was never to permit signs placed away (sometimes at great distances) from the property for sale.  However, as the wording for the rule was not specific enough it has been largely misinterpreted. We now have a situation where busy intersections are being bombarded with numerous real estate signs (and other signs). 

11. The board would also like the current seven days for signs to be removed once the sold notification has been placed, to be changed to five days.

12. The board supports section 26(2) Community event signage where the relevant authority which would include the local boards, has the ability to approve public sites for the display of community event signage, and may specify controls for the display of signage on those sites. Again local boards are best placed to make decisions that have the potential to impact their area. 

13. The board would like to see the maximum size allowance for community event signage to change from the proposed 1.5 square metres to 2.88 square metres.  This is what is currently permitted under the Auckland Council District Plan – Operative Waitakere Section. 

14. The board would like added to the bylaw for it to be prohibited to have people standing within the transport network such as footpaths or berm, holding signs advertising a business.  Examples within the west include young adults holding signs to attract motorist and pedestrian attention for Domino’s Pizza in Glen Eden, and for the Masala Indian restaurant in Titirangi. Using people as signboards is distracting and a safety issue for passing motorists. 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Western Joint Funding Committee - Updated Terms of Reference

 

File No.: CP2014/24131

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update terms of reference for the Western Joint Funding committee with the inclusion of the facility partnership fund.

Executive summary

2.       The Western Joint Funding Committee (WJF) is a joint committee established by the three Western local boards and has decision-making responsibility for the allocation of grants through the legacy community funding schemes.

3.       The terms of references were endorsed by three western local boards for the WJF committee in the beginning of the year and it has since been identified by staff that facility partnership fund was not included. This report seeks approval for updated terms of reference for the WJF committee.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Approves amended Terms of Reference for the Western Joint Funding Committee as per Attachment A.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Amended  terms of reference for WJF Committee

213

     

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Local Board member attendance at the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC)

 

File No.: CP2014/24273

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks approval for the Waitakere Ranges Local Board member, Neil Henderson to attend the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC).

Executive Summary

2.       The National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC) is hosting a national workshop specifically for animal ethics committees (AECs).  The programme has a special focus on empowering non-institutional members.

3.       The one-day workshop will be held in Wellington on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 at the Royal Society of New Zealand.

4.       Auckland Council’s involvement with this committee is a requirement of the Animal Welfare Act 1999.  The Committee’s purpose is to weigh the benefits of research, teaching and testing protocol against welfare cost to animals, stipulate appropriate conditions, monitor compliance with approvals, monitor animal management and facilities.

5.       It will provide valuable networking time with peers, encourage frank discussion on the present system and set the scene for the future.

6.       The Governing Body at their 30 January 2014 meeting, appointed Member Neil Henderson as an Auckland Council representative on the ‘Living Cell Technologies’ Animal Ethics Committee – resolution GB/20174/8.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         Endorses member Neil Henderson to attend the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee workshop (NAEAC) in November 2014.

 

b)      Agrees that travel and related expenses for attending the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee workshop (NAEAC) be provided for in line with Auckland Council's Elected Members' Expense Rules.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

NAEAC workshop invitation letter

217

bView

Animal Ethics Committee workshop programme

219

     

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Ref: 12-NAE-07-2

 

17 September 2014

 

 

Chairs/Secretaries of Animal Ethics Committees

 

 

 

Dear Sir/Madam

 

NAEAC NATIONAL WORKSHOP FOR AECs

 

The National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC) is hosting a national workshop specifically for animal ethics committees (AECs).  The programme (attached separately) has a special focus on empowering non-institutional members.

 

The one-day workshop will be held in Wellington on Tuesday, 11 November 2014 at the Royal Society of New Zealand.

 

In this year’s programme, there will be an opportunity for AECs to participate in one elected workshop.  When completing the registration form please rank the workshop topics from 1 (most preferred) to 3 (least preferred). 

 

Registration: There is no registration fee for the workshop as NAEAC considers that it is in the interests of all AECs to be represented and that the workshop should be seen as an important opportunity to keep abreast of the issues.  It will provide valuable networking time with peers, encourage frank discussion on the present system and set the scene for the future.

 

Please ask your AEC members to complete the registration form (attached separately) and send it back to Paula Lemow via email at naeac@mpi.govt.nz  or paula.lemow@mpi.govt.nz

 

Initial replies are requested by Friday, 31 October 2014.  AECs that do not intend to send anyone to this workshop are also encouraged to reply. 

 

If you have any questions, please contact Paula Lemow.

 

 

Yours sincerely

 

 

Virginia Williams

NAEAC Chair

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

NAEAC WORKSHOP PROGRAMME FOR ANIMAL ETHICS COMMITTEES

TUESDAY, 11 NOVEMBER 2014

 

 Royal Society of New Zealand (Te Whare Aparangi)

11 Turnbull Street, Thorndon, Wellington

 

08:15 am – 09:00 am

Registration ( Foyer)

Paula Lemow/Linda Carsons (MPI)

09:00 am – 09:05 am

Welcome and Housekeeping

Virginia Williams, NAEAC

09:05 am – 09:15 am

Opening Address

Virginia Williams, NAEAC

09:15 am – 09:30 am

Presentation of NAEAC Three Rs Award

Presentation of Animal Welfare Science and Bioethics Centre Award

Virginia Williams, NAEAC David Mellor, Massey University

09:30 am – 10:15 am

Keynote Address:  The Five Domains Model and Promoting Positive Welfare States (Aronui Conference Room)

David Mellor, Massey University

10:15 am – 10:45 am

Morning Tea (Foyer)

 

10:45 am – 11:45 am

Mock AEC meeting: Welfare Implications of 1080 poisoning in deer (Aronui Conference Room)

Peter Larsen, NAEAC

 

§ Institutional members (Aronui Conference Room)

Bruce Warburton/Malcolm Tingle, NAEAC

 

§ NZVA nominees (Kete 1)

Karen Booth/Craig Johnson, NAEAC

 

§ SPCA nominees (Kete 2)

Jeanette Crosado (ANZCCART)

 

§ Territorial nominees (Whare Hui)

Stephen Cairns/Terry Burrell, NAEAC

11:45 am – 12:45 pm

Feedback and discussion from Mock AEC meeting (Aronui Conference Room)

Peter Larsen, NAEAC

12:45 pm – 01:30 pm

Lunch (Foyer)

 

01:30 pm – 02:15 pm

Workshop 1: Emerging issues from Mock AEC meeting 

Virginia Williams, NAEAC

 

§ Institutional members (Aronui Conference Room)

Bruce Warburton/Malcolm Tingle, NAEAC

 

§ NZVA nominees (Kete 1)

Karen Booth/Virginia Williams, NAEAC

 

§ SPCA nominees and Territorial nominees (Kete 2)

Jeanette Crosado (ANZCCART)

 

§ AEC Chairs (Whare Hui)

Craig Johnson/Peter Larsen NAEAC

02:15 pm – 03:00 pm

Workshop 2:

 

 

§ Applying gradings to wildlife species (Aronui Conference Room)

Clare Veltman/Graeme Taylor, DOC

 

§ Statistics/power analysis (Kete 1)

TBC

 

§ Monitoring (Kete 2)

Malcolm Tingle, NAEAC

03:00 pm – 03:30 pm

Afternoon Tea (Foyer)

 

03:30 pm – 03:40 pm

Short Talk 1: NAEAC research findings: how AECs go about making decisions

Peter Larsen, NAEAC

03:40 pm – 03:50 pm

Short Talk 2: Euthanasia techniques

Craig Johnson, NAEAC

03:50 pm – 04:00 pm

Short Talk 3: Practical examples of the Three Rs

Tamara Diesch, MPI

04:00 pm – 04:10 pm

Short Talk 4: Highlights from the Expert Forum on Animals in Research: Openness, Democratic Decision Making and Public Engagement held in Vancouver in November 2013

Mark Fisher, MPI

04:10 pm – 04:20 pm

Short Talk 5: The Science Media Centre

Dacia Herbulock, Science Media Centre

04:20 pm – 04:30 pm

Closing Address

Virginia Williams, NAEAC

 

Location map

§ The Royal Society of New Zealand is located at 11 Turnbull Street, Thorndon, Wellington (A 5-10 minute walk from train and bus stations and with easy access from the motorway onto Murphy Street).

 

 

 

Parking

§ On weekdays there is no onsite parking available.

§ There is metered street parking on Murphy Street.

§ Wilson Parking is available on Murphy Street.  See link below for map and fee structure.

http://www.wilsonparking.co.nz/go/wilson-carparks/wellington/murphy-street

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Portfolio update: Member Greg Presland

 

File No.: CP2014/24512

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity for Member Greg Presland to give an update with regards to activity within his portfolio areas.

2.       Portfolio holders are responsible for leading policy development in their portfolio area, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

3.       Member Presland has lead for the portfolios of Transport and Regulatory/Planning.

Executive Summary                                                              

 

I thought that I would report on something general, something financial, and something local.

 

Something General

 

4.       There is a significant transport development that has recently occurred.  Auckland Transport has decided to upgrade the capability of its information gathering system.  High Definition cameras, 2,000 of them, and software are being installed or upgraded and they will allow for the automatic number plate recognition of cars at different locations.  An initial suggestion was that the data would be beamed over to the United States and processed by Hewlett Packard cloud servers based in Palo Alto, California although AT has said subsequently that the data would be retained only for seven days and kept within New Zealand.

5.       The initial announcement as reported in the New Zealand Herald contained this passage:

6.       “Only HP could comprehensively deliver the custom solution, expertise and ecosystem at this scale to transform our vision into reality.”

7.       The vast amount of data including text, images, audio and real-time video will be analysed by HP’s system.

8.       “The system will leverage data from a variety of sources, including thousands of security and traffic management cameras, a vast network of road and environmental sensors as well as real-time social media and news feeds,” HP said.

9.       Auckland Transport has said that it has engaged with the Privacy Commissioner and that it will not use the ability to track the movements of individual vehicles.  But as pointed out in Transport Blog this contradicts HP’s own press release which said this:

10.     "In the first phase of the project, Auckland Transport will focus on improving public safety. Law enforcement will use HP Intelligent Scene Analysis System and license plate recognition for accurate identification and scene analysis for dangerous activities and analyzing safety threats from over 2,000 cameras deployed within Auckland. Going forward this information will be linked with rich insight from social media news sources to provide a comprehensive solution that can proactively identify breaking trends and respond to critical safety incidents for cyclists and transport users.”

11.     Clearly the police will have access to the data that is collected for investigation and policing purposes. The Herald article suggested that a warrant would need to be obtained before the Police could retrieve data from the system but I wonder if this is the case how long this requirement will stay in place.

12.     The system potentially raises the prospect that mass surveillance of Auckland’s roads may only be the flick of a switch away.

13.     Should we be worried?  Some believe that as it is only data collected from public places and public sites we should have nothing to fear, at least those of us who are law abiding.  Others are concerned at the risks to privacy and the increased potential to track what we are doing and where we are going.

14.     Certainly there needs to be public consultation on the appropriateness of the capability, and any change to how the system is being operated will need to be considered carefully.  I am still trying to understand why social media data needs to be collected.

 

Something financial

 

15.     The Local Board has $1.2 million of funds held by Auckland Transport which can be designated for local capital transport projects.  The Board is getting close to making a decision on some of the projects to be advanced.  Contenders include pedestrianisation of part of Captain Scott Road, various improvements to the Oratia domain, further work on the Western Rail line cycleway and developing a walkway in the Mountain Road Opanuku area. There may still be funds.

 

Something local

 

16.     I recently met up with Ross Dellow of the Albionvale Road community.  He took the opportunity to show me a number of local safety concerns as well as untidy areas where Council could do better.  His feedback has been passed on.  All local areas would benefit from having someone like Ross to point out the local issues.  There is no better way to understand an area than to live there. 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the portfolio update from Member Greg Presland.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

      

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 October 2014

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Council Controlled Organisation Review, Progress Report to Local Boards

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains information on proposed changes that may impact the employment of staff within the Auckland Council group..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.