I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

6.00pm

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Simon Randall

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Josephine Bartley

 

 

Brett Clark

 

 

Bridget Graham, QSM

 

 

Obed Unasa

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Philippa Hillman

Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

10 November 2014

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 570 3848

Email: philippa.hillman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation : St Georges Rowing Club                                                              5

8.2     Deputation : Tāmaki working group on youth                                                 6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Seeking approval for the renewal schedule for Aquatic and Recreation facilities for 2014-15                                                                                                                                     9

13        Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment                                                                   15

14        Panmure Hall Future Management Model                                                                53

15        Process for naming the internal spaces within the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth                                                                                                                             61

16        Draft terms of reference and expressions of interest process - Committee of the local board to govern the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth                       67

17        Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report – November 2014                          141

18        Auckland Transport Quarterly Report                                                                    147

19        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2014/2015                                                                                               177

20        Draft Community Facilities Network Plan                                                              185

21        Request for feedback on the draft Local Approved Product Policy                   263

22        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops October 2014          279

23        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         285

24        Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board                                    293

25        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                         295  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 October 2014, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations.  Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Board.  This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda.  Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation : St Georges Rowing Club

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for St Georges Rowing Club to present to the Board regarding the maintenance of the mud mat at Panmure Wharf Domain.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from the St Georges Rowing Club.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thanks the St Georges Rowing Club for their attendance.

Attachments

a          St Georges Rowing Club supporting document.................................. 307

 

 

8.2       Deputation : Tāmaki working group on youth

Purpose

1.       Providing an opportunity for the Tāmaki working group on youth to present to the Board regarding a proposal on the disorderly youth in Tāmaki.

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chair has approved the request from the Tāmaki working group on youth.

3.       David Tucker, Mary-Kath Laita and Senior Sergeant Graeme Porter, will present on behalf of the Tāmaki working group on youth.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thanks the members of the Tāmaki working group on youth for their attendance.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Seeking approval for the renewal schedule for Aquatic and Recreation facilities for 2014-15

 

File No.: CP2014/22072

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for proposed 2014/15 property renewal capital works for Recreation Facilities.

Executive summary

2.       The property renewals programme is an annual capital works programme. The programme ensures that each Council facility can operate to the current level of service articulated in the relevant asset management plan.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board proposed property renewals programme for 2014/2015 is detailed in this report (Attachment A).

4.       In the 2014/15 financial year, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s Recreation Facilities budget is $1,304,324.00.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receives the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2014/2015 Recreation Facilities Proposed Property Renewals report

b)      approves the property renewals programme for 2014/2015 as listed in Attachment A

c)      delegates responsibility to specified member/s (refer Attachment A) to approve any moderate changes to the budget, in the event that there is a variation to identified costs for its property renewals programme

d)      allows for any project surplus to be held as contingency for other renewals projects included within this report for this board.

 

Comments

5.       Investment in this property renewals programme will ensure that Council facilities remain valuable, well-maintained community assets that continue to meet user expectations. Not undertaking timely property renewals will have an undesirable impact on the customer experience and put asset performance at risk, and ultimately increase the cost to maintain the facility.

6.       The property renewals programme, is a planned and documented process comprising of seven project management framework phases. These phases are: data collection, feasibility, initiation, planning, execution and transition, closure, and benefits realisation. Local Board sign-off is within the third phase (initiation) of the property renewals programme process.

7.       The property renewals programme process ensures that the proposed work-list (Attachment A) has received extensive input and assessment from both property and activity officers. The proposed property renewals programme (Attachment A) includes the name of the Recreation Facilities Representative.

Glen Innes pool

8.       Roofing renewals are to replace a section over roof, over an ingress in the plant room which will ensure water does not leak onto the boiler and electrical controls

9.       There is a failed pump in the teaching pool meaning only one is managing the pool. This needs replacement to maintain flow rates and meet water quality standards.

Lagoon Pool

10.     The sand and 3 DE filters, pumps listed below are in need of replacement due to their age, they are at the end of life. The goal is to maintain efficiency, maintain water quality standards, flow rates within the pools and service levels to the customer. Likewise the poolside change rooms are at the end of life and have been in need of replacement for some time.

11.     The roofing works are needed as a length of skylight runs the full length of the main pool hall which has become brittle is leaking allowing water onto the laminated beams. It will improve durability and protect against further degradation of the beams.

12.     Renewal of the air handling unit is required to improve air circulation and humidity control within the main pool hall while protecting the pool hall surfaces.

Onehunga War Memorial

13.     Pool sauna requires upgrading as it is inefficient and customer feedback has been taken into consideration.

14.     Test room is damp, with cabinetry and floor coverings all at the end of life

15.     The outdoor pools refurbishment involves resurfacing the floors of the main outdoor pool, dive well and the two toddler pools. This maintains the integrity of the pools and ensures they are kept to a good serviceable standard 

Condition Grade Rating

16.     The above renewals have been prioritised according to a condition rating system decided by Property specialists to ensure items most at risk to fail are prioritised, taking into account the risk to the assets and operations.

17      Category 4’s are rated as poor but still operational with replacement required soon but posing no risk in the short term.

18.     Category 5 ratings are very poor with failure eminent and urgent replacement required.

19.     The items above are listed as priorities as they will prevent further degradation of the building assets and pool plant, enable operators to meet water quality standards, while maintaining high quality service levels to the customers. The property specialists advise that there are no priorities not being met due to unavailable budget, any items of risk have already been brought forward and are listed in this report. 

Consideration

Local Board Views

20.     Council officers are seeking Local Board approval for the proposed Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board property renewals programme for 2014/15. Council officers will report quarterly to the Local Board, including any reduction in project costs, to enable a review of budget options.

Māori Impact Statement

21.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2014/2015 Proposed Property Renewals programme will ensure that all facilities continue to be well-maintained community assets benefiting the local community, including Māori.

General

22.     Council officers have consulted with Local Board representatives and relevant Council departments in order to formulate both the property renewals process and the attached lists of proposed renewals. Consultation will continue with all stakeholders throughout the financial year while this programme is implemented.

23.     Parks, Sport and Recreation and Property are in the process of developing a region-wide renewals strategy for the recreation facilities portfolio. For the next three to five years it is intended to give priority to renewals in the following areas;

a)      External cladding (in particular roofs)

b)      Building structure

c)      Facility plant and equipment

d)      Health and safety.

24.     The above issues exist across the network and if left uncontrolled have the ability to force the closure of facilities, should asset failure occur.

25.     A renewals strategy will ensure that facilities continue to provide ongoing base levels of service whilst reducing risks. The intent of the strategy is to ensure the asset conditions of all 41 recreation and aquatic facilities across the network meet a base service level and are functionally sound, by ensuring investment is distributed into areas of need and addressing fundamental asset issues as a priority.

26.     The condition of facilities across the network vary due to legacy maintenance and renewal funding policies relevant to each legacy Council. By focusing current resources on bringing facilities up to a minimum standard we will de-risk the network and allow the platform for the network to grow.

27.     Our approach is to take a comprehensive view rather than a piece meal approach focusing investment on a facility and address a number of issues at one time.

Implementation Issues

28.     This work will be implemented as part of Council’s Property Department’s usual business practice and delivered in partnership with Recreation Facilities.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Property renewals programme 2014/2015

13

      

Signatories

Authors

Jane  Franich - Contract Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment

 

File No.: CP2014/22897

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (the board) with a summary of the findings of the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment (TCNA) and recommend innovative ways for the board to respond to the needs that have been identified.

Executive summary

2.       “Our community spaces work for us” is one of the top priority areas in the 2011 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan.

3.       With the aim of increasing utilisation of their community spaces in direct response to the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision, the board approved the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment Scope and Plan at its business meeting on 18th of March, 2014.

4.       The purpose of the TCNA was to identify the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision so that the board can respond to them using the tools available.  In particular, the board are interested in what role the following community spaces can play in response to the community:

a)      Glen Innes Community Hall

b)      Panmure Hall

c)      Space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices

d)      Riverside Community Centre

e)      Dunkirk Road Activity Centre.

5.       As part of understanding local community needs, the board were also keen to understand the impact of an absence of a council owned community facility in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area.

6.       A considerable amount of existing research and studies were reviewed as part of the TCNA.  Further information was gathered through a survey of 104 Tāmaki residents, two workshops and interviews with key stakeholders. A workshop was held with the board on the 15th of July 2014, to provide an update on the findings of the needs assessment and to engage with the board as part of the research.

7.       A full report of the key findings is attached (Attachment A), which identifies a range of issues that are grouped under the following themes:

a)      Activities and spaces for youth and young people

b)      Safety and perceptions of safety

c)      Employment and skill development opportunities

d)      Housing

e)      Welcoming, well maintained facilities that are community hubs and accessible.

8.       The board are already involved in responding in a variety of ways, such as the delivery of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth (GIMAC) and the Housing Quality Improvement Project .


 

9.       The following additional responses to these needs are recommended:

a)      Funding within the boards allocated envelope for youth-focused activities at Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

b)      Development of a safety action plan for the board area.

c)      Working with Maungarei Community Christian Trust to support their proposal for a purpose built community centre in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area.

d)      Investigate opportunities to co-ordinate management of the Glen Innes Community Hall with GIMAC.

e)      Investigate the best use of the space above the board offices, with a particular focus on opportunities to support organisations that deliver training and employment services.

f)       Implementation of a management model in Panmure Hall that will activate the space and provide a welcoming presence.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receives the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment report (Attachment A)

b)      approves the following initiatives in response to the findings of the needs assessment:

i)       Funding for youth-focused activities at Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

ii)       Development of a safety action plan for the Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board area.

iii)      Working with Maungarei Community Christian Trust to support their proposal for a purpose built community centre in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area.

iv)     Investigate opportunities to co-ordinate management of the Glen Innes Community Hall with the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth.

v)      Investigate the best use of the space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices, with a particular focus on opportunities to support organisations that deliver training and employment services.

vi)     The implementation of an appropriate management model for Panmure Hall that will activate the space and provide a welcoming presence.

c)      seeks to identify funds within the board’s 14/15 discretionary budget to implement responses to the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment  as follows:

i)        $5.5k to deliver structured youth focussed activities at Riverside Community Centre.

ii)       $2.75k to deliver structured youth focussed activities at Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

Comments

10.     “Our spaces work for us” is one of the priorities in the local board’s 2011 Local Board Plan.  More specifically, this plan states that the board will:

(W)ork to address the identified need for more community spaces in the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area and those of our existing community spaces in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki that have not been maintained adequately and appropriately.  In addition, we support better connections between community spaces, particularly in Glen Innes.

11.     The Tāmaki subdivision contains some of Auckland’s most deprived neighbourhoods, and the board are committed to identifying opportunities for its community facilities to play an enhanced role in addressing local needs.  Specifically, the board want to understand the potential for increasing the use of the following council-owned spaces:

·        Glen Innes Community Hall (a council managed venue for hire).

·        Panmure Community Hall (a council managed venue for hire).

·        The space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices (office spaces currently leased by Police whose volunteers only use a small portion of the space available).

·        Riverside Community Centre (community centre managed by Maungarei Community Christian Trust).

·        Dunkirk Activity Centre (community centre managed by Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre Trust).

12.     As part of understanding local community needs, the board were also keen to understand the impact of an absence of a council owned community facility in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area.

13.     In order to identify clearly what the needs of the community are, and the opportunities for the board to respond to them through the five identified community spaces and other means available to them, the board requested that the TCNA be undertaken (Attachment A).

14.     A three stage process was undertaken in the development of the TCNA.  The first stage involved

a)      gathering information from a range of existing data sources, including previous needs assessments and relevant published reports

b)      a face to face resident survey

c)      one on one interviews with community stakeholders

d)      demographic analysis. 

15.     The second stage involved community workshops, where the high level findings gathered at the first stage of the process were presented to key community stakeholders in two workshops.  Attendees were asked to provide feedback on the findings, point out any additional community issues, and suggest solutions that the board could deliver or support in some way.

16.     The third and final stage involved a workshop with council staff to present the high level findings gathered in the previous stages, and discuss opportunities for delivering on the solutions suggested by community stakeholders.  Existing and other solutions to the identified need were also considered.

Key findings of the TCNA are summarised as follows:

Youth and young people

17.     The need for young people to be engaged in a variety of activities, to be involved in decisions that affect them, and to have spaces in which to gather safely, was a strong theme.  This included the need for free/low cost and inviting activities that would positively engage young people.

Safety and perceptions of safety

18.     Safety in town centres and open spaces was another strong theme.  Related to this is the need for improved cleanliness of these public spaces, in particular rubbish and graffiti, which often creates an unwelcoming atmosphere and a perception the area is unsafe.

Employment and skill development opportunities

19.     Employment was another area identified, in particular youth employment, but also employment opportunities that provide a family with a liveable wage, and increased local employment options.  Connected with this was the imperative for skill development opportunities, including those related to gaining and retaining employment.  This included the transition from school to employment and for people returning to the workforce after an extended time away.

Housing

20.     Housing was seen as another key need in the community including improved security of housing tenure, healthy and warm homes and affordable housing.

Welcoming, well maintained facilities that are community hubs and accessible

21.     The other key area identified is for welcoming, well-maintained facilities that feel like the hub of the community, are easily accessible with a simple booking process.  People felt that the Glen Innes hall was especially run-down and not fit for purpose, and there was a need for greater promotion of facilities and the activities occurring in them.  People also felt that more meeting spaces were required.

22.     The absence of a community facility in the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area was identified as a point of concern for a number of respondents.

Recommended responses

23.     A number of existing board initiatives already respond to the needs identified in the TCNA, including GIMAC and the Housing Quality Improvement Project.

24.     This section of the report discusses additional responses to address the identified needs.  The responses are split into two categories: significant responses requiring funding or considerable amounts of staff time, or both, and responses that can more readily be accommodated within existing or planned projects and work programmes.

Significant new responses

Youth and young people

25.     Managers from Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Road Activity Centre have indicated that they can accommodate more structured activity for young people at their facilities.

26.     Riverside are particularly interested in hosting a circus training programme, which they can accommodate within their afterschool programme once a week. This programme would be available for young people currently attending the after school programme, as well as any other interested parties. This programme has previously been run at Riverside before, and was very popular. The cost of delivering this programme once a week at low or no cost to users is $2750 per term. This covers the cost of circus instructors, resources and afternoon tea.

27.     The main hall at Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre is currently available Tuesday to Friday between 3pm and 6pm. The centre manager is supportive of running Arts 4 Us sessions to be accommodated at these afterschool times.

28.     Arts 4 Us use qualified arts therapists to run art-based sessions with young people aged between 6 and 16 years.  These sessions are semi structured in that each one has a focus but can be modified to suit individual needs. The cost of delivering this programme twice a week at low or no cost to users is $1375 per term. 

Safety

29.     Council’s Community Development and Safety Team are developing a safety plan for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area with support from Community Policy and Planning. Any costs associated with developing this plan will be covered by the Community Development and Safety Team’s existing budget (2014/2015).

Employment and skill development

30.     The related needs of employment and skills development was also a common theme of the needs assessment.  The board already support a number of initiatives that focus on these issues such as Youth Connections and the CAB who provide CV writing services. Staff consider that an appropriate way for the board to support these initiatives further could be through the provision of appropriate space.  For example, the space above the local board office has significant capacity for community office space and/or training rooms. 

31.     The Panmure CAB have expressed an interest in moving from their current location in the Panmure Community Hall building, to the space above the local board office. If this relocation was to occur, this would result in those rooms in the Panmure Community Hall building also becoming vacant. This could provide a further opportunity to support employment and skill development providers through the provision of space.

32.     Staff recommend that work be undertaken to explore the best use of this space above the local board office, in context of the following:

a)      the Police’s existing tenancy and possibilities for co-locating with the Police

b)      the CAB’s interest in relocating and the opportunities to house organisations that also focus on skill development and/or employment in the existing CAB accommodation should that become available

c)      the possibility of other organisations who deliver employment and skills development services leasing this space

d)      the board’s desire to run an open and transparent process

e)      cost and timeframe implications.

Community Facilities

33.     Because the Glen Innes Community Hall is in such close proximity to GIMAC, it is recommended that management of the hall by GIMAC staff be investigated, with a view to implementing this approach in time for GIMAC’s opening (scheduled for April 2015).  Although this would not result in staff being based in the hall, because of the proximity of the facilities, access to and maintenance could be effectively managed from one location. This option also has other advantages such as the possibility of leveraging off GIMAC’s youth focus and activation of a space in an area with safety issues.

34.     The board have long term aspirations to incorporate the Glen Innes Community Hall as part of implementing the Ruapotaka Reserve Masterplan. The masterplan was approved in principle by the board at their business meeting in March 2013, subject to funding and stakeholder consultation, and funding is currently being sought through the Long Term Plan process. One outcome of the masterplan is the relocation of the Glen Innes CAB and Glen Innes Plunket into the Glen Innes Community Hall as part of overall improvements to the facility. This would have significant safety benefits for allowing the removal of existing buildings that currently block sightlines between Ruapotaka and Maybury Reserves and are regular targets for graffiti and vandalism. Staff note that the existing masterplan leaves sufficient space for a large hireable room to remain in the Glen Innes Community Hall facility.

35.     In response to the community facilities related issues raised in the TCNA, another key recommendation of the TCNA is the implementation of an appropriate management model for Panmure Hall that will activate the space and provide a welcoming presence. Staff have already progressed this work, and will be reporting to the board on the future management of Panmure Hall separately.

Lack of community facility in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area

36.     The lack of a community centre in the Sylvia Park/Waipuna end of Mt Wellington area is noted in the TCNA, and a key objective of the draft Community Facilities Network Plan is to investigate opportunities to partner with community or private parties in the development of community facilities.

37.     Maungarei Community Christian Trust own and run some community space at 1-5 Waipuna Road and the board have provided funds for some of the programmes run on the site.  The Trust are currently considering their options for redeveloping their site into a purpose built community centre. It would be advantageous from a precinct perspective to support the Community Christian Trust with its endeavours.

Other recommended responses

Marketing campaign for venues for hire and bookable spaces

38.     Community Development, Arts and Culture are currently working on a marketing campaign for venues for hire and bookable spaces, scheduled to commence later this year. This may go some way to address the need for greater promotion of community facilities.

Future planning for Ruapotaka and Maybury Reserves

39.     As discussed previously, the board adopted the Ruapotaka Reserve Masterplan in March 2013, and funding for its implementation is currently being sought through the Long Term Plan process. In its current form, the Ruapotaka Reserve Masterplan will improve the condition of the Glen Innes Community Hall, and enable the relocation of the Glen Innes CAB and Plunket. This will respond to concerns raised through the TCNA process about the condition of the hall, and also have a number of safety benefits associated with removing the existing CAB and Plunket building. 

40.     Staff are also in the early stages of developing a concept plan for Maybury Reserve, which is immediately adjacent to Ruapotaka. There is potential for this work to respond to some of the needs identified in the TCNA for youth activity such as basketball spaces and age appropriate playground equipment.

Safety concerns associated with the public toilets at Dunkirk Road Activity Centre examined as part of reserve concept planning work.

41.     The need to address safety concerns associated with the public toilets at Dunkirk Rd was identified in the needs assessment.  It is recommended that opportunities to address these concerns be examined as part of the Panmure Wharf Reserve and Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve concept plan.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

42.    Two local board workshops have been held on 15 July 2014 and 14 October 2014 to discuss the TCNA. The board’s views are reflected in this report.

Māori impact statement

43.     According to 2013 census figures, 15% (6,111) of residents in the Tāmaki subdivision identify as Maori. Given this number, it is likely that any responses to the needs of the community will have a positive impact on the area’s Maori population.

44.     Glen Innes based Ruapotaka Marae, and mana whenua Nga Iwi Katoa, Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Paoa and Ngati Whatua o Orakei, were participants in the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company’s Community Engagement Report. This is one of the documents analysed as part of the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment.

Implementation

45.     A number of the recommendations require staff time, but no additional local board budget.

46.     Staff recommend that the Riverside Community Centre be funded to accommodate one session of the circus training programme per week, to be accommodated within their after school programme. This comes at a cost of $2750 per term, or $5.5k for two terms. Therefore this report recommends that the board identify $5.5k within their 14/15 discretionary budget to deliver structured youth activities at Riverside Community Centre.

47.     Staff recommend that that the Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre be funded to accommodate two sessions of Arts 4 Us per week, which can be accommodated between 3pm and 6pm Tuesday to Friday. This comes at a cost of $1375 per term, or $2.75k for two terms. Therefore this report recommends that the board identify $2.75k within their 14/15 discretionary budget to deliver structured youth activities at Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

48.     The Draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2014 identifies $150k to implement the findings of the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment

23

     

Signatories

Authors

Tanya Mead - Planner

Kathy O'Connor - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

 

 

 


The Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment Report

October 2014


Photo: Jay Farnworth

 

 

 

 

 

This report was compiled by staff from Community Policy and Planning, Regional and Local Planning, Auckland Council


1.0      Executive Summary

1.1       Purpose and scope

The purpose of the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment is to identify the needs of communities in the Tāmaki Subdivision of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area so that the local board can respond to these using the tools available to them.  In particular, the board are interested in what role council owned community spaces can play in response to community needs, principally:

·    Glen Innes Community Hall

·    Panmure Community Hall

·    Space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices in Panmure

·    Riverside Community Centre

·    Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

Map 1: Tāmaki Subdivision shown in orange/dark shading


The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board are aware that some of these facilities are currently underutilised[1] and have identified “our community spaces work for us” as one of the six priorities in their local board area[2].  The board requested that a needs assessment be undertaken in the Tāmaki area that would outline the most pressing needs of the Tāmaki community, and recommend how these needs can best be addressed through council-owned facilities in the area.

As part of understanding local community needs, this work also seeks to understand the impact of the current lack of council owned community facilities in the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area, and the potential for Maungarei Community Christian Trust’s proposed Waipuna Rd development to address this.

1.2       Research methods and findings

The needs assessment gathered information from a variety of sources including previous research reports, demographic analysis, interviews with key stakeholders and a face-to-face residential survey.  Once the high level findings for these sources were identified, they were shared with key community stakeholders at two workshops. These workshops provided participants with an opportunity to provide their feedback on the key findings, and also identify steps the local board could take to address the needs identified. Finally, a workshop was held with council staff, to identify what responses are already occurring and the opportunities for new ones.

Key findings of the needs assessment included:

·        More attractive and affordable youth focussed activities, and the involvement of young people in all aspects of these (from idea generation through to planning and execution).  Respondents also believed there was a need for more activities geared at pre-schoolers and young people, such as free afterschool care and better play equipment in parks. Existing playgrounds were often viewed as unwelcoming and underutilised, with outdated, inappropriate and damaged equipment.

·        Safety and security was also a strong theme, with the need for safer open spaces and town centres identified as a key priority for the community. Related to this was the need for improved cleanliness and less litter and graffiti.

·        Issues around employment was a key finding, including the identification of local and youth employment as a priority for the area. Connected to this was employment opportunities that provided families with a liveable income.

·        Related to the employment theme, the provision of skill development opportunities was also identified as an important need. This includes training people how to get a job, from how to find out about vacancies, the application process including CV writing, interview skills as well as retaining employment. Transition from school to employment, and for people returning to the workforce after extended time away, was also identified as a need. 

·        Housing, including improved security of tenure, healthy homes and affordability, also featured in the needs assessment.  There was a concern that Housing New Zealand tenants were being pushed out of the area and house prices were unaffordable for many.

·        The other key need that is evident in the community is for welcoming, well-maintained facilities that feel like the hub of a community and are easily accessible.  People felt that the Glen Innes hall was especially run-down, and that there was a need for more meeting spaces in the area.  Although the general impression from the needs assessment was that the need for new facilities was not pressing, and that the local board should make the most of what facilities they already have, the absence of a community centre in the Mt Wellington/ Sylvia Park area was of concern to some respondents who noted the lack of a sense of community and community hub.

1.3       Recommended responses

The local board are already progressing a number of initiatives that respond to the needs identified, a key one being the development of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth, which will be completed in early 2015, and the Housing Quality Improvement Project (HQIP).

This report also recommends the investigation of a number of new responses to the identified community need, including:

·        the delivery of more youth oriented activities at the board’s Tāmaki facilities

·        incorporating the Glen Innes Community Hall under the management of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth

·        opportunities for supporting other organisations (through the provision of space) to carry out training and employment related services: specifically the space above the local board office

·        the development of a safety plan for the Tāmaki area

·        the implementation of an appropriate management model for Panmure Hall that will activate the space and provide a welcoming presence

·        supporting Maungarei Community Christian Trust’s proposal to develop their Waipuna Rd site as a community facility.


 

2.0        Research methods

2.1       Overall approach

A three stage process was undertaken in the development of this needs assessment report:

·        The first stage was gathering information from a range of existing data sources, including previous needs assessments and relevant published reports, a face to face resident survey, one on one interviews with community stakeholders, and demographic analysis.

·        The second stage involved community workshops, whereby the high level findings gathered at the first stage of the process were presented to key community stakeholders in two workshops. Attendees were asked to provide feedback on the findings, point out any additional community issues, and suggest solutions that the local board could deliver or support in some way.

·        The third and final stage involved a workshop with council staff to present the high level findings gathered in the previous stages, and discuss opportunities for delivering on the solutions suggested by community stakeholders. Existing and other solutions to the identified need were also considered. 

2.2       Stage one

The first stage involved gathering information from a variety of sources and using a range of research methods. This included:

·    A review of previous reports including:

-    Feedback on the draft 2014 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki  Local Board Plan (2014).

-    Customer Satisfaction Survey of Council Community Halls and Centres (Colmar Brunton) (2013/2014).

-      Community Engagement Feedback (Tāmaki Redevelopment Co, 2013).

-      Youth Engagement Report (Tāmaki Redevelopment Co, 2013).

-    Tāmaki Community Action Research (CAR) Random Household Survey and Asset Mapping 2012.

-      Riverside Community Research (2008).

-      Sylvia Park Precinct Plan focus groups (2006).

 

·    Resident survey

-      Engaged Ka Mau Te Wero to develop a questionnaire regarding sense of community, local community needs and facility awareness and use.  Ka Mau Te Wero trained Auckland University of Technology students to undertake the survey and conduct face-to-face survey of Tāmaki residents and developed a report of their findings. One hundred and four residents participated in the survey.


 

·    Interviews (in person, email and/or phone) with key stakeholders

-      Community Policy and Planning staff, using a questionnaire based on the one developed for the resident survey discussed above, carried out one-on-one interviews with key community stakeholders either in person, over the phone, or via email. Nineteen stakeholders from the following organisations participated in the survey: Glen Innes Library, Riverside Community Centre , Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre, Maungarei Community Christian Trust, Island Child Charitable Trust, Plunket (Sylvia Park, Panmure, Glen Innes and Ellerslie), Point England School, CAB Sylvia Park & Panmure, CAB Glen Innes, Tāmaki Community Trust, St Mary’s Parish, Te Waipuna Puawai, Tāmaki Recreation Centre, St Pius X Catholic School, East Auckland House and Budget Service, Tāmaki Community Church, Youthtown, Carey College, Pt England Kindergarten and Ruapotaka School.

 

·    Demographic analysis including:

-      Review of New Zealand Census 2013 to develop a demographic model of the current Tāmaki population.

-      Analysis of predicted population growth using information from the Auckland Council Auckland Regional Transport Model Scenario I 8b[3].

-      Analysis of Tāmaki Redevelopment Company’s (TRC) proposed housing mix over the next twenty years.

 

2.3       Stage two

 

The second stage involved two workshops with community stakeholders facilitated by consultant Rachel Butler, with Community Policy and Planning staff in attendance, the workshops were carried out at Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre and involved:

 

·    A presentation of initial high level findings gathered from stage one of the needs assessment.

·    Gathering feedback on the findings presented, including the identification of any further community needs.

·    Identifying potential solutions for the local board to explore.

 

2.4       Stage three

 

The third stage of the needs assessment involved Community Policy and Planning facilitating a workshop with staff throughout council to understand existing responses, explore the feasibility of solutions suggested by community stakeholders, and identify other possible solutions for the local board’s consideration. This stage informed the recommended responses, outlined in section 6 of this report.


3.0      Background

3.1         Strategic context

One of the functions of local boards is to build strong local communities, and one way they can do this is through governance and/or funding of community facilities and spaces.

”Our community spaces work for us” is one of the priorities in the local board’s 2011 local board plan.  More specifically, this plan states that the local board will:

(W)ork to address the identified need for more community spaces in the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area and those of our existing community spaces in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki that have not been maintained adequately and appropriately. In addition, we support better connections between community spaces, particularly in Glen Innes (page 27).

The Community Facilities Network Plan

The Community Facilities Network Plan (the network plan) is a regional project being led by Community Policy and Planning.  The network plan looks at the Auckland Region as a whole, and will be used to guide council’s provision of new community facilities and major upgrades in the future.  Key drivers of the network plan are to

·        Optimise the use and efficiency of existing facilities.

·        Address gaps and needs for community facilities now and into the future.

·        Meet current and future demand arising from population growth and changing user expectations.

Leveraging and supporting partnerships is one of the objectives the network plan identifies for community facilities.

Spatial Transformation Projects

Tāmaki is listed as one of the potential spatial transformational projects in the Auckland region.  These have been identified as areas within Auckland where focused attention over an extended period will lead to the greatest gains in terms of improving the economy and contributing more widely to New Zealand’s overall well-being.

3.2         Key drivers

The Tāmaki subdivision contains some of Auckland’s most deprived neighbourhoods, and the local board wants to understand the opportunities for their community facilities to play a role in addressing local needs. Specifically, the local board want to understand the potential for increasing the use of the following council-owned spaces:

·        Glen Innes Community Hall

·        Panmure Community Hall

·        Space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices in Panmure

·        Riverside Community Centre

·        Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.


In order to identify clearly what the needs of the community are, and the opportunities for the board to respond to them through the five identified community spaces and other means available to them, the local board requested that the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment be undertaken.

 

3.3         About the community spaces

The Glen Innes Community Hall and Panmure Community Hall currently operate as venues for hire. As such, these facilities are accessed through a remote booking system run by council’s hall booking team. Venues for hire have no on-site staff, and users are required to complete an application form, pay a bond if applicable and pay a hireage fee before access is granted via the access card that’s provided with the invoice. Access to the venue is granted only for the time booked and paid for. Both halls are used by a range of community organisations.

Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre operate as community centres with on-site managers and a mixture of programmed activity and spaces for hire. Riverside is run by Maungarei Community Christian Trust who employ an on-site centre manager. Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre is run by an incorporated society created specifically for the purposes of running the centre, and also employs an on-site centre manager. Managers of both spaces have access to support from council’s community facilities team that focus on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area.  Both organisations receive funding from the Local Board via a funding agreement.

There is a network of rooms above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices in Panmure that the board also have jurisdiction over.  The space, some of which is currently being used by police volunteers, includes an office area, a small office, a small kitchen area suitable as a lunch room, an internal meeting room, and two 2 storage areas – one very small and the other large. This area is accessible directly from Pilkington Rd and is securely isolated from other occupants in the building such as the local board and library.  The two spaces are currently being used as storage areas and have bare concrete floors and no windows or air handling units.

Above the library there is a training room set up with networked PCs to train library staff, this is accessible through the library staff work room, with a fire egress into the main library. The second area adjacent to this room is currently occupied by the local Plunket as an office with access through the library staff workroom. The remainder of the upstairs area is the library staff lunchroom and amenities which the Plunket and training staff use.  

More information on these facilities can be found in Appendix 2.

3.4         Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park

There are no council owned community facilities in the Sylvia Park and Waipuna end of Mt Wellington, with the closest being Riverside, approximately 3km away and Dunkirk and Oranga, which are approximately 4.5km away.

Maungarei Community Christian Trust own and run some community space on 1-5 Waipuna Road and the local board have provided funds for some of the programmes run on the site.  Programmes run in this space include youth clubs, English language school classes, language nests, playgroups and coffee mornings.  The Trust are currently considering their options for redeveloping their site to include additional purpose built community facilities.


4.0      Demographics and Growth

4.1         Demand and provision analysis

Understanding the demographic profile of a community helps to paint a picture that not only informs comprehension of the current needs of that community but also aids analysis of how to best respond to and address these needs.

This section looks at the profile of residents living in the Tāmaki subdivision, including age, gender, ethnicity and socio-economic indicators.  Anticipated growth is also considered.

4.1.1         Tāmaki population and trends

i. Profile of Tāmaki residents

The following information is mainly sourced from the New Zealand 2013 Census with growth information from the Auckland Regional Transport Model Scenario I 8b. Census Area Units (CAUs) included in the research are:

 

 

 

Mt Wellington Domain  

Mt Wellington West

Ferndale

Mt Wellington North

Hamlin

 

 

 

Glen Innes East

Glen Innes West

Pt England

Tāmaki

Panmure Basin

 

Mt Wellington South

 

Tāmaki

The CAUs of Mt Wellington Domain and Mt Wellington South include some meshblocks that fall out of the study area.

There are approximately 42,000 people living in the Tāmaki area, about three percent of the Auckland region’s population.

Age

Based on the Census 2013 statistics, the Tāmaki population is generally younger, with a median age in 2013 of thirty one years old, compared with just over 35 years in Auckland.  Whilst thirty six percent of people across the Auckland region are under 25 years old, this percentage is much higher in particular pockets with approximately forty five percent of people living in Glen Innes East, Glen Innes West, Pt England and Tāmaki under the age of twenty five.

The percentage of people aged over fifty years is increasing, as is the trend in the Auckland region, though at a lesser rate, with twenty five percent of Tāmaki residents over the age of fifty, whilst twenty nine percent of Aucklanders were over fifty years old at the Census 2013.

Graph 1: Age groups in Tāmaki subdivision

Gender

The population of Tāmaki are gender balanced, with 51% females and 49% males, which mirrors the Auckland region.

Ethnicity

Tāmaki is a multi-cultural area as illustrated in Graph 2. There is a greater percentage of Pacific and Maori people living in Tāmaki when compared to the Auckland region as a whole, with 15% Maori, compared with 11% for the region and 28% Pacific Peoples, compared with 15% for the region.  Since 2001, the number of people of Asian descent has increased in Tāmaki, as is the trend across the region, whilst the number of European, Pacific Peoples and Maori has decreased slightly.

Graph 2: Ethnic make up of Tāmaki subdivision

Graph 3: Ethnicity in Tāmaki 2001-2013

Socio-economic deprivation

There are several factors to consider when looking at the socio-economic needs of a community.  These include household income, unemployment rates, home ownership and decile ratings.  Overall, the area faces greater levels of deprivation than the Auckland region, with a lower median household income, higher levels of unemployment and lower levels of home ownership.  However, the area is quite varied with pockets of greater deprivation and other areas less so.  One thing that makes Glen Innes in particular interesting is it that is a pocket of comparative poverty next to quite significant affluence in the neighbouring St Heliers.

-     Household income

The median household income is $62,900, approximately thirteen thousand less than the Auckland region median of $76,500.  Fifteen percent of households in Tāmaki have a total household income of less than $20,000, whilst just over forty percent of households have a total income of $50,000 and under.

When analysed by census area unit however, some areas have significantly lower household incomes than the regional average: for example, thirty five percent of households in the Pt England area unit have a household income of $20,000 or less whilst nearly half in Pt England have a total household income $30,000 or less, compared to eighteen percent of households across the region.

-     Unemployment

The rate of unemployment in Tāmaki is higher than the Auckland region, at seven percent versus five percent.   Breaking down the study area into smaller census area units, reveals that the rate of unemployment is higher in certain areas, in particular, in Glen Innes West (9%), Glen Innes (9%), Pt England (10%) and Tāmaki (11%).

-     Home ownership

Home ownership in Tāmaki is low with only thirty five percent of houses owned or partly owned, compared to forty six percent region wide.  Breaking this down into census area units, it is clear that this rate is lower in certain areas, in particular Pt England (18%), Glen Innes East (27%) and Tāmaki (28%).


 

-     Deprivation

Many people living in the Tāmaki area are facing high levels of deprivation, with seven of the nine census area units having a decile rating of 8-10, meaning they are considered to be in the most deprived thirty percent of New Zealand.

ii              Growth and trends

In order to understand if the community needs of today will still be relevant in the future, it is useful to consider the impact growth and other populations changes will have on residents in Tāmaki.

Tāmaki is growing at a faster rate than most of the Auckland region. In the nearly 30 years between 2013 and 2041, the population is expected to double from 42,000 people to over 85,000. It is currently unclear as to what the demographic make-up of this community will look like and how it may change.  However, trends in the Auckland region tell us that Auckland’s population is continuing to diversify, with growth in the Asian demographic particularly strong, followed by growth in the Pacific population.  The population is also aging with a rise in the average age evident from the 2013 census with both a decrease in the proportion of children and an increase in the proportion of older people, though this varies among the various population groups.  Home ownership is continuing to decline across the region and flat or apartment dwelling occupation is increasing. 

The Tāmaki Redevelopment Company (TRC), a redevelopment agency jointly owned by the Government and Auckland Council, are working on a 20 year regeneration programme in the areas of Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure. With an objective of the development of 11,000 houses (with a net growth of approximately 6,000 houses) by the end of the regeneration programme, the TRC are proposing a shift in the housing mix with social housing decreasing by half.  This shift will bring along with it some changes in the demographic make up and it would seem reasonable to infer that the population of Tāmaki will diversify in terms of socio-economic status, though a percentage of the population will always face a greater level of deprivation due to retention Housing New Zealand provision.

Graph 4: Existing and predicted population in Tāmaki

 


5.0      Key Findings

The needs of the Tāmaki community have been identified through a combination of primary and secondary research, including a review of relevant research reports and studies as well as interviews and workshops with key stakeholders and face-to-face interviews with residents.

Youth and young people

Not surprisingly, given the high percentage of young people in Tāmaki, one of the top themes identified in the needs assessment was based around youth and young people, including free/low cost activities, such as afterschool care, recreational opportunities and cultural events, Early Childhood Education (ECE) and inviting spaces for youth to gather.  It is evident that youth want to be involved with their own wellbeing, including being part of planning and running of youth-targeted activities.   The need for more sport-related activities for youth was also identified, such as outdoor basketball hoops and equipment in parks aimed at youth such as exercise equipment.  Whilst people noted that there were numerous playgrounds in Tāmaki, they were generally perceived to be poor quality and not geared at a wide range of age groups.

 

Some respondents also observed that youth and young people would benefit from mentoring programmes including positive male and Maori and PI role models.

Safety and perceptions of safety

Concerns around safety and the perception of being unsafe emerged as another key theme of the needs assessment.  This was largely around the town centres and in parks/open spaces, and included the issue of litter, graffiti and poor lighting as contributing factors in making a space feel unsafe and unwelcoming.  People noted that the location of playgrounds was sometimes away from opportunities for passive surveillance.  People wanted their open spaces to be beautified and feel inviting.

Employment and skill development opportunities

Given that Tāmaki has pockets of high deprivation, including high unemployment rates, it is not surprising that employment and skill development was highlighted as one of the major needs facing the people living there.  In particular, opportunities for local employment, including apprenticeships, were considered to be important and a means to increase household income.

Related to this was the need for increased provision of skill development, in particular based around getting people into employment from ascertaining what different jobs were available, where to find jobs and to CV preparation and interview skills through to maintaining employment and returning to work after an extended time off.  Budgeting services and general financial education was identified as necessary in a community where people often faced high levels of debt.  Learners driving courses and adult literacy and numeracy where also identified as skill development that would be beneficial.  It was noted that attendance at these courses would increase if they were low cost or free.

Housing

Overall, there are low levels of home ownership in Tāmaki and housing affordability was raised as a big issue in the area.  People were concerned that social housing was being pushed out with security of tenure identified as a key issue facing the community.  Housing affordability was also noted as an issue with people concerned at the rising levels of house prices, in particular in Mt Wellington and Pt England. 

 

Health issues resulting from housing was also discussed with one study noting overcrowding as an issue with evidence of people living in garages and tents and larger families living in three-bedroom houses.  There was also concern for housing quality and the need for warm, well-insulated healthy housing with one person noting that

 

“the housing issue affects our families a lot.  Constantly having children not coming because they’re sick again.  If one member of the family is sick, then they’ll all be down with it within minutes.”[4]

Welcoming, well maintained facilities that are community hubs and accessible

Overall, it appears that, with the exception of the Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park area, community facility needs were more about making the most of what already exists, rather than the development of new facilities.

 

People generally believed that the halls needed be personalised with a welcoming face.  For some people in Glen Innes, the library, CAB and Ruapotaka Marae acted more as community hubs than the community hall due to their welcoming and inviting nature.

 

The current booking process with regards to halls, of calling up council, rather than talking to someone on site, was noted as a barrier by some people.  Similarly, viewing the various spaces and finding out information about them online was seen as off putting, with someone noting

 

having to ring and talk to some [one] on the other end of the phone, and maybe not get your swipe card and those issues around the booking”[5].

 

Cost and awareness were also raised as issues.  People believed that certain programmes/activities offered within community spaces should be low cost/free, or that the cost is appropriate for the community that is using it.  Further, a lack of awareness of facilities, and the programmes they offered, was also noted. There is a perception that certain facilities are only for certain parts of our society, such as children, and there is a lack of information on how to access these facilities.  People believed that improved marketing and promotion of facilities was needed.

 

Maintenance and upgrading was also perceived to be a major issue with  facilities, in particular the Glen Innes and Panmure halls, with someone commenting that the

 

GI Community Hall is cold, roof leaks, very poor acoustics and very run down. Not fit for purpose. “[6]

People noted the absence of a community facility in Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park with some commenting that the lack of one affects liveability and contributes to a lack of community identity. The Maungarei Community Christian Trust are currently considering their options for redeveloping their Waipuna Rd site to include a purpose built community centre, which has the potential to address this issue.

The study did not uncover a strong need for more office space in the area, although the need for more, or improved, meeting space was evident.


5.1       Summary

Issues relating to youth and young people was perceived as the fundamental need of Tāmaki.  This included the need for free/low cost and inviting activities, be they programmes, recreation facilities or sports clubs.  Youth wanted to be part of their own development, from idea generation through to the planning and running of events.  Respondents also believed there was a need for more activities geared at pre-schoolers and young people, such as free afterschool care and better play equipment in parks.  Existing playgrounds were often viewed as unwelcoming and underutilized, often with outdated, inappropriate and damaged equipment.

Safety and perceptions of safety was a key theme identified by the study including feeling safe in open spaces and in town centres.  Related to this is the need for improved cleanliness of town centres and open spaces, in particular free of litter and graffiti, which often creates an unwelcoming atmosphere and perceptions of unsafety.  

Employment was another key need identified, in particular youth employment, but also employment opportunities that provide a family with a liveable wage, and increased local employment options.

Connected to this was the recognised need to provide skill development opportunities for the community, in particular with regards to gaining and retaining employment. This included the transition from school to employment and for people returning to the workforce after extended time away. 

Housing was seen as another key need in the community including improved security of housing tenure, healthy and warm homes and affordable housing. 

The other key need that is evident in the community is for welcoming, well-maintained facilities that feel like the hub of a community, are easily accessible with a straight forward booking process.  People felt that the Glen Innes hall was especially run-down and not fit for purpose.  Related to this, people felt that there was a need for more meeting spaces in the area, though the study did not uncover a particular need for more office space.


6.0      Next steps: local board responses to community need in the Tāmaki Subdivision

6.1.      Youth activities, spaces and involvement

The need for young people to be engaged in a variety of activities, to be involved in decisions that effect them, and to have spaces in which to gather safely, was a consistently strong theme across the research sources.

The local board are already responding to this need through a number of initiatives, including the development of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth (which is scheduled to open in early 2015), the establishment of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Panel, and through partnerships and service delivery contracts with the YMCA in the Panmure area.

Recommended responses

It is recommended that the following are also investigated as new responses to the identified need for more youth activities, spaces and involvement:

·        the delivery of more youth oriented activities at Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre

·        increasing the activation of Panmure Hall, with a particular focus on youth activity

·        incorporating the Glen Innes Community Hall under the management of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth

·        incorporating space for youth, such as basketball courts and high quality play equipment, in future open space planning including Ruapotaka Reserve and Maybury Reserve.

6.2       Safety and perceptions of safety

Safety was also a strong theme in the needs assessment, particularly the desire for safer public spaces. Connected to this was a desire for these spaces to be inviting and well maintained, free of graffiti and litter, with adequate lighting. 

The local board currently support the Tāmaki Policing and Safety Forum, and regularly support graffiti prevention initiatives through the discretionary funds available to them. The local board have also identified a number of safety initiatives in their draft 2014 Local Board Plan, including strengthening the capacity of volunteer led community safety groups and working with schools and police to scope creating junior neighbourhood supports. It is also worth noting that Council’s Graffiti Vandalism Prevention team are planning to roll out their localised youth development programme in Glen Innes in late 2014/early 2015.


Recommended responses

It is recommended that the following are also investigated as new responses to the identified need for increased levels of safety and perceptions of safety:

·        opportunities for supporting other organisations (through funding or the provision of space) to carry it out safety related services

·        increasing the activation of Panmure Hall, which is located in one of the sites that was identified as feeling unsafe by some respondents 

·        opportunities to address safety concerns relating to the public toilets in Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre through the Panmure Wharf Reserve and Mt Wellington War Memorial Reserve Concept Plan

·        supporting clean up days in public spaces

·        the application of CPTED principals to the Ruapotaka Reserve and Maybury Reserve planning projects

·        the development of a safety plan for the local board area.

6.3       Employment and skills development opportunities

Employment related issues, including a lack of local employment opportunities and youth unemployment, were also identified as needs to be addressed in the Tāmaki subdivision area, particularly by key stakeholders. Related to this was skills development (including budgeting and literacy skills) and training associated with the job application process (such as cv writing and preparing for job interviews).

The local board is becoming increasingly active in this area. Beyond “business as usual” practices such as supporting the Citizens Advice Bureau and working closely with Business Improvement Districts, the local board have identified a number of other employment related initiatives such as supporting the continuation of the Youth Connections[7] programme and identifying the benefits for business to be located in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki.

Recommended new responses

It is recommended that the following are also investigated as new responses to the identified need for more employment and skills development:

·        opportunities for supporting other organisations (through funding or the provision of space) to carry out employment and skills development related services. The space above the local board offices in Panmure, for example, may be able to provide space for organisations providing these services.

6.4       Welcoming, well maintained community facilities that are community hubs

Feedback on community facilities tended to focus on improving the existing stock, or promoting their programmes, rather than creating more centres. The exception to this was in the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area, where the lack of a community centre was noted.

Findings that related specifically to existing community facilities identified a desire for them to be welcoming, well maintained, and easily accessible (i.e. affordable, easy to get to and/or easy to book). Greater awareness of facilities, and what programmes and activities they offer, was also identified as areas for improvement. Glen Innes Community Hall and Panmure Hall were identified specifically by some respondents as facilities that required a higher level of maintenance, and people working in the centre to provide a welcoming face. One respondent maintained the Glen Innes Community Hall had a leaking roof.

Existing local board responses to the need for welcoming well maintained community facilities in the Tāmaki subdivision include supporting the trusts and staff that run the Riverside Community Centre and the Dunkirk Road Activity Centre. This is done in a number of ways including the provision of funding and support from staff in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Community Facilities team. In relation to the promotion of existing programmes, the board provided a grant to Dunkirk Road Activity Centre to establish a website and it is expected that a marketing campaign scheduled for later this year will improve awareness of venues for hire such as Panmure Hall and Glen Innes Community Hall.

Recommended new responses

It is recommended that the following are also investigated as new responses to the identified need for welcoming, well maintained community facilities:

·        the implementation of an appropriate management model for Panmure Hall that will activate the space and provide a welcoming presence

·        incorporating the Glen Innes Community Hall under the management of the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth

·        ensuring the Glen Innes Community Hall is watertight and receiving the required levels of maintenance and service

·        opportunities to better promote existing facilities and programmes occurring within them

·        opportunities for the development of a community centre in Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington, including options for supporting Maungarei Community Christian Trust’s proposal to develop their Waipuna Rd site.


3.0      References

 

·        Community Engagement Feedback (Tāmaki Redevelopment Co, 2013)

·        Community Needs Assessment Eastern Bays and Tāmaki Wards: Stage 2 Report (Prepared for Auckland City Council by CityScope Consultants Ltd, 2005)

·        Local Board Plan Engagement Reports 2014

·        Riverside Community Research 2008, Maungarei Community Christian Trust

·        Sylvia Park Precinct Plan focus groups (2006)

·        Tāmaki Community Action Research (CAR) Random Household Survey and Asset Mapping 2012

·        Tāmaki Needs Assessment: summary of workshop outputs July 2014 prepared by Rachael Butler

·        Tāmaki Sub-division Community Needs Assessment 2014 (Kau Mau Te Wero, Rising to the Challenge)

·        Youth Engagement Report (Tāmaki Redevelopment Co, 2013)


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDICES


APPENDIX 1

Key findings of reports and studies

 

The needs of the Tāmaki community have been identified through a combination of primary and secondary research, including a review of relevant research reports and studies as well as interviews and workshops with key stakeholders and face-to-face interviews with residents.  Note that many of the reports use different study areas to this needs assessment, in that they generally focus on a smaller area, such as Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure.

Studies carried out for the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment

 

2014: Tāmaki Sub-Division Community Needs Assessment (Ka Mau Te Wero, Rising to the Challenge)

This report summarises the results of 104 face-to-face surveys undertaken by Ka Mau Te Wero who engaged by Auckland Council as part of the Tāmaki Needs Assessment study.

The top priorities/ needs identified by the respondents were:

·        safety and security: including feeling safe and improved lighting in reserves

·        employment: including getting work and more jobs

·        better housing

·        increased household incomes.

 

The top suggestions for how these needs could be addressed were:

·        increased local employment opportunities

·        more information about community events and more community events

·        increased safety and security, including lighting

·        increased community facilities or space[8]

·        the report also identified the following in relation to community facilities:

·        there is a perception that certain facilities are only for certain parts of our society, such as children

·        barriers to accessing facilities include issues over parking, childcare and information on how to book them

·        there is a lack of information on who and how to access these facilities

·        respondents were generally unaware that Riverside Community Hall and Dunkirk Road community centre were council facilities

·        the majority of respondents have access to any spare time activities they need

·        the most common reason for facilities not being used was one of location, including that they were “too far” and “not in my neighbourhood”

·        Sylvia Park Mall was noted as the top place people liked to meet, followed by Glen Innes and Panmure libraries and then church.


Respondents were asked about their sense of community, or the extent to which they felt connected to their community.  The study found:

·        the top reason people gave for liking living in the area was that friends and family were there, the convenience, the friendly environment

 

·        top improvements to the area were safety and security, increased local employment opportunities, better housing and more activities for different age groups.

 

·        Respondents of the survey tended to not use the halls as they believed that there was nothing happening there and there were no welcoming staff

2014: Interviews with key stakeholders in the Tāmaki Community

As part of the research for this study, council officers interviewed key stakeholders in person, over the phone and via email.  These key stakeholders believed that the major needs/priorities of the community were:

·        housing

·        activities for youth

·        activities for young people, including pre-schoolers, such as improved and inviting playgrounds that have equipment geared at a wide range of age groups

·        employment including more local jobs, youth unemployment, skills to get into/back into the workforce

·        social support/counselling services for  issues including addictions, violence and mental health

·        improved community facilities including upgrading existing facilities, providing a welcoming face in facilities, improving accessibility and more meeting spaces

·        safety and security including dealing with litter and graffiti

·        health

·        a hub/community centre for Mt Wellington

·        free and more ECE opportunities.

The features they considered special about the Tāmaki community were:

·        the strong sense of community and pride

·        the people, including the diversity, friendliness and spirit of the residents

·        its central location

·        its natural environment including the beaches.

They felt the area could be improved by:

·        increased safety including  more inviting open spaces and better lighting

·        people understanding where to go to find information/get help without cost

·        increased (free/low cost) programming/training such as parenting programmes, activities for young people who are not parents

·        dealing with litter

·        more sport-related activities for youth such as outdoor basketball hoops, equipment in parks aimed at youth such as exercise equipment

·        upgrading community facilities especially Glen Innes Hall

·        providing mentoring programmes including positive male and Maori and PI role models

·        improved playgrounds that offer a range of play equipment for different age groups

·        involve youth when designing activities etc for them.

2014: Tāmaki Needs Assessment: Summary of workshop outputs

This report is a summary of two workshops held with key stakeholders in the Tāmaki community in June 2014.  The purpose of the workshops was to present the findings of the research to date, ascertain if there was anything to add/change and discuss potential next steps/solutions to the identified needs.

The stakeholders discussed the ‘territorial’ nature of residents, who preferred to use services and spaces within their close neighbourhoods, the poor standard of housing in some areas and the need for youth-focused activities and spaces.  

Overall it was felt that the top priorities/needs of the community was accurately captured, with some additional needs noted:

-     the impact of new roading in Panmure via the Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI)

 

-     the importance of medical and other facilities (e.g. playgrounds) being conveniently located due to a lack of transport for many residents

 

-     high debt levels within the  community and the need for financial education.

The stakeholders discussed possible solutions that the local board could do to address the various needs.

Potential solutions to the issue of safety/security included:

-     monitoring local parks and reserves (e.g. via CCTV cameras)

-     continuing to support neighbourhood groups

-     facilitating the configuration of open spaces to address safety issues (e.g. via land swaps).

Potential solutions to the issue of employment/education & training included:

-     increased participation of the local board in funding local organisations to deliver training and career development programmes

-     facilitate partnerships to develop pre-employment skills .

Potential solutions to the issue of community activities/spaces for youth included:

-     consultation with youth regarding needs

-     support for activities/opportunities for youth to participate in

-     address lack of play equipment in parks geared at youth, such as exercise equipment.

Potential solutions to the issue of social help included:

-     funding for local support groups

-     support for research into how local community can be encouraged to access help.

Potential solutions to the issue of housing included:

-     support creation of warm and dry homes (e.g. via insulation programmes).

Potential solutions to other needs included:

-     facilitate the development of community networks (e.g. directory of local organisations).

Key stakeholders noted that people tended to stay within their own smaller communities in terms of facilities so residents of Riverside tended to use the Riverside Community Centre, whilst residents of Panmure were more likely to use Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre or Panmure hall.

The main issues raised by these key stakeholders included the cost of hiring halls, the poor condition of some facilities and the booking system, including the inability to view facilities without a booking and a lack of awareness of the facilities.   The potential of community facilities to address the needs of the community was considered and the following possible solutions identified:

-     Improved/more accessible booking processes (face-to-face and linkage with other council facilities in the area)

 

-     Personalised community facilities (part time staff on site in facilities and/or volunteers to assist with manning of facilities)

 

-     Tiered pricing structure (subsidised charges for community groups based on need/ability to pay, provision of free community spaces for education/training opportunities, koha payment for certain activities and set fees for room hire)

 

-     Maintenance issues addressed (development of a maintenance plan, involvement of youth)

 

-     Improved marketing and promotion of facilities (Local Board functions held in community facilities, LB to positively promote facilities via their own networks, improved signage)

 

-     Funding (operational funding provided for facilities, funding to enable local organisations to deliver identified activities, funding for maintenance)

 

-     Amended configuration of facilities (purpose built facility in Mt Wellington, allocation of space above local board offices in Panmure to CAB, delivery of activities spread across facilities).

 

Previous reports and studies

2014: Feedback on the draft 2014 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki  Local Board Plan

In the development of their 2014 Local Board Plan, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board undertook engagement with their community, including key stakeholders, to find out what was important to them.  Note, the study area for the engagement is the entire local board area, though some are particular to Tāmaki.  Findings of this engagement included:

·        youth need something to do, including improved playgrounds and after school programmes

·        community facilities need to be accessible for all

·        awareness of facilities needs to be improved

·        there is a need for more community events

·        safety is an issue, including in parks

·        housing affordability is an issue

·        there is a need to improve relationships and collaboration between various organisations

·        there is a need to increase capacity at some clubs and facilities

·        support for the upgrading and improved maintenance of existing facilities

·        improve usage of community facilities including during weekends; support multi-use of facilities there is a need for more training to get youth into employment.

·        new facilities were not needed in the area, rather, existing facilities needed to be improved and maintained and utilisation increased.

·        existing spaces could be used for youth and young people. Accessibility, in terms of cost and awareness, was also raised as an issue.


2013: Haongia Te Rangatahi: Youth Engagement Report for the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company

This report was commissioned by the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company to find out, among other things, the interests and needs of youth (people under 25 years) in Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure.  Findings included that youth:

·        want the power to do things themselves

·        want more recreation and cultural arts things to do in the community

·        would like sports clubs to focus on the area, providing opportunities to increase health and fitness

·        are concerned with safety, in particular in parks and reserves

·        would like career advice and help, including learning about what they could be and how they can get there

·        would like to understand their genealogy, increasing cultural awareness and pride

·        would like more community events

·        want to help the environment including recycling and community clean up days.

2013: Tāmaki Regeneration: Community Engagement Feedback

In 2013 the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company undertook extensive engagement, largely with the communities of Glen Innes, Pt England and Panmure, to find out the key needs and aspirations and priorities of the community.  The purpose of this research was to inform future regeneration work.  This engagement found that:

·        people loved the community spirit, the natural environment, and the proximity to beaches and the CBD

·        people wanted improved town centre facilities, nicer and cleaner open spaces, and more programmes and facilities for youth activity

·        top priorities included: looking after children, less crime, healthier families, giving youth a voice, increased employment, more skills training, early childhood education , warm, healthy houses, cleaner waterways,  better housing options, more affordable homes, better public transport routes into neighbourhoods and better town centres with more stuff to do

·        Ruapotaka Marae is seen as a hub of the community.

2012: Tāmaki Community Action Research Project: Random Household Survey

In 2012 Ka Mau Te Wero undertook a needs assessment in the Tāmaki area, in which they held one-on-one interviews with 465 residents.  The study area surveyed was based around Glen Innes, Panmure and Pt England.

The findings of this work include:

·        the most important priorities for the majority of households in Tāmaki related to positive health and wellbeing of their families, followed by a better future for their children and then good family relationships

·        financial issues and the negative impact of addictions such as drugs and alcohol.

·        what residents liked about living in Tāmaki included the atmosphere and the people and its handy location.  Overall, there is a great sense of belonging to and connectedness within the community

·        seventy percent of respondents reported a good awareness of local community and wellbeing programmes or activities that promote people’s health and wellbeing

·        there are low levels of home ownership with only 20% of those surveyed owning their own home.  However, 71% were satisfied with their current housing situation

·        eighty nine percent of respondents liked living in Tāmaki

·        for the locals of GI, their library acted as a community centre, as did the CAB and the local marae to a lesser extent

·        twenty two percent of respondents saw the need for a free/affordable youth centre as the top priority for the community whilst twenty one percent believed that no other community facilities were needed

·        a further 17% believed there was a need for free/affordable community recreational facilities

·        many respondents qualified their responses with “free and affordable”, observing “there are facilities around the place and that, but we cannot afford them”

·        respondents also remarked that a community facility or service was only considered an asset if people felt that they had some control over the access to or use of them.

2008: Riverside Community Research

This report was commissioned by the Maungarei Community Christian Trust, an organisation that manages Riverside Community Centre for Council, in order to ensure that the facility was best responding to the needs of the local community.  The research found that:

·        there is a strong sense of community spirit in Riverside

·        there is a need for better early childhood educational facilities and opportunities in the area

·        youth need somewhere to go and things to do(low cost/free), particularly after school. Options noted including afterschool care, ECE, kids clubs, drop in centres and sports clubs.

·        approximately one third of households in Riverside are single parent families.  There is a need for activities for these parents such as a place to meet and chat and/or training/education opportunities

·        there are needs for various training/programmes including budgeting services, counselling, advocacy, learners driving course and adult literacy and numeracy

·        there are also needs for improved safety, including lighting, and beautification, such as the removal of graffiti and litter.

2006: Sylvia Park Precinct Plan Focus Groups: Summary of Key Findings

In 2006 Auckland City Council held focus groups with key stakeholders, local residents and businesses in the Sylvia Park area to gain an understanding of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within the area.  This research was to lead into a Sylvia Park Precinct Plan, though this plan was not completed.  Key themes identified included:

·        the existing community is seen as a strength and a good foundation for the areas future development

·        the lack of community facilities and amenities in the Sylvia Park area affects liveability and gives the perception of no community heart, a sense of neglect, lack of amenity and beauty, which in turn affected community identity, which was seen as lacking

·        the existence of the major roading network affected access to the surrounding community and walking and cycling were no longer perceived as safe

·        need for a community facility in the area.


APPENDIX 2

Information on community facilities in the Tāmaki subdivision

Council owned facilities

This piece of work is particularly interested in five council owned community spaces in the Tāmaki subdivision, described in the table below, and how their utilisation rates can be increased by addressing community needs.

Dunkirk Road Activity Centre

The Dunkirk Road Activity Centre is managed by a community trust with an on-site manager.  Facilities include a hall with a lounge area and kitchen, for up to 100 people, as well as a smaller meeting room with seating for up to 20 people.  Key stakeholders noted that the facility is “well run”.

Activities run at the centre include:

·    Churches – Tongan Youth

·    AA

·    Knitting

·    Dental nurses

·    Antenatal (birthcare)

·    Pacific Island blindgroup

·    Eastern suburbs blindgroup

·    Grandparents raising grandchildren

·    Yoga

·    Tai Chi

·    First Aid

·    Panmure Community Network group

·    Ladies coffee morning

·    Glen Innes gardening group

·    Paper crafts group

·    Auckland machine knitters

·    Panmure Probus

·    Panmure East Residents Association

·    Panmure Community Action Group

·    Kempo Bushido Ryo

·    Holiday programmes

·    Mini Sports

·    Community Network meetings

 

Utilisation at the centre averages just over forty percent.



July 2013

Aug 2014

Sept 2013

Oct 2013

Nov 2013

Dec 2013

Jan 2014

Feb 2014

March 2914

Total

Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre

43%

47%

36%

53%

38%

33%

34%

41%

43%

41%

Riverside Community Centre

The Riverside Community Centre is managed by a community trust, the Maungarei Community Christian Trust, and has an onsite manager.  Facilities at the site include a fenced playground and a hall with kitchen.

In general, programmes held at Riverside Community Centre are aimed at youth, such as afterschool care.  Other programmes offered at the centre include:

·        Preschool

·        Tongan language nest

·        Computer classes

·        Art for us

·        At Risk Youth


Utilisation of the centre averages forty two percent



July 2013

Aug 2013

Sept 2013

Oct 2013

Nov 2013

Dec 2013

Jan 2014

Feb 2014

March 2014

Total

Riverside Community Centre

31%

53%

56%

29%

42%

56%

24%

35%

53%

42%

Glen Innes Community Hall

The Glen Innes Community Hall operates as a council managed venue for hire.  Its facilities include a main hall with kitchen, with space for up to 130 people, a crèche and a smaller room for 20 people.  On average, the hall is utilized about a quarter of its available bookable time, less than the regional average of 30-40%.



July 2013

Aug 2013

Sept 2013

Oct 2013

Nov 2013

Dec 2013

Jan 2014

Feb 2014

March 2014

Total

Glen Innes Community Hall

23%

29%

22%

27%

23%

22%

47%

16%

24%

24%


Engagement with key stakeholders noted the run down perception of the facility with people stating “the GI Community Hall is cold, roof leaks, very poor acoustics and very run down.  Not fit for purpose.”  People also noted that it “should be run by a local person or organisation, and needs to be very low cost or free.”

Panmure Community Hall

The Panmure Community Hall is located next to the Panmure library and currently operates as a council managed venue for hire model.  Facilities within the space include a large hall with a kitchenette and dining facilities, seating up to 320 people, an annex room that fits 120 people and a smaller meeting room.  The space is used by a variety of users including tai chi groups and the YMCA.  On average, the facility is used a twenty five percent of the time it is available for bookings.



July 2013

Aug 2013

Sept 2013

Oct 2013

Nov 2013

Dec 2013

Jan 2014

Feb 2014

March 2014

Total

Panmure Community Hall

15%

12%

30%

29%

41%

24%

33%

20%

25%

25%

 


Key stakeholders commented that the hall was missing a welcoming face

The thing that came clearly through the research that the real positive is the sense of community here and people love it, but where is the face of the community in the premises that we currently have?  And it is a person, I think it is.  It’s about having coffee, being able to answer questions, being that real face of the community in those facilities”

Space above the Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board offices

There are a variety of spaces that sit above the Panmure library and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices that are currently managed by libraries.  This space was originally designed to form part of the Panmure Borough library as the main library serving the borough at the time.  However since amalgamation, first into Auckland City Council and then into Auckland Council,  has seen the role of the library change from the key library of a borough to one within a larger network, the majority of this space is no longer required for library purposes.  The majority of the space in the east wing is being used for library staff, whilst a smaller office in this eastern wing is used by Plunket as offices.  There are a mix of spaces over the local board offices, some of which are being used by the local constable for a volunteer organisation.  There are two other spaces in this west wing which are unfurnished and being used for storage.

A community facility in the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area

Sylvia Park Precinct Plan focus groups and Key Stakeholders identified a need for a community hub within the Sylvia Park/Mt Wellington area.  Indeed, whilst this area was believed to have a friendly community, it was believed that it was lacking in a strong sense of community.

Other community spaces where people meet

When looking at the best future use of the five identified council-owned community spaces, it is useful to consider other community spaces where people can meet and the services they provide.  Some of these facilities, such as Lagoon Stadium and the Tāmaki Recreation Centre offer spaces for hire and these spaces are taken into account when analysing various ways of addressing the needs of the community. These facilities are listed below.

Council owned facilities with meeting spaces available for community use

Facility

Description

Glen Innes Library

 

·    Hosts a number of events including storytime & homework club.

·    Groups use the various tables/spaces etc to hold meetings

·    Council managed

Panmure Library

·    Some meeting space, tables etc

·    Council managed

Lagoon Stadium

 

·    Facilities include stadium and table tennis

·    Space for hire for organisations, parties etc.

·    Contract with service providers

Tāmaki Recreation Centre (partnership)

·    Stadium and fitness suite

·    Space for hire including a community room and a function room with kitchenette

·    Managed by a community trust


Note, Swiftfoote hall on Tripoli Road in Point England is a council owned facility but is leased to Youthtown.

Non- council facilities

There are also a number of non-council owned facilities in Tāmaki including Ruapotaka Marae, in the Glen Innes town centre, which hosts events and has space for hire, as well as Mt Wellington Church in Sylvia Park, run by the Maungarei Community Christian Trust, which also has space for hire and is used by a variety of community groups.  There is also a scout hut in Fenchurch Street that is noted in the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company’s “Fenchurch Neighbourhood Plan” as having the opportunity to be transformed into a community hub.

 

There are also a number of other facilities available hire in the area including school halls, churches and sport clubs.  These have not been explored in detail and have not formed part of the study.


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Panmure Hall Future Management Model

 

File No.: CP2014/24449

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To decide on an appropriate future management model for the Panmure Hall that will activate the space

Executive summary

2.       “Our spaces work for us” is one of the priorities in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s (the board’s) 2011 Local Board Plan.

3.       With the aim of increasing utilisation of their community spaces in direct response to the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision, the board approved the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment (the TCNA) Scope and Plan in March 2014.

4.       The purpose of the TCNA was to identify the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision so that the board can respond to these needs using the tools available to them.  In particular, the board were interested in what role the council owned spaces could play in response to community needs, including the potential of the Panmure Hall.

5.       The TCNA is now complete and is being reported to the board separately in November 2014.

6.       The TCNA uncovered a wide range of findings including the need for more youth activities and safer public spaces. It also identified some issues specific to community facilities, such as the desire for welcoming, well-maintained facilities that feel like the hub of the community, are easily accessible and have a simple booking process.

7.       Following a board workshop on the 15th of July 2014, Community Policy and Planning staff were asked to carry out an analysis of potential management models for Panmure Hall that would respond to these findings. This analysis was carried out, with input from Community Facilities staff, and is outlined in Attachment A.

8.       As a result of this analysis, it is recommended that the management of Panmure Hall changes from the current venue for hire model to either an activated venue for hire or one of three community centre models. These models will all involve having paid staff based at the facility that activate space.

9.       An activated venue for hire model allows the hall to remain within the regionwide network administered by Council with a part time programmer based at the hall.

10.     A community centre model involves the facility being hired and programmed by staff based at the hall, and can take one of the following forms, each with their own advantages and disadvantages:

a)      a council managed community centre

b)      governed and managed by a community trust

c)      managed by a service provider.

11.     This report invites the board to choose their preferred management model for Panmure Hall, out of the activated venue for hire model or the three community centre models outlined in Attachment A.

12.     If the board choose to change the management of Panmure Hall from the current venue for hire model, staff estimate this will cost between 75k to 132k depending on the model chosen.

           

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorses the Panmure Hall changing from a venue for hire model to an activated venue for hire model or a community centre model, subject to budget being available.

b)      choose their preferred management model for Panmure Hall from the options outlined in this report and in Attachment A.

 

 

Comments

13.     “Our spaces work for us” is one of the priorities in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s (the board’s) 2011 Local Board Plan.

14.     With the aim of increasing utilisation of their community spaces in direct response to the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision, the board approved the Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment (the TCNA) Scope and Plan in March 2014.

15.     The purpose of the TCNA was to identify the needs of communities in the Tāmaki subdivision so that the board can respond to these needs using the tools available to them.  In particular, the board were interested in what role the following council owned spaces can play in response to community needs:

a)      Glen Innes Community Hall (a council managed venue for hire).

b)      Panmure Hall (a council managed venue for hire).

c)      Space above the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board offices (office spaces currently leased by Police whose volunteers only use a small portion of the space available).

d)      Riverside Community Centre (community centre managed by Maungarei Community Christian Trust).

e)      Dunkirk Road Activity Centre (community centre managed by Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre Trust).

16.     The TCNA is now complete and is being reported to the board separately in November 2014.

17.     The TCNA uncovered a wide range of findings including the need for more youth activities and safer public spaces. It also identified some issues specific to community facilities, such as the desire for welcoming, well-maintained facilities that feel like the hub of the community, are easily accessible and have a simple booking process.

18.     Following a board workshop on the 15th of July 2014, Community Policy and Planning staff were asked to carry out an analysis of potential management models for Panmure Hall that would respond to these findings. This analysis was carried out, with input from Community Facilities staff, and is outlined in Attachment A.

19.     Staff considered five management models that could be used for operating Panmure Hall. Apart from the existing model, venue for hire, all the models involve paid staff being based at the facility. Three of the models involve taking Panmure hall out of the venue for hire regional network, and are referred to as community centre models. The major advantages and disadvantages of each are noted below with further detail provided in Attachment A.


 

Model and estimated cost

Advantages

Disadvantages

Venue for hire (current model)

Hall bookings are arranged through council’s venue for hire booking team via telephone or email. There are no on-site staff.

No additional cost.

Available for community to hire.

Board kept closely informed.

Operates within a network of provision.

No cost.

Lack of welcoming presence.

Maintenance issues can be left unattended if customers don’t log a request.

Limited ability for board to take strategic approach to programming.

Venue for hire with activated programming (eg: New Lynn Community Centre)

Hall bookings are arranged through council’s venue for hire booking team via telephone or email. In addition to this, a 0.5FTE programmer is based at the hall to proactively programme the space.

0.5 FTE programmer = 35k

Programming costs = 25k

Other costs = 15k

Total cost = 75k

Available for community to hire.

Increased utilisation of space.

Meets some community need, including part time staff presence.

Board kept closely informed.

Continues to operate within a network of provision.

Programmed activities can potentially align to board priorities.

Some increase in relationship building and customer service opportunities.

Welcoming presence only part-time.

No ability to raise external funds like other community centre models.

Council managed may be perceived as disempowering to the community.

 

Council managed community centre (eg: Onehunga Community Centre)

Additional Council staff are appointed to be based at the facility and are responsible for hiring out and programming the hall.

0.5 FTE administrator = 27k

1 FTE programmer = 65k

Programming costs = 25k

Other costs = 15k

Total cost = 132k

Welcoming presence in building.

Increased utilisation of space.

Good alignment to board priorities.

Spaces still available for hire.

Board kept closely informed.

Increased relationship building and customer service opportunities.

Can leverage off the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Community Facilities team’s knowledge.

Most costly model and board will need to identify additional funding to allow for set up and ongoing operational costs.

No ability to raise external funds like other community centre models.

Council managed may be perceived as disempowering to the community.

 

Community centre managed  by a community trust (e.g. Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre)

A community trust are funded to govern and manage the facility. Trust staff are based at the facility and are responsible for hiring out and programming the hall.

Funding agreement = 60k

Loss of revenue = 30k

Total cost = 90k

Welcoming presence in building.

Ability to raise external funds.

Some alignment to board priorities through KPIs in funding agreement.

Increased relationship building and customer service opportunities.

Allows community led approach.

Space still available for hire.

 

Process to find suitable trust and staff may be long and/ or unsuccessful.

Requires board to identify additional funding for set up and ongoing operational costs.

Risks misalignment of objectives with having ‘two masters’ (board and trust).

Community centre managed by a service provider (e.g. YMCA)

A service provider (such as the YMCA) are contracted to manage the facility. Service provider staff are based at the facility and are responsible for hiring out and programming the hall.

Start up costs = 60k

Loss of revenue = 30k

Total cost = 90k.

 

Welcoming presence in building

Ability to raise external funds

Alignment to board priorities through contract for services

Increased relationship building and customer service opportunities

Should become financially sustainable after first year or two of operation

May have advantage of trading from popular brand

 

Model is dependent on availability of appropriate service provider

Process to find suitable provider may be long and/ or unsuccessful

Likely to involve set up costs

Risks misalignment of objectives with having ‘two masters’ (board and organisation)

Brand may be perceived as “corporate” rather than “community”

 

20.     Staff recommend that activation of the Panmure Hall will be best achieved through the activated venue for hire model or one of the three community centre models.

21.     It is also recommended that the board choose the model they deem to be most suitable for the Panmure Hall, noting that the key differences between them are:

a)      cost

b)      the degree to which they provide a welcoming presence (a need identified in the TCNA)

c)      the availability of appropriate trusts or service providers

d)      their potential to align with board priorities.

22.     The venue for hire with activated programming model, differs from the three community centre models in the following ways:

a)      it involves the hall remaining within the regionwide network of venues for hire, that is administered by the venue for hire team within Council (thereby incurring no additional administration costs)

b)      with the staff resource of a 0.5FTE programmer being based at the facility, a welcoming presence at the hall itself would be comparatively limited as it is likely the programmer will need to spend part of their time out in the local community developing relationships.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     Two local board workshops have been held on 15 July 2014 and 14 October 2014 to discuss the TCNA. The board’s views are reflected throughout this report.

24.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2014 identifies “Improve Panmure Hall’s role as a community centre by increasing the range of activities as a key initiative.

Māori impact statement

25.     According to 2013 census figures, 15% (6,111) of residents in the Tāmaki subdivision identify as Maori.  Given this number, it is likely that any responses to the needs of the community will have a positive impact on the area’s Maori population.

26.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2014 states that the board “will continue to strengthen and formalise its relationship with mana whenua” and identifies “the development of a vision and strategy to build robust engagement with mana whenua as a key initiative.” All management models outlined in this report, with the exception of the community trust model, retain the board as governors of Panmure Hall. Whether or not the community trust model would involve mana whenua or mataawaka is unknown at this stage, as it depends on the trust. 

Implementation

27.     Costs for each model are identified in the table above and in Attachment A.  The cost of implementing the most expensive model, a council managed community centre, is estimated at $132k annually. This sum allows for a half time administrator, a full time programmer, programming costs and other set up and staff related costs. This sum has been identified in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2014, in the event that the board adopt this model.

28.     The $132k figure allows for the following:

A 0.5 FTE Administrator (to replace the role of Council’s venue for hire team)

27k

A 1 FTE Programmer (to actively programme the hall and provide an on the ground presence)

65k

Programming costs

25k

Wifi, IS and other staff costs

15k

Total costs

132k

 

29.     The Community Facilities team consider this amount of resourcing necessary to deliver the level of services the community would expect should the Panmure Hall move to a community centre model.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Panmure Hall - Options analysis

59

     

Signatories

Authors

Tanya Mead - Policy Analyst

Kathy O'Connor - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Process for naming the internal spaces within the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth

 

File No.: CP2014/24452

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To enable the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (“the board”) to decide a process for naming the internal spaces within the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth (“the centre”).

Executive summary

2.       The Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth is scheduled to open in April 2015. The centre includes a number of spaces that will be available for the creation, rehearsal or display of visual or performing arts and/or community use, as illustrated in Attachment A.

3.       In March 2014 the board approved the future name for the centre. This name was gifted to the board from Ngati Paoa, with the support of Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngati Whatua Orakei.

4.       Mana whenua iwi also have an interest in naming the internal spaces within the centre, with a particular focus on sites of significance for the wider Glen Innes and Panmure area.

5.       Staff discussed the naming process for internal spaces with the board at a workshop on 7 October 2014, and various naming approaches were considered.

6.       This report recommends that the board endorse mana whenua iwi naming the centre’s prominent spaces, with the remaining spaces having functional bilingual names.

                  

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorses mana whenua iwi Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Paoa and Ngati Whatua Orakei proposing names for the following internal spaces within the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth, based on sites of significance for the Glen Innes and Panmure area:

i)        Performance/rehearsal space on level 1.

ii)       The foyer/entranceway on level 1 (incorporating what is referred to in Attachment A as hangout one, main entry, hangout two and west lobby).

iii)      The wide corridor on level 1 (incorporating what is described in Attachment A as gallery and east lobby).

iv)      The back stage lobby on level 1.

v)      The artist workshop on level 1.

vi)      The music/dance studio on level 2.

b)      requests staff report back in February, with the proposed names for approval.

c)      endorses the use of bilingual functional names for the remaining internal spaces.

 

 

Comments

7.       The Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth is scheduled to open in April 2015. The centre includes a number of spaces that will be available for the creation, rehearsal or display of visual or performing arts and/or community use, as identified in Attachment A.

8.       In March 2014, the board approved Te Oro as the future name for the centre. This name was gifted to the board from Ngati Paoa, with the support of Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngati Whatua Orakei. 

9.       Mana whenua iwi also have an interest in naming the internal spaces within the centre, with a particular focus on sites of significance for the wider Glen Innes and Panmure area.

10.     Staff discussed the naming process for internal spaces with the board at a workshop on 7 October 2014. Various approaches to naming the spaces were considered including:

a)      Young people choosing the names.

b)      The wider community choosing the names.

c)      Functional names (e.g. dance studio, visual arts workshop).

d)      Spaces being named after “youth champions” in the local community.

e)      Names that reflect the pioneering history of the wider Glen Innes area.

f)       Mana whenua iwi naming the spaces after sites of significance.

g)      A combination of two or more of the above approaches  (e.g. prominent spaces being named after sites of significance and others having functional names).

11.     Staff recommend that mana whenua iwi propose names for the following prominent spaces within the building after local sites of significance, with remaining spaces given bilingual functional names:

a)      Performance/rehearsal space on level 1.

b)      The foyer/entranceway on level 1 (incorporating what is referred to in Attachment A as hangout one, main entry, hangout two and west lobby).

c)      The wide corridor on level 1 (incorporating what is described in Attachment A as gallery and east lobby).

d)      The back stage lobby on level 1.

e)      The artist workshop on level 1.

f)       The music/dance studio on level 2.

12.     The reasons for recommending this approach are:

a)      It is in keeping with the centre’s future name, which is a gift from Ngati Paoa and relates to sites of significance in the local area.

b)      Naming the internal spaces does not foreclose other opportunities to engage young people and the wider community in preparing the centre for opening, and naming is of particular importance to mana whenua.

c)      The recommended prominent spaces are spaces where people will gather in large numbers, therefore it will be appropriate to names these spaces after local sites of significance.

d)      In the future, the facility may explore partnerships with organisations or investigate sponsorship opportunities. Giving functional names to the remaining rooms provides a level of flexibility to do this.

13.     With regard to the other approaches to naming that were discussed at the October board workshop, staff are progressing other opportunities for involving young people and the wider community in preparations for the centre opening. These include the development of community sound artworks and the opening event. These initiatives also have the potential to provide a platform for celebrating local youth champions or pioneers, should that be desired by participants.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The naming of internal spaces was discussed at a board workshop on 7 October 2014. The board’s views have been reflected throughout this report.

Māori impact statement

15.     Ngati Whatua Orakei, Ngati Paoa and Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki continue to be closely involved in the centre’s development. Ruapotaka Marae’s involvement is also increasing, both in a hosting capacity for meetings and events relating to the centre, and as a participant in engagement initiatives.

Implementation

16.     Staff estimate that up to six weeks is required to design, produce and install the signs for the prominent spaces in the centre. Therefore, future names for the internal spaces need to be decided in time for the necessary signage to be produced prior to the centre opening. This means that the final names must be decided at the board’s February 2015 business meeting, to ensure the signage can be completed in time for an April 2015 opening. A delay in any of the implementation steps (outlined in the below table) could result in the signs for the internal spaces not being installed in time for the centre opening.

17.     Timeline for naming the internal spaces within the centre

Action

Delivery date

Board decide approach to naming the internal spaces

18 November 2014

Mana whenua identify names (sites of significance) for prominent spaces within the centre

18 November 2014 until 26 January 2015

Board approve names for internal spaces

17 February 2015

Construction completed

Mid March 2015

Signs designed, produced and installed

31 March 2015

Centre opens

April 2015

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Floor plan

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Kathy O'Connor - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Draft terms of reference and expressions of interest process - Committee of the local board to govern the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth

 

File No.: CP2014/24886

 

  

 

Purpose

To endorse the terms of reference (“TOR”), and the expressions of interest (“EOI”) process, for the Committee of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to govern the GIen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth (“the committee”).

Executive summary

1.       In July 2013 the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (“the board”) made an in principle decision to establish a committee of the board to govern the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth, to be made up of both board and community members. The board later approved an implementation plan at their December 2013 meeting, and also requested that staff report back on the possibility of a dedicated mana whenua seat.

2.       Staff are currently working towards the board appointing all committee members by March 2015, which will allow time for an EOI process for community members to be run. This timeframe also enables the committee to be established before the centre opens in April.

3.       In August 2014 the board approved a draft TOR for socialising with mana whenua Ngati Whatua Orakei, Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngati Paoa. The draft TOR outlined committee membership as three board members, two community members and one mana whenua member, and accords decision making to the committee over the centre’s work programme.

4.       The purpose of socialising the draft TOR with mana whenua was to gain their feedback on their interest in one dedicated seat and how they would like to see it rotated. Their feedback can be summarised as follows:

a)      all three stated they would prefer one seat each (i.e. three mana whenua seats), and expressed their disappointment that this was not forthcoming.

b)      Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki suggested that the one dedicated seat be rotated, and the schedule be decided by ballot.

c)      Ngati Whatua Orakei suggested that a skills based approach be taken to appointing the mana whenua member to the one seat, with criteria, selection process and candidate to be agreed by all three iwi.

d)      Ngati Paoa are yet to provide a formal response to how they would like the one dedicated seat to work.

e)      Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Whatua Orakei and Ngati Paoa are having ongoing discussions about the merits of a rotating versus skills based approach to one seat.

5.       In the event that the three iwi do not agree on an approach and candidate in time for the board’s March 2015 meeting, it is recommended that their seat is offered to the third ranked candidate for the community seats.

6.       This report recommends that the board endorse the TOR (Attachment A), which is the same document as the draft TOR reported to the board in August apart from an alteration to clause 6.2 and appendix three. These changes have been made in order to accommodate whatever decision mana whenua jointly make, in relation to a dedicated mana whenua seat.


7.       Staff also recommend that the board endorse the EOI process for community members, outlined in the body of this report. The EOI process for community members involves:

a)      compiling a candidate information pack to inform potential applicants of the board’s vision for the centre, responsibilities of committee members and information on how applications will be evaluated

b)      advertising the opportunity for community members to put themselves forward

c)      an evaluation panel shortlisting applications based on an evaluation matrix

d)      an interview panel that will select and interview up to six applicants

e)      the interview panel choosing two preferred candidates to recommend to the board for appointment to the committee, or three in the event that mana whenua do not agree an approach and preferred candidate for the board’s March 2015 meeting.

8.       The evaluation matrix is an essential part of the EOI process, as it will form the basis for all decisions relating to the appointment of community members. An evaluation matrix is outlined in this report and involves reviewing applicants according to their governance experience, with a particular focus on young people, the local community and the creative cultural sector.

9.       Staff recommend that the interview panel be made up of:

a)      a Relationship Manager from council’s Local Board Services team (excluding the Relationship Manager for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board)

b)      a person external to council who has experience working in the creative cultural sector, preferably with a community and/or youth development focus

c)      a local board member who will not be a member of the committee.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorse the following in relation to the Committee of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to govern the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth:

i)       the attached Terms of References for the Committee of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (Attachment A)

ii)       the dedicated mana whenua seat defaulting to a third community seat to be offered to the third ranked community candidate, in the event that mana whenua do not agree an approach and preferred candidate in time for the board’s March 2015 meeting

iii)      the expressions of interest and appointment process outlined in this report

iv)     the evaluation matrix outlined in this report

v)      the interview panel being made up of:

·     a Relationship Manager from council’s Local Board Services team (excluding the Relationship Manager for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board)

·     a person external to council who has experience working in the creative cultural sector, preferably with a community and/or youth development focus

·     a Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board member who will not be a member of the committee.

b)      choose one Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board member, who will not be a committee member, to be a member of the interview panel.

 

Comments

Background and context

10.     In July 2013 the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board (“the board”) made an in principle decision to establish a committee of the local board to govern the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre for Youth. This committee is to be comprised of both board and community members and provides all the benefits of association with the board and council such as accountability through the local government election cycle and access to “in house” council funds and expertise, while allowing for a significant level of community decision making.

11.     In December 2013 staff reported back to the board with an implementation plan for the committee, and updated them on a number of related matters including Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Paoa and Ngati Whatua Orakei all declaring an interest in a dedicated iwi seat or seats on the committee. At that stage Ngati Paoa and Ngati Whatua Orakei declared an interest in there being two dedicated mana whenua seats on the committee.

12.     Staff are currently working towards the board appointing all committee members by March 2015, which will allow time for an EOI process for community members to be run. This timeframe also enables the committee to be established before the centre opens in April.

Terms of Reference

13.     In August 2014 the board approved a draft TOR for socialising with Ngati Whatua Orakei, Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngati Paoa. Committee membership outlined in the draft TOR was three local board members, two community members and one mana whenua member. The advantages of this makeup is that:

a)      it keeps the committee small

b)      allows for a partnership approach

c)      provides for half of the committee members to be made up of board members who are accountable to the voting public and have experience working in a governance capacity in local government

d)      allows for the majority of the remainder of seats to be from the community, while still providing for a mana whenua perspective.

14.     The draft TOR also accords decision making to the committee over the centre’s work programme, but does not extend to land owner decisions which will be retained by the board.

Mana whenua seat

The purpose of socialising the draft TOR with mana whenua was to gain their feedback on their interest in one dedicated seat and how they would like to see it rotated. Their feedback can be summarised as follows:

a)      all three stated they would prefer one seat each (i.e. three mana whenua seats), and expressed their disappointment that this was not forthcoming

b)      Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki suggested that the one dedicated seat be rotated, and the schedule be decided by ballot

c)      Ngati Whatua Orakei suggested that a skills based approach be taken to appointing the mana whenua member to the one seat, with criteria, selection process and candidate to be agreed by all three iwi

d)      Ngati Paoa are yet to provide a formal response to how they would like the one dedicated seat to work

e)      Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Whatua Orakei and Ngati Paoa are having ongoing discussions about the merits of a rotating versus skills based approach to one seat.

15.     In the event that the three iwi do not agree on an approach and candidate in time for the board’s March 2015 meeting, it is recommended that their seat is offered to the third ranked candidate for the community seats.

16.     This report recommends that the board endorse the TOR (Attachment A), which is the same document as the draft TOR reported to the board in August, apart from an alteration to clause 6.2 and appendix three. These changes have been made in order to accommodate whatever decision mana whenua jointly make, in relation to a dedicated mana whenua seat.

Expressions of Interest and appointment process

17.     The EOI process for community members involves a number of implementation steps, outlined in the table below

Step

Action sought

Delivery date

1

Candidate information pack developed

This will involve staff compiling the following information to be given to community members interested in applying for the committee:

·   a cover letter that describes what skills are being sought on the committee, the history of the project, and governance and management arrangements

·   an application form

·   the Terms of Reference

·   the Charter (which outlines the board’s vision and objectives for the centre)

·   floor plans.

24 November

2

Advertising the opportunity and receiving and processing applications

Advertising the opportunity for people to apply to be a committee member will commence on 25 November, to align with the application process. The following advertising channels will be used:

·   the centre’s facebook page

·   the centre’s website

·   email distribution list

·   the centre newsletter

·   other council channels.

25 November -  22 December 2014

3

Staff evaluating and shortlisting applicants

A panel of staff from Community Development Arts and Culture, Community and Social Policy and CCO Governance will form an evaluation panel. This panel will be responsible for assessing applications against an evaluation matrix (outlined below), for the purposes of developing a shortlist of applicants. Shortlists generally do not exceed ten applicants.

12 – 26 January 2015

4

Selecting and interviewing candidates

An interview panel will review the shortlist and select up to 6 people to interview, once again using the evaluation matrix to assist them. Staff recommend that this panel consist of a Relationship Manager, a community member and a board member. The interview panel is discussed in more detail later in the report.

Staff can assist the interview panel with this process by:

·   providing them with questions, based on the evaluation matrix

·   coordinating interviews

·   liaising with applicants.

27 January – 13 February 2015

5

Interview panel recommend preferred candidates to the board for its endorsement

The interview panel decide on their three preferred candidates, with the assistance of the evaluation matrix, and recommend to two or three to the board for appointment to the committee. Whether this number is two or three depends on whether or not mana whenua have agreed an approach and preferred candidate in time. Staff will assist the interview panel with this reporting process.

17 March 2015 (business meeting)

 

18.     Staff consider establishing the committee before the centre opens in mid April 2015 is desirable, as it will enable acknowledgement of all committee members at the opening event. Making this target date is dependent on the timeline outlined above being adhered to.

Evaluation matrix

19.     The evaluation matrix is an essential part of the EOI process, as it will form the basis for all decisions relating to the appointment of community members.

20.     Staff recommend that applicants be evaluated according to the degree to which they demonstrate experience in:

a)      governance

b)      team work and collaboration

c)      arts and culture as a community development tool

d)      youth development

e)      local community knowledge and standing

f)       creative cultural awareness.

21.     The rationale for the first two criteria is that they reflect experience and competencies required to be an effective committee member, regardless of the function of the committee. The rationale for the remaining four criteria is that they reflect the purpose and focus areas of the centre, as identified in the charter.


 

22.     The evaluation matrix is outlined in the below table, and requires evaluators to give a score out of three for each criteria per applicant.

Criteria

 

 

 

Governance

/3

/3

/3

Team work and collaboration

/3

/3

/3

Arts and culture as a community development tool

/3

/3

/3

Youth development

/3

/3

/3

Local community knowledge

/3

/3

/3

Creative cultural awareness

/3

/3

/3

1 = no or limited experience 2 = adequate experience 3 = strong experience

Interview panel

23.     Staff recommend that the interview panel be made up of:

a)      a Relationship Manager from council’s Local Board Services team (excluding the Relationship Manager for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board)

b)      a person external to council who has experience working in the creative cultural sector, preferably with a community and/or youth development focus

c)      a board member who will not be a member of the committee.

24.     This makeup reflects a combination of the approaches taken to the interview panels for selecting members for council advisory panels, and the interview panels for selecting CCO board members.

25.     The advantages of the makeup of this panel is that:

a)      it allows for differing perspectives, all of which are relevant to the purpose of the committee

b)      it avoids staff who may report to the committee in the future being on the interview panel

c)      it avoids local board committee members appointing fellow committee members.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     Local board views have been considered and reflected in this report.

Māori impact statement

27.     Ngati Paoa, Nga Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngati Whatua Orakei have been closely involved in the centre’s development, and their views have been reflected throughout this report.

28.     Section 7.1.2. of the TOR states that (T)he mana whenua iwi member is a member of the committee for the purposes of providing a local mana whenua perspective at a governance level. They are not there as formal representatives of mana whenua, and are not to be used as the only means of engagement with Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngati Paoa or Ngati Whatua Orakei with regards to the centre.

29.     Ruapotaka Marae is a matawaaka marae located next to the centre. The marae have been regularly consulted on matters relating to the centre and are aware of the committee’s development.

Implementation

30.     Implementation steps associated with the EOI process are outlined and discussed earlier in this report.

31.     Once established, community and mana whenua members of the committee will be eligible to invoice for sitting fees and mileage as per council’s policy on payments to non-elected members. This cost can be met within existing board budgets.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Terms of Reference

75

     

Signatories

Authors

Kathy O'Connor - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 





Appendix 1





























































Appendix 4

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report – November 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/25960

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the Local Board area since the last transport report.

Monthly Overview

2.       At the time of writing, a meeting with the Transport Portfolio leader and deputy is scheduled for 10 November. The following  matters are on the agenda for discussion:

a)      Ngahue Drive/Abbotts Way proposed cycleway.

b)      Road Corridor Safety Projects for delivery.

c)      General transport matters.

3.       A further workshop on bus network changes is planned for November.

4.       Auckland Transport invited Local Boards to attend a cluster-type workshop on 30 October with the aim of seeking further engagement with Local Boards on transport priorities for the next decade.  The meeting covered how Auckland Transport has arrived at a prioritised programme, following the Mayor’s budget proposal for the Long Term Plan.

5.       Auckland Transport also asked Local Boards what their priorities are, now that the Local Board Plans can be compared to the Mayor’s budget proposal.  Auckland Transport will review the draft prioritised programme in the light of these discussions.  This will lead to finalising a draft Council Long Term Plan (LTP) and draft Auckland Regional Land Transport Programme (RLTP).  Both proposals will be subject to formal consultation procedures when they are released in draft in January 2015.  

6.       This was followed up by an individual workshop with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board in early November to look at the more detailed programme in the Local Board area.. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receives the report.

 

Reporting Back

Consultation Report

7.       At the time of writing there were no new consultations under review.

Local Board Capital Projects

8.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has a fund available for the construction of transport related projects in its area. This fund is administered by Auckland Transport.  Each year, the Local Board’s  capital fund allocation is  $494,757 and this amount can be consolidated within each electoral term. 

9.       At the time of writing the unspent transport capital fund budget for the current electoral term was $1.177 million.  This comprises of $645,000 allocated toward the Onehunga Mall upgrade and a balance of $532,000 uncommitted.

10.     At its September meeting, the Local Board requested Auckland Transport to provide rough order of costs for the completion of the Tetra-trap programme in the Local Board area and for the provision of a footpath at the harbour end of Princes Street, Onehunga to link to the reserve and foreshore works.  The rough order of costs for the tetra trap programme was provided in the October report.

Provision of Pedestrian Interface between Onehunga Bay Reserve and Princes Street

11.     Auckland Council Parks department have provided information and plans of the proposed improvements at the Onehunga Bay Reserve, Princes Street and Beachcroft Road to Auckland Transport.  At the time of writing, the rough order of costs were still in preparation.  It is anticipated that these will be able to be tabled at the meeting.

Update on the Delivery of current  Transport Capital Projects

Princes Street Pedestrian Enhancements

12.     This is the last Local Board Capital Fund project outstanding from last term.  It is expected to be completed by the end of November.

East West Connections

13.     As a result of the public engagement carried out earlier this year as part of the East West Connections programme, a project is now being carried out to address two priority issues by 2021. These are the transport connections into and out of Onehunga-Penrose and a public transport between Mangere, Otahuhu and Sylvia Park. The aim of the project is:

·        to create more reliable travel times and better transport connections for freight and business traffic in the Onehunga/Penrose areas; and

·        to make travel times by bus quicker and more reliable by creating priority for buses between Mangere, Otahuhu and Sylvia Park.

14.     A number of potential options have been identified to address these issues and an initial assessment of the options has been undertaken. This included assessing factors such as transport performance, construction costs, ability to consent, constructability, urban design and social, natural environment, public health and cultural heritage effects. Following the assessment, some options have been identified for further investigation.

15.     There are now six shortlisted options. The options identified are still to go through a more detailed phase of design, which means that some specifics of the options have yet to be identified. For example if an option notes that an existing road will be widened, no decision has been made as to what side of the existing road the widening may occur.

16.     The joint project team of AT and the NZ Transport Agency are now undertaking public consultation in the month of October 2014, seeking feedback from the public on these options. The feedback received will be used to further develop the options and assist to identify the option to be progressed.

Pt England to Panmure Safe Routes Scheme

17.     The scheme assessment report for the project is almost completed.  The next stage of the project will be public consultation on the routes and their treatment.  Auckland Transport is working toward this happening in February 2015, when schools are back from the Christmas break.

18.     Transport Portfolio leads were briefed on the project on 6 October.  A workshop with the Local Board has been requested for the New Year to refresh Local Board members on the project and for discussion on the consultation materials.

Ngahue Drive/Abbotts Way Cycleway

19.     Just touching the edge of the boundary between the Orakei Local Board and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is a new cycle way project along Abbotts Way from Grand Drive to Ngahue Drive.

20.     Auckland Transport has prioritised completing this missing link of the Auckland metro cycle connection that runs along Abbots Way from Grand Drive, connecting with Ngahue Drive to the existing shared path on College Road and through to the proposed Glen Innes to Tāmaki Drive cycling path.

21.     This cycle lane will be on the road and will offer contraflow (two way), and is expected to be a protected cyclepath, allowing cyclist and cars to be physically separated.

22.     This project has been given a high priority and therefore Auckland Transport expects to move quickly from feasibility to detailed design (subject to funding) and intends following up with stakeholder engagement in the near future.

23.     Public consultation on this project is expected to be undertaken in May 2015.

24.     A workshop with the Local Board  will be scheduled for April 2015, if required, to fully inform the board of the project and to gather feedback on the consultation materials.

25.     Auckland Transport would like to begin construction in  the 2015/2016 financial year, subject to successful consultation and funding.

Orpheus Drive Shared Path

26.     The improvement works at Onehunga foreshore are currently under construction.  A shared walking and cycling path between the Manukau Cruising Club and Seacliffe Road will be constructed once the main works are completed as funding and consents are in place.

27.     This leaves a gap between the Manukau Cruising Club and the beginning of the existing shared path of approximately 400 metres.

28.     A feasiblity study has been completed looking at several options for completing this section and detailed investigation of the options is expected to begin this calendar year. The detailed design and construction of this section is subject to funding and the consenting process.

Auckland Transport News

New Safety Campaign

29.     As schoolchildren returned from their holidays in October, Auckland Transport's Back to School Campaign reinforced its 'Slow Down Around Schools' message with the help of monsters and children.  The campaign opened with radio adverts and press ads in suburban newspapers reminding motorists to ‘Slow Down Around Schools’.

30.     The campaign continues with radio advertising and bus backs. A placard campaign was also scheduled where students, together with school staff, waved placards at passing motorists to encourage them to be more vigilant and reduce their speed around schools.

31.     Speeding cars and drivers around schools are portrayed as ‘monsters’ and the campaign featured images of terrified children reacting to the approaching monsters. The aim is to raise awareness of the vulnerability of children on roads near schools and for motorists to ‘Slow Down Around Schools’.

 

Walk or cycle Auckland’s new road and tunnel

32.     Auckland’s newest road is expected to take thousands of trucks a day off Panmure roads.

33.     Auckland Transport opened the 1.5km Te Horeta Rd in Panmure to traffic on Sunday 2 November. The road goes through a 220m tunnel, has new cycle lanes and a shared cycle and foot path alongside, which all opened at the same time.

34.     A community event was held on Saturday 1 November so people in the area could walk or cycle through the tunnel, along the road and on the shared path.

35.     Completing the new road is the final major milestone for the $180m first stage of the Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI). It also included building the new Panmure Station, three new bridges and new cycling and walking links.

36.     AMETI is a group of projects aimed at giving people in the south-eastern suburbs improved transport choices and better connections to the rest of Auckland. See an aerial video and photos of the new road, station and other upgrades here: at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/ameti/.

37.     Issues Raised through/by Board Members

Location or Name of Issue

Description

 

AT Response

Gavin Street

Residents prepared a deputation to the Local Board meeting in May in regard to their concerns about heavy traffic using Gavin Street as a short cut between two arterial routes. This issue has been ongoing for several years.

Auckland Transport is considering several possible remedies for Gavin Street.

 

29/08/14

 A report back on this matter is expected in the November LB agenda.

24/10/14

At the time of writing, no update on Gavin Street was available.

Konini Reserve, 42 Waiohua Street

Complaint that commuters park all day in the P180 area next to Konini Reserve. Requests for enforcement are largely ineffective.

This area is monitored regulary and alternative chalking methods are being tried.  Approximately 100 tickets were issued in the first half of October 2014 and alternative chalking methods are being used.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Report

 

File No.: CP2014/26060

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months July – September 2014 and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months October – December 2014.

Executive summary

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months July – September 2014 and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months October – December 2014.

 

2.       Attachments include:

·        A – Auckland Transport activities

·        B – Travelwise Schools activities

·        C – Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

·        D – Report against local board advocacy issues

·        E – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly Report.

 

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Key Agency Initiatives

East West Connections

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) and the NZ Transport Agency have completed an indicative business case that identified a short list of options to address the transport issues in the Onehunga-Penrose area.  Improvements were also identified along the proposed bus route between Mangere, Otahuhu and Sylvia Park.

4.       The assessment process to narrow down potential options included the outcomes of the July/August engagement as well as assessing factors such as transport performance; consentability; constructability; natural environment; public health and cultural heritage.  The short list contains a range of low to high investment options for further investigation.

5.       Public consultation on these short listed options commenced in October.  This included public open days and workshops.

 

Public Transport Development

Otahuhu Interchange

6.       A civil enabling works package has gone to market to enable construction activities in December to capitalise on the scheduled Christmas Block of Line in the rail corridor.

7.       The main works package is scheduled to go to market mid-December, with tenders closing end of January and award end of February 2015.  Target completion for the interchange is end of September 2015.  A public open day was held in Otahuhu Town Hall, attended by 225 people including Local Board members; feedback was very positive.  Hui with local mana whenua are on-going with six having been completed to date. 

 

City Rail Link

8.       Registrations of interest (ROI) by the construction industry for the Enabling Works design work for the downtown section of the City Rail Link, from Britomart through Queen, Customs and Albert Streets to Wyndham Street were received and evaluated during August.

9.       Following an evaluation process, Request for Proposal documentation for two enabling works contract packages were released to the ROI respondents in late August.  A series of interface meetings are scheduled with respondents prior to receipt of proposals in November whereby a tender evaluation will be undertaken to procure the preferred tenderer.  A project update was provided to manu whenua groups (seven iwi represented) mainly focussing on stormwater mitigation issues.

Electric Multiple Unit Procurement

10.     There are now 27 units in NZ with 17 units in service.  Manukau peak services began mid September.  Electric Multiple Unit (EMU) testing on the Western line to Swanson began on 29 September.  Manufacture and delivery is on programme.

Public Transport Operations

Bus Improvements

11.     An on-going programme of bus timetable adjustments, in partnership with AT service providers, continued this year to ensure published timetables more closely reflect actual bus running times.  This is driving a significant improvement in bus service reliability, particularly for North Star, Go West, Waka Pacific and Metrolink Outer with implementation scheduled across the entire bus network by September 2014.

12.     On-time performance across the entire bus network rose to 91.45% for September and has remained over 90% during the quarter. 

13.     NZ Bus operated 91.7% of its bus services on time, which is a 10% increase on the previous 12 months.  Go West showed the largest improvement with an 11% increase in punctuality since December.  On-time performance improved by 5% after delivering a new customer value proposition of services from 7am to 7pm, 7 days a week on 3 August in the west (Green Bay/Titirangi).   

14.     On time performance for the Northern Express Service also continued to operate at a very high level during August delivering 98.7% and with most of September operating at 99.4%.

Rail Improvements

15.     Rail patronage for the 12 months to September 2014 was more than 11.8 million; an increase of 27% on the previous year and a new record for heavy rail in the Auckland region.  Rail patronage for the first quarter 2014 was 15% above the same period in 2013.

16.     Rail service punctuality was stable at 87.7% for the 12 months to September 2014; an improvement from 86.3% the previous year.  This was achieved through a period of operational change to new systems following the introduction of EMUs that have presented some challenges.  For the month of August 2014, punctuality was 90.5% - the first month for at least ten years that performance exceeded 90% outside holiday periods .

17.     Rail station security was upgraded from May 2014 and a strategic review of rail safety, security and fare enforcement is underway.

Road Design and Development

Dominion Road

18.     Construction on the cycle routes is proceeding with the project being close to 50% complete.   Tenders for the main Dominion Road works have closed and evaluation is underway.  The project has been expanded at the request of Watercare to include water main replacement in the three village centres.

Albany Highway

19.     The contract for construction has been awarded to Fulton Hogan. Work will commence on site in November.  The construction is expected to be completed early in 2017.

20.     An open day will be held in October to give the local community the opportunity to meet the construction team and ask any questions they may have about the project before works begin.  A communications and stakeholder management plan will be in place for the duration of the construction period.

Murphys Road

21.     Construction of Flat Bush School Road and Murphys Road intersection upgrade is progressing and on track for completion by mid-December 2014. Design of the Murphy’s Road upgrade between Flat Bush School Road and Ormiston Road is on-going and programmed to finish by the end of December 2014.

AMETI

22.     Construction of the new Te Horeta Road at Panmure is near complete.  Pavement works and line marking were completed during the period and the final integration testing of tunnel systems is in progress.  The road is scheduled to open on 2 November when critical activities on Mt Wellington Highway and at the adjacent NCI site are complete.

23.     The new William Harvey Bridge footbridge is now fully operational.  The upgrade of Van Damme’s Lagoon, NCI and Watercare works are ongoing.

24.     Planning and design meetings were held to update Pakuranga town centre stakeholders on the design work for Pakuranga bus station and Reeves Road flyover.  Feedback will assist to further develop the design.

Cycle Initiatives

25. The construction of Stage 1 (Churchill Street to Quay Street via Mahuhu Crescent and Tapora Street) was completed ahead of schedule and formally opened by the Prime Minister and the Mayor.  A short safety video for cyclists has been produced http://youtu.be/fNlu7xaS2KA.  Within a week it had been viewed more than 2,700 times on YouTube.

26. A survey to benchmark the number of cyclists is about to start and will be used to monitor usage.  The design of Stage 2 that will make the link through to Britomart Place is progressing with the start of construction planned for early 2015.

27. A number of other cycle schemes are under construction including Portage Road (New Lynn), Swanson Rail Path and St George Street (Papatoetoe).  Meanwhile the Spring Cycling Programme has commenced with a series of cycle training and safety events being held throughout the region.

Services

Public Transport ‘Give it a Go’ Scheme

28.     Between Late May and the end of September AT has delivered the scheme through 18 businesses and personalised journey planning projects.  Through the scheme, individuals have two weeks of commute travel.

29.     Results indicate that six weeks after the start of the trial 52% are continuing to use public transport and after eight weeks there is only a slight drop to 41%.

30.     An evaluation survey is also undertaken as this allows participants to provide feedback on the service.  There has been positive feedback, as shown in the quotes below:

“Great idea – certainly surprised me how great public transport has become”  ASB workplace survey

“I had never taken public transport before the trial and now find that travelling by train is a lot less stressful than by road… …and thank you for offering the trial pass, you now have a passenger for life.”  Health Alliance workplace survey

“Using public transport was a lot better than I had expected. More trials like this should be done to convince others.”  Sovereign workplace survey

Commute Businesses

31.     Auckland Council senior management have approved the Auckland Council Travel Plan.  A more detailed Action Plan is being co-developed for presentation to the Chief Planning Officer in early November for approval to proceed.

32.     Commute awards recognised businesses achieving success in travel planning.  The award winners have been promoted in business publications including Auckland Today.  The award winners were:

·        Progress on Travel Plan – AECOM

·        Delivery of Commute Packages – Mahitahi Trust

·        Embedding sustainable transport into company practice – MRCagney.

 

Route Optimisation

33.     The 2013 – 2014 Route Optimisation Programme has been primarily focused around the Auckland city centre, aiming to prioritise and optimise network performance for all modes as appropriate.  The Programme made use of the detailed Network Operating Plan to translate strategic intent into operational priorities, for the various modes by time of day.  Being the city centre, greater emphasis was placed on public transport and pedestrian performance, the latter being particularly noticeable during the day outside of peak periods.  As a whole, route optimisation covered approximately 33 km, over 110 intersections.

 

Variable Message Signs (VMS)

34.     Eight variable message signs (VMS) programmed for the 2013-14 year are now in place.

35.     The signs are due for final hand-over to the Auckland Traffic Operations Centre (ATOC) during the month of October, and will be available for use for incident management, planned events, multi-modal real time travel time information (including multi-modal travel time where relevant), and any messaging requirements.

Bus route improvements

36.     The Operational Planning and Performance Teams have been assisting the Public Transport Operations team to identify and implement quick-win projects to improve the efficiency and reliability of the bus operations.  Current projects include:

 

Route

Project Scope

Progress

Esmonde Road

Widening to extend bus lane

Resolution prepared, awaiting tree removal consent

Khyber Pass Road

Introduction of additional 90m of bus lane

Resolution prepared, awaiting Local Board approval

Crowhurst intersection bus priority upgrade

Wellesley Street East

Bus lane pocket

Resolution prepared, awaiting Road Safety Audit sign off

Park Road

Investigation of southbound bus lane

Concept design complete, internal consultation to commerce shortly

Parnell Road

Investigation of bus lane

Concept development with consultants, due imminently

 

Urban KiwiRAP (International Road Assessment Programme) Update

37.     A specialist engineering team completed vehicle-mounted video-mapping of 2,000 kilometres of the Auckland local road network in September as part of the Safer Journeys Urban KiwiRAP demonstration project.  This project is a world first and the video footage will be analysed to establish road safety star ratings for the Auckland urban local road network that will be used to prioritise improvements on high-risk parts of the network.


Road Corridor Delivery

38.     Overall operating expenditure is running ahead of budget due to the effects of the major storm event which struck Great Barrier Island in June, higher electricity costs and an increased spend on unsealed road maintenance.

39.     Renewal expenditure is behind forecast but good progress has been made in making preparations for the upcoming construction season.  The actual spend is consistent with the reduced level of funding now available for renewals.

Key Renewals

40.     Construction of the Beach Road Cycleway was delivered by the Road Corridor Group and completed on time for the opening by the Prime Minister in August.

41.     The design of the new box culvert is underway on Great Barrier Road with the intention of commencing physical works later this year.  The existing steel plate was washed away in the storm event on 10 June 2014 and there is a temporary stream crossing in place until the works can be completed.

42.     Chipsealing commenced in Franklin in August using Emulsion instead of cut-back bitumen.  Emulsion can be sprayed in cooler weather, provides improved chip wetting and adhesion and is safer and more environmentally friendly than hot bitumen. 

43.     Repairs to the Maraetai Beach seawall were also completed in August.  The seawall had been undermined by several major storms over the June/July period.

44.     Streetlight improvements have been carried out on East Tāmaki Road and on the cycle routes in the Dominion Road Corridor.  The street lights in these cycle routes, located immediately to the East and West of Dominion Road, have been upgraded with LED Luminaires to improve safety.

Road Corridor Access

Corridor Access Request (CAR) Applications

45.     There were 4,039 CAR applications approved during the first quarter, representing a 4.4% increase over the number of 3868 for the same period last year.

46.     Monthly incremental increases of around 8% have been experienced since July with the major share of the increases being for minor works i.e. works in the footpath and berm area only.

Ultra-Fast Broadband Rollout

47.     Overall forecast build starts have fallen below forecasts and the likelihood of a back ended build programme for the year has increased.  Up to 30 cabinet areas appear to be at risk.

48.     Currently for Year 4, 88 cabinet areas are in build, 43 are completed and 22 have moved into warranty. 

Watercare Hunua 4 Bulk Watermain

49.     As at the end of September 2014, 12.6 km of pipe has been laid at an average weekly rate of 48 metres and Watercare advise it is on target.

Watercare Pakuranga Rising Water Main

50.     Work commenced in January on the construction of a new 0.9 metre diameter sanitary sewer rising main in the carriageway of Pakuranga Road and Lagoon Drive in the vicinity of the Panmure Bridge. 

51.     Progress at either end of the project site (Lagoon Drive and Pakuranga Road east of the Panmure Bridge) has been good and the positive temporary traffic management measures employed have enabled traffic to continue with only minimal delays.


Overweight Permits

52.     There were 198 overweight permit applications processed in September. Of the 198 permit applications, 155 (78.3%) were processed within the target times and all applications were processed by the nominated travel start date.

53.     The target timeframes for processing overweight permit applications are 3 days for KPI 2, single trip, multi travel and continuous renewal permits and 5 working days for KPI 3 continuous and area permits.

Parking and Enforcement

Parking machine replacement

54.     The existing 922 Pay and Display machines installed in the greater Auckland area have reached their end of life and are due for replacement.  Parking Services have conducted an on-going investigation into the developing technology associated with on-street parking.  A paper has recently been prepared requesting the funding necessary for a technology upgrade and is planned to be presented to the AT Board at its November meeting.

55.     The proposed new system incorporates the ‘pay by space’ mode with in-road sensors for each parking spot.  Parking availability will be published on the internet.  Once a parking space is occupied payment will be made at a nearby payment machine that will accept HOP cards, credit cards, text-a-park and cash.  Smartphone payments will also be available with text reminders being sent when the time limit is due to expire.  Additional topping up for extending parking will be available by either smartphone or at any other parking payment machine.

56.     Enforcement of expired parking spaces will be managed from Parking Officers PDAs that will be able to communicate to a central system holding data on the parking status of the city’s precincts.  Improved management information and remote tariff adjustments will be managed from the centralised system.

Auckland parking discussion document

57.     There was significant interest in the parking discussion document, with AT receiving over 6,000 submissions.  The submissions are still being analysed and themes collated.  The next step will be to draw up a region-wide parking policy which will consider information from those submissions.

58.     A report on key themes and possible policy responses is expected to be reported back to the AT Board in October.  The detail of individual schemes will follow.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Schedule of activities undertaken for the first quarter 2014/15 ending 30 September 20614 and forward works programme for the second quarter 2014/15 ending 31 December 2014.

153

bView

Attachment B, Travelwise schools activities broken down by local board

169

cView

Attachment C, Traffic Control Committee Decisions

171

dView

Attachment D, Local Board Advocacy Report

173

eView

Attachment E, Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

175

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport Officers

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

















Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) Programme 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2014/26226

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2014/2015 Small Local Improvement Projects (SLIPs) programme and recommends projects for scoping approval and commencement.

Executive Summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $329,120 SLIPs operational funding (Opex) to allocate in the 2014/2015 financial year. At the time of this report, $222,177 SLIPs operational expenditure has been approved totalling 68% of the total available budget.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $911,000 SLIPs capital funding (Capex) in the 2014/2015 financial year. Of this, $779,383 capital expenditure has been allocated to projects in previous years and carried forward. The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has allocated a further $151,860 capital funding towards new projects in financial year 2014/2015.

4.       This report recommends that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board reallocate funding from two projects and allocate budget to the scoped proposals as detailed below

1

Local Alcohol Strategy and action plan

 $15,000 SLIPs Opex

2

Local Board Building spaces

 $15,000 SLIPs Opex

3

Programme for Panmure Hall and Fergusson Hall

 $50,000 SLIPs Opex

4

Youth initiatives plan

 $10,000 SLIPs Opex

5

Implementation response to Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment - Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre

 $8,250 SLIPs Opex

6

Treaty Of Settlements and Spark - Point England Reserve Concept plan

$5,000 SLIPs Opex

7

Arthur Street Restoration – top-up funding contribution towards weed control

$14,000 SLIPs Opex

8

Tin Tacks Reserve concept design delivery

$30,000 SLIPs Capex

9

Maybury Reserve storm water issue

 $10,000 SLIPs Capex

10

Signage for AT Mobility Parking monitoring

 $2,000 SLIPs Capex

11

Tāmaki Estuary walkway concept plan – installation of furniture / fixed asset

 Funding value to be determined at business meeting

12

Panmure Basin concept plan - installation of furniture / fixed asset

 Funding value to be determined at business meeting

 

5.       Detailed information outlining the background to each of the proposed projects will be tabled at the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board November business meeting.

6.       Approval of the recommendations in this report will allocate 100% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure in the financial year and 100% of the available SLIPs operational expenditure.

7.       All 2014/2015 projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2014/2015 financial year; to enable commencement and completion prior to 30th June 2015. 

8.       Most projects will need eight months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2014/2015 financial year. Projects that have budget allocated to them with less than six months remaining within the current financial year will be at risk of not being completed by 2014/2015 financial year end.

9.       Budgets for projects funded from 2014/2015 SLIPs capital expenditure and SLIPs operational expenditure must be fully expended within the 2014/2015 financial year.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      acknowledges receipt of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2014/2015 SLIPs funding summary programme.

b)      delegates authority to the spokesperson to provide guidance and advice to the SLIPs team regarding their allocated proposals and delegates authority to the spokesperson and chair of the board, to be exercised together, to make additional funding decisions where a variation to a project scope is needed due to unforeseen circumstances.

c)      reallocates $106,859 SLIPs capital funding from the Mt Wellington War Memorial Peace Walk project and place this project on hold until the ongoing concept plan works are complete and an alternative funding source has been confirmed. 

d)      reallocates  savings of $7,200 SLIPs operational budget from the AT Monitoring and Enforcement of Mobility Parking Spaces project to scoped projects.

e)      approves the Local Alcohol Strategy and Action plan development project for commencement and allocates $15,000 SLIPs operational budget.

f)       approves a feasibility study for the Local Board Building space for commencement and allocates $15,000 SLIPs operational budget.

g)      allocates $50,000 SLIPs operational budget towards additional programmes for Panmure Hall & Fergusson Hall.

h)      approves funding for preparation of a Youth initiatives plan and allocates $10,000 SLIPs operational budget.        

i)        approves an implementation response to Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment report and allocate $5,500 SLIPs operational budget for additional programmes at Riverside Community Centre and $2,750 for additional programmes at the Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre.

j)        approves a concept plan design project for the Elstree North entrance to Point England Reserve for commencement and allocates $5,000 SLIPs operational budget.

k)      allocates $14,000 SLIPs operational budget as a top-up contribution towards the Arthur Reserve restoration project weed control.

l)        approves the Tin Tacks Reserve concept design delivery project and allocates $30,000 SLIPs capital budget.

m)     approves the Maybury Reserve storm water filter installation project and allocates $10,000 SLIPs capital budget.

n)      approves the AT Mobility Parking signage installation project and allocates $2,000 SLIPs capital budget.

o)      approves allocation of remaining $44,616 SLIPs capital funding  to one or more of the following projects:

i)        Tāmaki Estuary walkway concept plan – installation of furniture / fixed asset

ii)       Panmure Basin concept plan - installation of furniture / fixed asset

p)      notes that upon approval of the above recommendations 100% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and 100% of the available SLIPs operational expenditure would be allocated to projects.

 

Comments

10.     This report recommends that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board reallocate funding from two projects and allocate budget to the scoped proposals as detailed below

1

Local Alcohol Strategy and action plan

 $15,000 SLIPs Opex

2

Local Board Building spaces

 $15,000 SLIPs Opex

3

Programme for Panmure Hall & Fergusson Hall

 $50,000 SLIPs Opex

4

Youth initiatives plan

 $10,000 SLIPs Opex

5

Implementation response to Tāmaki Community Needs Assessment - Riverside Community Centre and Dunkirk Rd Activity Centre

 $8,250 SLIPs Opex

6

Treaty Of Settlements and Spark - Point England Reserve Concept plan

$5,000 SLIPs Opex

7

Arthur Street Restoration – top-up funding contribution towards weed control

$14,000 SLIPs Opex

8

Tin Tacks Reserve concept design delivery

$30,000 SLIPs Capex

9

Maybury Reserve storm water issue

 $10,000 SLIPs Capex

10

Signage for AT Mobility Parking monitoring

 $2,000 SLIPs Capex

11

Tāmaki Estuary walkway concept plan – installation of furniture / fixed asset

 Funding value to be determined at business meeting

12

Panmure Basin concept plan - installation of furniture / fixed asset

 Funding value to be determined at business meeting

 

11.     Detailed information outlining the background to each of the proposed projects will be tabled at the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board November business meeting.

12.     Communities are impacted by SLIPs projects. They provide an opportunity for staff and elected representatives to engage with the communities on their specific needs. SLIPs staff will liaise directly with all residents and stakeholders impacted by any SLIPs funded projects to be delivered.

13.     Funding for the proposed projects within this report will come from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki SLIPs budget. After allocating budget to all the projects listed in this report and elsewhere, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board have allocated 100% of the available SLIPs capital expenditure and 100% of the available SLIPs operational expenditure.

14.     SLIPs need to comply with all relevant legislation, including the Resource Management Act 1991, the Local Government Act and all Auckland Council policies.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

15.     This report canvasses the views of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

16.     The recommendations contained within this report fall within the Local Boards allocated authority.

Maori Impact Statement

17.     Parks and open spaces contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate consultation will follow.

Implementation

18.     All 2014/2015 projects should have budget allocated to them within the first quarter of the 2014/2015 financial year; to enable commencement and completion prior to 30th June 2015. 

19.     Most projects will need eight months or more to be successfully delivered within the 2014/2015 financial year. Projects that have budget allocated to them with less than six months remaining within the current financial year will be at risk of not being completed by 2014/2015 financial year end.

20.     Budgets for projects funded from 2014/2015 SLIPs capital expenditure and SLIPs operational expenditure must be fully expended within the 2014/2015 financial year.

21.     The ability to spend/deliver outcomes is dependent on the availability of experienced staff or consultant project management resource.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, SLIPs Programme 2014/2015

181

    

Signatories

Authors

Vandna Kirmani - SLIPs Project Portfolio Leader

Authorisers

Katrina Morgan - Team Leaders SLIPs

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/24852

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Board’s feedback on the draft Community Facilities Network Plan (Attachment A) following workshops held with all local boards in August and September 2014.

Executive summary

2.       In August 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee endorsed the Draft Community Facilities Network Plan (REG/2014/98) for engagement with local boards, advisory panels and key external stakeholders.

3.       The purpose of the Community Facilities Network Plan (draft plan) is to guide council’s provision of community facilities for the next 10 years and beyond.  The key drivers are to:

a)      optimise the use and efficiency of existing facilities

b)      address gaps and needs for community facilities now and into the future

c)      meet demand arising from population growth and changing user expectations.

4.       The scope of the draft plan includes community centres, venues for hire (community or rural halls), arts and culture facilities, aquatic and leisure facilities.  The network includes facilities owned by council and facilities owned by third-parties which are supported by council and available for community use.  While facilities like libraries, sport clubs, community leases, schools, churches and marae are not included in the recommendations of the network plan, these facilities will be considered in the implementation phase.

5.       There are three key components of the draft plan:

a)      Strategic framework – specifies the outcomes council is seeking from its investment in community facilities aligned with the Auckland Plan, Local Board Plans and other strategic priorities; and articulates the council’s key objectives for future provision.

b)      Provision framework – guides council’s approach for future community facility provision.

c)      Action Plan – over 50 recommended actions to investigate areas with potential gaps in provision and to investigate existing facilities with issues affecting their performance.

6.       Each action will require detailed community or sector based investigation to understand needs and determine the appropriate response.  Process guidelines have been developed to ensure a consistent approach to these investigations.  Local boards and the local community will be fully involved in investigation processes.

7.       As council may not have the capacity to invest in all community facility projects, the draft plan also provides prioritisation criteria to help determine the priorities for investment once the investigation process determines the appropriate facility response.  The ability and timeframe to implement the actions is dependent on the budget available for community facility investment in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP).

8.       Feedback on the draft plan was sought from key stakeholders including regional sports organisations, facility partners, facility managers and advisory panels.  Submissions were also invited through shapeauckland.co.nz which closed on 15 September 2014.  A summary of feedback is attached in Attachment B.

9.       It is proposed that libraries should be included in the Community Facilities Network Plan as another key community facility that council provides, and to ensure alignment of planning and future facility provision.  Libraries have undertaken similar research to understand the gaps and needs for libraries and are well placed to be included.  There will need to be further communication with local boards on the libraries content.  Revised timeframes to integrate libraries into the plan and to align with the LTP process are outlined in this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provides feedback of the Draft Community Facilities Network Plan which will guide council’s provision of community facilities, including any specific feedback on the strategic framework, provision framework, action plan, implementation approach and prioritisation criteria.

b)      notes proposed revised timeframes to include libraries in the Community Facilities Network Plan and that further engagement with local boards will be undertaken to discuss the libraries content and the final revised network plan.

 

Comments

Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

10.     Community facilities contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing space for people to connect with each other, socialise, learn skills and participate in a range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities.  Community facilities contribute to improved lifestyles and a sense of belonging, identity and pride among residents.

11.     The draft plan outlines how council will provide and invest in community facilities to respond to community needs and population growth and changes.

12.     The draft plan sets out a strategic framework for community facilities to articulate why council invests in the provision of community facilities, the desired outcomes from this investment and the key objectives for future provision.  This is aligned with the strategic direction and transformational shifts in the Auckland Plan, local board plans and relevant strategic action plans.

13.     The proposed common purpose for community facilities is “Vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of where and how communities connect and participate”.

14.     The draft plan sets out four proposed key objectives to guide and underpin the future provision of community facilities:

a)      Undertake robust and consistent planning to ensure future decisions on the provision of community facilities are based on clear evidence of needs and assessment of all options.

b)      Maintain, improve and make the best use of existing community facilities where they continue to meet community needs and investigate the future of facilities that no longer meet community needs.

c)      Provide flexible and multi-purpose facilities that are co-located and/or integrated with other community infrastructure.

d)      Look for opportunities to leverage and support partnerships.

Future Provision Framework

15.     The draft plan proposes provision frameworks for each type of community facility to guide council’s approach to the provision of new facilities in the future.

Community Centres

16.     The proposed provision approach for community centres is to continue to maintain and deliver community centres at the local level across the region, recognising the important role they play in meeting local community needs for spaces to deliver a wide range of community, recreation, learning, events, arts and culture activities.

Venues for hire

17.     Given the wide range of providers of venues to hire, the draft plan proposes the council does not invest in any more new stand-alone venues for hire. It is proposed that bookable space is included in multi-purpose community centres (new or existing/redeveloped), guided by community needs assessments. Other options should be explored including partnerships or encouraging other organisations (such as schools, sports clubs and churches) to make bookable spaces available for community use. In some cases where venues for hire are no longer serving community needs, there may be potential to consider repurposing venues for other activities or possible divestment.

Aquatic and Leisure Facilities

18.     The proposed provision framework for aquatic and leisure facilities is through a hierarchy of local, destination and regional facilities to support participation in a range of sport and recreation activities from casual play through to competitive sport.  The draft plan outlines different functions and level of provision for local, destination and regional facilities.

Arts and Culture Facilities

19.     At the local level, the proposed future provision will focus on enabling participation in arts and culture activity through programming in existing facilities and new multi-purpose facilities, rather than building new standalone local arts facilities.  The focus will be placed on integrating arts space and programming within the existing network or in new multi-purpose facilities, repurposing existing spaces or partnering with others to provide suitable space.

20.     It is recognised there is a need for some specialised arts and culture facilities that serve larger catchments.  The draft plan proposes supporting a network of destination and regional arts and cultural facilities to meet sector and audience demand, which would be determined by robust investigation on a case-by-case basis.  It is proposed the council would only intervene when the private sector does not and opportunities for partnerships with the wider sector including central government should be explored.

Action Plan and Implementation

21.     The draft plan includes over 50 recommended actions to undertake investigations into the future provision of community facilities, focused on both existing facilities and potential areas for new facilities.

22.     All recommended actions will require detailed community or sector based investigation to determine the appropriate response. It is intended that any future investment in community facilities will be determined following detailed investigation which provides clear evidence of need, options analysis and development of a robust business case. Detailed process guidelines to ensure a consistent approach to these investigations have been developed (Appendix 2 of draft plan: Community Facilities Development Guidelines). Local boards and the community would be fully involved in investigation processes.

23.     As council may not have the capacity to invest in all community facility projects, the draft network plan provides prioritisation criteria to assist the governing body to determine its priorities for investment in community facilities.

24.     The draft plan identifies existing community facilities which have issues impacting on their performance and ability to meet community needs. In these cases, investigation is required to understand in more detail how the facility is operating and meeting community needs, explore various options for the facility and to determine the appropriate response. There could be a variety of options including changes to facility governance, management or programming, facility redevelopment, repurposing for another activity or possible divestment.

25.     For potential areas for new facilities, a similar investigation process is required to understand community needs, explore and test the feasibility of different options and assess the business case for a new facility.  The outcome of this investigation may identify a non-asset solution is required such as programming, partnerships or supporting a non-council facility.

26.     The actions in the draft network plan have been ranked according to the urgency of completing the investigation recognising different factors including condition issues, responding to catalysts, opportunities for rationalisation or partnerships, timing and scale of population growth and location in a spatial priority area.

27.     During workshops with local boards, some inaccuracies were identified in the draft plan.  Corrections have been included in the draft plan attached in Attachment A.

Stakeholder Engagement

28.     The draft plan has been informed by previous feedback from communities, principally via annual customer satisfaction surveys, user surveys, catchments studies and consultation on the Auckland Plan and relevant strategic action plans.

29.     Given this context, engagement on the draft plan has primarily been limited to targeted stakeholders, including council’s advisory panels, facility partners and managers and external stakeholder groups such as regional sports organisations.  Additionally, the draft plan has been available for wider public comment on shapeauckland.co.nz.  A summary of feedback is attached in Attachment B.

30.     Most of the actions identified in the draft plan will require further investigation to determine the appropriate response.  This will include detailed and localised community and/or sector based investigation/engagement and feedback from communities on different options. The public will also have the opportunity to provide feedback on the proposed level of future investment in community facilities via the LTP consultation process.

Incorporating Libraries into the Network Plan

31.     Through the LTP process, the Parks, Community and Lifestyle theme has been working to address priorities and funding for activities including community facilities, recreation facilities and libraries.  It has become clear there is a need for a more coordinated and aligned approach for the future planning and development of community facilities with an emphasis on multi-purpose facilities.

32.     It is proposed that libraries be included in the network plan as a key community facility that council provides and to ensure alignment of planning and future facility provision.  Libraries have undertaken similar research to understand the gaps and needs for future libraries and are well placed to be included.  There will need to be further communication with local boards on the libraries content which means the timeframes to complete the network plan will need to be extended into 2015.

33.     One advantage of extending the timeframes is alignment with the LTP process.  The level of future capital investment in community facilities won’t be known until after the public consultation process on the LTP is completed in May 2015.  Finalising the network plan once the LTP process is completed (or near completion) will ensure the plan can incorporate the LTP outcomes and governing body priorities for future investment in community facilities.

34.     The key benefit of modifying the scope to include libraries is the alignment of planning and provision to achieve better community outcomes and greater efficiency. 

35.     The revised timeframe for integrating libraries into the draft plan is outlined below:

Dec

Briefing with local boards on the library research

Dec-Jan

Development of revised Community Facilities Network Plan

Feb 2015

Workshops with local boards to review the revised plan

Mar

Report to the governing body on the revised draft plan

Apr-May

Report to local boards seeking feedback on revised draft plan

July

Report to governing body seeking approval of final Community Facilities Network Plan

Consideration

Local board views and implications

36.     During August and September, workshops with local boards were undertaken to present on the draft Community Facilities Network Plan, to respond to any questions and assist local boards in formulating their feedback.

37.     Feedback from local boards is sought on the draft plan, particularly on the following:

a)      Strategic framework (section 3) including the common purpose, outcomes and objectives.

b)      Provision frameworks (Section 4).

c)      Action plan (section 5).

d)      Implementation approach (section 6) including process guidelines and prioritisation criteria.

38.     The feedback from local boards will be incorporated into a revised network plan (which includes libraries) and will be presented/reported to local boards in 2015.

Māori impact statement

39.     The provision of community facilities contributes to improving wellbeing among Maori communities by providing spaces to connect, socialise, learn skills and participate.  For all community facility types Maori are represented as users.  At aquatic facilities Maori make up 14% of users (compared to 9% of the population), 11% of leisure facility users and 9% of community centre users.  Maori are under-represented as users compared to the Auckland population at arts and culture facilities.

40.     Given the context of the network plan and the information already received through the user surveys and iwi consultation on the strategic action plans, it was not proposed to undertake any specific engagement with Maori or other facility users.

41.     The broader picture of community facility provision recognises that marae and kohanga reo are important social infrastructure for Maori and the community. Officers from Te Waka Angamua are currently scoping a project to address the future provision and development of marae facilities.  Opportunities for aligned provision and/or partnerships with marae facilities should be considered as potential options to meet community needs.

Implementation

42.     The draft plan is an aspirational plan for the next 10 to 20 years which outlines what needs to be investigated and undertaken to deliver a network of community facilities to meet community needs.  The ability and timeframe to implement the actions is dependent on the level of budget available through the council’s LTP 2015-2025.

43.     Through the LTP process, the governing body will consider the amount of funding available for investment in community facilities.  To deliver the network plan this will need to include both operational funding to undertake the required investigations and depending on the outcome of each investigation, capital and operational funding to implement the recommended response.

44.     Once the network plan is adopted, implementation will focus on progressing the high priority actions using the implementation approach and community facilities development guidelines.

45.     The draft plan lists a number of community facility projects that are already underway or were anticipated to commence construction in 2014/15.  The current review of the 2014/15 capital works programme may result in the deferral of some of these projects.  Once decisions have been made on deferrals, then the draft network plan will be amended to reflect this.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Draft Community Facilities Network Plan

191

bView

Attachment B, Draft Community Facilities Network Plan stakeholder feedback

257

     

Signatories

Authors

Anita Coy-Macken - Principal Policy Analyst – Central

David Shamy - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - Regional & Local Planning Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Acting Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 















Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 













































Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 






Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 






Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Request for feedback on the draft Local Approved Product Policy

 

File No.: CP2014/25879

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek local board feedback on the draft Local Approved Product Policy (LAPP).

Executive summary

2.       On 9 October 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved the draft LAPP for public consultation (REG/2014/123).  The LAPP sets rules regarding where retail outlets of psychoactive substances may operate.  The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 provides that a policy may regulate the location of retail outlets by reference to broad areas within a district, proximity to other premises selling approved products and/or distance from certain types of premises such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities.

3.       Local boards are being asked to provide formal feedback on the draft LAPP by the end of December.  There will be an opportunity for local boards to present their views to the hearings panel in February 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Local Approved Product Policy in the attached report.

 

 

Comments

4.       On 9 October 2014 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee approved a draft LAPP for public consultation (REG/2014/123). 

5.       The LAPP sets rules regarding where retail outlets of psychoactive substances may operate.  The Psychoactive Substances Act 2013 provides that a policy may regulate the location of retail outlets by reference to broad areas within a district, proximity to other premises selling approved products and/or distance from certain types of premises such as schools, places of worship and other community facilities.

6.       The draft LAPP will prevent licences being granted in areas of high deprivation, near high schools and near addiction and mental health treatment centres.  It would also limit how close to an existing shop a new shop could open.  The policy also has a separate set of rules for the city centre where licences won’t be granted in areas of high residential deprivation and new shops would have to be a certain distance from existing shops.  This draft would reduce the availability of these substances in areas where their presence is likely to have the greatest potential for harm. 

7.       Public consultation on the draft LAPP will be conducted via a special consultative procedure.  The consultation will begin on 28th October and run for four weeks.  The consultation is being publicised via social media, Our Auckland, the peoples panel, various public events and advisory panel networks.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       Local board views are being sought via this report.  Local boards have previously provided feedback on possible options and on a proposed draft.  Workshops on the proposed draft were held with a number of boards.  17 boards provided feedback on the specific options, three requested a complete ban.  Great barrier declined to comment as they did not consider it an issue for their area.  

9.       As a result of local board feedback to the proposed draft the following changes were made:

·        Buffer zones around schools were increased

·        Buffer zones around mental health and addiction treatment centres were increased

·        New rules for the city centre were added.

10.     Local board feedback is being sought in in a parallel process to the special consultative process.  The local board process will last until the end of December with local boards having the opportunity to present their views to the hearings panel in February 2015.

Maori impact statement

11.     Māori are over represented amongst the groups of vulnerable people likely to be affected by using approved psychoactive substances.  This over representation has two effects.  Firstly getting the right option for the LAPP to maximize harm reduction will be more effective for Māori.  Secondly, any solutions need to be designed in close collaboration with Māori to ensure they are workable and support wider initiatives aimed at improving Māori outcomes.  Both of these goals are consistent with outcomes set out by Auckland Council to improve social outcomes for Māori in Auckland.

12.     The consultation process with Māori has been developed in partnership with Māori agencies.  A workshop has been undertaken with representatives from Hapai Te Hauora Tapui, an agency representing Māori health providers in the Auckland region, to provide initial feedback.  Council staff are working with the Independent Māori Statutory Board, Te Waka Angamua and Hapai Te Hauora Tapui to ensure effective engagement with Māori.  The initial work has centred on ensuring information is available to iwi and maata waka. 

Implementation

Step

Estimated timeframe

1. Special consultative procedure

28 October – 28 November

2. Local board consultation

20 October – 19 December

3. Hearings

February 2015

4. Adopt final policy

April 2015

5. Implementation and review

Ongoing

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Changes from proposed to draft summary

265

bView

Attachment B, Statement of Proposal - draft LAPP

267

     

Signatories

Authors

Callum Thorpe - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 












Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops October 2014

 

File No.: CP2014/26081

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The attached workshop records provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops.

2.       These sessions are held to give an information opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects, and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Recommendation/s

That the record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receives the workshops report for October 2014.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Local Board record of workshops for October 2014

281

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 7 October 10am-5pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

 

Apologies:       Alan Verrall

 

1.0

Significance and Engagement Policy

 

To discuss the significance and engagement policy

 

Officers present:

Ben Parsons

 

 

2.0

Elected Members Expenses Policy

 

To discuss the elected members expenses policy.

 

Officers present:

Victoria Villaraza

 

 

3.0

Long Term Plan

 

To discuss development of the Long Term Plan.

 

Officers present:

Victoria Villaraza, Sugenthy Thomson

 

 

4.0

Onehunga Foreshore Restoration

 

To discuss progress of the project.

 

Officers present:

Greg Hannah, Steve Owens, Kirsten Reidt, Peter McGregor, Deb Diaz

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 14 October 10am-5pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

1.0

Tāmaki Needs Assessment

 

To discuss the Tāmaki needs assessment research.

 

Officers present:

Kathy O’Connor, Tanya Mead, Kate Holst

 

 

2.0

Long Term Plan

 

To discuss development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Victoria Villaraza, Nina Siers, Victoria Ly

 

 

3.0

Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Board

 

Relationship meeting

 

Officers present:

Adam Johstone, John Dunshea

 

 

4.0

Long Term Plan

 

Further discussion on development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Victoria Villaraza, Nina Siers, Victoria Ly

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 21 October 10am-5pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

1.0

Long Term Plan

 

To discuss development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Nina Siers, Sugenthy Thomson

 

 

2.0

Family and sexual violence strategic action plan

 

To discuss the Family and sexual violence strategic action plan

 

Officers present:

Kelly Maung, Beverly Fletcher

 

 

3.0

Local Board Engagement

 

To discuss local board engagement

 

Officers present:

Victoria Ly

 

 

4.0

Long Term Plan

 

Further discussion in the development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Penny Pirrit

 

 

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

Record of workshop proceedings for 28 October 2014 10am-5pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Brett Clark

Josephine Bartley

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

1.0

Long Term Plan 

 

To discuss development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Nina Siers, Sugenthy Thomson

 

 

2.0

AMETI effects on Panmure Business Association

 

To discuss the research findings.

 

Officers present:

Rose Cosgrove, Kate Brill, Arvin Seaman, Greg Horne

 

 

3.0

Road naming workshop

 

To discuss the road naming guidelines.

 

Officers present:

Brett O’Shaughnessy

 

 

4.0

Sir Woolf Fisher Park

 

To discuss development of the park.

 

Officers present:

David Barker

 

 

5.0

Long Term Plan 

 

To discuss development of the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Victoria Villaraza

 

 

6.0

Arthur Street Concept Report and Pt England Pond update 

 

To discuss the concept plan for Arthur Street and an update on Pt England Pond.

 

Officers present:

Tessa Chilala, Mark Iszard, Mark Lewis

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Board Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2014/26082

 

  

 

Purpose

Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receives the board member reports.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A, Deputy Chair report, Chris Makoare

287

bView

Attachment B, Board Member report, Brett Clark

289

cView

Attachment C, Board Member report, Bridget Graham

291

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Board

Month- Oct Nov

Deputy Chair report

30/09     Local board meetings

6/10       Attended Panmure Business Association AGM

7/10       8am: Pick up Murals from Adult Literacy GI and deliver to Local Board office        

9am: Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan

10am: Local board meetings

8/10       Advisors catch-up

11/10     Liv It Up- Youth Music event (East HEART unplugged)

14/10     Local board meetings

                Business meeting

15/10     Chairs catch-up

                Advisors catch up

16/10     Financial literacy and housing affordability workshop at West Hub

21/10     Local board meetings

                Business meeting

22/10     Family Whanau and sexual health workshop follow up

27/10     Labour Day

28/10     9.30am- Meet with Mt Wellington Swim Club and Panmure Lagoon Pools

29/10     Chairs catch-up

31/10     Dawn Blessing Te Horeta Rd

1/11       Te Horeta Rd official opening

3/11       Central Facilities Partnership Committee Workshop

4/11       Local board meetings                    

 

 

Highlights of the Month

Te Horeta Rd opening

Representing the Local Board at the dawn blessing was the highlight for me this month. The dawn blessing was not favoured by dignitaries who prefered attending the opening event. For me representing the Board at this time to tautoko Mana Whenua in what they see as an important part of the opening I felt showed and strengthened that relationship the Board is growing with Mana Whenua. The official opening of the road on the Saturday was hugely successful as there were a lot of people in attendance, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board was well represented by myself, Bridget and Josephine with Councillor Denise Krum also in attendance, there were other Councillors and Board members from other wards so I think Council as whole showed a presence.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Board Member’s Report – Brett Clark

 

  

Committee: 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting Tuesday 18 November 2014 Panmure Local Board Office

 

Activities from 13 October 2014 – 5 November 2014

13 October

The Onehunga Combined Sports Trust

14

M-T Local Board workshop

15

Panmure Business Association

 

Panmure Basin Advisory Committee

16

Onehunga Business Association

 

Onehunga police catch up

 

41 Apirana Ave – Housing NZ

 

TRC Central Tāmaki Special Housing Area (SHA) Drop-in Session

17

Onehunga Business Association Strategic Plan with their consultant

 

Draft concept plan for Tin Tacks Reserve

18

Diwali Cultural Celebration Onehunga Library

20

Oranga Community Centre Society

21

M-T Local Board workshop

 

M-T Local Board  Business Meeting

23

Sport Auckland

28

M-T Local Board workshop

 

The Onehunga Combined Sports Trust

29

Update on Onehunga Foreshore with the chair

30

Penrose Business Association breakfast

 

M-T Local Board parks catch up

4 November

M-T Local Board workshop

5

The Onehunga Combined Sports Trust

 

Local Government New Zealand Infrastructure Management Workshop – How it really works

On Friday 26 September I attended the above workshop in Hastings, my fellow participants were mainly elected councillors from local district councils although an engineering department officer from another mainly rural council joined us.

 

Key elements included:

·        Basic principles and the value of infrastructure management

·        Elected members as decision makers

·        Looking in more detail at key elements of infrastructure management

·        Key asset life cycle strategies

 

My knowledge and understanding has grown in this area of our business and I am sure this will help me in my parks portfolio role as we further develop the renewals budget programme for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki. It was also valuable to discuss with fellow elected members the challenges they face when there is a static or declining population and/or usage/demand rather than the issues associated with growth.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report from Brett Clark be received


 

Signatories

Authors

Brett Clark


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Board Member Bridget Graham

Monthly Report, October – November 2014

13 October

Manukau Harbour Forum hui with Iwi

14 October

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting to adopt the Local Board Plan

Annual General Meeting for the Friends of Onehunga Community House

15 October

Maungakiekie Health Working Group

16 October 

Onehunga Business Association Annual General Meeting

21 October

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Business Meeting 

22 October

Budget Committee discussion with prior meeting

23 October 

Commissioners’ meeting re Pakuranga Road BP Station

Onehunga Community Patrol

28 October

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops

30 October

Local Board cluster meeting regarding Auckland Transport’s priorities for the Long Term Plan.

1 November

Opening of Te Horeta Road.

4 November

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops

Portfolio Update

13 October – Manukau Harbour Forum hui with Iwi

23 October – Commissioners’ meeting re BP service station

 

Site visits and recommendations: -

7/59 Victoria Street Onehunga

56/60 Carbine Road Mt. Wellington

52/54 Selwyn Street Onehunga

434B Church Street East Penrose

 

Community Networks: -

Onehunga Community House

28 October – Management Committee Meeting.

Maungakiekie Health Working Group

15 October – monthly meeting

CABAC

31 October monthly management meeting

 

Highlights

Meeting Dame Nganeko Minhinnick at the Manukau Harbour forum meeting with Iwi.

 

Attending Max Cryer’s fund raising show held at the Dolphin Theatre, for the Dolphin Theatre.


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2014/26083

 

  

 

Executive summary

Providing the Chairperson, Simon Randall, with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues he has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receives the Chairperson’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2014/26340

 

  

 

Executive Summary

 

Providing the Governing Body Member, Denise Krum, the opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on projects, meetings, events and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receives the Governing Body Member’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

     

  


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1, Attachment a - St Georges Rowing Club supporting document         Page 307


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

18 November 2014

 

 

Background to the deputation to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

November 18th 2014.

 

Deputation from the St Georges Rowing Club regarding launching facilities at The Panmure Wharf Domain.

 

Michael Harrison.

 

The Tāmaki River does not naturally provide good launching facilities for small boats so some form of artificial structure is required for the river to be used.

 

The Panmure Wharf itself was not designed for small boats the size of Rowing skiffs, Waka or Kayaks.

 

There was a boat ramp on the seaward side of the wharf where vehicles could back trailers in and unload boats. Waka, canoes and row boats could also be launched from there. This has not been maintained for years and is not usable for vehicles or small boats except at high tides.

 

Upstream from the Wharf the old Auckland City council allowed St Georges RC to build a facility. This is simply layers of commercial plastic matting (not unlike weed matting) and gravel which sits on the natural mud base. The result is a gravel surface which gets a fine layer of mud over it, which allows launching at all tides.

 

Because it is laid on top of the tidal mud it slowly sinks into it. This means it has needed extra gravel to fill up the holes. It was envisaged that as it settled less and less maintenance would be required.

 

The structure was funded by Auckland City Council grants (both the original build and subsequent filling of hollows) with St Georges management. Working bees have been manned by St Georges, Auckland Grammar RC and the local Waka group. It is a public structure used by anyone with a small craft without charge.

 

The current Auckland Council will not allow any further maintenance without a resource consent and formal approval. The St Georges RC does not have the funds or expertise to acquire the necessary approvals. The club feel that this is a public facility used by a number of groups, both formal and informally, and it would be more appropriately maintained by the council.

 

The alternative is to look at the use of the Panmure Wharf itself. This is no longer a commercial facility and in poor repair. This could be cut down (lowered) with an additional floating structure added at right angles so there was dry launching at all tides.

 

The attached digital photographs show the existing structures at low tides. I have added these so people will have a good idea of the current situation and I can concentrate my time on looking forward.

 

Michael Harrison.

Pictures attached.

 

1.       The St Georges built mud mat as seen from the Wharf looking upstream. This shows the final structure blending into the general mud of the bay.

2.       The mud mat as seen from the road with the wharf on the left.

3.       The view from the mud mat looking downstream to the wharf.

4.       From the Panmure wharf looking towards the sea showing the yacht club jetty and floating platform. This would be similar to what could be done with the Panmure wharf.

5.       The last working bee working on maintenance using methods making minimal impact on the environment.

 

The St Georges built mud mat as seen from the Wharf looking upstream. This shows the final structure blending into the general mud of the bay.

 

The mud mat as seen from the road with the wharf on the left.

 

 

The view from the mud mat looking downstream to the wharf.

From the Panmure wharf looking towards the sea showing the yacht club jetty and floating platform. This would be similar to what could be done with the Panmure wharf.

 

 

The last working bee working on maintenance using methods making minimal impact on the environment.

 

 



[1] For example, according to hall utilisation data for July 2013- March 2014 (CDAC), utilisation rates of the Glen Innes Community Hall and Panmure Community Hall are below the regional average, at 24% and 25% respectively, compared with the regional average of 30-40%.

[2] Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Plan 2011.

[3] This model provides the framework for growth options in the region based on the Auckland Plan, using the Auckland Strategic Planning and Auckland Regional Transport (ART) models. The ART model represents the long term transport network and land-use pattern that Auckland aspires to over a 30 year time period.  Analysis included discussions with council’s Research and Monitoring Unit (RIMU).

[4] Tamaki Needs Assessment: Summary of workshop outputs. Rachel Butler July 2014.

[5] Tamaki Needs Assessment: Summary of workshop outputs. Rachel Butler July 2014.

[6] Key Stakeholder interviews, 2014.

[7] Youth Connections is a programme that creates pathways to employment for young people.

[8] Interestingly, increased community space were responses only from residents in Mt Wellington/Sylvia Park, an area that previous studies, including Sylvia Park Precinct Plan focus groups, identified as lacking strong sense of community, and the area that currently does not have a purpose built community centre or library.