I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 20 April 2015

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Adele White

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Jim Donald

 

 

Lucy Schwaner

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Steve Udy

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Lynda Pearson

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

10 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 572 0151

Email: lynda.pearson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Gum Tree on Whiteacres Reserve                                                                     5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Mrs Jody Nicolson, Chairperson, Nixon Hall Committee                               6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Chair's Report                                                                                                                9

13        Councillor's Update                                                                                                     11

14        Auckland Transport Update – April 2015                                                                 13

15        AMETI – Park Land Proposals                                                                                   39

16        New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Hugh Green Limited at 40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush                                                                                                                       49

17        New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Greenland Investments Limited at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush                                                                                          53

18        Allocation of Local Park Public Convenience Renewal Capex Funding              57

19        Howick Community Grants Programme 2015/2016                                                 61

20        Howick Local Board Community Fees and Charges - July to December 2014    67

21        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                   87

22        LGNZ Conference and AGM 2015                                                                           105

23        Site proposed for divestment - 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga                           113

24        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           119

25        Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals  123

26        Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016                                                139

27        Workshop Notes                                                                                                        145  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

  


 

1          Welcome

 

The Chairman will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 9 March 2015, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Gum Tree on Whiteacres Reserve

Purpose

1.       Providing a petition received from concerned residents regarding gum trees in Whiteacres Reserve.

Executive Summary

2.       A petition has been received from Robyn Goulding, Neighbourhood Watch Coordinator for Whiteacres Drive, Sunnyhills regarding the safety of the large gum trees in the Whiteacres Reserve (copies will be tabled at the meeting).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receives the petition regarding the gum trees on Whiteacres Reserve.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

9.1       Mrs Jody Nicolson, Chairperson, Nixon Hall Committee

Purpose

1.       Mrs Nicolson wishes to speak during public forum on the subject of Nixon Hall in respect to the fees and charges.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Thanks Mrs Jody Nicolson, Chairperson, Nixon Hall Committee, for addressing the board during public forum.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/04157

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Chair to update the meeting on projects and issues which the Board has been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       An opportunity for the Chair to verbally update the meeting on projects, issues, events, and progress the board has made since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receive the Chair’s verbal report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Councillor's Update

 

File No.: CP2015/04158

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

Executive Summary

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receive the verbal report.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05640

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on transport matters for the information of the Howick Local Board and a register of transport issues in the Howick Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Howick Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·    the Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund

·    response to Howick Local Board resolutions

·    new Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

·    AMETI update

·    Redoubt Road-Mill Road Corridor project update.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – April 2015’ and the attached issues register from Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South);

b)      Confirms that, having given consideration to the public consultation feedback received on the proposal, Auckland Transport should proceed to complete the detailed design and costing phase on the Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals project under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

 

Discussion

Howick Items

 

A1. Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

4.       The Howick Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is $871,903 per annum.

5.       The Board’s active projects are included in Table 1 below (NB: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost):

 

Table 1:

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

009

Walkway and amenity improvements at Half Moon Bay (HMB) Marina

·      $27,000 allocated from 2011/12 Discretionary budget in Aug-13

·      $36,221 incurred in detailed design phase as at 31-Dec-14

·      FEC estimate of $230,000 (construction only)

·      Firm estimates (for construction only) and detailed designs were reported to the Board’s transport portfolio meeting on 6-May-14.

·      Final designs were completed and distributed to the Board’s portfolio holders in Dec-14.  AT awaits direction from the Board on any further action at an upcoming portfolio meeting.


 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

155

Burswood Business Area enhancements

·      FEC estimate reduced to $318,730

·      $104,000 allocated by Council’s Business Area Planning Unit

·      $214,730 balance from LBTCF

·      On 9-Sep-13, the Board resolved that engagement with affected parties and representative groups be undertaken on the project.  This was undertaken over Sep/Oct-14.

·      On 10-Nov-14, the Board approved the project for construction.  The bus shelter component of the proposal was subsequently put on hold and the FEC estimate reduced accordingly.

·      AT Procurement has approved the use of the Minor Roading Works Framework Contract for delivery even though the work is over $250,000.

·      The tender should be offered to 3+ pre-approved contractors to submit prices the week after Easter.  The pricing period will be 1-2 weeks, then two days for review and award.

·      Delivery is expected in May/Jun-15.

156

Highland Park bus shelter installation

·      FEC estimate of $29,000 for new Classic shelter including two lightboxes and seats

·      Adshel will remove the existing single shelter and install a new double Classic shelter.  Adshel agreed to cover the cost of removing the existing shelter and installing the new one (and maintaining it) if the Board met the cost of the new double shelter.  The approximate dimensions of the proposed shelter are 7.6m long and 1.7m deep.

·      On 8-Dec-14, the Board approved the project for construction, based on the FEC of $29,000.

·      It is expected that the shelter will be installed around mid May-15.

217

Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals

·      ROC estimate revised to $280,000

·      On 10-Feb-14, the Board approved the project to proceed to detailed design and costing stage based on the ROC of $165,000.

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board approved the project to proceed with detailed design and costing based on the revised ROC of $280,000.

·      Public consultation on the proposal was completed in March and 39 submissions were received, mostly in support of the proposal.  The submissions were considered at the Transport Portfolio meeting on 31-Mar-15.

·      Board confirmation to proceed with the completion of the detailed design and costing phase, in light of the submissions received, is now sought.

272

Little Bucklands Beach walkway – both north and south of Grainger Point

·      ROC estimated at $300,000 (for approx 150m in both directions)

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved this project to progress to detailed design and costing stage.

·      AT was requested to maintain contact with AC Parks regarding this and other potential projects along the length of The Parade.

·      A cross portfolio site walkover was held on 24-Feb-15.  Options are being assessed with AC Parks prior to a programmed cross-portfolio Board workshop on 28-Apr-15.

276

East Tamaki streetlighting upgrade

·      ROC estimated at $58,000

·      This proposal covers Kerwyn Ave, Andromeda Crescent, Lorien Place and Arwen Place.

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved this project to progress directly to construction based on the ROC.

·      Installation commenced in March and will be completed in Apr-15


 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

279

Chapel Road pedestrian signals

·      ROC estimated at $200,000

·      Proposal is for a signalised pedestrian crossing at the pedestrian refuge north of Baverstock Road.

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved this project to progress to detailed design and costing stage.

·      Consultation has been completed and no major changes are required.

·      Opus is currently working on the detailed design, including utility service issues.  Once the design is finalised, AT will arrange for a safety audit before returning to the Board seeking construction approval.

274

Point View Drive footpath

·      FEC estimate of $137,400

·      On 8-Sep-14, the Board approved this project to progress to detailed design and costing stage, based on the ROC of $136,500.

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board approved this project for construction based on the FEC of $137,400.

·      Construction is about 80% complete.  Completion is expected by the end of Apr- 15.

372

The Parade, Bucklands Beach, new footpath

·      ROC estimated at $5,800

·      Final cost to be reported

·      On 8-Sep-14, the Board approved construction for a section of new footpath on The Parade, based on the ROC of $5,800.

·      Construction complete.  Final cost to be reported.

396

Half Moon Bay (HMB) new ferry facility

·      $2.5m allocated*

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board allocated up to $2.5m towards a new ferry facility at HMB, *subject to AT allocating at least $1m towards the project.

·      NZTA subsidy approval for approximately 50% of the proposed $4.3M project is confirmed.

·      A progress update is included at item A2 below.

 

6.       The Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below:

Howick Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total funding available ($871,903 p.a.across 5 FYs – 2012/13 to 2016/17)

$4,359,515

Completed projects reporting actual costs (3x driver feedback signs; Ti Rakau & Cockle Bay bus shelters; Pedestrian improvements at Meadowlands/Whitford/Millhouse; Crooks Road streetscape improvements)

674,471

Firm estimates for projects given construction approval (East Tamaki streetlighting upgrade; The Parade footpath; Point View Drive footpath; Burswood Business Area enhancements; Highland Park Adshel double bus shelter)

444,930

Design costs to date and construction estimate for project at detailed design stage (HMB walkway/amenity improvements)

266,221

Rough estimates on projects at detailed design stage (Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals; Little Bucklands Beach walkway; Chapel Road pedestrian signals)

780,000

Maximum allocation made towards new Half Moon Bay ferry facility

2,500,000

Funding being transferred from Howick LB 2011/12 discretionary budget

+27,000

Funding available to allocate (assuming construction approval given to all projects)

($279,107)

 

 

A2. Response to Howick Local Board resolutions

7.       At the March 2015 Board meeting, the Howick Local Board passed the following resolutions:

Resolution number HW/2015/25

That the Howick Local Board:

b)         Notes the agreement to consider the return of the balance of funds of up to $2.5m previously committed, on a pro rata basis as NZTA has now contributed 50% of the Half Moon Bay Ferry facility project


 

c)         Requests Auckland Transport consults further through the Half Moon Bay Residents &Ratepayers Association to residents who may not have been consulted regarding the intersection of Prince Regent Drive/Sunderlands and Pigeon Mountain Roads.

8.       Resolution HW/2015/25 b) is noted and will be discussed with the Howick Local Board in coming months when detailed designs and estimates for the project are available.

9.       In relation to resolution HW/2015/25 c), Auckland Transport does not propose to consult further on the safety improvements scheme at the intersection of Pigeon Mountain Road, Prince Regent Drive and Sunderlands Road as the appropriate process has been followed and concluded (including consultation with those considered to be immediately impacted by the proposal).

10.     However, Auckland Transport notes that the Half Moon Bay Residents and Ratepayers Association recently provided a submission on behalf of its members addressing both the Howick Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund proposal for metering signals on Pigeon Mountain Road and Auckland Transport’s upcoming safety improvements at the intersection, and none of the Association’s feedback regarding the proposed intersection improvements is such that Auckland Transport considers it necessary to amend or halt the project.

 

A3. New Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

11.     Work on the project is progressing to schedule.  The Stage 1 pontoon and gangway tender has been released to market and the tender evaluation and award process is planned for completion early April.

12.     The Stage 1 pontoon and gangway fabrication works is programmed to be completed by July.

13.     The Stage 2 design process for the fixed walkway and associated landside works is underway with the architects planning to present a draft design for review by Auckland Transport at the end of April.

14.     An environmental consultancy has been engaged to provide marine and environmental support along with the required technical input to produce a consenting package ready for review by Auckland Transport and submission to Auckland Council in May.

15.     On-going engagement with Mana Whenua has confirmed their on-going interest in the project and their desire to be consulted on matters of cultural significance.

16.     The communications and engagement plan is being finalised and Auckland Transport’s intention is to continue the established engagement process and to present the proposal plans to an open forum similar to that convened during the development of the Half Moon Bay ferry terminal redevelopment concept plan.

17.     Auckland Transport has engaged a traffic engineering company to provide design support for the land-side development works to facilitate the bus connection and turnaround area.

18.     Auckland Transport’s Project Director for Rail/Ferry Improvements is firming up the project budget required in order to provide visibility to the Howick Local Board on how much of its ‘up to $2.5m’ allocation of funds from the Transport Capital Fund will be required for the project.

 

19.     Auckland Transport considers that this project offers greatly improved facilities for ferry passengers alongside an exciting opportunity to ensure the unique and varied history of Half Moon Bay is seen and celebrated in the best way possible.


A4. Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI)

20.     Public information days and neighbourhood meetings were held in March with some 700 people attending and providing feedback on plans and proposals for the Panmure to Pakuranga section of the wider AMETI project.

21.     The Panmure to Pakuranga projects include:

·    Replacing Panmure roundabout with a signalised intersection including more direct pedestrian crossings

·    A dedicated Panmure to Pakuranga busway separated from general traffic

·    Cycle and foot paths from Panmure to Pakuranga

·    A second Panmure Bridge for the busway and a shared cycle/foot path.

22.     The AMETI team is currently reviewing and considering feedback received from the latest consultation round and is working towards finalising technical and specialists reports for the Notice of Requirement (NoR).  The team is also formulating responses to people who provided feedback.

23.     Work on the NoR and consents for the Panmure to Pakuranga section is on track to be lodged with Auckland Council at the end of April.

 

A5. Redoubt Road-Mill Road Corridor project update

24.     Auckland Transport identified its preferred route for the northern section of the Redoubt Road-Mill Road corridor upgrade and applied to Auckland Council in November 2014 to designate land (Notices of Requirement) for the project.

25.     The key reasons for the project are to provide for significant housing growth in the area and to improve the corridor’s poor safety record.  Safeguarding this route will provide certainty to both existing and future property owners on what land is required for the upgrade.  New housing areas can then be built knowing where the transport infrastructure to support it will be.

26.     Auckland Council has advised it will publicly notify the Notice of Requirement in mid-April.  Legislation requires at least 20 working days for submissions.  A public hearing will subsequently be held by independent commissioners to test Auckland Transport’s proposal.

27.     Auckland Transport is organising two public information days on 17 April (11am to 2pm) and 18 April (10am to 1pm) at Westfield Manukau, so interested people can find out more to assist with their submissions.

28.     Any member of the public can make submissions on the proposal. Auckland Transport encourages people to make submissions if they have any concerns about the project or the assessments carried out.

29.     Auckland Transport has already contacted affected property owners directly about the project to discuss their land owner rights and the planning process, and has met with the majority of them.

 

A6. Consultation documents on proposed improvements

30.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Howick Local Board for its feedback.  As the Board’s transport portfolio holders are delegated to provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only.

31.     Proposed safety improvements, Topland Drive and Stancombe Road intersection, Flatbush – visibility for vehicles exiting Topland Drive and for pedestrians crossing Stancombe Road at that location is restricted by parked vehicles being too close to the intersection.  Auckland Transport is proposing safety improvements at the intersection including relocating the existing northern bus stop 35m eastwards, installing side islands at the existing pedestrian refuge crossings on both sides of the road, installing 33m of ‘No Parking At All Times’ (NSAAT) parking restrictions and removing/trimming vegetation on the raised traffic island.  The proposal is shown on the plan at Attachment A.

32.     Electronic 40km/h School Speed Zone (SSZ) for Botany Downs Secondary College, Kilkenny Drive, Botany – Auckland Transport is planning to implement an SSZ for this school, consisting of a 40km/h speed limit during peak school traffic hours, on Kilkenny Drive.  This will be achieved by installing electronic 40km/h speed limit signs with alternating flashing beacons on the road approaching the zone.  Additionally, static 40km/h speed limit signs displaying operating times will be installed on side roads approaching each zone.  The electronic signs operate at the beginning and end of each school day, and require motorists to reduce their speed to below 40km/h during these times.  The speed limit reverts to 50 km/h when these signs are not in operation.  The proposal is shown on the plan at Attachment B.

33.     Electronic School Zone for Our Lady Star of the Sea School, Orangewood Drive, Northpark –Auckland Transport proposes to install electronic “School Zone” signs in the vicinity of this school.  These electronic signs which are equipped with alternating flashing beacons will be installed on the road approaching the school and will operate at the beginning and end of each school day to increase driver awareness of the school, as well as reinforce driver expectation of the presence of children.  Auckland Transport undertook an assessment, using criteria set down by the NZTA, to determine the appropriate electronic signage for this location, which is expected to be installed by July 2015.  The proposal is shown on the plan at Attachment C.

34.     Conversion of Passing Lane to Slow Vehicle Bay, Whitford Road, Mangemangeroa Gorge – Auckland Transport is committed to improving road safety and reducing the number of people killed or injured on the road network, with a focus on high risk corridors.  A safety issue has been identified at the passing lane in Mangemangeroa Gorge on Whitford Road.  Whitford Road has had 81 reported crashes in the past 5 years including one fatality and 25 injury crashes, with six crashes on the westbound passing lane in the Gorge.  The horizontal curves throughout the passing lane are unsuitable for higher speeds, making it difficult for vehicles to overtake while safely negotiating the bends.  Auckland Transport is therefore proposing to convert the westbound passing lane to a slow vehicle bay, which will result in only slow moving vehicles (mainly trucks) using the left lane and remove the incidence of unsafe speeds in the right lane.  The proposal is shown on the plan at Attachment D.  Given the relatively short distance to the urban area, overtaking vehicles other than slow moving trucks is not considered necessary.  The eastbound passing lane on Whitford Road was previously converted to a slow vehicle bay and the incidence of crashes reduced as a result.

35.     Electronic School Zone for Ormiston Primary School, Helianthus Avenue, Ormiston –Auckland Transport proposes to install electronic “School Zone” signs in the vicinity of this school.  These electronic signs which are equipped with alternating flashing beacons will be installed on the road approaching the school and will operate at the beginning and end of each school day to increase driver awareness of the school, as well as reinforce driver expectation of the presence of children.  Auckland Transport undertook an assessment, using criteria set down by the NZTA, to determine the appropriate electronic signage for this location, which is expected to be installed by July 2015.  The proposal is shown on the plan at Attachment E.

General Information Items

 

B1. Submissions on Long Term Plan (LTP)

36.     Auckland Council’s LTP 10-year budget consultation received 27,353 written submissions, with the majority of Aucklanders opting to support the advanced transport network.

37.     Aucklanders provided feedback on a number of issues, including what needs to be done to fix the region’s transport problems.

38.     Figures show that 50% opted for the advanced transport network and 29% supported the basic transport plan.  On the question of funding the transport options, 34% supported motorway tolls, while 27% favoured a fuel tax and rates rises.

 


 

B2. Review of Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP)

39.     Auckland Transport has commenced a process to update the Auckland RPTP.

40.     The timetable for the variation involves the preparation of a draft proposal by late April, followed by a public consultation phase during May 2015.  Hearings would be planned for late May/early June.

41.     The variation will cover the following issues:

·    The proposed introduction of a new zone-based integrated fares system

·    Proposals for a new light rail transit network on some major arterial routes on the central Auckland isthmus

·    Service and infrastructure changes arising from the Ferry Development Plan

·    Revised service descriptions on the new bus network.

 

B3. Harbourmaster moves to Auckland Transport

42.     The Harbourmaster and Harbourmaster team will transfer from Auckland Council’s Civil Defence and Emergency Management Division to Auckland Transport on 27 April 2015.

43.     The move will allow the Harbourmaster team to work more closely alongside Auckland Transport Operations Centres (ATOC).  This will ensure a more integrated approach across all transport coming into Auckland, as well as better access to transport support functions.

 

B4. Public Transport Monthly Patronage statistics – February 2015

44.     Auckland public transport patronage totalled 77,088,240 passenger trips for the 12 months to Feb-15, an increase of +0.8% on the 12 months to Jan-15 and +9.5% on the 12 months to Feb-14.  February monthly patronage was 6,683,047 – an increase of 608,194 boardings or +10.0% on Feb-14 (normalised to ~ +11.9% accounting for only special event patronage, as there were the same number of business and weekend days in Feb-15 compared to Feb-14).  In the financial year to date (YTD), overall PT patronage has grown by +10.2%.

45.     Rail patronage totalled 12,994,815 passenger trips for the 12 months to Feb-2015, an increase of +1.6% on the 12 months to Jan-15 and +19.5% on the 12 months to Feb-14.  Patronage for Feb-15 was 1,209,882 – an increase of 204,509 boardings or +20.3% on Feb-14 (normalised to ~ +34.1%).  In the financial YTD, rail patronage has grown by +22.1%.

46.     The Northern Express bus service carried 2,732,222 passenger trips for the 12 months to Feb-15, an increase of +1.1% on the 12 months to Jan-15 and +16.8% on the 12 months to Feb-14.  Northern Express bus service patronage for Feb-15 was 226,656 – an increase of 30,117 boardings or +15.3% on Feb-14 (normalised to ~ +19.1%).  In the financial YTD, Northern Express patronage has grown by +20.5%.

47.     Bus services (excluding the Northern Express) carried 56,009,807 passenger trips for the 12 months to Feb-15, an increase of +0.5% on the 12 months to Jan-15 and +7.6% on the 12 months to Feb-14.  Bus services excluding Northern Express patronage for Feb-15 was 4,690,676 – an increase of 281,939 boardings or +6.4% on Feb-14 (normalised to ~ +6.4%).  Financial YTD bus services excluding Northern Express patronage has grown by +7.6%.

48.     Ferry services carried 5,351,396 passenger trips for the 12 months to Feb-15, an increase of +1.7% on the 12 months to Jan-15 and +4.0% movement on the 12 months to Feb-14.  Ferry services patronage for Feb-15 was 555,833 – an increase of 91,629 boardings or +19.7% on Feb-14 (normalised to ~ +19.7%).  In the financial YTD, ferry patronage has increased by 7.0%.


Media Items

 

C1. Independent company to survey Aucklanders on transport

49.     A month-long quantitative survey, asking 4,200 Aucklanders for their views on fixing and funding transport, is being undertaken as part of Auckland Council’s 10-year budget consultation.

50.     The survey results will be considered, along with feedback collected on Council’s 10-year budget, by elected members before they make decisions on what goes into the final budget in June.  The survey results will be made public by May.

 

C2. Auckland rail patronage hits 13 million

51.     On Monday 2 March the annual total for passenger trips passed 13 million for the first time, an annual growth of 19% to the end of February.  Auckland’s trains are now carrying 10,000 more customers on a normal weekday than at this time last year.

52.     Significant growth has been recorded on both the Onehunga and Eastern Lines, which now run only electric trains.  Stations which have had major investment are also recording big patronage growth, including passenger numbers having doubled at Panmure in the past year.

53.     The stand-out performer is Manukau Station where numbers are up 176% for the year.  That increase ties in with the completion of the MIT campus and an increase in the number of services before Christmas.

54.     Rail patronage on weekends has also increased significantly, which can be attributed to increased rail services and fewer weekend rail network closures.

 

C3. Car share scheme

55.     Auckland Transport is looking for a car share operator to launch a large scale scheme in Auckland, based on Plug-in Electric Vehicles.

56.     Auckland Transport has released a Request for Proposal (RFP) from car share operators to create a scheme here.  It would initially have 250 – 300 vehicles which Auckland Transport will match with a similar number of car parks dedicated to care share vehicles.  It’s expected that, in time, the fleet would increase to at least 500 cars.

57.     A new large-scale scheme in Auckland would be a private venture with all significant costs borne by the operator, not by Auckland ratepayers.  Auckland Transport’s main contribution would be to designate dedicated car parks around the city.

58.     Car share schemes are based on members who pay a membership fee which entitles them to use a scheme-owned car on demand, for which they pay a per-trip charge based upon the time used.

59.     There are already about five million people world-wide who are members of a car share scheme and the numbers of both users and cities with a scheme are growing rapidly, changing transportation habits in the process.

60.     Auckland already has a commercial car-share operator, called City Hop.  There is also a community-based scheme, called NZ Car Sharing, on Waiheke Island.  Auckland Transport has worked with both, which are relatively small-scale operators, for a number of years and will continue to do so.

C4. 2015 Public Transport Fare Review

61.     The focus of this year’s public transport fare review, announced by Auckland Transport on 16 March, is to better align short and long distance fares in preparation for a change to a simpler zone based system (integrated fares) next year.

62.     Improving the fare structure with integrated fares will allow the introduction of the New Network which will see more frequent services on key routes at a minimum average of every 15 minutes, 7am to 7pm, seven days a week.

63.     Integrated fares, the introduction of the AT HOP card, electric trains, the first step towards the construction of the City Rail Link and an investigation of the benefits of light rail are all initiatives designed to give Aucklanders choices.

64.     The changes to public transport fares through the 2015 review include:

·    Small increases of 5-10 cents for stage one and two trips for those using the AT HOP card

·    No increases on longer AT HOP trips on buses and trains, other than for stage five journeys which receive a tertiary concession

·    Stage six and seven child fares using AT HOP reduce

·    Some cash fares will increase by 50 cents to further encourage passengers to switch to using AT HOP to receive fare discounts

·    Tertiary and child concession fares will now be available on the InnerLink bus service

·    There will also be some changes to pricing for the CityLink bus service now that an earlier subsidy has ended.

65.     On average, fares contribute 47% to the total cost of providing public transport services – the remainder is provided through government (NZTA) contributions and rates subsidies.

66. For more: https://at.govt.nz/farechange

 

C5. Dedicated motorcycle parking

67.     Auckland Transport is gearing up for the increasing number of people using two wheels to get to their destination by adding free, dedicated, motorcycle and scooter parking areas to its CBD parking buildings, in addition to existing bicycle parking areas.  There is also a dedicated entry lane for motorbikes at the Downtown car park to complement the 112 dedicated spaces installed.

68.     The Civic car park has also been fitted out with more motorcycle and scooter parking and Victoria Street carpark will be developed in the near future.

 

C6. City Rail Link (CRL) Design Showcase

69.     A design showcase for the CRL’s three new stations and their adjacent public spaces will give Aucklanders a peek into the future.  The showcase is being held in an Auckland Transport Bus by the No.1 Café in QE11 Square, from 10am to 4pm daily between Saturday 11 and Wednesday 15 April.

70.     Each station, new ones at Aotea and Karangahape and a redeveloped Mt Eden, has been designed in partnership with Mana whenua, who shared their considerable knowledge of the local areas to provide a unique look and feel.

71.     Visitors to the design showcase in mid-April will also find out how the first stage of construction will roll out later this year.

72.     For more information on the CRL visit:

www.cityraillink.co.nz and www.facebook.com/cityraillink

 

C7. City Rail Link (CRL) contract award

73.     The CRL took another significant step forward with the announcement on 7 April of the appointment of two construction consortia to commence the first phase of the CRL construction in the Downtown area.

74.     There was wide interest from the New Zealand construction industry and Auckland Transport has appointed two Joint Venture contractors for the work; Downer NZ and Soletanche Bachy JV and Connectus (McConnell Dowell and Hawkins JV) for the first phase of design at a cost of about $3 million.  The next phase will provide for a negotiated contract to construct the CRL.

75.     The Downer lead joint venture has been chosen to progress the CRL work through and under Britomart Station and Queen Street to the Downtown Shopping Centre site with construction likely to start in early 2016.

76.     The contract includes establishing temporary accommodation for Britomart Station’s ticketing and customer service operations, underpinning the historic former Chief Post Office building, to allow the construction of the rail tunnels beneath and reinstating Britomart Station and upgrading urban space and surrounding roads.

77.     The Connectus Consortium will construct the cut and cover tunnels under and along Albert Street from Customs Street to Wyndham Street.  The work is likely to start in October with the relocation of a major stormwater line in Albert Street between Swanson and Wellesley Streets.

78.     Once completed, CRL will turn a one way cul-de-sac rail system at Britomart into a two way through system that will be able to carry 30,000 people an hour, providing an efficient and reliable transport choice for Aucklanders.

Issues Register

79.     The regular monthly issues register is Attachment F to this report.

Consideration

Local Board Views

80.     The Howick Local Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation Issues

81.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Plan of proposed safety improvements, Topland Driver and Stancombe Road intersection, Flatbush

23

bView

Plan of proposed 40km/h School Speed Zone for Botany Downs Secondary College, Kilkenny Drive, Botany

25

cView

Plan of proposed Electronic School Zone for Our Lady Star of the Sea School, Orangewood Drive, Northpark

27

dView

Plan of proposed conversion of Passing Lane to Slow Vehicle Bay, Whitford Road, Mangemangeroa Gorge

29

eView

Plan of proposed Electronic School Zone for Ormiston Primary School, Helianthus Avenue, Ormiston

35

fView

Issues Register - April 2015

37

Signatories

Authors

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager; AT

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

AMETI – Park Land Proposals

 

File No.: CP2015/05288

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Local Boards views on the declaration of park land for road purposes under S114 of the Public Works Act (1981) for the Pakuranga Road section of the AMETI Project, and appropriate compensation.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland-Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI) involves a series of projects for the eastern suburbs aimed at increasing public transport use, walking and cycling, and unlocking the economic potential of the area by dealing with traffic congestion on key transport links.

3.       The Howick side of the Panmure-Pakuranga Bridge project includes the construction of a bus lane and cycle lane along Pakuranga Road.

4.       This part of the AMETI project affects four parks (Kerswill Reserve, 18R Pakuranga Road Reserve, Kerswill Corner Reserve and 22R Pakuranga Road) and Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking to declare areas of these parks as road (totaling 2157m) under Section 114 of the Public Works Act (1981).

5.       To compensate the loss of this park land, AT is offering Auckland Council a section of land at 24 Pakuranga Road as a place holder until such time as final areas are determined.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Notes the declaration under S114 of the Public Works Act (1981) of the following sections of park land for roading purposes:

i)    2R Pakuranga Road (248m2) NA99C/463 which describes Section 1 Survey Office Plan 66069.

ii)   18R Pakuranga Place Reserve (802m2), Lot 8 DP 44164, NA1801/32 - Auckland Council pursuant to Section 191 Municipal Corporations.

iii)   20R Pakuranga Road (607m2), Lot 1 DP 60871, NA1844/67 Auckland Council Freehold land.

iv)   22R Pakuranga Road (500m2), Lot 21 DP 44724, NA5C/221 - This freehold title is currently held as an esplanade reserve.

b)      Supports the following compensation proposal as a minimum for the park land to be taken for roading purposes noting that final compensation is subject to further negotiation.  The parks portfolio holder be granted delegation for providing Local Board input to the full and final compensation on the condition that this may vary in location or area but should be at least of equal or greater value:

i)    24 Pakuranga Road (2345m2), Lot 19 DP 44724, CT-1634/58.

c)      Requests that any and all compensation be redirected back to the Local Board for investment in open space with the preference, in the first instance, that this be provided through replacement land area and where this is not possible the provision of cash compensation.

 

 

Discussion

6.       AT is progressing the AMETI project along Pakuranga Road to improve public transport. The project will provide separate cycling and bus lanes from the Panmure-Pakuranga Bridge to the Pakuranga Town Centre. The improvements will connect to, and continue along Lagoon Drive, to the Panmure roundabout.

7.       Four parks will be affected by this stage of the AMETI project either in full or in part. They are as follows:

a.   2R Pakuranga Road or Kerswill Reserve (248m2) NA99C/463 which describes Section 1 Survey Office Plan 66069 (see Attachment A). AT is seeking to declare the full reserve for roading purposes. The land currently functions as a road and will be located under the proposed new Panmure-Pakuranga Bridge. AT proposes to retain the vehicle access under the existing bridge.

b.   18R Pakuranga Road Reserve (802m2), Lot 8 DP 44164, NA1801/32 - Auckland Council pursuant to Section 191 Municipal Corporations (see Attachment A). AT is seeking to declare the full reserve for roading purposes to accommodate the proposed cycle way.

c.   20R Pakuranga Road or Kerswill Corner Reserve (607m2), Lot 1 DP 60871, NA1844/67 Auckland Council Freehold land (see Attachment B). AT is seeking to declare the full site for roading purposes to accommodate the proposed cycle way.

d.   22R Pakuranga Road (500m2), Lot 21 DP 44724, NA5C/221 - This is currently held as an esplanade reserve (see Attachment B). A partial declaration of land for roading purposes is required in this easement, again to accommodate the proposed pedestrian walkway and cycle way.

8.       AT has also identified additional land at Ti Rakau Park and in adjacent areas, which may be required for road for the AMETI works. The design for this section has not progressed sufficiently to confirm the area of the park land required. AT intends to confirm these requirements later in 2015 and will seek to acquire these parks at that time.

9.       To compensate for declaring the park land as road, AT has offered a section of land at 24 Pakuranga Road (see Attachment C) as a place holder. The value of this land offered exceeds the value of the park land to be acquired across both the Panmure Bridge end of Pakuranga Road and Ti Rakau Park areas of the project. However, AT acknowledges that the area of land likely to be finally acquired for these works is substantially more than the area of land currently offered in compensation. AT is offering 24 Pakuranga Road in compensation with the expectation that the land will be managed as park. AT would ensure that any buildings and debris are removed and the site reinstated and grassed. The land offer is subject to confirmation from the AT Board.

10.     The table below provides a summary of the parks likely to be affected by the AMETI project and their valuations, and the land offered in compensation.

Reserve

Area (m2)

Value

2R Pakuranga Road

248

$35,000

18R Pakuranga Place

802

$300,000

20R Pakuranga Place

607

$270,000

22R Pakuranga Road

500

$35,000

Sub-total for this report

2157

$640,000

Bus Stop Reserve (96R Pakuranga Rd) This reserve has not been valued yet.

970

$XXX

27W Ti Rakau Drive

273

$20,000

William Roberts (Allotment 322)

554

$50,000

William Roberts (Allotment 324)

2,524

$230,000

William Roberts strip off Lot 1

1,349

$92,000

Total

7,827

$1,032,000

24 Pakuranga Road

2,735

$1,900,000

 

11.     AT acknowledges that the land offer may not constitute the full and final compensation option. The final compensation offer will be subject to determination of the total park area and valuation information.

12.     Should Auckland Council not reach an agreement on suitable land compensation the compensation may be substituted with payment of the acquired land value.

Consideration

Local Board Views

13.     AT has presented the AMETI park land acquisition requirements at three full board discussions since mid-2014. AT has worked with the Parks, Sport and Recreation  Department and Board members to:

·    Identify the park land required for the project works

·    Discuss issues and options associated with the land required, and

·    Present the offer of land as compensation for consideration.

14.     The Local Board has expressed a preference for the area of park land taken to be compensated on a land for land basis where possible. AT has yet to confirm the full compensation offer and has requested Parks representatives to seek a recommendation from the Local Board on the interim park acquisition and compensation option.

Maori Impact Statement

15.     AT established a regular (monthly) hui with all iwi affected by the AMETI project at the start of the project. These regular meetings provide an opportunity to consult with iwi on an on-going basis. AT has identified nine mana whenua groups with interests in the project area and engages with these groups regularly and has sought MVA’s (Maori Values Assessment) from each in an effort to better understand the association and issues of each group within the project area.

16.     This consultation has not specifically addressed the park land declaration and compensation proposals. Further consultation shall be undertaken as part of the NoR process.

Implementation Issues

17.     To declare the park land for road, AT is seeking to implement Section 114 of the Public Works Act (Declaring Land to be Road). This section requires the signatures of

·  the body who controls or in whom the land is vested (Auckland Council)

·  AT as the roading authority (AT Board and AC Property Committee), and

·  the signature of Minister of Conservation (delegated to the council).

18.     In seeking the approval of Council (in whom the land is vested), AT is seeking support for the acquisition and compensation proposals from the Local Board. Approval will then be sought from the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee who have the delegation for the acquisition and disposal of park land.


 

19.     Should the Local Board support the Section 114 (Declare land for Road) and the compensation option of 24 Pakuranga Road, AT shall undertake public consultation on the land take in parallel to the consultation required for the NoR process. If the Local Board does not provide their support, AT shall include the park land required in the NoR process. The NoR is expected to be lodged in late April 2015.

20.     Finally, it should be noted that should AT declare the park land as road, the land would remain vested in Auckland Council, but would be managed by AT as road rather than by the Local Board as park.  The land provided by AT in compensation for declaring the park land as road will be vested as reserve.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reserve land at 2R and 18R Pakuranga Road

43

bView

Reserve land at 20R and 22R Pakuranga Road

45

cView

Reserve land at 24 Pakuranga Road

47

     

Signatories

Authors

Sophie Bell - Parks & Open Space Specialists Manager

Authorisers

Malcolm  Page - Manager Local & Sports Parks South

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Hugh Green Limited at 40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush

 

File No.: CP2015/05155

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board for eight (8) new roads created by way of subdivision at 40 Hugh Ways, Flat Bush. The development is known as Donegal Glen Stage 7.

Executive Summary

2.       The legacy Manukau City Council had an existing road naming policy which set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria are applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming in the Manukau area, until a policy is developed for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names “Casheltown Way”, “Barnesmore Road”, “Ballykerrigan Road”, “Drumbuoy Drive”, “Creggan Crescent”, “Cloghfin Place”, “Drumfad Road” and “Mullafin Road” were determined to meet the road naming policy criteria.

4.       James Brown of Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki has been consulted and provided verbal approval to the applicant to proceed with the names proposed.

5.       New Zealand Post and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have been consulted and have no issues with the road names proposed.

6.       The names “Casheltown Way”, “Barnesmore Road”, “Ballykerrigan Road”, “Drumbuoy Drive”, “Creggan Crescent”, “Cloghfin Place”, “Drumfad Road” and “Mullafin Road” proposed by the Applicant, are recommended for approval to the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval the road names “Casheltown Way”, “Barnesmore Road”, “Ballykerrigan Road”, “Drumbuoy Drive”, “Creggan Crescent”, “Cloghfin Place”, “Drumfad Road” and “Mullafin Road”, proposed by the Applicant, for the new roads created by way of subdivision at 40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush, noting that these names meet the relevant road naming criteria.

 

Comments

Background

Applicant:                              Hugh Green Group Limited

Site Address:                                    40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush

Council’s Reference:                        Resource Consent No. 45122 SP11486

 

7.       The legacy Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for Council’s approval.

8.       The residential subdivision will be serviced by new roads that come off Hughs Way. In this case, road name approval is being sought for the new roads within the subdivision (Roads 1 - 8).

9.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the eight (8) new roads created as part of the residential development at 40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush.

Road Number

Proposed New Road Name

Road 1

Casheltown Way

Road 2

Barnesmore Road

Road 3

Ballykerrigan Road

Road 4

Drumbuoy Drive

Road 5

Creggan Crescent

Road 6

Mullafin Road

Road 7

Cloghfin Place

Road 8

Drumfad Road

 

 

Figure 1 - Location of the new roads (Roads 1 – 8) for the subdivision at 40 Hughs Way, Flat Bush.


 

10.     These road names were submitted as part of this development reflect on the following:

Greerton Holdings Limited/Hugh Green Limited is wholly owned subsidiaries of Hugh Green Group. Hugh Green, the director and chairman of Hugh Green Group, originated from Donegal in northwest Ireland and arrived in Auckland in 1953.  The company was involved in many land developments in the Flat Bush area including the Donegal Glen Stages 1 to 6 at 89 Flat Bush School Road, which was completed in 2014. 

The road names proposed were derived from places and towns from County Donegal in northwest Ireland where Mr. Green originated. This is a common theme adopted by the Applicant and is consistently used on roads named in their previous land developments within the Flat Bush area. 

Decision Making

11.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

12.     The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the following criteria set out in the legacy Manukau City Council road naming policy;

Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy Assessment

(a)   Not a duplication of names already in current usage in the Auckland region either in spelling or pronunciation;

(b)   Brief, melodious and easily and readily pronounced;

(c)   Avoids cartographic problems as the length of the name matches the length of the new road;

(d)   Being associated with the nature of the environment or have historic or local significance

(e)   Being a descriptive;

(f)    Not of possessive form;

(g)   Has appropriate association with other names in the area;

(h)   Not in poor taste or likely to cause offence and;

(i)    Suffix for road name is suitable for road layout

 

13.     There is a “Ballydonegan Rise” within the East Tamaki area that is considered to be similar to “Ballykerrigan Road”. However, Land Information New Zealand has noted that the proposed name, “Ballykerrigan” is unique and acceptable but have recommended that the applicant avoid using the road suffix ‘Rise’ to avoid confusion. All of the proposed road names are consistent with the legacy road naming policy. Furthermore, the names proposed as part of this subdivision has appropriate association with other names in the area.

14.     As the preferred road names of the Applicant (“Casheltown Way”, “Barnesmore Road”, “Ballykerrigan Road”, “Drumbuoy Drive”, “Creggan Crescent”, “Cloghfin Place”, “Drumfad Road” and “Mullafin Road”) meets the criteria of the road naming policy, it is considered appropriate that these names are recommended for approval to the Local Board.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

15.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

16.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report does not adversely affect Maori communities as the naming of roads is not linked to one of Council’s strategic priorities for Maori.

17.     Despite the above, the Applicant has initiated consultation with the local iwi to provide them with the opportunity to comment on the proposed road names and offer alternative road names to be put forward for approval if they wish to do so.

Consultation

18.     The Applicant undertook consultation with Ngai Tai ki Tamaki as mana whenua of the area. Jame Brown of Ngai Tai ki Tamaki have indicated their support and endorsement for all of the proposed road names. Mr. James Brown has also noted that he wishes to be consulted for the naming of the reserves created as part of this residential subdivision. These reserves will be named at a later stage.

19.     New Zealand Post and Land Information New Zealand have been consulted and indicated that there are no postal issues with the proposed names “Casheltown Way”, “Barnesmore Road”, “Ballykerrigan Road”, “Drumbuoy Drive”, “Creggan Crescent”, “Cloghfin Place”, “Drumfad Road” and “Mullafin Road”.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

20.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road names and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

21.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

22.     The Southern Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Gayatri Devi - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Julie  Bevan - Acting General Manager Resource Consents

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Greenland Investments Limited at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

 

File No.: CP2015/04486

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for six new road names for seven roads created by way of subdivision at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush.

Executive Summary

2.       The legacy Manukau City Council had an existing road naming policy which set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria are applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming in the Manukau area, until a policy is developed for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Peihinga Road’, ‘Valderama Drive’, ‘Hangahai Road’, ‘Tinaku Road’, ‘Ngaki Street’ and ‘Tipu Road’ were determined to meet the road naming policy criteria.

4.       Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki was consulted and did not oppose the suggestions and did not indicate a preference or supply suggestions.

5.       The names ‘Peihinga Road’, ‘Valderama Drive’, ‘Hangahai Road’, ‘Tinaku Road’, ‘Ngaki Street’ and ‘Tipu Road’ proposed by the Applicant, are recommended for approval to the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval of the road names ‘Peihinga Road’, ‘Valderama Drive’, ‘Hangahai Road’, ‘Tinaku Road’, ‘Ngaki Street’ and ‘Tipu Road’ proposed by the Applicant, for the new roads created by way of subdivision at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, noting that these names meet the relevant road naming criteria.

 

Comments

Background

Applicant:                                          Greenland Investments Ltd.

Site Address:                                                431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

Council’s Reference:                    Resource Consent No. 42788 SP 11147 & 45059 SP11477

 

6.       The legacy Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for Council’s approval.

7.       The residential subdivision will be serviced by new roads that come off Ormiston Road, Flat Bush. The development will require the creation of seven new roads to be vested in Council. In this case, road name approval is being sought for the seven new roads within the subdivision (Roads 1/3, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7).

8.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new roads created as part of the development at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush.


 

Road Number

Proposed New Road Name

Road Meanings

Road 1/ 3

Peihinga Road (preferred name)

Revolution Road (first alternative name)

Moonstone Road (alternative name)

Peihinga - Beijing

Road 2

Valderama Drive (preferred name)

Navy Road (first alternative name)

Aqua Marine Road (alternative name)

Valderama - Extension of the existing Valderama Drive

Road 4

Tinaku Road (preferred name)

Hurihanga Road (first alternative name)

Onyx Road (alternative name)

Tinaku - To germinate, Sprout

Road 5

Hangahai Road (preferred name)

Goldpot Road (first alternative name)

Tanzanite Road (alternative name)

Hangahai - Shanghai

Road 6

Ngaki Street (preferred name)

Wheatland Road (first alternative name)

Kunzite Road (alternative name)

Ngaki - To weed, cultivate, plant

Road 7

Tipu Road (preferred name)

Cerulean Road (first alternative name)

Spinel Road (alternative name)

Tipu - To grow, increase, spring, develop, sprout

 

Figure 1 - Location of the new roads for the subdivision at 431 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

9.       These road names were submitted as part of this development.

The developer has decided on Maori names that reflect New Zealand’s history for this development. The preferred road names: ‘Tinaku Road’, ‘Ngaki Street’ and ‘Tipu Road’ are the names of gardening terms within the Maori language. ‘Peihinga Road’ is the Maori term for Beijing. ‘Hangahai Road’ is the Maori term for Shanghai. ‘Valderama Drive’ is the extension of the existing Valderama Drive.

10.     The proposed suffix of ‘Drive’ for Road 2 is considered appropriate as the new road will extend the existing Valderama Drive.  The proposed suffix of ‘Road’ and ‘Street’ for Road’s 1/3, 4, 5 & 7, and Street 6 is considered appropriate as these suffixes can generally be applied to most names as per the Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy.

Decision Making

11.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

12.     The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the following criteria set out in the legacy Manukau City Council road naming policy;

Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy Assessment

(a)   Not a duplication of names already in current usage in the Auckland region either in spelling or pronunciation;

(b)   Brief, melodious and easily and readily pronounced;

(c)   Avoids cartographic problems as the length of the name matches the length of the new road;

(d)   Being associated with the nature of the environment or have historic or local significance

(e)   Being a descriptive;

(f)    Not of possessive form;

(g)   Has appropriate association with other names in the area;

(h)   Not in poor taste or likely to cause offence and;

(i)    Suffix for road name is suitable for road layout

 

13.     All six of the proposed road names are consistent with the legacy road naming policy.

14.     It is considered that the first alternative names for Road’s 1/3 (Revolution Road), 4 (Hurihanga Road), 5 (Goldpot Road), 6 (Wheatland Road) & 7 (Cerulean Road) are appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming policy.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

15.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

16.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report does not adversely affect Maori communities as the naming of roads is not linked to one of Council’s strategic priorities for Maori.

17.     Despite the above, the Applicant has initiated consultation with the local iwi to provide them with the opportunity to comment on the proposed road names and offer alternative road names to be put forward for approval if they wish to do so.

Consultation

18.     The Applicant undertook consultation with Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki as mana whenua of the area. Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki did not oppose the suggestions and did not indicate a preference or supply suggestions.

19.     New Zealand Post has been consulted and indicated that there were no issues with the road names proposed. 

Financial and Resourcing Implications

20.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road names and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

21.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

22.     The Southern Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road names.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Julie  Bevan - Acting General Manager Resource Consents

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Allocation of Local Park Public Convenience Renewal Capex Funding

 

File No.: CP2015/04649

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To request that the Howick Local Board  approve a proposal from Local and Sports Parks South to allocate 2014-15 LTP funding for the Renewal of the Eastern Beach southern toilet block.

Executive summary

2.       The local board has completed minor works at Tiraumea Drive reserve to upgrade the facilities making use of the open space between the existing male and female toilet areas as part of the 2014-15 LTP renewal programme.

3.       Park Advisors review of the current 2014-15 LTP Renewal programme, recommends that the remaining Local Park Public Convenience renewal funding be provided for a renewal of the Eastern Beach southern toilet block.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board approves the proposal to allocate all remaining funding from Local Parks South 2014-15 LTP Renewal Public Convenience funding for the full renewal of the Eastern Beach southern toilet block. Project value $250,000.

 

Comments

4.       Howick Local Board has completed minor works at upgrading the facilities at Tiraumea Drive reserve to make use of the open space between the existing male and female toilet areas as part of the 2014-15 LTP Capex programme.

5.       Community lease staff is currently creating a lease for Pakuranga Outrigger Canoe Club to use this space as storage.

6.       The Eastern Beach is the most popular beach within the Howick ward. The Eastern Beach southern toilet block was built in the mid 1970’s. The building has two toilets (one fully accessible), two sinks and a changing room on the female side and one fully accessible toilet, a urinal, one sink and changing rooms on the men’s side.

7.       Due to the normal high summer usage of this toilet block council has provided an additional four portaloos, which is not ideal situation for such a high profile beach.

8.       These older styled toilet blocks have low safety levels due to their layout and lack of public surveillance. Their materials make them more susceptible to vandalism leading to high operational costs.

9.       Crime prevention Through Environmental Design principles state toilets should ensure good visibility, with toilet doors opening directly onto public space and planting kept low

10.     The renewal of the Eastern Beach southern toilet block would be completed this financial year during winter, using the available funding from Local Parks South 2014-15 LTP Capex Public Convenience renewals. A toilet renewal budget of $250,000 which includes the demolition of the existing toilet block.


 


Deferred to Y15 and Y16

Budget

Local Parks South 2014-15 LTP Capex Public Convenience renewals.

2014

 

 

 

$21,682

FY 2014 actual spend

 

$220,318

Y14 Unspent and rolled to Y15

 

$74,787

Deferred to Y15 and Y16

 

$316,787

FY 2014 Total Budget

2015

 

 

 

$220,318

FY 2014 deferral to FY 2015

 

$183,235

FY 2015 pre-deferral budget

 

$403,553

FY 2015 budget- Pre-deferral

2015 reprioritization

 

 

 

$123,235

Deferred amount from FY 2015 to FY 2016 for Eastern Beach

 

$280,318

FY 2015 revised budget after reprioritization

2015 program details

 

 

 

$280,318

FY 2015 revised budget after reprioritization

 

$17,000

FY 2015 Tiraumea Drive toilet- Actuals to date

 

$263,318

Unallocated FY 2015 budget

11.     The proposed toilet block would have four bays [one being fully accessible] and external shower(s).

12.     There are no known risks with this proposed change but this project will require consenting.

13.     This project would complement one of the aspirations in the Local Board Plan to ensure ‘Parks and recreational facilities are well maintained and have fit for purpose infrastructure’.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     This report sets out a decision for the Howick Local Board to make in order to complete all Local and Sports Parks South 2014-15 LTP Capex works within the financial year.

15.     The board consider as a key objective in their local board plan the need to address ‘Parks and recreational facilities are well maintained and have fit for purpose infrastructure’.

Māori impact statement

16.     This is not a significant decision for Maori. Consultation and engagement with interested mana whenua has already started.Implementation

17.     There are no known implementation issues to this project, although this project will trigger building and resource consent.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Example of standard toilet block

59

Signatories

Authors

Janine Field - Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Example of a standard toilet block:

Note: this example is only a 3 bay toilet. Proposed is a 4 bay toilet with an external shower.

Exterior

Interior


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Howick Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/04606

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to present the Howick Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme to be attached to the policy as an appendix.

4.       This report presents the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      adopt the Howick Community Grants Programme 2015/2016.

 

Comments

5.       The new Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014 and implementation will commence on 1 July 2015.

6.       The policy supports each local board to develop a Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016. This local board grants programme will guide community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       Two workshops were undertaken with the local board in February and March to discuss and develop the local board’s grants programme. The grants programme does not include budgets as these will continue to be developed, as part of the Long Term Plan process.

8.       The Howick Local Board community grants programme includes:

·                    outcomes as identified in the local board plan

an involved and connected community

Howick’s future growth is managed effectively

valuing our cultural diversity

we all treasure and enjoy our environment

our community is active and healthy

a prosperous economy

·                    specific local board funding priorities:

people are supported to lead and develop projrects and create opportunities for young people

share and celebrate our culture through events

grow our arts, culture and music

ensuring our natural and built environment and coastline are well-managed

protection of identified geological and archaeological sites and important local heritage sites

increased participation of people in sport, leisure and recreation activities

·  grant types which will operate locally, the number of funding rounds and when these will open and close

quick response will be for a minimum of $250 and a maximum of $2,000 and operate five times a year

local grants will be for grants over $2000 and operate twice a year

discretionary grants will be for urgent grants only

·          additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

lower priorities include activities or events with less than 50% of the project costs from other sources

fundraising events or activities unless the activity or event has a wider community benefit beyond its primary purpose as a fundraise

gratuity for volunteers will not be funded

·          other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making

the local board requires recipients of a local grant to report back to the local board on their project or event.

9.       An implementation plan is underway to support an integrated and simplified approach to grants programme administration. Funding staff from different departments are working together to ensure a co-ordinated approach, expected to benefit applicants and streamline internal processes.

10.     Key processes to be developed once the local board programmes are adopted include redevelopment of the website, development of new application forms and comprehensive advertising of the new local board grants programme.

11.     Once the local board community grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, funding rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

12.     The Community Grants Programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme can be reviewed on an annual basis.

Māori impact statement

13.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

14.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels. Targeted advertising and promotion will be developed for target populations, including migrant and refugee groups, disability groups, Maori and iwi organisations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Funding Programme Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Attachment A

Howick Local Board – Local Grants Programme 2015/2016

Our Local Grants Programme aims to provide contestable community grants to local communities.

Outcomes sought from the local grants programme

Our grants programme will be targeted towards supporting the following outcomes, as outlined in our local board plan:

·    An involved and connected community

·    Howick’s future growth is managed effectively

·    Valuing our cultural diversity

·    We all treasure and enjoy our environment

·    Our community is active and healthy

·    A prosperous local economy

 

Our priorities for grants

The Howick Local Board welcomes grant applications that align with the following local board plan priorities:

Priority one

·    People are supported to lead and develop projects and create opportunities for young people

Priority two

·    Share and celebrate our culture through events

Priority three

·    Grow our arts, culture and music

Priority four

·    Ensuring our natural and built environment and coastline are well-managed

Priority five

·    Protection of identified geological and archaeological sites and important local heritage sties

Priority six

·    Increased participation of people in sport, leisure and recreation activities

 

Lower Priorities:

We will also consider applications for other services, projects, events and activities.  However, these may be considered a lower priority.

1)   The Howick Local Board has identified the following activities as lower priorities:

·    Activities or events with less than 50% of the project costs from other sources

·    Fundraising events or activities, unless the activity or event has a wider community benefit beyond its primary purpose as a fundraiser.

 

In addition to the eligibility criteria outlined the Community Grants Policy, the Howick Local Board will not fund:

Exclusion One: Gratuity for volunteers eg petrol vouchers

 

Investment approach

The Howick Local Board has allocated budgets to support the local grants programme as follows:

·    Quick Response Local Grants

Minimum amount per grant: $ 250

Maximum amount per grant: $ 2,000

·    Local Grants

·    Discretionary Grants

Application dates

Grant rounds for 2015/2016 will be as follows

Quick Response Local Grants

[insert year] funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round One

July

August

September

September

Round Two

September

October

November

November

Round Three

January

February

March

March

Round Four

March

April

May

May

Round Five

May

June

July

July

 

Local Grants

[insert year] funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round one

3 August 2015

11 September

October/November

November

Round two

1 April

15 May

June/July

August

 

 

Accountability measures

The Howick Local Board requires

·    recipients of a local grant to report back to the local board on their project or event.


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Howick Local Board Community Fees and Charges - July to December 2014

 

File No.: CP2015/05431

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To present the usage and revenue data from community facilities within the local board area for the period 1 July to 31 December 2014 and to highlight any significant impact of the new fees and charges that were introduced on 1 July 2014.

2.       To recommend community facilities hire fees for the 2015/2016 year.

Executive Summary

3.       On 25 February 2015, members of the Howick Local Board met at a workshop to consider the impact of the council’s ‘Hire Fee Framework – For Hire of Auckland Council’s Community Facilities’ (the framework), which was introduced on 1 July 2014. Please refer to Attachment A for the fee schedule for 2014/2015.

4.       The framework was developed over a two-year period from 2012-2014 and was based on good practice principles. New fees and charges, which would help ensure fairness and transparency for all users, were to be introduced for all council facilities across the region on 1 July 2014. Some hire fees were rising, either because fees for comparable venues of similar quality, size and condition are being brought closer together, or to address past inconsistencies in pricing across the region. As a guide, in finalising the first year of fees under the new framework, a threshold of no more than a twenty percent increase was applied to limit the impact of such fee rises on the community.

5.       All local boards adopted the framework although six local boards, including Howick, chose to vary from the recommended fees and charges, acknowledging that existing hirers that were on special legacy rates and that some hirers would be facing an increase of more than twenty percent.

6.       The Howick Local Board area has four council-managed community facilities – the Bucklands and Eastern Beaches War Memorial Hall, Fencible Lounge, Nixon Park Community Hall and Pakuranga Community Hall

7.       After 1 July, the council received enquiries from 43 of the 46 regular hirers across all four venues. Apart from several of the smaller-sized groups who hired the Nixon Park Community Hall, many hirers accepted a priority activity discount offered by the Howick Local Board or a transition arrangement until the end of September 2014. Seven hirers at Nixon Park Community Hall cancelled their bookings. For the full list of regular hirers, please refer to Attachment B.

8.       Of the local boards that accepted the recommended the fees and charges, 12 per cent (on average) of the regular hirers enquired about the new fees and charges structure. Less than one per cent (on average) of these regular hirers cancelled their bookings. The greater number of cancellations in the Howick Local Board area when compared with other local boards has likely been aggravated by the very low legacy fees and charges for venues in the Howick area.

9.       For a table of fees and charges per venue for the July to December period, please refer to the summary in Attachment C. Attachment D shows the number of sessions booked by activity type.

10.     The table below summarises the combined activity of the four facilities in the Howick Local Board area for the July to December six-month period. Please note that some figures are reported as percentage points (pp), while others are shown as a percentage (%). Please refer to the glossary of terms (Attachment E) for more information on percentage points.

Utilisation

Visitors

Revenue

       -10.5 (pp)

       -6,312 (-14%)

      -$16,168 (-34%)

 

 

 

 

 

11.     Overall, utilisation (booked hours divided by 10 available hours per day) has decreased by 10.5 percentage points. In the same six-month period, visitor numbers decreased from 45,286 to 38,978 (-14 per cent). Revenue decreased by $16,168, which is in line with lower utilisation.

12.     On 1 July a new process was introduced to book the available spaces in most of the council-managed community facilities across the region and to record visitor numbers. This has resulted in more accurate visiting figures for this reporting period, when compared with 2013.

13.     For the 2014/2015 financial year, revenue from community facilities is expected to decrease for the Howick Local Board.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Agrees to adopt the 2014/2015 community facilities hire fees, uninflated, for the 2015/2016 year, as per Attachment A and will apply to all new hirers using the facilities.

b)      Approves a transitional arrangement of a 10% increase on their specific 2014/15 fee for all legacy hirers, as listed in Attachment F.

c)      Requests council staff communicate with the groups in transition to confirm the new rates and that the 2015/2016 year will be the final year for transitional arrangements.

d)      Requests council staff to provide regular updates on the impact of the hire fees and the performance of council-managed community facilities as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Comments

14.     The council’s ‘Hire Fee Framework – For Hire of Auckland Council’s Community Facilities’ (the framework) was developed over a two-year period from 2012-2014 and acknowledged that ‘access to safe, affordable places for people to pursue their interests provides many benefits to the wider community…’ The framework included these good practice principles: public management, lawfulness, accountable, transparent (openness), value for money, integrity and fairness.

15.     All local boards adopted the framework although six local boards, including Howick, chose to vary from the recommended fees and charges. (Resolution number HW/2014/36 in April 2014).

16.     When the new framework was implemented, it became clear that across some local boards there were a large number of exceptions to the published hire rates that had not been recorded in the past or visible to the organisation. The experience of the local boards that accepted the recommended fees and charges is averaged as follows:

·    12 per cent of regular hirers enquired about the new fees and charges.

·    Those facing significant price increases were allowed transition rates until the end of September 2014.

·    Less than one per cent of these regular hirers cancelled their bookings.

17.     Members of the Howick Local Board met for a workshop on 25 February 2015 to consider the impact of the new fees and charges introduced on 1 July 2014. It was the view of some members that the board continues to provide subsidies to regular hirers on legacy arrangements and to increase those rates by 10 per cent for the 2015/2016 year. Please refer to Attachment A for the fee schedule for new hirers in 2014/2015 and Attachment F for hirers on legacy rates.

18.     Impact of implementing new fees and charges

After 1 July, the council received enquiries from 43 of the 46 regular hirers across all four venues in the Howick Local Board area. Many accepted a priority discount offered by the Howick Local Board or a transition arrangement until the end of September 2014. Seven hirers at Nixon Park Community Hall cancelled their bookings, citing uncertainty around fees and charges in the future. For the full list of regular hirers, please refer to Attachment B.

19.     The greater number of cancellations in the Howick Local Board area when compared with other local boards has likely been aggravated by the very low legacy fees and charges for venues in the Howick area.

20.     Summary of utilisation, visits and revenue by local board area

Please note that some figures in the following graphs are reported as percentage points (pp), while others are shown as a percentage (%). For a table of fees and charges per venue for the July to December period, please refer to the summary in Attachment C. Attachment D shows the number of sessions booked by activity type.

21.     Howick Local Board – utilisation hours booked

22.     Utilisation decreased in all four of the local board’s council-managed facilities in the range of 1 to 23 percentage points. The average was a 10.5 percentage point decrease when compared with the same six-month period last year. 

 

 


 

23.     Howick Local Board – visits

24.     Visitors to the Howick council-managed community facilities decreased by 14 per cent compared with the same period last year, with three of the four facilities reporting decreases. 

25.     From 1 July 2014, new processes were introduced to book the available spaces in most of the council-managed community facilities across the region and also to record visitor numbers as part of the standard booking process. This has meant that the visiting figures are more accurate over the six-month period to December 2014, when compared with the same period in 2013.

 

Highlights/exceptions

26.     Utilisation and visits at a facility level are shown on the two graphs below.

 

 


 

27.     Nixon Park Hall: Utilisation and visits is notably down. Of the 19 regular hirers, seven cancelled their bookings in response to the changes. They were all contacted and advised that the local board had reverted to the hire rates from 2013/2014. However, some were hesitant to rebook as they believed that their charges will increase in coming years. The council staff continue to work with groups affected by the changed fees and charges.

 

28.     Bucklands and Eastern Beaches War Memorial Hall: 55 per cent increase in visitors.

 

29.     Regular and casual users: The two charts below show the regular and casual users of the four local board community facilities. Nixon Park Community hall, which is more popular with smaller groups, has lost a considerable amount of hirers. There has been little change at the other facilities.

 

 


 

30.     Revenue

 

31.     The local board earned less revenue when compared with the same period last year. This is in line with the lower utility.

32.     Revenue for the Fencible Lounge has nearly halved compared with the same period last year. Since there has been little change to the overall number of hirers at this venue, the lower revenue is likely a result of change in customer type to those paying a lower rate or the hirers booking for a shorter time.

 

In summary

33.     A new framework for fees and charges was introduced for council facilities across the region on 1 July 2014. All local boards adopted the framework although six local boards, including Howick, chose to vary from the recommended fees and charges.

34.     Of the local boards that accepted the recommended the fees and charges, 12 per cent (on average) of the regular hirers enquired about the new fees and charges structure. Less than one per cent of these regular hirers (on average) cancelled their bookings.

35.     There were a greater number of cancellations in the Howick Local Board area when compared with other local boards. This has likely been aggravated by the incredibly low legacy rates in the Howick and Pakuranga area.


36.     The table below summarises the combined activity of all of the Howick Local Board venues for the July to December six-month period. Overall, utilisation has decreased by 10.5 percentage points. Over the same period, visitor numbers decreased from 45,286 to 38,978 (-14 per cent). Revenue decreased by $16,168, which is in line with lower utilisation

Utilisation

Visitors

Revenue

       -10.5 (pp)

       -6,312 (-14%)

      -$16,168 (-34%)

 

 

 

 

37.     On 1 July a new process was introduced to book the available spaces in most of the council-managed community facilities across the region and to record visitor numbers. This has resulted in more accurate visiting figures for this reporting period, when compared with 2013.

38.     For the 2014/2015 financial year, revenue from community facilities is expected to decrease for the Howick Local Board.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

39.     The impact of the new community facilities fees and charges introduced on 1 July 2014 was work shopped with members of the Howick Local Board on 25 February 2015. It was the view of some members that the board continues to provide subsidies to regular hirers on legacy arrangements and to increase those rates by 10 per cent for the 2015/2016 year. Please refer to Attachment F.

 

40.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Howick Local Board’s authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

 

41.     The fees and charges framework is not specifically targeted for Maori populations. However, it aims to be clear and transparent to all users, including Maori.

Implementation

42.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Fee schdule for 20142015 Howick

75

bView

List of regular hirers for Howick

77

cView

Summary of fees and charges data July - December 2014

79

dView

Activity type

81

eView

Glossary of terms Howick fees and charges

83

fView

List of hirers at legacy rates in Howick

85

     

Signatories

Authors

Kat Teirney – Manager Community Occupancy, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Attachment A: Fee schedule for new hirers for 2014/2015

Howick

                                                                                                                                                                                      

               

Hourly rate

as of 1 July 2014

Facility Category

Facility Name

Room

Peak Standard

Off-Peak Standard

Venues for hire

Bucklands and Eastern Beaches War Memorial Hall

Main Hall

 $       44.00

 $       35.20

 

Fencible Lounge

Main Hall

 $       44.00

 $       35.20

 

Nixon Park Community Hall

Main Hall

 $       44.00

 $       35.20

 

Pakuranga Community Hall

Main Hall

 $       44.00

 $       35.20

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Attachment B: List of regular hirers in the Howick Local Board Area

 

Bucklands and Eastern Beaches War Memorial Hall

Social Dance Group

Eastern Districts Country Music Club Inc

D for Dog Training

Bucklands Beach Combined Probus

Free Wesleyan Church of Tonga Filipai Howick

Ladies Probus Half Moon Bay

Yoga

Yoga 2

Faith Community

 

Fencible Lounge

The Performance Net Limited

Samoan Assembly of God Chuch Manukau Central

Howick Spinners

Howick Orchid Society Inc

U3A Howick History Group

Howick Art Group Inc

Fitness League

Yoga 4 You

Yoga

Howick Toastmasters

Gentle Exercise for Elderly

 

Nixon Park

Howick Combined Probus Club

Fencible Quilters of Howick

Lions Club of Howick Inc

Howick and Districts Cardiac Club Inc

Satya Sai Service Organisation

Stitch n Fun

Rainbow Ringers Inc

Scrapbooking 1

Fat Quarter Quilters

Friday Quilting Friends

Sunday Quilting Friends

Scrapbooking 2

The Friendship Force of Howick Inc

Auckland Vintage Jazz Society Inc

 

Pakuranga Community Hall

East City Japanese Playgroup

Church of the Risen Lord Jesus Christ

Social Dance Group

Auckland Mulan Boxing Association Inc

East Auckalnd Table Tennis Club

Pakuranga Indoor Bowling Club

Special Olympics Howick

Australasian Toyakwai Karate Association (ATKA)

Pakuranga Highway Playgroup

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Attachment E: Glossary of terms

Howick Local Board community facilities fees and charges – July to December

 

Term

Definition

B

Bookings

Number of slots/sessions booked by a hirer

C

Casual hirer

Group or individual who has made 5 or less bookings across the network of community facilities managed by CDAC per year.

Note:

This definition is for this this analysis only, and may not conform with other business use of the term.

H

Hirer

The entity who is party to the rental contract. A contract may relate to more than one booking.

O

Off peak

According to the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule. Discount rates applied

P

Peak

According to the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule. Discount not usually applied.

Peak utilisation

Booked hours during peak times / Total available peak hours.

Percentage points

A percentage point (pp) represents the difference between two percentages on a 100 per cent scale. It is used for measures like utilisation so the changes can be put into the right context. For example, if utilisation increased from thirty per cent to forty per cent that could be stated in error as a 25 per cent increase. To put it in the right context means it would be a ten percentage point increase. Volume-based increases or decreases (e.g. visitor numbers or revenue) are reported as percentages.

R

Regular hirer

An entity that has made six or more bookings across the network of community facilities managed by CDAC.

Note:

This definition is for this analysis only and may not conform with other business use of the term.

Revenue

Refers to revenue as reported in the financial accounts.

(Not what is reported as revenue for management accounting purposes i.e. in the omnibus reports)

U

Utilisation

Booked hours divided by 10 available hours per day.

Note: All comparison reporting in utilisation is presented as percentage point movements.

V

Visits

Number of people attending a bookable space at a Community Centre or Venue for Hire in any one session.

Note:

·      community facilities events that don't use the inside of a facility are not included

·      People attending the facility to only pick up or drop off an attendee of a bookable space are not included

·      A person is counted as a visitor more than once per day

If they leave and return to the facility for use of a different booking

Visit more than one community facility address per day.

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/04894

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Otara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association.  A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area and for which site plans are included.

5.       The activity of the Association is of a local purpose nature rather than recreation. There are three of the 39 sites where the land is not classified as local purpose as set out in Attachment A.  The affected boards are asked to approve a lease under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977. Prior to granting the lease, public advertising of Council’s intention is required under Section 73(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 and approval from the Minister of Conservation or their delegate if required. Iwi consultation pursuant to Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 is required on two sites where they are not contemplated in a Reserve Management Plan. Council staff will consider and work through a process if required to reclassify the kindergartens lease area from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       There are four of the 39 premises where the land the kindergarten is sited on is an unclassified recreation reserve. The affected boards are asked to support the classification of the reserves as set out in Attachment A as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommend approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

7.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where the group owns the building.

8.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Approves the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

b)      Approves a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Pakuranga Kindergarten, Highland Park Kindergarten, Somerville Kindergarten, Cascades Kindergarten and Howick Kindergarten, details specified in Attachment A, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

c)      Approves the granting of the lease for Pakuranga Kindergarten located on Reeves Road Kindy Reserve, 107R Reeves Road, Pakuranga under Section 73 (3) of the Reserves Act 1977 subject to the further following terms and conditions:

i)        The public notification of the new community leases

ii)       Council staff will consider and initiate if required a process to reclassify the lease area of the Pakuranga Kindergarten from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977;

d)      Supports the classification of Meadowland Drive Shops Reserve (Somerville Kindergarten) located at 84R Clydesdale Avenue, Northpark, Howick being Lot 2 DP 133066 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

Comments

9.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

10.     A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

11.     This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

12.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

13.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

14.     The activity of the Association is of a local purpose nature rather than recreation. There are three of the 39 sites where the land is not classified as local purpose as set out in Attachment A.  The affected boards are asked to approve a lease under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977, required when the established activity does not fit within the present classification. Prior to granting the lease, public advertising of Council’s intention is required under Section 73(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 and approval from the Minister of Conservation or their delegate if required. Iwi consultation pursuant to Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 is required on two sites where they are not contemplated in a Reserve Management Plan.

15.     For the three sites Council staff will consider and work through a process if required to reclassify the kindergartens lease area from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     Where the land is an unclassified recreation reserve the affected boards are asked to support the classification of four reserves as set out in Attachment A as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.  This classification will support the activity that is currently being undertaken and Parks staff has been consulted.

17.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

18.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments.

19.     A Community Outcomes Plan as approved will be an attachment to the lease and reported on annually by the Association.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

20.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

21.     A portfolio meeting has been held with each local board and they were presented with the proposal for the lease for multiple premises.

Māori impact statement

22.     The Association has long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

23.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

24.     There are no costs to the Local Board for approval of the community lease for multiple premises and costs for preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council. Costs will be incurred and met by Auckland Council for the public notification of those leases which require it. The initial costs are approximately $1500.00 for placing a public notice in the print media covering multiple sites. Costs may be incurred in the classification of unclassified reserves process and these will be covered by Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

91

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

103

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 












Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

LGNZ Conference and AGM 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05292

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report informs local boards about the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and conference in Rotorua from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 and invites local boards to nominate a representative to attend as relevant.

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government New Zealand annual conference and AGM takes place at the Rotorua Energy Events Centre from Sunday 19 July to Tuesday 21 July 2015.

3.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to 4 official delegates at the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The Governing Body will consider this at their meeting on 26 March 2015.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor as a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor as the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster as Chair LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council, and the Chief Executive.

4.       In addition to the official delegates, local board members are invited to attend.  Local boards should consider the relevance of the conference programme when deciding on attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      nominate a representative to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2015 annual general meeting and conference from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board’s work programme

b)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

Comments

5.       The 2015 LGNZ Conference and AGM are being held in Rotorua. The conference commences with the AGM and technical tours from 09.30 am on Sunday 19 July 2015 and concludes at 2.30 pm on Tuesday 21 July 2015.

6.       The theme of this year’s conference is “Leading the Charge for our Communities”.  The programme includes:

·    Stephen Yarwood, former Mayor of Adelaide, will discuss performance and customer focussed culture - taking your people with you;

·    David Meates, CEO of Canterbury District Health Board, will present on understanding what's important to communities and why a strong focus on the customer matters;

·    Dr Lester Levy, CEO of New Zealand Leadership Institute, will discuss disruptive governance – how do we increase our performance and create a strong link from strategy to transparent financial performance;

·    Kevin Roberts, Executive Chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi, on telling our story and selling the value of our sector;

·    Penny Webster, Councillor at Auckland Council; Rob Cameron, Partner at Cameron Partners; and Dr Oliver Hartwich, Executive Director of the New Zealand Initiative will speak on funding for growth – transformation of local government;

·    Dr William Rolleston, National President of Federated Farmers; Andrew Knight, CEO of New Zealand Oil and Gas; and Gary Taylor, Executive Director of the Environmental Defence Society will discuss resource management – how a growing economy can also support a healthy environment;

·    Mayors Meng Foon, Stuart Crosby, Annette Main, David Ayers and Tony Kokshoorn will each present on right-sizing your town and making the important decisions – a response to economic and demographic change;

·    Brenda Halloran, former Mayor of Waterloo, Canada, will talk about nation building – infrastructure and urban development; and

·    Brett Way of Central Hawkes Bay District Council and Rochelle Deane of Auckland Council will present on delivering local government expertise in the Pacific – a snap shot of the Local Government Technical Assistance Facility for Pacific Countries, (PacificTA) programme.

7.       The programme also includes a number of Master Class sessions including:

·    Growing NZ's talent and economies – strategies to retain and attract skilled migrants;

·    Local boards – connecting with the community;

·    Engaging with iwi to grow local and regional economies;

·    Collaboration, culture change and customer focus under the RMA; and

·    Getting the most from the One Network Roading Classification system.

 

8.       Local boards should consider the relevance of the programme when deciding on conference attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

Annual General Meeting

9.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to have four delegates to the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor (or his nominee), the Deputy Mayor, Councillor Penny Webster (as Chair of Zone 1) and the Chief Executive (or his nominee).

10.     The Mayor is a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor is the Mayor’s alternate for this position, and Councillor Penny Webster is the Chair of LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council.   The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at their meeting on 26 March 2015.

11.     LGNZ request that local board members who wish to attend the AGM, register their intention prior to the AGM. 

Costs

12.     The Local Board Services Department budget will cover the costs of one member per local board to attend the conference. 

13.     Registration fees are $1410.00 (incl GST) before 3 June 2015 and $1510.00 (incl GST) after that.  Full conference registration includes:

·    Attendance at conference business sessions (Sunday-Tuesday);

·    Satchel and contents;

·    Daily catering;

·    Simpson Grierson welcome cocktail function;

·    Fulton Hogan conference dinner and EXCELLENCE Awards function; and

·    Closing conference function ticket.

 

14.     The council hosted tours on Sunday 19 July 2015 are not included in the conference price. Local board members are welcome to attend these at their own cost.

15.     Additional costs are approximately $150 per night accommodation, plus travel.  Local Board Services will be co-ordinating and booking all registrations and accommodation and investigating cost effective travel.

Consideration

Local Board Views

16.     This is a report to the 21 local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

17.     The Local Government NZ conference will better inform local boards and thereby support their decision making for their communities including Maori.

Implementation Issues

18.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LGNZ Conference and Master Class Programme

109

     

Signatories

Authors

Anna Bray – Policy & Planning Manager, Local Boards

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 




Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Site proposed for divestment - 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga

 

File No.: CP2015/05562

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the Howick Local Board’s (HLB) endorsement for Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL) to recommend for disposal the site at 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga.

Executive Summary

2.       The council-owned property at 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga has been identified as potentially surplus to council requirements through a review process.

3.       The subject property a 718m2 residential site with a standalone dwelling.  This site was acquired in 1968 by the Auckland Regional Authority for motorway purposes and is no longer required for this purpose. 

4.       ACPL commenced the rationalisation process for this property in 2013.  Consultation with council and its CCOs, Iwi authorities and the HLB has now taken place.  No accepted alternative service uses for this site were identified during the rationalisation process.  The HLB has provided informal feedback that it is supportive of the proposed disposal of this site.

5.       A resolution for the sale of the site is required from the Finance and Performance Committee before any proposed disposal can be progressed.

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      endorses Auckland Council Property Limited’s recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee to dispose of 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga.

 

Comments

6.       ACPL and ACPD work jointly on a comprehensive review of council’s property portfolio. One of the outcomes of the review process is to identify properties in the council portfolio that are potentially surplus to requirements and that may be suitable to sell.  The subject site was identified as potentially saleable through the review process.

7.       Once a property has been identified as potentially surplus, ACPL engages with council and its CCO’s through an Expression of Interest (EOI) process, to establish whether the property must be retained for a strategic purpose or is required for a future funded project.  Once a property has been internally cleared of any service requirements, ACPL consults with local boards, mana whenua, ward councillors and the Independent Maori Statutory Board.  All sale recommendations must be approved by the ACPL Board before it makes a final recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee. 

8.       The subject property a 718m2, flat, residential site with eastern and southern boundaries to public reserve.  The improvements comprise of a standalone, 1960s, weatherboard and tile dwelling.  It has a 2014 rating valuation of $550,000.  The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan zoning is residential. 

9.       This site was acquired in 1968 by the Auckland Regional Authority for motorway purposes.  It was subsequently transferred to the Auckland Regional Council, which declared it surplus in 1991.  It was subsequently transmitted to Auckland City Council to manage as part of the Auckland Regional Roading Designation Fund but the title was not changed.  Following the Auckland Regional Roading Designation Fund being wound up, the site was transferred to Manukau City Council in 2010, and transferred to Auckland Council in 2011 upon amalgamation of the legacy councils.

10.     The rationalisation process for this property commenced in 2013.  EOI’s were sought from council and its CCO’s in respect of these sites.  Parks and Community Policy and Planning (CPP) expressed an interest in absorbing this site into an adjoining reserve as open space.  The HLB were supportive of retaining this site to enhance the adjoining reserve by removing the dwelling on the subject site and adding the site to the reserve to increase accessibility, visibility and safety of the park.  This option was investigated by Parks and CPP and considered by the Portfolio Review Steering Group (PRSG) in April 2014.  It was found that there was no need to incorporate this site into the adjoining reserve, and the PRSG decided that the rationalisation of this site should proceed.

11.     The Heritage Unit and the Maori and Strategy Relations team were provided the opportunity to flag any issues.  Neither of these parties raised any relevant issues. 

12.     The results of the rationalisation process to date indicate that this property is not required for current or future service requirements.  As such ACPL recommend that this site be sold.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.     ACPL first engaged with the HLB regarding this property in early 2013.  The HLB were supportive of retaining this site to enhance the adjoining reserve.  After this option was investigated and subsequently not supported by Parks and CPP, ACPL held a further workshop with the HLB, which verbally acknowledged that it endorsed the proposed disposal of this sites in principle but wished to pass a formal resolution. 

14.     The HLB’s resolution will be included in ACPL’s report to the Finance & Performance Committee.

Māori impact statement

15.     11 iwi authorities were contacted regarding the potential sale of 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga. The following feedback was received.

i.        Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei has no commercial or site specific interest in this property.

ii.       Te Kawerau-ā-Maki

Te Kawerau-ā-Maki notified general cultural significance in the site. Representatives initially sought to meet with ACPL but then advised they would work directly with Te Waka Angamua.  ACPL requested to be contacted following the outcome of any such discussions.

iii.      Ngāti Tamaoho

Ngāti Tamaoho responded that the Chair would make further inquiries with kaumātua and reseach personnel. ACPL responded that we can feed any information back into the process moving forward.

iv.      Te Akitai Waiohua

Te Akitai Waiohua has expressed potential commercial interest in any council owned properties that may become available for sale.

v.       Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Ngāti Te Ata has expressed general cultural significance of all sites to Ngāti Te Ata; along with commercial interest should the property become available for sale. Their representative has additionally stated that due to the cost of land in Auckland it would be important for council to consider discounted rates for land sales to iwi to enable displaced iwi to live in their rohe.


 

vi.      Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki

Ngai Tai have generally instructed that if no feedback is received then there is no site specific interest.

vii.     Ngāti Paoa

Ngāti Paoa has expressed potential commercial interest in any council owned properties that may become available for sale.

viii.    Ngāti Whanaunga

No site specific feedback received.

ix.      Ngāti Maru

No site specific feedback received.

x.       Ngāti Tamaterā

No site specific feedback received.

xi.      Te Patukirikiri

No site specific feedback received.

Implementation

16.     A resolution for the sale of the site is required from the Finance and Performance Committee before any proposed disposal can be progressed

17.     This property was advertised for sale in 1992 under section 40, Public Works Act 1981.  Due to this, the property is now exempt from the Public Works Act 1981 offer back requirements. 

18.     This property is not one of Council’s Strategic Assets to which the Significance Policy would apply.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Images of 29 Tiraumea Drive, Pakuranga

117

     

Signatories

Authors

Letitia McColl, Senior Engagement Advisor, Portfolio Review, Auckland Council Property Limited

Authorisers

Marian Webb, Team Leader, Portfolio Review, Auckland Council Property Limited Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/05297

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·    two chairs and portfolio holder workshops.

·    individual board workshops in April.

·    a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receives the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt and Kay McIntyre), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson).

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

·    ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.

·    Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

·    How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

·    provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information.

·    provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities.

·    facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council.

·    develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices.

·    support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

·    the model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

·    the path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

·    one size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

·    all parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

·    capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

·    recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

·    revised approach.

·    the proposed operating model for the CDS unit.

·    supporting tools.

·    budget and implementation implications.

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

 

Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd - Local Board Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals 

 

File No.: CP2015/05824

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Howick area for the local board’s consideration to help inform its advocacy to the Budget Committee and their decision making on locally driven initiatives (LDI budgets).

Executive Summary

2.       The LTP proposals were released for public consultation in January 2015, with local engagement and Have Your Say events held through until 16 March to receive feedback.  Feedback was also received through written or online forms, email and through social media.

3.       In total, the Council received and processed over 27,000 pieces of written feedback of which 1300 were received from the Howick Local Board area. In addition over 40 people attended a Have Your Say event in the Howick Local Board area on 3 and 5 March 2015.

4.       Attached to this report is a summary of the feedback received through the LTP consultation on local and regional proposals for the Howick Local Board area. This feedback will help inform the Howick Local Board’s advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April. These discussions are timed to inform the Budget Committee prior to them making decisions on the LTP on 7 and 8 May 2015.

5.       The feedback will also assist the Howick Local Board decisions in their decision making when finalising LDI and advocacy content for their Local Board Agreements 2015/2016.

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receive the summary of feedback from Howick Local Board area consultation report in attachment A.

b)      Confirms an updated list of advocacy points for the discussions with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April (Attachment B).

 

Comments

6.       The summary of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A.  It must be noted that the figures may not necessarily represent informed feedback.  This feedback is only one of many tools to help the local board in their decision-making.

7.       This feedback builds on the local board’s understanding of their community priorities and preferences. It will also inform the local board’s advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April.  At these discussions the board will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the key consultation issues of investing in Auckland, fixing transport, sharing rates and housing and development. The board may also provide feedback on regional proposals with particular impact locally and may advocate for specific local priorities where the Budget Committee is the decision maker, such as large capital projects. 

8.       The updated advocacy points in relation to the LTP are in Attachment B (to be tabled at the meeting).

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

9.       The Howick Local Board needs to consider any changes that it might make to their LDI budgets or advocacy in light of the feedback on the LTP proposals.   

Māori impact statement

10.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Maori. The local board agreements are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Maori. The local board agreement is based on the local board plan which are both been developed through engagement with the community, including Maori.

Implementation

11.     Following the local board discussions with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April the Budget Committee will make decisions on regional proposals on 7 and 8 May.  Local boards will then hold workshops from 14 to 20 May to finalise their local board agreements prior to them being adopted at board meetings between 9 and 16 June.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Long Term Plan 2015-2025 consultation feedback report for Howick Local Board

125

bView

Howick Local Board Advocacy (to be tabled at the meeting)

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Mata  Ropeti-Laumalili - Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 












Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Placeholder for Attachment 2

 

 

 

. Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals.DOC

 

 

 

Howick Local Board Advocacy (to be tabled at the meeting)

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016

 

File No.: CP2015/04159

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a list of reports requested and issues pending for the Howick Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       A list of reports requested and issues pending is updated monthly and presented at the Board meeting to keep members informed of progress on outstanding reports and issues.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 – 2016 schedule.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Issues Register

141

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

 

HOWICK LOCAL BOARD – REPORTS REQUESTED / ISSUES RAISED 2013 - 2016

 

 

Item No

Date of Meeting

Resolution or Item No:

Issue

Resolution/Description

Target Date

Progress/Comments

39

16/4/12

HW/2012/68

Encroachment by MacLeans College on MacLeans Park

b) That the Howick Local Board reaffirms the 1999 decision of the legacy Manukau City Council that a land exchange be approved as formally consented by the Department of Conservation as of March 2000.  The Local Board also reaffirms that MacLeans College and the Ministry of Education meets all the conditions of the 1999 land exchange.

c) That the Howick Local Board seek from MacLeans College and the Ministry of Education removal of the fence and all surrounding encroachments and either the removal of the basketball courts or an agreement with Auckland Council for full unrestricted access to the courts by members of the public. 

d) That the Howick Local Board seek from MacLeans College and the Ministry of Education removal of the practice cricket wickets nets.

e) That the Howick Local Board request officers to make early contact with MacLeans College and the Ministry of Education regarding the Howick Local Board’s resolutions passed on 16th April 2012.

f) That the Howick Local Board request officers to report on compliance of the utility buildings beside the basketball courts along the boundary.

 

 

a)   Action sheet sent 19/4/12

b)   The Board were updated in April at the briefing on progress to date.

c)   A workshop/briefing is scheduled for 20th September 2012.

d)   Actions from the workshop was for Council officer to confirm the conditions of the consent and to arrange a meeting with the HLB and the Chair of the Board of Trustees and policyholder.

e)   Parks Sports & Recreation staff briefed portfolio members on 20th February.  A report will be provided to the May business meeting recommending options to the board.

f)     Parks Sport & Recreation Portfolio members and council staff are meeting 29 May with McLeans College Principal, Board representative and MOE representative to discuss a way forward to address encroachment issues prior to reporting at a formal board business meeting.

g)   Further workshop held on 17 July 2014.  Discussion of options resulted in another meeting with MacLeans College and MOE being required.

h)   Meeting with MacLeans College, MOE and Board members held on 4 September. Survey to be completed as a first step to confirm the boundaries, so they can be clearly presented in reports and future discussion documents.

 

71

9/9/13

HW/2013/168

Uxbridge Redevelopment

d)requests a report on the outcome of developed and detailed design along with an updated timetable to the Board in May 2014

 

a)      Action sheet sent to Rhoda Fowler.

b)      An update was provided to the Events, Arts & Culture portfolio on 25th February 2014.  A report will be provided to the June business meeting.

c)      Update on Uxbridge provided to Events, Arts & Culture portfolio on 27 May.  A report will follow.

d)      Awaiting confirmation of accommodation for Uxbridge during redevelopment.

e)      ACPL confirmed in late November for 34 Moore Street to be used for relocation of Uxbridge during redevelopment.

73

9/12/13

HW/2013/208

Emilia Maud Nixon Garden of Memories

a)seeks feedback from Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and the wider Māori community through Te Roopu Awhina o Wairoa on the Draft Operational Management Plan for Te Whare Wānanga o Wairoa.

b)approves the development of a request for proposal process for the provision of a Māori cultural education programme.

c)requests officers complete the formal opening of the Whare by the end of March

 

a)   Action sheet sent to Johnnie Freeland 12/12/13

b)      A Steering Group and Working Party has been formed.  Planning for opening now in progress.

c)       Reports on August agenda.  Agreed date for the opening on 13th September 2014, agreed draft operational plan, agreed process for proposal of educational programmes.  Agreed to suggested name for the Whare.

d)      Whare opening and naming on 13th September 2014, including renaming of the museum.

e)       Proposal for contracting of educational programmes to be presented back to the board.

f)       TWA attending Events and Arts and Culture portfolio meeting on 2nd December to discuss proposal for contracting of educational progrmmes.

74

9/6/14

HW/2014/69

Petition regarding Eastern Beach Action Network (EBAN) re Macleans College Encroachments

a)receives the petition requesting action to resolve issues in the area of the eastern boundary between Macleans Park and Macleans College.

 

a)    Action sheet sent to Rose Ward to address petition’s issues in report to Board.

b)    Issues will be addressed in a report to the Board.

75

14/7/14

HW/2014/112

HW/2014/113

Fees and charges for Community Halls

d)requests that any fees or charges paid by or charged to a community organisation between 1 July 2014 and 14 July 2014 be refunded in part if the amount charged is greater than the amount the community organisation would have paid if the date of use of the facility fell prior to 1 July 2014.

e)request officers to prepare a report at the earliest opportunity for a Howick Local Board meeting.  This report needs to include the following:

i)A list of community and arts facilities, and rooms within, that user groups are/have been hiring over the past 12 months.

ii)How often and how long have they hired the facility for?

iii)Are these spaces appropriate for the user groups?  If not, are there other local facilities that could be used and what is the cost?

iv)A comparison of rates previously paid for usage (outside the fee structure), previously published rates and the proposed new fees, including the percentage increase.

v)Information about what consultation or communication was carried out with the existing users prior to the changes being made on 1 July 2014.

vi)Options to resolve the fee differential between existing user groups of the four Community Halls and the new fees and charges, which includes an option of grandfathering charges for existing community organisations.

vii)The financial impact of any resolution suggested in 'vi'.

 

a)      Action sheet sent to Kevin Marriott.

b)      Meeting held on 22nd July 2014 with Portfolio lead Lucy Schwaner, Kevin Marriott, Tereena Griffiths and Vanessa Leddra.

c)      Further meeting with council officers and portfolio team scheduled for 3rd September 2014.

d)      Further resolutions passed at 8th September meeting.

76

8/9/14

HW/2014/140

Fees and charges for Community Halls

a)  Considers the Notice of Motion on Fees and Charges by Member Lucy Schwaner.

b)  Reinforces its resolution HW/2014/112 passed at its business meeting on 14th July 2014

c)  Agrees the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule (as per Attachment C III Local Community and Arts Facilities) be implemented for all new users

d)  Supports the existing affected hirers (including but not restricted to tabled Attachment A) by continuing their legacy arrangements until a review of Fees & Charges in June 2015 contingent upon the provision to the Board of an analysis of use by hirers from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 on a month by month basis.

e)  Requests a report analysing financial impact to both the Local Board and hirers of the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule.

f)   Delegates responsibility to the Howick Local Board Chair and Portfolio Lead of the Community Facilities Portfolio to set charges for legacy users who may not be regular users.

 

 

a)    Action sheet sent to Kat Teirney, Tereena Griffiths, Tristan Coulson and Vanessa Leddra on 10/9/14

b)    Update on progress requested following the resolution on 8 September business meeting and when provided will be given to the Portfolio team at its regular meeting

c)    No decisions made by Chair and Portfolio lead to date around setting charges for any legacy users who are not regular users as per resolution 12 (f).

d)     Local Board Services staff are currently working with the Venues for hire team to plan and prepare the report which will be presented to the local board in February 2015. This report will address the issues raised by the local board at their July and September business meetings, and provide options for fees and charges for the 2015 / 2016 financial year.

e)     Draft report discussed at Community Facilities Portfolio in February and way forward agreed. Report likely to come to April BM.

 

 



Howick Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/04161

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report attaches the workshop notes taken for the period stated below.

Executive Summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the Board shall be closed to the public, however, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop notes for the period stated below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the workshop notes for workshops held on 26th February, 12th, 19th and 26th March 2015.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Notes

147

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

20 April 2015