I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 April 2015

6.00pm

Local Board Office
7-13 Pilkington Road
Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Simon Randall

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Josephine Bartley

 

 

Brett Clark

 

 

Bridget Graham, QSM

 

 

Obed Unasa

 

 

Alan Verrall

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Philippa Hillman

Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

2 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 570 3840

Email: philippa.hillman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Blind Citizens New Zealand                                                                                6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Maungakiekie Tāmaki Youth Connections Career Start Funding                           7

13        'Enterprising Auckland' Pilot in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki                                            9

14        Te Oro Place-Making Project                                                                                     41

15        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Discretionary Community Funding - Round Three 2014/2015

This report was not available at the time of printing and will be distributed under separate cover.

 

16        Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvements - Concept Design                              57

17        61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga - application for new commercial lease - Darryl Prout Trading as Enchanged Forest Mini Golf                                                                   65

18        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                   71

19        AMETI - Park Land Proposals                                                                                    85

20        Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report – April 2015                                   101

21        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           109

22        Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals

This report was not available at the time of printing and will be distributed under separate cover.

 

23        Extra meeting scheduled for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Long Term Plan process                                                                                                                       113

24        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops - March 2015           115

25        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         123

26        Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board                                    127

27        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                         129  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 19 March 2015, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

9.1       Blind Citizens New Zealand

Purpose

1.       Providing the Auckland branch of Blind Citizens New Zealand, an opportunity to speak to the Board regarding upper Onehunga Mall.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland branch of Blind Citizens New Zealand has requested the opportunity to speak in public forum regarding the Onehunga Mall.

3.       As per standing orders the Chairman has approved the request to speak in public forum, noting the speaker has 3 minutes including questions.

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thanks Carolyn Peat and Vivian Naylor, representatives of Blind Citizens New Zealand (Auckland Branch) for their attendance.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Maungakiekie Tāmaki Youth Connections Career Start Funding

 

File No.: CP2015/05133

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval for allocation of $22,310 of Youth Connections Budget 2014-2015 financial year to fund the Career Start Programme.

Executive Summary

2.       The Youth Connections programme in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki is part of Auckland Council’s response to youth unemployment. The programme supports young people in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki to move successfully from school into meaningful further education, training or employment.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Connections programme has a dedicated steering group with representatives from the secondary and tertiary education sectors, community, local iwi and the business sector. This group brings leadership and advice to Youth Connections work in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and supports the Career Start programme outlined in this report.

4.       The Career Start programme aims to support youth between 16 and 24 years into full-time employment.  Staff propose that $22,310 be allocated to fund 50 per cent of the next Career Start intake in partnership with the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company and Auckland Chamber of Commerce.  The Youth Connections budget for 2014-2015 currently has $45,345 remaining.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      allocate $22,310 towards the delivery of the Career Start programme in Tāmaki.

 

Background

5.       The Youth Connections programme in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki is part of Auckland Council’s response to youth unemployment. The programme supports young people in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki to move successfully from school into meaningful further education, training or employment.

6.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Youth Connections programme has a dedicated steering group with representatives from the secondary and tertiary education sectors, community, local iwi and the business sector. This group brings leadership and advice to Youth Connections work in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and supports the Career Start programme outlined in this report.

7.       Through Youth Connections, the local board is committed to addressing youth unemployment in the local area. Suggested initiatives discussed with Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board include work ethic based skills training, more specifically:

·        developing soft skills such as work attitude, showing initiative, confidence in interviews, etiquette in interviews (hygiene, clean clothes), the importance of attending work, and communication,

·        language and communication programmes,

·        career guidance and first job mentoring.

8.       Youth Connections has identified significant barriers which prevent young people from accessing employment opportunities both locally and across the region.  Research with employers undertaken by the Local Board in 2014 showed that a key issue for employers is the low employability skills among young jobseekers.

Career Start Programme

9.       The Career Start programme aims to support youth between 16 and 24 years into full-time employment.  The programme includes eight days of intensive work-readiness training, work experience placement, driver licensing, access to the Auckland Chamber of Commerce business network as well as mentoring during job-seeking and the first 12 months of employment.

10.     Participation in the Career Start programme aims to directly address the employability of local youth. Over 80 Tāmaki youth completed the programme over four intakes in 2014, and 63 secured employment.

11.     To support work to address known barriers to youth employment, staff propose that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board fund $22,310 of the programme, in partnership with the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company, who have funded the programme up until now.  This funding agreement would apply to the next intake of the programme, planned for May 2015.  The programme will be delivered in Glen Innes by the Auckland Chamber of Commerce.

Local board views and implications

12.     This proposal has the support of the Local Board Youth Connections Steering Group which is chaired by the board chair and portfolio holder.

Maori impact statement

13.     According to 2013 census figures 16% (6111) of residents in the Tāmaki subdivision identify as Maori. Given this number, it is likely that any responses to the youth employment needs of the community will have a positive impact on the Maori population in the area.

Implementation

14.     Youth Connections will work with the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company and the Auckland Chamber of Commerce to identify suitable participants for the programme.

15.     Career Start will be run for four weeks starting in May 2015 to a cohort of 25 local jobseekers.  Participants will also receive 12 months mentoring to May 2016.

16.     Over 40 young jobseekers have already expressed interest in participating in the programme.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Zimmerman – Senior Advisor, Community Development, Arts and Culture

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

'Enterprising Auckland' Pilot in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

 

File No.: CP2015/04824

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report recommends that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocate $44,000 of its local economic development budget to pilot a new approach to fostering social enterprise as outlined in the ‘Enterprising Auckland’ report (Attachment A).

Executive Summary

2.       In 2014 Auckland Council’s Community and Cultural Strategy Unit commissioned Envision Ltd to prepare a short report on how local boards could use a social enterprise approach to growing local economic development.

3.       The Enterprising Auckland report draws on Envision Ltd’s experience in the community recycling sector and applies these insights to social enterprise in the Auckland context. The Enterprising Auckland report describes a combination of strategies to support local economic development. The main aspects of this approach are:

a)      contracting an experienced ‘broker’ to identify commercial opportunities in the local community,

b)      providing match funding to encourage collaboration between community groups, local businesses, and

c)      taking an advocacy role in accessing Auckland Council procurement opportunities.

4.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has indicated an interest in piloting the approach presented in the Enterprising Auckland report in the first half of 2015. The local board has identified funds available in its economic development budget to resource the pilot.

5.       The primary risk involved in this proposal is that it may not be successful in catalysing a viable business opportunity. Given the timeframe and the innovative nature of the approach being used this is a real risk. However, this is a risk involved in piloting any new approach and needs to be understood in the context of the learning and insights that can be gained through the pilot.

6.       The potential benefits of this approach include creating a viable new business opportunity in the local community. The support provided by the broker mitigates some of the risk of failure which is high with any new start-up. Having an independent broker also helps avoid any real and perceived conflicts of interest.

7.       The total funds sought for this project is $44,000.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      contract Envision Ltd to pilot a new approach to fostering social enterprise as outlined in the ‘Enterprising Auckland’ report

b)      allocate $20,000 to support Envision Ltd to play the role of ‘broker’, identifying local economic development opportunities in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and connecting these with a viable social enterprise

c)      allocate $24,000 to provide ‘match funding’ to support the development of a new social enterprise opportunity within Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

d)      request that Envision Ltd handle all funds and report back to the Local Board on the outcomes of the pilot.

 

Comments

8.       In 2014 Auckland Council’s Community and Cultural Strategy Unit commissioned Envision Ltd to prepare a short report on how local boards could use a social enterprise approach to growing local economic development. The report was launched with support from the Local Board Services Department on 27 March 2015. The completed report can be found as attachment A to this report.

9.       The Enterprising Auckland report draws on Envision Ltd’s experience working with Auckland Council and other organisations, to support local economic development in general and, in particular, community recycling initiatives. The report takes lessons from the solid waste sector and translates these into a ‘road map’ that local boards can apply to other sectors of the economy. The Enterprising Auckland report describes the potential benefits for local boards of contracting a ‘broker’ to identify specific local economic development opportunities and to connect these opportunities with local entrepreneurs, businesses, and not for profit organisations. Some of these opportunities may involve Auckland Council’s procurement supply chain. The report also identifies the need to provide match funding to support local entrepreneurs to work together and make the most of the commercial opportunities available in their local community.

10.     The Enterprising Auckland report is informed by a ‘community recycling’ model that has worked in over a dozen communities around New Zealand. One of the essential ingredients in this model is a ‘cornerstone contract’ with the local authority. Procurement is an area of interest to local boards and the approach described in the Enterprising Auckland report provides a new avenue for local boards to explore the potential of using Auckland Council’s purchasing power to support local economic development.

11.     The Enterprising Auckland report describes a catalytic role for local boards in supporting local economic development. This report recommends that this support takes the form of match funding to support the development of a new social enterprise opportunity. The funds available need to be adequate to initiate a pilot project and to identify potential partners for any future development. If successful the Local Board may want to repeat the process, but would need to give careful consideration before investing any additional funds in the enterprise that comes from this pilot.

Discussion of options and implications of those options

12.     There are many perspectives about what role local government should play in supporting local economic development and which approaches work, and why. However, most initiatives include the following elements: providing business advice; creating networking opportunities; capability and skills development; providing seed capital; help finding investors; and support to access new markets and customers. There are a number of agencies that can provide these services and the Local Board should be aware that they have many options available to them.

13.     The Enterprise Auckland model is just one of many options available to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board that could benefit the local community. Three alternative good options include:

a)      Capacity building – contracting a credible business coach to run capacity building workshops with local ventures to help them develop their ventures.

b)      Investing in what already works - choose an existing local business or social enterprise to invest in and help them grow.

c)      New ideas - put out an Expression of Interest (EOI) asking for proposals from local entrepreneurs who are looking for investment.

14.     While all these options are likely to provide some benefit to the business and social enterprises that take part, they all need someone to deliver them and this would take some time to organise. Given the timeframe for allocating these funds, an ‘off the shelf’ solution as described in Enterprising Auckland makes good sense.

15.     A second challenge is deciding which businesses, social enterprises, or community organisations to support. Council employees or elected representatives may not be in the best position to identify businesses that should be invested in. Fundamental issues include real and perceived conflicts of interest, varying levels of commercial acumen and experience, and government’s low appetite for risk. By contracting this process out to a broker such as Envision Ltd these issues can be managed by them.

16.     The main reason that this report is recommending that the Enterprising Auckland model be piloted is that it has the potential to create new business opportunities, rather than simply supporting or growing existing ventures. While option three above could lead to the creation of a new venture, the success rate of start-ups tends to be low. The approach described in Enterprising Auckland has the potential to avoid many of the pitfalls associated with an individual entrepreneur creating a new business from scratch. Instead the ‘broker’ would actively seek out local economic opportunities on the demand side and work with entrepreneurs in the local community to supply the relevant goods or services.

17.     If this report is adopted, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be the first local board to pilot this new approach. There is always a risk associated with trying new approaches and the Local Board should be aware of this risk. Pilot projects are designed to test and learn from untested ideas. While the process outlined in the Enterprising Auckland report is based on practical experience it is important to note that the economic benefits of the pilot are unknown. The process will, however, provide the Local Board with valuable information about how it can support local economic development in the future. Piloting new initiatives is an important part of the innovation process and can provide other local boards with the evidence they need to try new approaches in their communities. By piloting the Enterprising Auckland report approach, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board also has an opportunity to demonstrate that it is championing social enterprise in its local area.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

18.     Envision Ltd’s proposal has been discussed with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s Chairperson and Economic Development portfolio holder. Matthew Luxton from Envision Ltd also met with the Chairperson on 9 March 2015 to discuss the proposal in detail.

Māori impact statement

19.     The proposal presented in this report is not targeted to support Mana Whenua specifically however there is the potential for local Iwi and Hapu organisations to participate in the pilot. Envision Ltd currently advises several Iwi organisations to support them to engage in local economic development.

Implementation

20.     Envision Ltd is confident that it can set up the pilot in the timeframe available. However the pilot will take time to be implemented, and for the outcomes to become clear. For this reason it is recommended the Local Board ask Envision Ltd to report back later in 2015.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Enterprising Auckland - A social enterprise approach to local economic development

13

     

Signatories

Authors

Billy Matheson – Principal Strategic Advisor, Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

Authorisers

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 





























Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Te Oro Place-Making Project

 

File No.: CP2015/05150

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To request the allocation of $37,000 by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board towards a place-making project within the local board area using custom designed Te Oro bench seats.

Executive Summary

2.       Over the past six months, artists and three key iwi linked to the Te Oro facility (formerly known as GIMAC) have partnered to develop a visual language for Te Oro. The project has resulted in a developed design proposal to install custom designed bench seats so that Te Oro emanates into surrounding public spaces, providing a physical reverberation from the centre.

3.       Public art and parks staff will collaborate to refine siting and location of the benches within the Local Board rohe, according to the existing parks renewals programme. The benches are expected to have a limited life span of 5-10 years and will revert to standard type at the end of this period. Maintenance and cleaning of the benches during the life of the asset will be funded through public art collection management operational budget. 

4.       The Arts, Culture and Events committee has allocated $40,000 of regional public art capex investment towards the ‘place-markers’ artwork in the rohe surrounding Te Oro (ART/2015/10). This allocation was made on the basis that this local board project also carries a story of regional significance for both the Maungarei maunga and the centre to a wider geographic reach than the immediate Glen Innes neighbourhood.

5.       The total cost of the place-markers is estimated at $77,000. Staff recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocate $37,000 of public art capex investment to this project to advance developed design work and fabrication.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board :

a)      allocate $37,000 towards a place-making project within the local board area using custom designed Te Oro bench seats.

 

Comments

6.       Over the past six months, artists and three key iwi linked to the Te Oro facility (formerly known as GIMAC) have partnered to develop a visual language for Te Oro, including a place-making concept that reflects Te Oro’s identity into surrounding areas. The project has resulted in a developed design proposal to install custom designed bench seats so that Te Oro emanates into surrounding public spaces, providing a physical reverberation from the centre.

7.       Ngāti Paoa gifted the name ‘Te Oro’ to the centre. ‘Oro’ is the tonal reverberation of sound within a chamber such as that created by winds moving over volcanic craters.  The works take the form of custom designed bench seats, designed for use in public space (refer Attachment A for concept images).

8.       At the February meeting of the Arts, Culture and Events committee, $40,000 of regional public art capex investment was allocated towards the ‘place-markers’ artwork in the rohe surrounding Te Oro (ART/2015/10). This allocation was made on the basis that this local board project also carries a story of regional significance for both the maunga and the centre to a wider geographic reach than the immediate Glen Innes neighbourhood.

9.       The total cost of the place-markers is estimated at $77,000. Staff now recommend that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocate $37,000 of public art capex investment to this project to advance developed design work and fabrication.

10.     The project will involve collaboration between public art and parks staff to refine siting and location of the benches within the Local Board rohe according to the existing parks renewals programme. The benches are expected to have a limited life span of 5-10 years and will revert to standard type at the end of this period. Maintenance and cleaning of the benches during the life of the asset will be funded through public art collection management operational budget. 

11.     During the life of the asset, cleaning and maintenance will be carried out as required, funded from a public art collection management operational budget.

12.     There has been considerable discussion during the design process about customising each seat in ways that are specific to the areas where they will be sited. This proposal is however not recommended as it triggers the requirement for additional consultation, more technical cleaning and maintenance concerns, and a resulting sense of proprietary ownership on the part of the contributing artists with no mechanism for the renewal of the assets at the end of their life.

Local board views and implications

13.     The project will enhance place-making objectives in the Local Board plan by building on the identity of Te Oro as a destination facility.

Maori impact statement

14.     Public Art Policy calls for permanent works of art for our shared public places to give expression to Māori stories and to enfold Mātauranga Māori. This project, being led by three iwi, is expected to progress according to Te Aranga Maori design principles.

15.     Three iwi have been involved in the development of the artworks at the Te Oro facility; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei and Ngāti Paoa. Ngāti Paoa gifted the name ‘Te Oro’ to the centre and as a result the iwi has played a key role in the identity of the centre. The name for the centre has been woven by wāhine from all three iwi in Tukutuku. Similarly all three iwi were involved in developing audio for the facility’s sound artworks.

16.     The project is expected to contribute to Whai Tiaki Maori cultural wellbeing by:

·        facilitating ahi kā, a living presence at the site

·        being a visible example of nga mahi toi where iwi and hapu have a living and enduring presence in the rohe through the design process of the brand and identity work for Te Oro.

Implementation

17.     Through the detailed design process, staff will explore opportunities for connections to Te Oro’s programming offering.

18.     Building consent for the benches may be required, as they are a non-standard item.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Seating concept images

43

     Signatories

Authors

Sarah Zimmerman - Senior Advisor, Community Development, Arts and Culture

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 














Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvements - Concept Design

 

File No.: CP2015/02301

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board endorsement of the final concept design for the Onehunga Mall Streetscape following stakeholder and public feedback.

Executive Summary

2.       The Onehunga Streetscape Improvement project is a priority in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2014. The extent of the proposed upgrade includes the section of Onehunga Mall between Grey Street to the North and Arthur Street to the South. The project aims to increase foot traffic and in turn economic activity by improving the street environment, reducing speed of passing traffic, and providing safer places for pedestrians to cross.

3.       There is currently $2,040,400 allocated to the Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvement Project in 2014/15 and 2015/16 financial years. In addition, $645,000 has been allocated to the project from the Local Board’s Capital Transport Fund to be spent in 2015/16 financial year.

4.       In February 2015, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board endorsed:

·        the draft concept design for the Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvement Project

·        council staff proceeding with public information events to get feedback on the draft concept design.

5.       The draft concept design includes new footpath surfaces, new kerb build out areas with associated street furniture, three raised table pedestrian crossings, new street trees, and improvements to the Arthur Street roundabout. To achieve these outcomes, the design also includes a reduction in the number of car parking spaces along Onehunga Mall and changes to the current parking time restrictions.

6.       Public information events were held on 26 to 28 February 2015. Staff have also sought feedback on the draft concept design directly from the Onehunga Business Association, affected businesses on Onehunga Mall and other key stakeholders.

7.       Whilst the Onehunga Business Association and business owners along Onehunga Mall were not supportive of the proposed reduction in the number of car park spaces, overall feedback received at the public information events was positive with the wider community expressing strong support for the project and its outcomes.

8.       Staff have reviewed all feedback and made a number of minor changes to the concept design where possible. The final concept design is attached to this report and Local Board endorsement of the concept design is sought to enable staff to proceed to detailed design and construction.

9.       Detailed design will be completed by June 2015 with construction scheduled to complete by November 2015. Staff will continue to inform key stakeholders throughout the design and construction process including mana whenua, the Onehunga Business Association and affected businesses.

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      endorse the final Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvement Project concept design (Attachment A), to enable staff to proceed to detailed design and construction

b)      note that as part of the implementation of the Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvement Project, Auckland Transport will lead a formal consultation process on any proposed changes to the current parking time restrictions along Onehunga Mall

c)      note that Council staff will continue to inform key stakeholders throughout the design and construction process including mana whenua, the Onehunga Business Association and all businesses along Onehunga Mall that will be affected by construction

d)      note that detailed design will be completed by June 2015 and construction is scheduled to be completed by November 2015.

 

Comments

Background

 

10.     The Auckland Plan identifies Onehunga as a town centre which will experience significant change over the next 30 years. Maximising the opportunities presented by this change is a key priority of the both the Onehunga Precinct Plan (2010-2050) and the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan (2014).

11.     The project is being managed on behalf of Council by Auckland Transport. The project is being delivered using a design and build contract lead by Auckland Transport’s current Maintenance Contractor (Liveable Streets).

Concept Design

12.     The draft concept design includes new footpath surfaces, new kerb build out areas (urban spaces) with associated street furniture and trees, three raised table pedestrian crossings, 10 new street trees (Liquidambars) and improvements to the Arthur Street intersection. To achieve these outcomes, the design also includes a reduction in the number of car parking spaces along Onehunga Mall and changes to the current parking time restrictions.

13.     It is proposed that the graphic elements within the urban spaces will be developed in collaboration with local artists and mana whenua.

14.     The raised tables and building the urban spaces out from the existing pavements are engineered to decrease the speed of traffic, enhancing pedestrian safety and enabling a more integrated flow between vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians. 

15.     The additional deciduous street trees (Liquidambar) contribute a dappled shade to the street in summer, while providing for seasonal change in colder months. They are the same tree species as those in lower Onehunga Mall. 

Stakeholder feedback

16.     Following endorsement by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the draft concept design in February 2015, Council staff carried out public information events to inform the community of the proposed design. The events took place on 26th, 27th and 28th February on the corner of Onehunga Mall and Arthur Street. Feedback received at the public information events was generally positive with the community expressing support for the key project drivers.

17.     Feedback has also been sought directly from the Onehunga Business Association and business owners within the project area. The Onehunga Business Association and business owners do not support the proposed reduction in carparking and expressed concerns regarding whether the draft concept design is consistent with the design of Onehunga Mall to the south of Arthur Street.

18.     Staff have reviewed all feedback and made a number of minor changes to the concept design where possible. This has resulted in a reduction of 11 parking spaces, down from a reduction of 14 spaces proposed by the draft concept design endorsed by the Local Board in February.

19.     In terms of design consistency, the concept design includes bands of basalt paving to reference the lower Mall south of Arthur Street. Tree species have also been selected to match species found in the lower Mall. The lower Mall was last upgraded in 1998 and the concept design introduces more contemporary elements. Further, the new footpaths will be laid in exposed aggregate concrete, which is easier to maintain and keep clean than the asphalt footpaths found in the lower Mall.

20.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board gave support to the final concept design at a workshop on 17 March 2015. Local Board member Brett Clark has updated the Onehunga Business Association on the outcomes of this workshop

21.     The final concept design is attached to this report and Local Board endorsement is sought to proceed to detailed design and construction. Staff will continue to inform key stakeholders throughout the design and construction process including mana whenua, the Onehunga Business Association and affected businesses.

Programme

22.     To enable the current programme to be met detailed design element will be completed by June 2015. This will be followed by the construction package, with construction on site scheduled to be completed by the end of November 2015.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

23.     There have been a number of workshops held with the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to agree the project scope and the outcomes the streetscape improvements need to deliver.

Maori Impact Statement

24.     Onehunga has a long history of Maori habitation prior to European settlement. The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan shows no areas of significance or value to mana whenua along Onehunga Mall between Grey Street and Arthur Street. The work proposed is relatively shallow and is in an area that has been significantly modified since the early days of Auckland European settlement. Council staff wrote to all mana whenua and had contribution from Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi to the design brief.

25.     It is proposed that the graphic elements within the urban spaces created along the street will be developed in collaboration with local artists and mana whenua.

Implementation Issues

26.     There is currently $2,040,400 allocated to the Onehunga Mall Streetscape Improvement Project in 2014/15 and 2015/16 financial years. In addition, $645,000 has been allocated to the project from the Local Board’s Capital Transport Fund to be spent in 2015/16 financial year. The final concept design can be delivered within this total budget.

27.     The project is being managed on behalf of Council by Auckland Transport. In order to complete the project by November 2015, the project is being delivered using a design and build contract lead by Auckland Transport’s current Maintenance Contractor (Liveable Streets).

 

 

28.     Construction on site is scheduled to be completed by the end of November 2015 and run for a period of between four- six months. Exact timings will be developed by Liveable Streets over the next two months as part of their construction methodology. Once confirmed the methodology will be communicated to stakeholders and local affected businesses before work begins on site.

29.     It is noted that streetscape projects present a level of disruption for the local business and community. The construction methodology will ensure that any disruption resulting from this project is kept to a minimum. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Final Concept Design

61

     

Signatories

Authors

Rachael Eaton - Team Leader City Transformation - Central/Islands

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - GM - Plans & Places

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga - application for new commercial lease - Darryl Prout Trading as Enchanged Forest Mini Golf

 

File No.: CP2015/04877

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks to gain approval from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for the application for a new commercial ground lease over the site at 61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga, Auckland Central.

Executive Summary

2.       John Fletcher Limited (hereon referred to as John Fletcher) is the current tenant of the site at 61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga and holds a commercial ground lease with Auckland Council.  John Fletcher is in the process of selling his business to Darryl Lee Prout trading as Enchanted Forest Mini Golf (hereon referred to as Darryl Prout).

3.       The lease with John Fletcher expired on 31 December 2013 and he is currently ‘holding over’ in accordance with the terms of the lease. As the lease has expired, an assignment of the lease is no longer an option.  The potential new business owner Darryl Prout is applying for a new lease directly over the site.

4.       The land was originally developed in 1992 by John Fletcher’s predecessor as a mini golf based leisure facility and all improvements to the land were carried out at the cost of the original and subsequent tenants. 

5.       The Strategy and Asset Planning department of Auckland Council have advised that the primary use of the land is registered as park land under Council control with ACPL management and responsibility; the land is not subject to the Reserves Act. 

6.       John Fletcher will have no choice but to vacate the site if he is not in a position to sell the business as a going concern.  The site is established for mini golf activity and provides commercial revenue to Auckland Council.

7.       To retain the current activity at the site and secure the new business venture a new lease is required with a certainty of tenure for the new tenant of nine years.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to a new commercial ground lease to Darryl Lee Prout trading as Enchanted Forest Mini Golf over the site at 61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga, Auckland Central subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       an initial term of three (3) years commencing from 1 May 2015;

ii)       two further rights of renewal of three (3) years each;

iii)      the Lessor will provide the Lessee with six (6) months’ notice to terminate the lease should the premises be required by the Lessor for re-development purposes.  The six months (6) termination clause will apply from the first renewal date of 1 May 2018;   

iv)      rent reviews to apply every three years from 1 May 2015;

v)      final expiry date of 30 April 2024 (if all rights of renewal are exercised).

 

Comments

Background

8.       As the current lease has ended, the Operator must either agree terms for a new lease and continue to operate, or leave the site. The latter will effectively remove any value associated with his business.

9.       If a new lease is not granted, the site may sit vacant for a substantial period of time. This inevitably leads to issues with site security and vandalism. It may also prove difficult to locate a new commercial tenant for a mini golf facility and there would be a large cost to Council to maintain the site or return it to a park use.

10.     To mitigate the risk that the site may be required in the future for an alternative use by Auckland Council the recommendation is to include a six month termination clause for redevelopment purposes applicable from the first renewal.

11.     The site at 61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga is a 1332sqm parcel of land located at the western periphery of the Onehunga commercial centre.  The commercial ground lease to John Fletcher Limited (current tenant) commenced on 1 January 2005 and finally expired on 31 December 2013.  John Fletcher (current tenant) is in the process of selling his business to Darryl Lee Prout trading as enchanted Forest Mini Golf.  Given that the lease has expired and there is no longer the option to assign the lease, Darryl Prout is applying for a new commercial lease over the site.  The land was developed by the John Fletcher’s predecessor (original tenant) as a mini golf based leisure facility and all original improvements to the land were carried out at the cost of the original tenant.  All subsequent improvements have been funded by John Fletcher.

12.     Darryl Prout has been managing the premises on behalf of John Fletcher since last year when the lease expired.

13.     Auckland Council Parks Department has confirmed they are supportive of the new commercial ground lease and the site continuing its current use of mini-golf activity. The Parks department have suggested that access should be free in to the public park space during business hours however use of the mini golf activity within the site shall be chargeable to any members of the general public that wish to participate as part of the commercial activity.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is supportive of initiatives that lead to the optimal use of open spaces. Concerns regarding public access to the site have been addressed directly with the Auckland Council Parks Department.

Māori impact statement

15.     ACPL has a comprehensive Iwi engagement process that engages with the 19 key Mana Whenua groups in Tāmaki on four fronts: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal and development properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and engagement around design outcomes for council driven development projects. ACPL has also undertaken to be part of council’s Maori Responsiveness Plan pilot program. The project’s key output will be an operational document outlining how ACPL will contribute to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Maori. As there is no change to the property, the existing tenants, or re-tender of the property, there has been no Iwi engagement undertaken in respect of the tenants’ new lease application.

Implementation

16.     If the Local Board approves the above recommendations Auckland Council Property Limited will enter in to a new commercial ground lease with the new tenant Darryl Lee Prout trading as Enchanted Forest Mini Golf.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

61-65 Selwyn Street, Onehunga - site map

69

     

Signatories

Authors

Lori Butterworth - Property Manager, Auckland Council Property Limited

Authorisers

Margrit de Man - Property Portfolio Manager, Auckland Council Property Limited

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/05202

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Otara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association.  A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·        providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·        promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·        Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions.

·        One report per annum on community outcomes.

·        Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process.

·        Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus.

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area and for which site plans are included.

5.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where the group owns the building.

6.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

 

 

 

b)      approve a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Onehunga Kindergarten and Sylvia Park Kindergarten, details specified in Attachment A, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

 

Comments

7.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

8.       A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·        Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·        One report per annum on community outcomes

·        Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·        Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

9.       This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

10.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

11.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

12.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·        providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·        promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

13.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments.

14.     A Community Outcomes Plan as approved will be an attachment to the lease and reported on annually by the Association.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

15.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

16.     Lease advisors have kept portfolio holders apprised of the proposal for the Auckland Kindergarten Association lease for multiple premises.

Māori impact statement

17.     The Association has long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

18.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

19.     Costs for preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

75

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

83

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 









Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

AMETI - Park Land Proposals

 

File No.: CP2015/05154

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Local Board’s views on the declaration of park land for road purposes under S114 of the Public Works Act (1981) for the Lagoon Drive section of the AMETI Project, and appropriate compensation.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland-Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI) involves a series of projects for the eastern suburbs aimed at increasing public transport use, walking and cycling, and unlocking the economic potential of the area by dealing with traffic congestion on key transport links.

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki side of the Panmure-Pakuranga Bridge project includes the construction of a bus lane and cycle lane along Lagoon Drive, which extends along Pakuranga Road and Ti Rakau Road.

4.       This part of the AMETI project affects three parks (Bill McKinlay Park, Domain Reserve and Sunset View Road Reserve) and Auckland Transport (AT) is seeking to declare areas of these parks as road (totaling 485m) under Section 114 of the Public Works Act (1981).

5.       To compensate the loss of this park land, AT is offering Auckland Council land adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park, an alternative accessway and improvement works within Domain Reserve, and collaboration with the council on the Panmure Wharf/Basin greenways network project.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the declaration under S114 of the Public Works Act (1981) of the following sections of park land for roading purposes:

i)        7 m2 of Allotment 55, Part Allotment 56 Section 1 Small Lots near Village of Panmure. CFR NA16A/991 Recreation Reserve by NZ Gazette 1979

 

ii)       210 m2 of Part Allotments 45, 63-64, 77-79 Section 2 Village of Panmure. CFR NA1D/726 Reserve for Recreation Purposes subject to Reserve Act 1977

 

iii)      268 m2 of Allotment 81 Section 2 Village of Panmure. CFR NA7A/1212 (Reserve for Plantation subject to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953).

b)      support the following in compensation for the park land to be taken for roading purposes:

i)        2482m2 being Section 33 (2031 m2) + Lot 1 DP 140046 (451 m2) NA83A/907 SO 471986 adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park (subject to AT Board approval)

ii)      Improvements to Domain Reserve including a new access route, reconfiguration of the upper carpark, improved lighting, drainage and vegetation along the rear access to Squash Courts (subject to Auckland Council determining the future of the building)

c)      note the commitment from Auckland Transport to collaborate with Auckland Council to implement cycling/walking improvements in the Panmure area.

 

Comments

6.       AT is progressing the AMETI project through Lagoon Drive to Panmure Bridge to improve public transport. The project will provide separate cycling and bus lanes from the Panmure roundabout to Panmure Bridge. The improvements will connect to, and continue along Pakuranga Road to the Pakuranga town centre.

7.       Three parks (existing recreation and plantation reserves) will be affected by this stage of the AMETI project. These are summarised below along with the compensation proposed by AT.

Domain Reserve

8.       The design for the bus lanes includes utilising the full extent of the existing road corridor along Lagoon Drive. Road access to the Recreation Centre on Domain Reserve and half of the parking spaces in the lower carpark at 36-46 Lagoon Drive currently occupy the road corridor and these will be affected by the proposed bus lane design (see Attachment A).

9.       The road access to Domain Reserve from Lagoon Drive will be removed and new access will be provided to the lower carpark area from Domain Road. The lower carpark will be reconfigured to accommodate a new parking layout. Pedestrian access to the front entrance and second level of the Recreation Centre will remain available, as will pedestrian access to the entrance to the Squash Courts.

10.     AT is seeking to take 210m2 from the upper carpark of Domain Reserve as road to provide an alternative access route to the private residences located at 48-58 Lagoon Drive (see Attachment B). The upper carpark will be reconfigured to ensure the legal road is legible and the surrounding area clearly marked for parking. Safety considerations for users of the upper carpark such as fencing, lighting and clear road markings will be included. An alternative location along the eastern side of the upper carpark was considered for the new road but this was ruled out due to the geography of the land and access issues over privately owned land.

Sunset View Road Reserve

11.     AT proposes to construct a retaining wall to strengthen the rock face and protect vehicles beneath the park located at 6 Sunset View Road. To ensure the footprint of the retaining wall remains within the road area, AT is seeking to take 268m2 along the road edge of Sunset View Road Reserve. In addition, an easement is sought across the top of the park to recognise and protect the location of the wall nails (see Attachment D). A one off compensation payment of $12,000 is offered which has been assessed by a valuer and is based on current market value

Bill McKinlay Park

12.     AT is seeking to take a small section of park land (7m2) at Bill McKinlay Park as road (see Attachment C). The land is currently utilised for road and fenced off from the park area.

13.     In addition to the works and compensation outlined above for Domain Reserve and Sunset View Reserve, AT have offered other compensation options as outlined below:

a)      2031m2 of Section 33 and 451m2 Lot 1 DP 140046 (533 Ellerslie-Panmure Highway) adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park (3-35 Ireland Rd) (see Attachment E). This section of land lies adjacent to the rail corridor and has been utilised by AT for construction works.

AT has an agreement with Kiwirail over a 3-4m wide strip along the rail edge of the land (see Attachment E) which allows them to develop the land for a third rail line. The agreement has a sunset clause of 10 years, with 8 years remaining at this time, and would be recognised by an encumbrance or caveat placed on the title to the land. Council would have the use and enjoyment of the full section until Kiwirail determined to either take the land or the clause expired.

The Mt Wellington Stadium Charitable Trust has indicated their interest in utilising this land for additional carparking for their facilities. This would not add to the recreation opportunities but would help the club at peak times. In addition options for use of this land for events, basketball half court or small training areas that could deliver additional training areas will be explored. Section 33 has no other legal vehicle access. However, should the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board not be interested in accepting the land as compensation, AT would retain ownership and seek to lease it along with 535 Ellerslie-Panmure Highway, utilising the vehicle access from 535 Ellerslie-Panmure Highway.

AT has not completed a detailed due diligence on Section 33 and the land was historically used by a panel beater. Repair and spray activities were undertaken within the main building on site and this building has now been removed and the ground cleared. As the historic land use is a HAIL (Hazardous Activities and Industries List) activity (Section F Motor Vehicle Workshop under the NES (2011)) it is possible that contaminants may be present in the soil. A change in use of this land must therefore be considered under the National Environmental Standard for Assessing and Managing Contaminants in Soil to Protect Human Health (NES 2011). Should the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board support taking the land as compensation, AT would ensure all NES requirements are met prior to disposal of the land. AT would also ensure that the soil contaminant concentrations are below the NES criteria for use of the land for recreation purposes and such requirements are likely to include sealing the unsealed surface of the site.

AT would further ensure the land is cleared of any buildings, debris and construction materials before it is handed over to the council. Most of the site is already sealed with concrete and maintenance requirements on this land are likely to be minimal.

OR

b)      Financial contribution to the value of the park land taken towards the council’s Greenways Programme.

OR 

c)      Financial contribution, to the value of the park land taken towards walking and cycling network improvements within the Panmure area. Both council and AT have a concept plan for such improvements.

14.     Another compensation option considered was the provision of a footbridge over Lagoon Drive between Domain Reserve and the Panmure Basin. While AT recognises that a footbridge would improve access across the road, the footprint and length of the access ramps would be substantial (approximately 100m in length and impinging on the carparking options) as it will be influenced by the construction of bus lanes along Lagoon Drive. As an alternative AT will construct a new signalised pedestrian crossing on the southern side of the existing intersection with Domain Road to improve pedestrian accessibility between the Reserve and the Basin.

15.     The table below provides the valuations of the park areas to be taken for road purposes and the proposed land adjoining Bill Mckinlay Park as compensation.

Reserve Land Parcel

Valuation

7 m2 at Bill McKinlay Park

$1,860.00

210 m2 at Domain Reserve

$56,000.00

268 m2 at Sunset View Rd Reserve

$33,100.00

187 m2 Easement at Sunset View Rd Reserve (not taken for road but declared as an easement)

$12,000.00

Total

$102,960.00

 

 

2482 m2 Section 33+Lot 1 adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park

(or without 3-4m strip 1777 m2)

$660,000.00 (or without 3-4m strip $473,000.00)

16.     On assessing the options it is recommended that the land adjoining Bill McKinlay Park be accepted as compensation. With AT addressing the contamination issues, this land will provide additional parking adjacent to the Bill McKinlay Park Trust clubrooms which will address the shortfall currently being experienced, particularly around game time.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

17.     AT has presented the AMETI reserves land acquisition options and issues at regular workshops with the Local Board since mid-2014. During these workshops AT has worked with AC Parks and Board members to:

·        identify the park land required for the project works

·        present and discuss options around the land take within Domain Reserve

·        present and discuss options associated with the proposed access lane from Domain Road to the lower carpark

·        discuss issues and options associated with reconfiguration of the upper Domain Reserve carpark

·        discuss compensation options for consideration

·        confirm the preferred compensation options available.

18.     AT has now requested AC Parks representatives to seek a recommendation from the Local Board on the park acquisition and compensation option.

Māori impact statement

19.     AT established a regular (monthly) hui with all iwi affected by the AMETI project at the start of the project. These regular meetings provide an opportunity to consult with iwi on an on-going basis. AT has identified nine mana whenua groups with interests in the project area and engages with these groups regularly and has sought MVA’s (Maori Values Assessment) from each in an effort to better understand the association and issues of each group within the project area.

Implementation

20.     To acquire the park land for road, AT is seeking to implement Section 114 of the Public Works Act (Declaring Land to be Road). This section requires the signatures of:

·        the body who controls or in whom the land is vested (Auckland Council)

·        AT as the roading authority (AT Board and AC Property Committee), and

·        the signature of Minister of Conservation (delegated to the council).

21.     In seeking the approval of Council (in whom the land is vested), AT is seeking support for the acquisition and compensation proposals from the Local Board. Approval will then be sought from the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee who have the delegation for the acquisition and disposal of the park land.

22.     Should the Local Board support the Section 114 (Declare land for Road) and the compensation option of the additional land adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park, AT shall undertake public consultation on the land take in parallel to the consultation required for the NoR process. If the Local Board does not provide their support, AT shall include the park land required in the NoR process. The NoR is expected to be lodged in late April 2015.

23.     Finally, it should be noted that should AT declare the park land as road, the land would remain vested in Auckland Council, but would be managed by AT as road rather than by the Local Board as park.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bus lane design along Lagoon Drive

91

bView

Land required from upper car park at Domain Reserve

93

cView

Bill McKinley Park

95

dView

Land required at Sunset View Road Reserve

97

eView

Approximate width and location of Kiwirail strip of land

99

     

Signatories

Authors

Steve Owens - Parks Advisor

Jane Aickin - Manager Local and Sports Parks Central

Sophie Bell - Parks & Open Space Specialists Manager

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Attachment A - Bus lane design along Lagoon Drive

Drawing shows proposed access lane and impact on lower car park of Domain Reserve.


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Attachment B - Land required from upper carpark in Domain Reserve

 

Preferred Option 2 requires 210m2 from the upper carpark.

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Attachment D - Land required at Sunset View Road Reserve

Drawing identifies 268m2 of land required and 187m2 that will be covered by an easement.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Attachment E - Approximate width and location of Kiwirail strip of land adjacent to Bill McKinlay Park

Land subject to agreement between AT and Kiwirail is shown between the blue and pink lines.

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report – April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/04987

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the Local Board area since the last transport report.

Monthly Overview

2.       At the time of writing, a meeting with the Transport Portfolio leader and deputy is scheduled for 20 April.  Items for discussion include:

·        changes to the Pt England to Panmure cycle project

·        Grey Street/Onehunga Mall intersection scheme assessment report

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receives the report.

 

Reporting Back

Consultation Report

3.       No consultations have been forwarded to the Local Board for comment in the last reporting period.

Regional Land Transport Plan (‘RLTP’) Consultation

4.       The draft RLTP is being consulted on alongside Council’s Long Term Plan. Both documents were released for public consultation on 23 January 2015 and submissions closed on 16 March 2015.

5.       The RLTP represents the combined intentions of Auckland Transport, NZTA, and KiwiRail in terms of forward planning and priorities.

6.       Over 24,000 submissions were received on the LTP and RLTP and work on analysing the submissions is ongoing.

AMETI Update

7.       Significant progress has been made on the plans for a new busway and other transport improvements between Panmure and Pakuranga. Following the completion of Panmure Station and Te Horeta Road, Auckland Transport is now finalising Panmure to Pakuranga design plans.

8.       Public information days were held in March to share the plans before Auckland Transport applies for consents in late April. The consents process will provide an opportunity for the public to make a submission and to be heard at an official hearing.

9.       A further update on the consenting and lodgement process will be given to the Local Board in late April.

Local Board Capital Projects

10.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has a fund available for the construction of transport related projects in its area. This fund is administered by Auckland Transport.  Each year, the Local Board’s capital fund allocation is $494,757 and this amount can be consolidated within each electoral term. 

11.     At the time of writing the unspent transport capital fund budget for the current electoral term was $1.177 million.  This comprises of $645,000 allocated toward the Onehunga Mall upgrade, $280,000 allocated to the Beachcroft Avenue improvements with a balance of $252,000 uncommitted.

Update on the Delivery of Current Transport Capital Projects

Princes Street Pedestrian Enhancements

12.     This is the last Local Board Capital Fund project outstanding from last term and Auckland Transport apologises for the delays in delivery of the project.

13.     This project has been bundled with another similar project in the Puketapapa Local Board area and it has been intended that both projects be tendered as a package.  It is expected that the work package will be completed and tendered in the March/April period and that work will start in May.

14.     Both projects are expected to be completed before the end of June.

Onehunga Mall Upgrade Progress

15.     Updates to the Local Board on this project are being managed by Auckland Council, who is leading the upgrade project.

Beachcroft Avenue Pedestrian Improvements

16.     The Local Board resolved to proceed with Option 1 and Option 4 at their March meeting.  These options will allow for a comprehensive improvement for pedestrians in this area, subject to consultation.

East West Connections

17.     This project provides road connections between SH20 and SH1 to improve traffic flow, particularly for heavy trucks.  The southern component of the project seeks to provide improved bus travel and cycling connections between Mangere and Otahuhu Town Centres and Sylvia Park.

18.     The project team has been looking at options since the public consultation in late 2014.  Additional assessment work needs to be completed before a decision can be made on a preferred approach for the Onehunga-Penrose area. Feedback from the engagement identified a range of issues to be considered, including potential impact of any proposed options on the Neilson Street connection, interaction with the foreshore, and people being able to move around reliably when using all transport modes. The project team would like to discuss their latest thinking with the Local Board in April with a view to incorporating that feedback into the decision making process.

Pt England to Panmure Safe Routes Scheme

19.     Auckland Transport is facing funding constraints as detailed in the draft Regional Land Transport Plan and this also applies to the walking and cycling budget.  The direction from Central Government  is that the cycling and walking budget should prioritise the central network and support improving cycling and walking connections to public transport hubs.  This does include Glen Innes and Panmure Stations and linkages to existing cycle infrastructure, or soon to be constructed infrastructure such as the Glen Innes to Tāmaki Drive project.

20.     Taking this directive into account AT will re-scope this project and investigate other routes to connect Glen Innes to Panmure and how linkages to other transport hubs in the Local Board area can be improved.

21.     Further background on this change and how it might affect the Local Board area will be provided at the monthly meeting with the transport portfolio holders.

Orpheus Drive

22.     In addition to the foreshore works at Onehunga, a shared cycling and walking path is to be constructed.  The shared path on Orpheus Drive comprises of two sections – the first half is between the Manukau Cruising Club and Seacliffe Road.  The design for this section has been completed and AT will soon be seeking prices for the work. It may be possible to begin construction in this financial year, but it will depend on available budget.

23.     The second half of the cycleway from Manukau Cruising Club to Onehunga Harbour Road is being investigated for the shared path.  Constraints in this area make the planning and design of this section more complex. Investigation has been undertaken into possible geotechnical and contamination assessments and it is expected that coastal consents will need to be applied for (a 400m stretch).  Further updates will come to the Local Board in due course.

Auckland Transport News

Music and Panmure Station

24.     A piano has been positioned in the concourse of the new Panmure Station and has already attracted a range of talented (and not so talented but keen) performers eager to demonstrate their musicial skills to fellow travellers.

25.     The idea has been inspired by the “Play me, I’m Yours” movement which has seen pianos and some amazing performances by pianists at stations and other transport facilities in the great capitals of the world.  AT hopes that the initiative will bring music and spontaneity to the interchange and add warmth and greater sense of community to the station.

26.     If the experiment proves successful at Panmure Station, the idea may be extended to other interchanges in Auckland.

Busway for East Auckland a Step Closer

27.     The Panmure to Pakuranga busway designs are nearing finalisation.  Public information days and neighbourhood meetings have been held and information was sent to people in the area to get feedback before the consents for the project are lodged in late April.

28.     The key project is the Panmure Station to Pakuranga town centre section of the South Eastern busway.  Construction is likely to start in 2017, with the busway due to open by 2021.  Auckland Transport also announced that it is aiming to open the full busway to Botany by 2024, four years earlier than previously planned and extend bus lanes to Highland Park.  The Panmure to Pakuranga project includes:

·        replacing Panmure roundabout with an intersection with traffic lights and more direct pedestrian crossings

·        Panmure to Pakuranga busway on lanes  separate to traffic congestion

·        Panmure to Pakuranga cycle and foot paths separate to traffic

·        second Panmure Bridge for busway and shared cycle/footpath.

SH 1 Ellerslie

29.     The NZ Transport Agency are asking motorists to take extra care when travelling to the city through Ellerslie.  As part of the SH1 Ellerslie Widening Project, which started in March 2015 and until the project completion date of mid 2016; orange paint will mark out slightly narrowed city bound lanes from the Ellerslie-Panmure interchange to just after the Main Highway overbridge.

30.     A reduced speed limit of 80km/h will be enforced.

 


2015 Public Transport Fare Review

31.     The focus of this year’s public transport fare review is to better align short and long distance fares in preparation for a change to a simpler zone based system (integrated fares) next year.

32.     The New Network will see more frequent services on key routes at a minimum average of every 15 minutes, 7am to 7pm, seven days a week but may mean users may need to transfer services.  Integrated fares will allow passengers to transfer services with a minimum impact on fares.

33.     The changes to public transport fares through the 2015 review will see:

·        small increases of between 5 and 10 cents for short distance (stage one and stage two trips) for those using the AT HOP card

·        some cash fares will increase by 50 cents to increase the incentive for passengers to take advantage of fare discounts that AT HOP provides

·        no increases on longer AT HOP trips on buses and trains, other than for five stage journeys that receive a tertiary concession

·        stage 6 and 7 child fares, using AT HOP, reduce by 5c and 16c respectively.

34.     Some fares on Hobsonville and West Harbour ferry services decrease by between 24c and 50c a trip.

35.     Tertiary and child concession fares will now be available on the InnerLink bus service

36.     The City Link bus service had received funding from the Heart of the City business organisation and Waterfront Auckland, however that subsidy has now ended.  Therefore AT has reluctantly introduced fares on this service.  AT HOP card users will pay 50c and cash fares for adults will be $1.00.  There will be discounted rates for students and children.

37.     On average, fares contribute 47% to the total cost of providing public transport services and the remainder is provided through government contributions and rates subsidies. Fuel prices make up only a small percentage of operator costs and by far the largest expense is wages.

38.     Public transport patronage growth has continued strongly during recent fuel price reductions showing customers are choosing to use improved services rather than sit in traffic congestion.

39.     Latest figures show that transport patronage is at an all-time high.  Bus patronage for the 12 months to January 2015 rose 9.4%, while rail patronage saw an annual rise of 20%.

Motorcycle Parking

40.     Auckland Transport is gearing up for an increase in motorcycle and scooter use by inner city commuters.

41.     While a sharp increase in public transport patronage is well-documented, an increasing number of people are also using two wheels to get to their destination.

42.     As a result Auckland Transport has added free, dedicated, motorcycle and scooter parking areas to its CBD parking buildings, in addition to existing bicycle parking areas. There is also a dedicated entry lane for motorbikes at Downtown car park, which complements the 112 dedicated spaces.

43.     The Civic car park has also been fitted out with more motorcycle and scooter parking and Victoria Street carpark will be developed in the near future.

Regional Signage

44.     A cross-Council project team led by Auckland Transport has been tasked with cleaning up the jumble of signs in the city to make it easier for us all to get around. At present our directional signage or “wayfinding” varies all over Auckland.

45.     Now there is a single council structure it’s time to make it simpler to travel around the region.  Auckland Transport expects to discuss this project with Local Boards over May and June of this year.

46.     Further information is attached.

City Rail Link Design Showcase

47.     A design showcase for the City Rail Link’s three new stations and their adjacent public spaces will be on display in April. The City Rail Link, which starts construction late this year, will re-shape the city by bringing Britomart, Aotea and Karangahape Road within three to six minutes of each other and Mt Eden within nine.

48.     Each station, new ones at Aotea and Karangahape and a redeveloped Mt Eden, has been designed in partnership with Mana whenua, who shared their considerable knowledge of the local areas to provide a unique look and feel.

49.     Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 700,000 in the next 30 years and the CRL is considered vital to meet the city’s traffic needs by 2040.  It will double the number of people within 30 minutes of the city, reducing the time and increasing the frequency of most trips, while allowing for more connections between rail, ferry and bus services.

50.     Auckland’s CBD is the heart of the city’s economy with up to 16,000 employees per square kilometer, accounting for 34% of jobs in New Zealand and 37% of the country’s GDP.

51.     The design showcase is being held in an AT bus by the No1. Café in QE11 Square, 10am to 4pm daily from Saturday 11 April to Wednesday 15 April.

Issues Raised through/by Board Members

Location or Name of Issue

Description

 

AT Response

Elstree Avenue

Concern over speeding on Elstree Avenue between Taniwha Street and Pt England Roundabout.  Children are crossing here (popping out from behind parked cars) and there is concern for their safety.

A preliminary site visit has been undertaken.  AT officers have decided a more detailed investigation is necessary.  It is expected a more comprehensive report back should be able to be provided before the end of June.

Mayfair Place Lighting

A request that AT look into the lighting levels here.

AT has requested more detailed information as to which areas are considered to be most affected.

Commuter parking issues in Glen Innes

Complaints about commuters parking all day outside local businesses.

This has been logged with the Parking Design team for investigation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Signage Information

107

    

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart - Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/05002

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·        to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach

·        to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more

·        for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·        two chairs and portfolio holder workshops

·        individual board workshops in April

·        a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·        to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach

·        to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more

·        for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt, Kay McIntyre), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson). 

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

a)      ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.

b)      Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

c)      How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

a)      provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information

b)      provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities

c)      facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council

d)      develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices

e)      support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

a)      The model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

b)      The path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

c)      One size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

d)      All parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

e)      Capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

f)       Recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

a)      revised approach

b)      the proposed operating model for the CDS unit

c)      supporting tools

d)      budget and implementation implications.

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd - Local Board Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Extra meeting scheduled for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Long Term Plan process

 

File No.: CP2015/05048

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the scheduling of an extra meeting to allow for Long Term Plan matters to be considered.

Executive Summary

2.       To complete the LTP process within the timeframes agreed an extra meeting has been scheduled on Tuesday, 16 June to adopt the local board agreement, 10 year budget and fees and charges schedules.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)       agree to hold an extra meeting of the board to conclude the Long Term Plan process on Tuesday, 16 June 2015 at 4.00pm at the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure to adopt the local board agreement, 10 year budget and fees and charges schedules.

 

Discussion

3.       To complete the LTP process within the timeframes agreed, an extra meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has been scheduled for Tuesday, 16 June 2015 to adopt the local board agreements,10 year budgets and fees and charges schedules.

4.       The extra meeting scheduled meets the requirement of clause 19, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Consideration

Local Board Views

5.       This decision falls under the local board’s delegated authority.

Māori Impact Statement

6.       There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.

Implementation Issues

7.       Meetings of the local boards are supported by Auckland Council’s Local Board Services Department.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops - March 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05033

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       The attached workshop records provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops.

2.       These sessions are held to give an information opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects, and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Recommendation/s

That the record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the workshops report for March 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Record of workshops for March 2015

117

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 3 March 10am-4.45pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

Apologies:       Brett Clark

 

 

1.0

Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre

 

To progress the Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre project

 

Officers present:

Stella Gaseata, Beverly Rogers

 

 

2.0

Community Grants Policy

 

To discuss the grants policy

 

Officers present:

Marion Davies

 

 

3.0

Parks playground renewals

 

To discuss playground renewals

 

Officers present:

Steve Owens, Jenny Wood, Bruce Tupp

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 10 March 10am-12noon

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

                        Alan Verrall

 

 

1.0

Auckland Council Property Ltd

 

A relationship workshop

 

Officers present:

David Rankin, Ebony Duff, Gavin Peebles, Karen Cooke, Allan Young

 

 

2.0

Lease space in Panmure

 

To discuss lease space in Panmure

 

Officers present:

Antonia Butler, Tanya Mead


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 17 March 12noon-3pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

Apologies:       Josephine Bartley

 

1.0

Onehunga Mall Upgrade

 

Update from the project team

 

Officers present:

Adam Johnstone, Keerthi Mayakaduwa, Paul Edmonds

 

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 24 March 10am-3pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

Apologies:       Simon Randall (Chairperson)

 

 

1.0

Onehunga Foreshore update

 

Update from the project team

 

Officers present:

Greg Hannah, Kirsten Reidt

 

 

2.0

Tāmaki Redevelopment Company

 

Update from the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company

 

Officers present:

Nina Siers, Peter Fa’aifiu , Shelley Katae

 

 

3.0

Local Alcohol Bans

 

To progress the local alcohol bans work

 

Officers present:

Daniel Pouwel

 

 

 

 


 

 

RECORD OF WORKSHOPS

 

Record of workshop proceedings for 31 March 10am-5pm

 

Held at the Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Members present for all or part of the workshops:

Simon Randall (Chairperson)

Chris Makoare (Deputy Chairperson)

Josephine Bartley

Brett Clark

Bridget Graham

Obed Unasa

Alan Verrall

 

 

1.0

Small Local Improvement Projects

 

Update on projects

 

Officers present:

Vandna Kirmani

 

 

2.0

Long Term Plan

 

To discuss the Long Term Plan

 

Officers present:

Victoria Ly, Mary Binney

 

 

3.0

Community Facilities Network Plan

 

To discuss the Community Facilities Network Plan

 

Officers present:

Anita Coy-Macken

 

 

4.0

Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre

 

To discuss the project

 

Officers present:

Stella Gaseata, Mikki-Tae Tapara, Robert Newson

 

 

5.0

Glen Innes Music and Arts Centre

 

To discuss the project

 

Officers present:

Sarp Egene

 

 

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Board Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2015/05120

 

  

 

Purpose

Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receives the board member report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Report - Board member Graham

125

     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Board Member Bridget Graham

Monthly Report, March - April 2015

 

11 March

Civil Defence Catch up meeting

 

12 March

Onehunga Community News Catch up

Quarterly libraries catch up

Long Term Plan meeting  at the Ruapotaka marae

 

13 March

Local Alcohol Ban Working Party

 

15 March

Dolphin Theatre Annual General Meeting

 

16 March

Oranga Community Committee meeting

 

17 March

Community led Development workshop

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops.

 

21 March

Site visits: -

22 Bell Avenue Mt. Wellington

13B Gabador Place Mt. Wellington

 

23 March

Empowering Communities workshop

Oranga Community Committee

 

24 March

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local board workshops

 

25 March

Site visit for Swimming Pool Exemption Committee

Swimming Pool Exemption Committee Meeting

Making an Impact With Maori Training

 

26 March

CABAC monthly meeting

Quarterly Events meeting catch up

Grants portfolio meeting

 

27 March

Oranga Community Committee

 

28 March 

Oranga Community Festival

Movies in the Park Fergusson Park

 

30 March 

Local Board cluster briefing on  new CCO Development Auckland

Elected Members survey Action Plan meeting

 

25 February

Long Term Plan meeting with the public at the Onehunga Library

 

 


 

Portfolio Update

Site visits and recommendations: -

 

22 Bell Avenue Mt. Wellington – new configuration

13B Gabador Place Mt. Wellington – change of use

 

Events

 

Oranga Community Festival

Fergusson Park Movies in the Park

 

Community Networks: -

Onehunga Community House

24 March – Management Committee Meeting.

Oranga Community Committee

9 March – management meeting

16 March, 23 March, 27 March – festival meetings.

ODCOSS

11 March – monthly meeting

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Chair's Report to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/05228

 

  

 

Executive summary

Providing the Chairperson, Simon Randall, with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues he has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the Chairperson’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

16 April 2015

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2015/05229

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Providing the Governing Body Member, Denise Krum, the opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on projects, meetings, events and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         receive the Governing Body Member’s report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Philippa Hillman - Democracy Advisor, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager