I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 20 April 2015

5.00pm

Manukau Chambers
Level 1
Manukau Civic Centre
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Fa’anānā Efeso Collins

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ross Robertson

 

Members

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Stephen Grey

 

 

Mary Gush

 

 

Donna Lee

 

 

John McCracken

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

13 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 8969

Email: carol.McGarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Friendship House update                                                         6

9.2     Public Forum - Parklets for Lot 59 - Manukau City Centre                             6

9.3     Public Forum - Vaka Manu’kau Niue Community Trust                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Manukau Ward Councillors Update                                                                            9

13        Facility Partnership Fund - Papatoetoe Gymnastics Feasibility Study                 11

14        Options to proceed with development at Puhinui Reserve, Wiri                           89

15        Business Association bulk funding                                                                          99

16        Skills Shed investigation Ōtara-Papatoetoe                                                           103

17        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Community Grants Programme 2015/2016                             107

18        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                 113

19        Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report - April 2015                                    129

20        New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Housing New Zealand Corporation at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe                                                                                  141

21        Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals 145

22        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           167

23        LGNZ Conference and AGM 2015                                                                           171

24        For Information: Reports referred to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board          179

25        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  181

26        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Reports and Actions Pending                            187

27        Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board members portfolio update                                  191

28        Chairpersons Announcements                                                                                195  

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

Apologies from members Mary Gush and Donna Lee.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 16 March 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Friendship House update

Purpose

 

Vicki Sykes, Chief Executive of Friendship House, will provide an update to the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thanks Vicki Sykes from Friendship House for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Parklets for Lot 59 - Manukau City Centre

Purpose

 

Ben Ross will present to the Local Board on Parklets for Lot 59 - Manukau City Centre and getting two parklets built alongside the Auckland Transport Manukau Bus Interchange Project. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thanks Ben Ross for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Vaka Manu’kau Niue Community Trust

Purpose

 

Casey Smith from the Vaka Manu’kau Niue Community Trust, will provide an update to the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board thanks Casey Smith and the Vaka Manu’kau Niue Community Trust representatives for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2015/04930

 

  

 

Executive Summary

A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         receive the verbal reports.

b)         receive the written report from Councillor Arthur Anae.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Facility Partnership Fund - Papatoetoe Gymnastics Feasibility Study

 

File No.: CP2015/03148

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the recently completed Papatoetoe Gymnastics Club Inc. (Gymcity) and Papatoetoe Association Football Club Inc. (AFC) feasibility study funded through the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board facility partnership fund.

Executive Summary

2.       Gymcity is located in a community tenancy at The Depot, 91 Cambridge Terrace, Papatoetoe and was given notice to relocate on 5 July 2011 because Auckland Council Properties Limited is developing the area for mixed housing and as part of the project, seeks to provide better connection between the site and current shopping mall. 

3.       On 19 March 2013 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolved; “That officers be requested to work with Gymcity to investigate options for a long term solution for relocation and these options be reported back to the Local Board.” (OP/2013/316)

4.       Staff investigated several sites either known to them or identified by Gymcity.  The preference for Gymcity was to relocate to Murdoch Park because this is Gymcity’s main catchment area.

5.       A facility partnership fund application was made to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to undertake a feasibility study on 16 June 2014.  The Local Board resolved; “The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board approves a facility partnership funding grant to Papatoetoe Gymnastics Club of $50,000 for a feasibility study to explore the building of a shared use facility on Murdoch Park that would house the existing football club, a relocated Papatoetoe Gymnastic club and possibly other community users.” (OP/2014/75)

6.       The feasibility study was completed on 9 March 2015 and presented to Gymcity and the Papatoetoe AFC.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Receive the Papatoetoe Gymnastics Club Inc. and Papatoetoe Association Football Club Inc.  Feasibility Study Report.

b)      Note that developing a shared facility at Murdoch Park site is not workable.

 

Comments

7.       Gymcity choose to investigate Murdoch Park as an option to relocate to and to pursue a potential joint venture with Papatoetoe AFC.

8.       The outcome of the feasibility study highlighted to Papatoetoe AFC that a joint venture was not in their best interest.  The Papatoetoe AFC have acknowledged that they see the feasibility study as a great opportunity for them to grow their sport and it has given the Club a clear direction towards improvements of their facilities at Murdoch Park.

9.       The feasibility study identifies the lack of available local sports park sites available for the construction of a new purpose built facility for Gymcity and highlighted:

·    The data, research and analysis summarised therein will all be required to support future funding applications, and to inform further facility development;

·    The analysis of the existing site and facilities, coupled with the derivation of gymnastics specific facility requirements can be used to inform future facility design development;

·    The preliminary review of the associated capital and operational costs for such a facility can inform operational planning and budgets for any new facility.

10.     Options available to Gymcity are that they could further explore a site at Manukau Sports Bowl, or investigate an amalgamation/partnership with ICON Gymnastics in Mangere East however both of these are considered by Gymcity to be outside their catchment area.  The feasibility study also underlined that there is no funding capacity by Gymcity to undertake a large building project.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     This report provides an update to the local board on the findings of the feasibility study as a result of the local board decision OP/2014/75.

Māori impact statement

12.     No particular negative implications for Māori community or Māori stakeholders have been identified as arising from this report.

Implementation

13.     There are limited sites available for the construction of a new purpose built facility within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

14.     There are no known implementation issues arising from this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Papatoetoe Gymnastics and Papatoetoe AFC Feasibility Study

13

     

Signatories

Authors

Kim Squire - Sports and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Ken Maplesden - Sport and Recreation Adviser

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 













































































Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Options to proceed with development at Puhinui Reserve, Wiri

 

File No.: CP2015/05907

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To consider options to progress development and use of part of Puhinui Reserve.

Executive Summary

2.       Puhinui Trust has developed a proposal to use Puhinui Reserve for an international standard equestrian facility. Council has been working with the group since 2008.

3.       The proposal from the Trust is inconsistent with the reserve management plan for the reserve. Where a proposal is consistent with the reserve management plan, the local board can proceed without public notice. If a proposal is inconsistent with the reserve management plan, public processes are required. The board is asked to confirm it is willing to consider developments that are inconsistent with the reserve management plan.

4.       The Puhinui working party has endorsed an area for potential development on the reserve that will have less of an impact on the values of the site.  The local board needs to endorse this location, and make a decision on future use and development of the reserve.

5.       Staff recommend either endorsing the Trust as the preferred occupier of the site subject to them providing a proposal that protects the values of the site and public consultation, or seek expressions of interest from all interested users who may want to develop and use the site.

6.       Mana whenua have a key interest in the reserve as a cultural heritage landscape and have asked to be involved in identifying the preferred use/development, and assessing whether the values of the site are protected. The local board has committed to working collaboratively with mana whenua and it will need to be determined how to involve mana whenua in decision making, and what costs will be associated with this.  

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Endorse the area identified in the attached map as the area for development.

b)      Either:

Approve an Expressions of Interest process to seek applications for the development and use of identified area for development in accordance with the Puhinui Reserve Management Plan 2002

or

Endorse the Puhinui Trust’s proposal for an international equestrian facility in principle and publically notify an intention to provide a lease, subject to further detail on design and operations from the Trust.

c)      Delegate to the Local Board Chairperson the authority to approve the content of any public notices.

d)      If an expressions of interest process is approved, disestablish the Puhinui working party that was established by the local board in December 2013.

e)      Supports in principle, the involvement of mana whenua in the chosen option, including determining the successful applicant(s) for an expressions of interest process or the detailed design of the international equestrian facility. 

f)       Allocates up to $3000 from the local board’s budget for the costs of the public notice.

g)      Notes that depending on the option chosen, staff will schedule it in the relevant department’s work programme and advise the local board when the option can be progressed.  

 

 

Comments

Background

7.       Puhinui Reserve is a 199ha reserve located at 108 Prices Road, Wiri. The local board is the administering body of the reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. The site was purchased in 1991 by Manukau City Council ‘to further its goals of sustaining the natural environment and providing a diverse range of recreational opportunities for the communities of Manukau’.

8.       The Puhinui Reserve (Thurlows Farm) Management Strategy was adopted in 1992. The strategy identifies the reserve’s significant cultural, heritage, landscape, archaeological, geological, ecological and conservation values, and sets out a range of appropriate uses.

9.       Since 1994, regional and international equestrian events have been held on the reserve. Two events per annum are held through a license to occupy to Auckland Equestrian Eventing Ltd. 

10.     The Puhinui Reserve Management Plan was adopted in 2002 and provided for a diverse range of uses, including:

Walking, jogging, orienteering, bicycling, photography, sketching, bird study, outdoor recreation/conservation experience, educational research, interpretation, relaxation, viewing scenery, spectator activities, limited tourist activities, picnicking, ethno-botanic gardens, structured sports participation, casual horse riding, and club associated activities.(Section 3.3.5, Puhinui Reserve Management Plan 2002). 

11.     In 2008 the Puhinui Trust sought to enter into an agreement with Manukau City Council to develop Puhinui Reserve for equestrian purposes. The Trust prepared feasibility reports for an international equestrian facility in 2010 and 2012 based on a public-private partnership model. The Trust’s proposal seeks to establish a multi-disciplinary international equestrian facility (including showjumping, dressage, eventing and cross country) and a home for elite equestrian sport in Auckland, with four major events a year. The proposal includes buildings, arenas, event hub, toilets, stables and associated parking

12.     In December 2013, the local board established a working party to assess issues and identify options for the international equestrian facility proposal at Puhinui Reserve that protects the site values (OP/2013/563). The working party has considered the development of Puhinui Reserve for equestrian purposes in conjunction with wider opportunities such as the neighbouring Colin Dale Park development, the Puhinui Structure Plan, Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and the Regional Equestrian Facility Plan 2014.

13.     In February 2015 the working party endorsed a potential area for development that in their view would sufficiently protect the values of the reserve (see attachment A). The working party used the proposed equestrian development as the basis for assessing the impact on the values of the site, including the impacts on the site of buildings, carparks and activities such as equestrian. The final assessment of the impact on the values of the site will be subject to detailed design of the facilities and the intensity of the activities. Options for the development and use of Puhinui Reserve other than for equestrian purposes have not been canvassed to date.

14.     The Trust’s proposal is inconsistent with the Reserve Management Plan and will require either an amendment to the Plan or a transparent public process that highlights the board’s intention to allow a use that is inconsistent with the Plan. The Trust is seeking a level of certainty of board support prior to investing further funds to modify its design and business case to fit with the site values and agreed development area.

15.     The working party cannot continue further until the board approves the identified development site, and either endorses the Trust as the preferred occupier or approves a public process that will eventually determine the user of the site. The working party has requested that the board determines its preferred option to progress the development of the reserve.

Assessment

16.     Staff have identified four options to progress the proposed international equestrian facility or an alternative development on Puhinui Reserve. The benefits and risks of each option are set out below.

Option 1

17.     Endorse the development of an international equestrian facility on site and publically notify the board’s intention to grant the Trust a lease subject to further details such as an updated concept plan, a feasibility study showing protection of the site values, and public consultation.

The benefits are:

·    Public confirmation of the board’s preferred use of the site

·    The ability of the Trust to confidently invest in future planning

·    The costs (approximately $3000 for public notices) and timeframes (approximately 6 months) are relatively low compared to the other options. This does not take into account costs if  hearings of submissions by an independent panel are needed. 

The risks are:

·    No detail on the exact scale and impact of the development

·    Doesn’t take into account alternative uses of the development site, including ones that may be consistent with the reserve management plan

·    No participation of the public or mana whenua in decision-making, which can create risks and conflicts at further stages of the project.

Option 2

18.     Request that the Trust revise its concept plan and provide more details on its intended operations on the identified development site prior to confirming the Trust as the intended tenant on site.

The benefits are:

·    The board and the public will have a clear idea of the scale and impact of the proposed development prior to public consultation

·    The board will have an opportunity to involve mana whenua and key stakeholders in further concept planning

·    There are no costs of the local board.

The risks are:

·    Doesn’t take into account alternative uses of the development site, including ones that may be consistent with the reserve management plan

·    The Trust will incur further costs without surety of whether the equestrian development is supported.

Option 3

19.     Seeks expressions of interest from all interested parties to develop and use the identified development site, including uses that may be inconsistent with the reserve management plan. A process diagram is provided in attachment B.

The benefits are:

·    Allows all interested parties an opportunity to propose a use/development for the site, including providing an appropriate level of information on the scale and impact of the development

·    Provides a transparent public process prior to a decision to either enter into a lease or update the reserve management plan

·    Mana whenua will have an opportunity to participate at an early stage and outline the cultural values

·    The process will provide the successful proposer a level of surety that the board supports the proposal, prior to investment in detail design and feasibility studies.

The risks are:

·    The process could take up to six months to conclude depending on the number of proposals and the complexity of the issues

·    Any use/development that is inconsistent with the reserve management plan are subject to further public processes, i.e. lease or update to reserve management plan

·    The immediate costs are low (approximately $3,000) for public notices. Further costs may be incurred depending on the complexity in determining the preferred proposer and further public processes. 

Option 4

20.     Revise the Reserve Management Plan 2002 to reconsider all uses of the reserve, including an international equestrian facility.

The benefits are:

·    An opportunity to update the values, objectives and policies on management and use of the site, which can provide clarity on the appropriate scale and impact to any proposed development of the site

·    All uses for the site can be considered

·    Ability to integrate the reserve with the Colin Dale Park Masterplan and coordinate the planning of infrastructure, services and operations for both parks

·    Ability to utilise the Puhinui structure Plan information to understand restrictions and opportunities for Puhinui Reserve

·    Feedback can be received from mana whenua, key stakeholders and wider public for all uses of the reserve and whether a minor or major change will be required.

The risks are:

·    Can take 12 months to conclude, or even longer depending on the extent of the review and the complexity of the issues and internal resource availability

·    Can cost between $20,000 and $60,000 depending on the extent of the review. For instance accommodating the development of the scale proposed by the Trust would be considered a major change.

·    Loss of momentum for the Puhinui Trust in its planning and the development of its proposal. 

21.     In consideration of the relative benefits and risks of each option, staff recommend that the local board either:

endorse the Trust as the preferred occupier,  or

invite expressions of interest for future use of the reserve.

 

 

Next Steps

22.     Depending on the option chosen staff will have to schedule the work into current or future work programmes.

23.     The expressions of interest process or an intention to lease process would commence with a public notice which includes the scope of the contemplated activities, timeframes and assessment criteria if any. Delegation to the local board chair is sought for approval of the final notice. 

24.     The cost of a public notice in various media is approximately $3000. Costs associated with involving mana whenua are unknown at this stage. Further costs may be incurred depending on the number of proposals/submissions, and whether an independent hearings panel is needed to consider the issues and make recommendations.

 

25.     The Puhinui working party can continue if the Trust is endorsed as the preferred occupier, or be discontinued until the conclusion of an expressions of interest process. In the latter case a similar working party may be required in the future to work with the preferred applicant to develop their proposal further.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

26.     A workshop in March 2015 provided an update on the Puhinui working party and options to progress the development of the reserve. This report seeks the local board’s views on its preferred option.  

Māori impact statement

27.     Mana whenua who have interest in the Otara-Papatoetoe local board area are Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Pāoa, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Waikato Tainui, Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki,  Ngāti Tamatera, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru and Te Kawerau ā Maki.

28.     The site is part of a wider cultural heritage landscape.

29.     Council contacted the above mana whenua in March 2015, outlining the intent to progress options. At the time of writing, correspondence was received by Te Ākitai Waiohua outlining the following principles for the local board:

1) That the iwi be involved in the consultation process from the beginning and not after the proposed EOI process has been well advanced as a Treaty partner including joint decision making on  any proposal that comes before the Board as an EOI

2) The EOI or any proposed development takes cognisance, and give effect to the Puhinui Structure Plan process

3) That the Local Board implements a formal process with Te Akitai Waiohua to ensure its cultural landscape and heritage is recognised

4) That the local board keeps a formal record of all consultation with Te Akitai Waiohua.

30.     Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua and Ngāti Tamaoho are also interested in participating and being involved in the process.

31.     At its meeting in February 2015, the Board (OP/2015/13) committed to partner with mana whenua to take a collaborative approach to further explore, enhance and enable meaningful relationships and genuine engagement with iwi.

32.     Local board services staff advise that iwi involvement in decision making will be considered in all phases of project planning for the reserve. Prior to any assessment and decision on the preferred expressions of interest it will need to be determined how to involve mana whenua in this phase of the decision making.

33.     Ngati Te Ata is also a lessee on Colin Dale Park. 

Implementation

34.     The draft Auckland Council Long Term Plan 2015-2025 does not allocate funding for the development of Puhinui Reserve. Any development of the reserve is to be funded externally, or budget allocated in the Auckland Council LTP.

35.     ATEED has an interest in attracting major events and investment into south Auckland, and have confirmed that they may be able to assist with further feasibility analysis if a proposal has the potential to attract major events that contribute to the economic development of the area. 

36.     The Puhinui Structure Plan process and detailed planning for the operations on Colin Dale Park is yet to be concluded. These may have an important role in determining what is feasible on Puhinui Reserve.

37.     Work to progress the options for Puhinui reserve is not currently scheduled in work programmes. The board’s chosen option will be scheduled into the relevant department’s work programme and staff will advise the local board of when the option can be implemented.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Map of Puhinui Reserve and Proposed Development Site

95

bView

Expressions of Interest Process Map

97

     

Signatories

Authors

Manoj Ragupathy - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Sarah Mossman - Principal Policy Analyst  

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Business Association bulk funding

 

File No.: CP2015/03577

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board   of the financial commitments that three of the business associations in the local board area face, and to present funding options available to support them.

Executive Summary

2.       This report concerns the local board’s investment in community safety in the local area.  Specifically, public places CCTV systems and support for local business associations who monitor the CCTV systems and carry out further community safety and economic development work.

3.       As part of the local board-funded community safety work, council manages the public places CCTV systems, providing a quality crime prevention tool to each of the three local business associations (BAs). Staff recommend that this arrangement continues, and that council continue to manage the contract process for CCTV monitoring. This arrangement ensures an accountable, robust and safe approach to CCTV use.

4.       As well as monitoring CCTV systems, three local BAs also run community safety and economic development initiatives, which incur significant costs. These BAs are Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated, Papatoetoe Main Street Society Incorporated and Otara Business Association Incorporated.

5.       The board currently assists the business associations by granting them money for specific purposes. Staff propose replacing this system with bulk funding, to give the BAs a more reliable and secure source of funding with lower administrative load for council.

6.       Aside from funding for council management of the CCTV systems (value $85,000), staff recommend that the local board’s safety funding be equally divided between the three BAs to the value of $91,666 each.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      allocate $91,666 from the 2015/2016 local board budget  to each of the following business associations towards crime prevention, safety and economic development initiatives, subject to accepting the accountability detailed in their respective funding agreements:

· Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

· Papatoetoe Main Street Society Incorporated

· Otara Business Association Incorporated

b)      allocate $85,000 per annum of the local board’s safety budget towards council maintenance and management of local public places CCTV systems (to include procuring the required services including maintenance, network costs and monitoring)

c)      approve the Community Development and Safety unit procuring CCTV monitoring contracts with Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated and Otara Business Association Incorporated.

 

 

Discussion

7.       As part of local board-funded community safety work, council manages the public places CCTV systems, providing a quality crime prevention tool to each of the three local business associations (BAs). This arrangement ensures an accountable, robust and safe approach to CCTV use.  The systems are mostly monitored by the BAs, with the exception of Otara, where the CCTV system is currently monitored by Manukau Institute of Technology.

8.       The local BAs also run community safety and economic development initiatives, which incur significant costs. The board currently assists the BAs by granting them money for specific purposes. Staff propose replacing this system with bulk funding, to give the BAs a more reliable and secure source of funding with lower administrative load for council.

Bulk Funding of Business Associations

9.       In preparing draft budgets for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025, local board members discussed alternative methods to supporting BAs. The three BAs involved are:

· Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

· Papatoetoe Main Street Society Incorporated

· Otara Business Association Incorporated.

10.     The local board currently pays a combined total of approximately $400,000 per annum to these BAs, in a complex series of grants and contractual payments for various purposes. These payments are in addition to the council revenue the BAs receive from BID targeted rates.

11.     The three BAs all have differing needs and requirements, but all incur significant costs in their economic development roles, as well as running crime prevention and safety initiatives in their respective areas. Last year, the local board supported all three BAs with safety and economic development funding, which included the following:

Table One: Local Board Funding for Safety and Economic Development funding to Business Associations in 2014/2015

BA

Budget

Amount granted

Hunters Corner

Crime prevention officer funding

$55,000

Ambassador contributions

$21,500

Economic development discretionary funding

$30,000

Otara

Crime prevention officer funding

$70,000

Ambassador contributions

$21,500

Economic development discretionary funding

$30,000

Papatoetoe

Ambassador contributions

$21,500

Economic development discretionary funding

$30,000

 

12.     The local board has considered paying each BA a fixed sum in 2015-2016. This would replace the current BID top-up and mixture of grants for specific purposes. The bulk funding proposal arose as a solution to a number of issues:

·     bulk funding fits in with the Auckland Plan policies of empowered communities and community led development

·     the system of making grants for specific purposes is becoming increasingly complicated and costly.  Bulk funding would be simpler

·     anomalies have crept in between the level of support given to the three BAs, so bulk funding would re-establish equity

·     the BAs are restricted by the specific nature of the current grants, allowing no flexibility to identify where and how to appropriately apply the funding. Bulk funding would enable them to make rational choices that optimise results from the resources available.

13.     Bulk funding would require the BAs to be accountable to the local board for the way they use the funding and the results obtained. The accountability process can be incorporated into funding agreements and can be managed by council staff.

14.     The bulk funding option would not preclude the BAs from applying for other forms of funding, for example events funding.

Local Board support for CCTV systems

15.     Currently the local board supports the operational expenses associated with running the council’s public places CCTV systems operating in Otara and Hunters Corner (which is also linked to Papatoetoe’s business association system). These costs include maintenance, network costs and monitoring contracts to a value of approximately $85,000. These systems are currently managed by council staff, but not monitored by them.

16.     Staff recommend the local board continue to use the safety budget to fund council staff to manage the CCTV systems, to ensure continued provision of a quality crime prevention tool to each of the three BAs. The proposed bulk funding model suggests the local board set aside $85,000 for CCTV operating costs.

17.     Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated is currently contracted (until June 2015) to monitor council’s public places cameras at certain times in the Papatoetoe area. In Otara, the CCTV monitoring contract currently sits with the Manukau Institute of Technology (until June 2015) due to Otara Business Association Incorporated previously being unable to resource the operation.

18.     The Otara Business Association Incorporated has recently made positive steps towards improving safety, including the recruitment of a crime prevention officer. Staff now recommend shifting the monitoring contract for Otara to the Otara Business Association Incorporated premises. This would allow the crime prevention officer to better coordinate the ambassadors, better align safety services in the town centre and improve interaction with the police and other agencies. This more effective use of CCTV monitoring would help improve safety across the local board area.  

19.     Staff recommend that the Community Development and Safety unit procure new CCTV monitoring contracts with Hunters Corner Town Centre and Otara Business Association, to ensure continued CCTV monitoring when the current contracts expire. The new contracts would commence in July 2015 for the period of one year, and would be funded from the CCTV operating expenses component of the proposed funding allocation below.

Proposed bulk allocation of funding – incorporating CCTV monitoring

20.     With $360,000 potentially available to the local board from the current safety budget, removing the CCTV component first (of $85,000, which includes monitoring contracts) would leave $275,000 to be divided equally between the BAs. The proposed financial split is shown below.

Table Two: Proposed allocation of local board safety budget

Expense

Recipient

Amount

CCTV operating expenses (incl. monitoring contracts)

Council staff (to manage on behalf of the LB)

$85,000

Bulk funding

Hunters Corner Town Centre Society Incorporated

$91,666

Bulk funding

Papatoetoe Main Street Society Incorporated

$91,666

Bulk funding

Otara Business Association Incorporated

$91,666

TOTAL

 

$359,998

  

Consideration

Local Board Views

21.     The crime prevention and town centre safety issues have been workshopped with the local board on a number of occasions in late 2014 and early 2015. The local board has supported the ambassador programme and also the empowering of the BAs to influence perceptions of safety in their respective areas (through a variety of locally driven safety initiatives – such as CCTV monitoring).

Maori Impact Statement

22.     While this project is not specifically targeting Maori, it is noted that Maori are generally over-represented as both victims and perpetrators in crime statistics. Maori are likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community. The three town centres involved are frequented by significant numbers of Maori living in the localities. By supporting thriving town centre business associations, it would indirectly benefit Maori.   

General

23.     There is sufficient funding available in the local board’s CCTV and town centre safety initiatives budget to support a contribution of $91,666 to each of the three BAs and cover basic monitoring contracts.

24.     The decision sought does not invoke the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

Implementation

25.     Staff would implement the local board’s decision through funding agreements with each of the BAs.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Mark Evans - Team Leader Safety South

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Skills Shed investigation Ōtara-Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2015/04841

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report outlines the processes required to establish two skills sheds in the local area.  The report also requests that the local board allocate funding toward the establishment of skills sheds, and authorise staff to review existing local facilities and the processes required to make buildings available for use as skills sheds.

Executive summary

2.       Skills sheds are an initiative of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and included in the 2015 – 2018 Local Board Plan. Two sites are sought for skills sheds within the local area.

3.       At the request of local board, staff investigated two existing sites at 27R St George Street – The Band Room and 19R Boundary Road – Manukau Sports Bowl. The identified sites are not currently within the Community Development Arts and Culture (CDAC) community lease portfolio.

4.       While the sites were identified as suitable, there is currently no budget to bring the facilities into the CDAC portfolio. CDAC can support the local board to investigate opportunities to house skills sheds within existing portfolio facilities in the local board area.

5.       A number of existing community facility leases in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area have recently expired and are available for potential repurposing and re-leasing at the local board’s discretion. Staff propose bringing all available lease renewals within the local board area to a workshop to advise the board of recently available options for skills shed development.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board :

a)      Allocate funding of $40,000 for implementation of skills sheds outcomes as detailed in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board plan.

b)      Request council staff review the existing community facilities available for lease renewal and recommend which facilities are suitable for re-purposing as potential skills sheds.

c)      Request that council staff initiate an expressions of interest process to identify potential lease holders for sites, once appropriate sites are identified and all due diligence processes are met, including:

i)        Assessing all future tenancies up for lease renewal, with regard to alignment with local board plan outcomes, such as potential skills shed developments

ii)       Identifying and resolving any district plan and council process requirements for proposed skills sheds

iii)      Negotiating any properties or community lease requirements or making other suitable leasing arrangements

iv)      Confirming the correct site classification for the planned activities

d)      Where suitable council owned and managed property is unavailable, request staff initiate an expression of interest process to identify potential community organisations with property that would consider establishing skills sheds with local board support.

 

Comments

Background

6.       The local board has requested that staff identify two sites to be used as skills sheds in the local board area. Skills sheds are an initiative of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and included in the 2015 – 2018 Local Board Plan.

7.       Staff investigated two existing sites at 27R St George Street – The Band Room and 19R Boundary Road – Manukau Sports Bowl. These properties are practical options for use as skills sheds.  However, the sites are not currently within the Community Development Arts and Culture (CDAC) community lease portfolio.

8.       No budget is available within the Long Term Plan (LTP) to acquire additional facilities into the Community Facilities property portfolio. Local board advocacy to the governing body regarding LTP direction on property acquisition would be required to progress these options further.

9.       CDAC can support the local board to investigate opportunities within existing Community Facilities portfolio facilities in the local board area. A number of existing community facility leases in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area have recently expired, rendering the facilities available for potential repurposing by the local board and re- leasing at the local board’s discretion.

LTP implications and operational costings

10.     Acquisition of new or existing council assets into the Community Facilities portfolio is contrary to the current draft LTP position.  The capital expenditure position is that there is no available budgeted capacity within the LTP to acquire additional facilities into the CF property portfolio.

11.     The board included $40,000 for skills sheds in its draft LTP budget for 2015/2016. Council staff estimate that basic costs for refurbishing small existing facility sites can be met within that budget.  Reclassification of property for use as skills sheds would incur costs which the local board may need to budget for, dependent upon site location.

12.     Based on information from existing ‘men’s sheds’, initial cost to build a purpose built skills shed is estimated at $200,000 (where land is provided) with ongoing operational costs estimated at $28,000 per annum. Cost is wholly dependent upon the size and scale of the development.

13.     Costs to refurbish a small existing community facility to a standard for allocation to community groups, for development as skills sheds range between $14,000 and $26,000. This estimate covers setup costs detailed in Table One below.

Table One: estimated skills shed setup costs (dependant on age and condition of facilities)

minor repairs and maintenance

$2,000

$5000

security installation

$2,000

$4000

installation of three phase power

$3,000

$5000

wall lining and strengthening remodelling

$7,000

$12,000

 

$14,000 low estimate

$26,000 high estimate

 

14.     This expenditure would prepare a small facility as a shell for a community group to fit-out for use as a skills shed. Estimates do not include the costs of any legal processes and district plan requirements or workshop fit out with equipment or tools. 

15.     These basic costs are considered indicative for initial refurbishment of small to medium sized community use properties. A full building assessment and maintenance costing will need to be conducted on any selected property.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

16.     A workshop with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board was held on 2 February 2015 to seek local board input regarding potential sites and skills shed development.

Maori impact statement

17.     Approximately 15.6% of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe community are Maori.

18.     Opportunities for Maori to pursue social, cultural and wellbeing outcomes would be supported through development of skills sheds in the OPLB area.

19.     There are no known special considerations to Maori in relation to the use of these sites. Mana Whenua will be eligible to respond to the expression of interest to be lease holder of one or both of these sites. No direct consultation with Mana Whenua will occur.

Implementation

20.     CDAC will continue a process to further identify suitable properties and any potential leasing and repurposing issues as well as building modification costs.

21.     CDAC will initiate an expression of interest (EOI) process seeking interested parties from the local community at such time as a suitable property is identified and all property issues have been resolved.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Ayr Jones - Team Leader – Community Advisors South

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/04539

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme to be attached to the policy as an appendix.

4.       This report presents the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      adopt the Otara-Papatoetoe Community Grants Programme 2015/2016.

 

 

Comments

5.       The new Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014 and implementation will commence on 1 July 2015.

6.       The policy supports each local board to develop a Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016. This local board grants programme will guide community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme can include:

·    outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·    specific local board funding priorities

·    budget allocated to the grants programme

·    which grant types will operate locally, the number of funding rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·    an indication of participation in multi-board funding

·    other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making

8.       An implementation plan is underway to support an integrated and simplified approach to grants programme administration. Funding staff from different departments are working together to ensure a co-ordinated approach, expected to benefit applicants and streamline internal processes.

9.       Once the local board community grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, funding rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Community Grants Programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme can be reviewed on an annual basis.

Māori impact statement

11.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

12.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels. Targeted advertising and promotion will be developed for target populations, including migrant and refugee groups, disability groups, Maori and iwi organisations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Otara-Papatoetoe Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

109

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Funding Programme Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 




Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/04891

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association.  A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area and for which site plans are included.

5.       There are four of the 39 premises where the land the kindergarten is sited on is an unclassified recreation reserve. The affected boards are asked to support the classification of the reserves as set out in Attachment A as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommend approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

6.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where the group owns the building.

7.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Approves the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

b)      Approves a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Aorere Kindergarten, Murdoch Park Kindergarten, Kotiri Kindergarten and Mayfield Kindergarten, details specified in Attachment A, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

c)      Supports the classification of Hallberry Reserve located at 39R Hallberry Road, Mangere East being Lot 124 DP 49111 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

d)      Supports the classification of part of Pearl Baker Reserve, 20R Pearl Baker Drive, Otara that the kindergarten is sited on, being Section 1 SO70564 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (1) of the Reserves Act 1977 and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

 

Comments

8.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

9.       A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

10.     This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

11.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

12.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

13.     Where the land is an unclassified recreation reserve the affected boards are asked to support the classification of four reserves as set out in Attachment A as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.  This classification will support the activity that is currently being undertaken there and Parks staff has been consulted.

14.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

15.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments.

16.     A Community Outcomes Plan as approved will be an attachment to the lease and reported on annually by the Association.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

17.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

18.     A portfolio meeting has been held with each local board and they were presented with the proposal for the lease for multiple premises.

Māori impact statement

19.     The Association has long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

20.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

21.     Costs for preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.  Costs may be incurred in the classification of unclassified reserves process and these will be covered by Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

117

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

127

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 











Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update Report - April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05934

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on local transport matters over the last month for the Otara Papatoetoe Local Board (OPLB)

Executive Summary

2.       This report contains a general monthly update on transport matters both locally and from across Auckland and a list of issues currently being addressed by Auckland Transport for the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      Receive this report

b)      Requests Auckland Transport progress the design and construction of entry signage for Otara and/or Papatoetoe and approves budget from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund at a rate of $4600 per sign. (Sign locations to be confirmed to ATRM by Transport Portfolio holder).

c)      Request Auckland Transport to add the following criteria for applications for markets in the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

 

 

 

Consideration

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

3.       The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board LBTCF is $549,314.00 per annum; this can be spent per year or rolled together and used for larger projects. i.e. three years’ worth of funding is $1,647,942.00. Please see attachment A for current updates.

 

Signage

4.       The Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board have expressed a desire to see gateway or entry signage as you enter both Otara and Papatoetoe townships. A number of options have been explored but the cost of these options have proved to be an issue. Auckland Council Parks have installed a number of signs in Papatoetoe that may provide examples of the type of sign that could be used. The design for these signs is provided in attachment C. The cost for the sign illustrated was $4,533.49 per sign.

 

Markets on Auckland Transport Land

5.       Auckland Transport own car parks in Papatoetoe and Otara town centres and currently a market operates from the Otara car park. This weekly market has been held successfully in the town centre car park since 1979.

 

6.       It is important for Auckland Transport that applications for markets have the support of the local board, as a market can have significant impact on a local community. While Auckland Transport has a number of criteria that markets are expected to meet, support of the proposal by the Local Board is necessary if a proposal is to proceed. It is important that Auckland Transport understand the Local Board’s overall position in relation to markets and whether it feels that a particular market proposal would fit within their board area.

 

7.       The communities of Otara and Papatoetoe are different in the way they engage with their local areas and retailers are an important element within these communities. In addition to the criteria below and support from the board, Auckland Transport would want to see a level of support from retailers and the local business associations, when considering whether to proceed with an application for a market.

 

8.       Below is a list of the criteria that Auckland Transport currently require to be met before considering an application.

·          Support of the Local Board

·        Acceptance of the market licence terms (usually a valuation needs to be commissioned by AT to assess the licence fee and the cost in obtaining such valuation as well as legal costs for the preparation, negotiation and execution of the licence are to be met by the applicant)

·          Confirmation of the applicant’s details

·        Statement of the applicant’s financial position for the last 3 years and evidence of compliance with the Incorporated Societies Act 1908

·          Current public liability insurance

·          Current resource consent decision allowing for the operation of the market

·          Traffic management plan

·          Operation manual – detailing cleaning, security and health and safety procedures

 

9.       Auckland Transport wants to ascertain whether the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board have any additional criteria it would want assessed for any applications for markets in the board area.

 

Train Station Safety

10.     Following a presentation from local police and Auckland Council, the board expressed a number of concerns around safety on trains and at stations in the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. As a result of this presentation, Auckland Transport was asked to investigate safety at train stations in the board area.

 

11.     Auckland Transport is currently assessing the safety needs across the entire rail network. This review is scheduled to be completed by May 2015, with results and recommendations from this review being reported to the Auckland Transport Board. Following this, there will be more information on train and rail station safety and options for improving the situation.

 

12.     However, the safety of the travelling public is a major concern for Auckland Transport and while this safety assessment is being carried out Auckland Transport will have security personnel on the platforms of rail stations.

 

Redoubt Road-Mill Road Corridor project update

13.     Auckland Transport identified its preferred route for the northern section of the Redoubt Road-Mill Road corridor upgrade and applied to Auckland Council in November 2014 to designate land (Notices of Requirement) for the project.

14.     The key reasons for the project are to provide for significant housing growth in the area and to improve the corridor’s poor safety record.  Safeguarding this route will provide certainty to both existing and future property owners on what land is required for the upgrade.  New housing areas can then be built knowing where the transport infrastructure to support it will be.

15.     Auckland Council has advised it will publicly notify the Notice of Requirement in mid-April.  Legislation requires at least 20 working days for submissions.  A public hearing will subsequently be held by independent commissioners to test Auckland Transport’s proposal.

16.     Auckland Transport is organising two public information days on 17 April (11am to 2pm) and 18 April (10am to 1pm) at Westfield Manukau, so interested people can find out more to assist with their submissions.

17.     Any member of the public can make submissions on the proposal. Auckland Transport encourages people to make submissions if they have any concerns about the project or the assessments carried out.

18.     Auckland Transport has already contacted affected property owners directly about the project to discuss their land owner rights and the planning process, and has met with the majority of them.

 

Submissions on Long Term Plan (LTP)

19.     Auckland Council’s LTP 10-year budget consultation received 27,353 written submissions, with the majority of Aucklanders opting to support the advanced transport network.

20.     Aucklanders provided feedback on a number of issues, including what needs to be done to fix the region’s transport problems.

21.     Figures show that 50% opted for the advanced transport network and 29% supported the basic transport plan.  On the question of funding the transport options, 34% supported motorway tolls, while 27% favoured a fuel tax and rates rises.

 

Review of Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP)

22.     Auckland Transport has commenced a process to update the Auckland RPTP.

The timetable for the variation involves the preparation of a draft proposal by late April, followed by a public consultation phase during May 2015.  Hearings would be planned for late May/early June.

          The variation will cover the following issues:

·        The proposed introduction of a new zone-based integrated fares system

·        Proposals for a new light rail transit network on some major arterial routes on the central Auckland isthmus

·        Service and infrastructure changes arising from the Ferry Development Plan

·        Revised service descriptions on the new bus network.

 

Road Resurfacing

23.     Auckland Transport receives considerable feedback from Local Boards and the general public around the decision to use chip seal for resealing roads, as opposed to asphaltic concrete. Attachment B to this report seeks to provide some clarity around why Auckland Transport uses particular road sealing options on particular roads.

 

East - West Study

24.     The East - West Study is a project to analyse transport routes between SH20 and SH1

and develop solutions for managing an anticipated increase in road freight of 60%, through that corridor in the next 30 years. In particular, the objective will be to permit better connectivity for the industrial areas of Onehunga-Southdown, East Tamaki-Highbrook, the Airport, Wiri and southern Mt Wellington.

 

25.     In 2014 the project focussed on two key areas:

·    Freight movements east-west via Onehunga; and

·    Public transport linkages to and from Sylvia Park, Otahuhu, Mangere and the Airport. 

 

26.     Late last year consultation about these two areas was completed and proposed options that can  be pursued in the short-term, identified:

·        A re-development of Neilson Street; and

·        Improvements in bus connectivity between Otahuhu and the Airport.

 

Media

Investigation into alternative transport solutions

27.     The Board of Auckland Transport has called for an investigation into a light rail network, which could relieve traffic congestion on some of the region’s busiest roads.

28.     This stems from work in 2012 (the City Centre Future Access study) which responded to a government request to develop a robust and achievable solution for access to the CBD. That showed that the City Rail Link, together with surface bus improvement, provided the best regional solution. However, it also identified that the city centre is already facing serious congestion across all major road entry points which, if not addressed now, will worsen.

29.     Key arterials such as Dominion Road and Symonds Street were identified as major bus routes which will be significantly congested in the future as the demand for public transport grows, along with increased jobs and residents in the city centre. The population of adjacent suburbs such as Ponsonby and Parnell is also projected to almost double between 2011 and 2041.

30.     Recent work by Auckland Transport has pointed towards light rail (essentially high-speed trams) as a possible solution and is referenced in the draft Regional Land Transport Programme currently being publicly consulted on.  Light rail would move more than three times the number of people per hour (approximately 18,000), at higher speeds, than buses for example.

31.     Possible routes under consideration include Queen Street, Symonds Street, Dominion Road, Sandringham Road, Manukau Road and Mt Eden Road. 

32.     Proposed light rail solutions will be complementary to the critical City Rail Link and the existing rail network, providing fast, efficient, environmentally friendly public transport services in parts of Auckland which buses alone will not be able to cater for in the near future.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Summary of Otara - Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

135

bView

Road Resurfacing

137

cView

Signage Design

139

     

Signatories

Authors

Melanie Dale, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Housing New Zealand Corporation at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe

 

File No.: CP2015/04654

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for one new road name for a private right of way created by way of subdivision at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe.

Executive Summary

2.       The legacy Manukau City Council had an existing road naming policy which set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria are applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming in the Manukau area, until a policy is developed for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names “Otaki Lane” and “Kumanu Lane” were determined to meet the road naming policy criteria.

4.       Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngati Te Ata Waiohua and Ngati Tamaoho were consulted and provided the applicant with their preference for the road names proposed.

5.       The names “Otaki Lane” and “Kumanu Lane” proposed by the Applicant, are recommended for approval to the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval the road name “Otaki Lane”, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road and created by way of subdivision at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe, noting that this name meets the relevant road naming criteria.

 

Comments

Background

Applicant:                                             Housing New Zealand Corporation

Site Address:                           174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe

Council’s Reference:              Resource Consent No. 44016 SP11313

 

6.       The legacy Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for Council’s approval.

7.       The residential subdivision will be serviced by a new private right of way that comes off Shirley Road. In this case, road name approval is being sought for the new right of way within the subdivision (Road A).

8.       The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new private right of way created as part of the development at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe.

 

Road Number

Proposed New Road Name

Road A

OTAKI LANE (preferred name)

KUMANU LANE (first alternative name)

KAKAHO LANE (second alternative name)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1 - Location of the new road for the subdivision at 174 Shirley Road, Papatoetoe

 

9.       These road names were submitted as part of this development for the following reasons:

a.    The Otaki Creek is the name of a freshwater creek that travels from Middlemore inlet through to Papatoetoe. The creek is of historical significance as a section of a portage route allowing Maori to transport their waka (canoes) across from the Manukau Harbour, over land at Puhinui, through Papatoetoe and up to the Tamaki river via Middlemore inlet and out to the Waitemata Harbour.

b.    Kumanu, being a verb, meaning to tend carefully, foster, attend to, care for, cherish.

c.    Kakaho is the flower stem of the toetoe grass for which Papatoetoe was named for. Papatoetoe meaning undulating area where the toetoe is the predominant feature.

Decision Making

10.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

11.     The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the following criteria set out in the legacy Manukau City Council road naming policy;

Manukau City Council Road Naming Policy Assessment

(a)   Not a duplication of names already in current usage in the Auckland region either in spelling or pronunciation;

(b)   Brief, melodious and easily and readily pronounced;

(c)   Avoids cartographic problems as the length of the name matches the length of the new road;

(d)   Being associated with the nature of the environment or have historic or local significance

(e)   Being a descriptive;

(f)    Not of possessive form;

(g)   Has appropriate association with other names in the area;

(h)   Not in poor taste or likely to cause offence and;

(i)    Suffix for road name is suitable for road layout

 

12.     There is a Kakapo Place within the Papatoetoe area is considered to be similar to Kakaho Lane, as such is likely to cause confusion. Two out of three of the proposed road names are consistent with the legacy road naming policy.

13.     As the preferred name of the Applicant (“Otaki Lane”) meets the criteria of the road naming policy, it is considered appropriate that this name is recommended for approval to the Local Board.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

14.     The decision sought from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

15.     The decision sought from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on this report does not adversely affect Maori communities as the naming of roads is not linked to one of Council’s strategic priorities for Maori.

16.     Despite the above, the Applicant has initiated consultation with the local iwi to provide them with the opportunity to comment on the proposed road names and offer alternative road names to be put forward for approval if they wish to do so.

Consultation

17.     The Applicant undertook consultation with Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngati Te Ata Waiohua and Ngati Tamaoho as mana whenua of the area. Te Akitai Waiohua recommended the use of Kakaho Lane and Otaki Lane and Ngati Tamoaho indicated their support and endorsement for both these names. No feedback has been received from Ngati Te Ata Waiohua.

18.     New Zealand Post has been consulted and indicated their concerns regarding the use of “Kakaho Lane” as there is a “Kakapo Place” within the Papatoetoe area and could be easily confused with “Kakaho Lane”.  

Financial and Resourcing Implications

19.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road names and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

20.     The decision sought from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

21.     The Southern Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Julie  Bevan - Acting General Manager Resource Consents

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals

 

File No.: CP2015/05349

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

2.       This feedback will inform the board’s advocacy to the Budget Committee, and the board’s own decisions on its locally driven initiatives (LDI) budgets.

Executive summary

3.       The LTP proposals were released for public consultation in January 2015, with local engagement and Have Your Say events held through until 16 March to receive feedback.  Feedback was also received through written or online forms, email and through social media.

4.       In total, the Council received and processed 27,353 pieces of written feedback, as well as 1,354 pieces of feedback via social media.  More than 1,400 people attended a Have Your Say event. Written feedback was given by 400 people and organisations from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. In addition, 8 people attended a community hui at Clover Park on 10 February, and 12 people attended a Have Your Say event at Manukau on 24 February 2015.

5.       This report provides a summary of the feedback received through the LTP consultation on proposals for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. It also summarises feedback on the regional proposals from people or organisations based in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area. 

6.       This feedback will inform the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April. These discussions are timed to inform the Budget Committee prior to them making decisions on the LTP on 7 and 8 May.

7.       The feedback will also inform Ōtara-Papatoetoe decisions to finalise LDI and advocacy content for the Local Board Agreement 2015/2016.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:       

a)      confirm the updated list of advocacy points for discussion with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April.

b)      recommend that the governing body adopts for inclusion in the Annual Plan 2015/2016 a targeted rate set as a uniform charge per separately used or inhabited part of a property, on residential properties in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, for the purpose of fully subsidising entry to swimming pools for persons 17 years and over. Further, that the local board notes the rate is estimated to be $28.86 including GST, based on current cost estimates and the number of separately used or inhabited parts of a residential property in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

 

 

Comments

8.       An overview of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A.

9.       A fuller summary is in Attachment B.  Each piece of written feedback from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area and the feedback recorded from local engagement and Have Your Say events is available online.

10.     This feedback builds on the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s understanding of their community’s priorities and preferences. It will inform the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’s advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April.  At these discussions the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the key consultation issues of investing in Auckland, fixing transport, sharing rates and housing and development. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board may also provide feedback on regional proposals with particular impact locally and may advocate for specific local priorities where the Budget Committee is the decision maker, such as large capital projects. 

11.     The updated advocacy points from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board in relation to the LTP are in Attachment C.  These are a mix of long-standing advocacy points and some issues that have emerged recently.

Swimming pool funding - targeted rate

 

12.     The local board insert in the consultation documents highlighted the proposal to continue with the board’s policy enabling adults to use the Ōtara and Papatoetoe swimming pools without charge. The rationale is that the board considers that the use of swimming pools delivers important social and public health benefits. As in the previous two financial years, the board proposed to fund this policy through a targeted rate, this year expected to be around $28.86 per residential unit.

13.     Feedback on this proposal drew 54 submissions, 31 supporting, and 20 not supporting, and 3 others, with comments summarised in Attachment A.  It is recommended that the board ask the governing body to proceed with the rate.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board needs to consider any changes that it might make to their LDI budgets or advocacy in light of the feedback on the LTP proposals.

Māori impact statement

15.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Maori. The local board agreements are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Maori. The local board agreement is based on the local board plan which are both been developed through engagement with the community, including Maori.

Implementation

16.     Following the local board discussions with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April the Budget Committee will make decisions on regional proposals on 7 and 8 May.  Local boards will then hold workshops from 14 to 20 May to finalise their local board agreements prior to them being adopted at board meetings between 9 and 16 June.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation Feedback summary

149

bView

Summary of submissions (Under Separate Cover)

 

cView

Updated advocacy points

163

     

Signatories

Authors

Neil Taylor - Senior Local Board Advisor  

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 















Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 





Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/04920

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·    two chairs and portfolio holder workshops.

·    individual board workshops in April.

·    a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receives the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt, Kay McIntyre), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson). 

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

·    ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.

·    Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

·    How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

·    provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information.

·    provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities.

·    facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council.

·    develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices.

·    support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

·    the model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

·    the path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

·    one size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

·    all parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

·    capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

·    recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

·    revised approach.

·    the proposed operating model for the CDS unit.

·    supporting tools.

·    budget and implementation implications.

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd, Strategic Advisor, Local Board Services r

Authorisers

Karen Lyons, Manager, Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

LGNZ Conference and AGM 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/03594

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report informs local boards about the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and conference in Rotorua from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 and invites local boards to nominate a representative to attend as relevant.

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government New Zealand annual conference and AGM takes place at the Rotorua Energy Events Centre from Sunday 19 July to Tuesday 21 July 2015.

3.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to 4 official delegates at the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The Governing Body will consider this at their meeting on 26 March 2015.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor as a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor as the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster as Chair LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council, and the Chief Executive.

4.       In addition to the official delegates, local board members are invited to attend.  Local boards should consider the relevance of the conference programme when deciding on attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      nominates a representative to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2015 annual general meeting and conference from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board’s work programme

b)      confirms that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

 

 

Comments

5.       The 2015 LGNZ Conference and AGM are being held in Rotorua. The conference commences with the AGM and technical tours from 09.30 am on Sunday 19 July 2015 and concludes at 2.30 pm on Tuesday 21 July 2015.

6.       The theme of this year’s conference is “Leading the Charge for our Communities”.  The programme includes:

·      Stephen Yarwood, former Mayor of Adelaide, will discuss performance and customer focussed culture - taking your people with you

·      David Meates, CEO of Canterbury District Health Board, will present on understanding what's important to communities and why a strong focus on the customer matters

·      Dr Lester Levy, CEO of New Zealand Leadership Institute, will discuss disruptive governance – how do we increase our performance and create a strong link from strategy to transparent financial performance

·      Kevin Roberts, Executive Chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi, on telling our story and selling the value of our sector

·      Penny Webster, Councillor at Auckland Council; Rob Cameron, Partner at Cameron Partners; and Dr Oliver Hartwich, Executive Director of the New Zealand Initiative will speak on funding for growth – transformation of local government

·      Dr William Rolleston, National President of Federated Farmers; Andrew Knight, CEO of New Zealand Oil and Gas; and Gary Taylor, Executive Director of the Environmental Defence Society will discuss resource management – how a growing economy can also support a healthy environment

·      Mayors Meng Foon, Stuart Crosby, Annette Main, David Ayers and Tony Kokshoorn will each present on right-sizing your town and making the important decisions – a response to economic and demographic change

·      Brenda Halloran, former Mayor of Waterloo, Canada, will talk about nation building – infrastructure and urban development

·      Brett Way of Central Hawkes Bay District Council and Rochelle Deane of Auckland Council will present on delivering local government expertise in the Pacific – a snap shot of the Local Government Technical Assistance Facility for Pacific Countries, (PacificTA) programme.

7.       The programme also includes a number of Master Class sessions including:

•        Growing NZ's talent and economies – strategies to retain and attract skilled migrants

•         Local boards – connecting with the community

•         Engaging with iwi to grow local and regional economies

•         Collaboration, culture change and customer focus under the RMA

•         Getting the most from the One Network Roading Classification system

 

8.       Local boards should consider the relevance of the programme when deciding on conference attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

 

Annual General Meeting

9.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to have four delegates to the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor (or his nominee), the Deputy Mayor, Councillor Penny Webster (as Chair of Zone 1) and the Chief Executive (or his nominee).

10.     The Mayor is a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor is the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster is the Chair of LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council.   The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at their meeting on 26 March 2015.

11.     LGNZ request that local board members who wish to attend the AGM, register their intention prior to the AGM. 

 

Costs

12.     The Local Board Services Department budget will cover the costs of one member per local board to attend the conference. 

13.     Registration fees are $1410.00 (incl GST) before 3 June 2015 and $1510.00 (incl GST) after that.  Full conference registration includes

·      Attendance at conference business sessions (Sunday-Tuesday)

·      Satchel and contents

·      Daily catering

·      Simpson Grierson welcome cocktail function

·      Fulton Hogan conference dinner and EXCELLENCE Awards function

·      Closing conference function ticket

 

14.     The council hosted tours on Sunday 19 July 2015 are not included in the conference price. Local board members are welcome to attend these at their own cost.

15.     Additional costs are approximately $150 per night accommodation, plus travel.  Local Board Services will be co-ordinating and booking all registrations and accommodation and investigating cost effective travel.

Consideration

Local Board Views

16.     This is a report to the 21 local boards.

Maori Impact Statement

17.     The Local Government NZ conference will better inform local boards and thereby support their decision making for their communities including Maori.

Implementation Issues

18.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LGNZ Conference

175

     

Signatories

Authors

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 




Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/03700

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of information-only reports and resolutions for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has referred resolution PKTPP/2015/5 regarding their input to Auckland Council submission NZPM, MBIE on: Block Offer 2015 – Proposal for Petroleum Exploration Permit Round, that was considered at the 26 February 2015 meeting.

3.       That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)           receive a written report from Member DA Holm.

b)      convey to the Governing Body via the Council Controlled Organisations Governance and Monitoring Committee its concern that proposals to remove elected members from the Board of Directors of Auckland Transport were raised without any consultation with Local Boards as part of the CCO Review which sought to “ensure sufficient political oversight and public accountability of CCOs”.

c)      note the attached Board's submission for inclusion in the Council's response to the invitation to comment on Block Offer 2015 – Proposal for Petroleum Exploration Permit Round.A copy of the Notice of Motion is attached to this report as Attachment A.

 

Link to submission http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/02/PKTPP_20150226_MAT_5370.PDF page  3

 

 

4.       The Auckland Development Committee has referred the Cost of Residential Servicing Study report, that was considered at the 12 March 2015 meeting.

5.       That the That the Auckland Development Committee:

a)      receive the Cost of Residential Servicing Study and note that the findings highlight the need for the following: consistency in whole of life cost reporting; consistency in the use of IFAs and infrastructure charge offsets; and a standardised approach to service levels;

b)      request that this report be circulated to local board for their information.

                                                                                                           

Link to Agenda, Cost of Residential Servicing Study report on page 37 - http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/03/AUC_20150312_AGN_5684_AT.PDF

Link to Attachments - http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/03/AUC_20150312_ATT_5684_EXCLUDED.PDF

 

6.      
The Albert-Eden Local Board has referred resolution AE/2015/20 relating to a Notice of Motion - Call on Ports of Auckland that was considered at the 1 April 2015 meeting.

7.       That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receives the Notice of Motion - Call on Ports of Auckland to Pause Reclamation Plan.

b)      calls upon Ports of Auckland Limited to pause any further physical extension of  wharves into the harbour pending the outcome of the comprehensive study of the social, cultural, environmental and economic effects of the port as promised by the Mayor in 2013 and again last week.

c)      notes that in making this call the board is well aware that POAL has a legally valid resource consent to extend Bledisloe Wharf by some 100 metres but calls upon them to act as good corporate citizens and heed the long standing, widespread and deep seated public concern about the impact of further reclamation on the harbour which was side-stepped by the non-notified process.

d)      notes its expectation that the above study will be conducted transparently and include plenty of opportunity for public input.

e)      requests that officers circulate the resolutions to the Mayor and Councillors and other Local Boards.

Link to Notice of Motion – page 8 http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/04/AE_20150401_AGN_4917_AT.PDF

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)            note the Puketāpapa Local Board MR/2015/11 resolution.

b)      note the Auckland Development Committee report and resolution on the Cost of Residential Servicing Study.

c)            note the Albert-Eden Local Board AE/2015/20 resolution.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2015/04931

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Attached are the notes for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshops held on 9 and 30 March 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the workshop notes for 9 and 30 March 2015.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Notes 9 March 2015

183

bView

Workshop Notes 30 March 2015

185

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Reports and Actions Pending

 

File No.: CP2015/04932

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on actions and reports pending/requested at previous meetings or workshops.

 

Recommendation/s                                           

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports and Actions pending

189

    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board members portfolio update

 

File No.: CP2015/04940

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity at the business meeting for portfolio holders to update the full Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on any significant activities over the last month.

Executive Summary

2.       The portfolio leads and alternates for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board are as follows:

Portfolio

Lead

Alternate

Planning, Regulatory, bylaws and compliance

Efeso Collins

Ross Robertson

Arts, Culture and Events

Donna Lee

Ross Robertson

Community Services and Libraries

Mary Gush

Donna Lee

Youth Development

Lotu Fuli

Efeso Collins

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Ross Robertson

John McCracken

Built and Natural Environment, Heritage and Housing

Stephen Grey

Donna Lee

Economic Development, Business and Town Centre revitalisation

Stephen Grey

Mary Gush

Transport

Efeso Collins

John McCracken

 

3.       At the commencement of this electoral term, the reasons for having local board portfolio-holders was workshopped with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board and it was generally agreed that the objectives of local board portfolio holders are to:

·    Provide clear steering of the relevant work programme

·    Lift detailed discussion out of local board meetings and workshops

·    Ensure key decisions go before the full local board

·    Reduce or avoid delays in project delivery

·    Enable local board members to apply their time and energy with enthusiasm and interest

·    Ensure clear communications within the local board and between the local board and officers

·    Maintain strong, connected relationships between the local board and its communities

·    Maintain mutual trust

 

4.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board also workshopped what the role or job description of a portfolio holder might be, and some examples of how local board members might perform their role as a portfolio holder are outlined below:

 

Portfolio role

Examples of actions by portfolio holder

Undertaking roles specified in officer delegation protocols

·    Landowner consents; and proposed asset renewal works:  The portfolio-holder can either decide the issue or ask officers to refer it to the full local board for a decision

·    Providing feedback on resource consent applications

Sharing the workload between local board members

·    Speaking at external meetings on local board matters e.g. at sports clubs – to gather their views, and represent the views of the local board

·    Supporting the Chair and other local board members in speaking to governing body committees or at public meetings on portfolio topics

·    Keeping alternate portfolio-holders informed, so they can assist the portfolio-holder where needed

Gathering knowledge

·    Receiving officer progress updates on projects already agreed by the local board, noting that work programmes are approved by the full local board

·    Engaging and maintaining relationships with stakeholders

·    Reading background reports relevant to the portfolio

Acting as a sounding-board and advising officers

·    Meeting with officers to give the local board view of issues

·    Where there is no known local board view, the portfolio-holder gathers the views of all local board members and formulates the local board position. (Contentious issues are best referred to a local board workshop)

·    Helping to shape details of departmental annual work programmes before presentation to the local board, to secure local board plan outcomes

·    Commenting on proposed design details and other issues arising from local board projects

·    Enabling officers to test possible local board interest in a proposal

·    Helping officers to define preferred options or approaches before reporting to the local board

·    Encouraging officers, especially through difficult decisions

Monitoring action against the Local Board Plan

·    Asking officers for progress updates

·    Advising officers and local board when projects need response or attention

Leading local board projects as a convenor of the relevant steering group or working party

Various, but currently include:

·    Aorere Park joint steering group

·    Otara Lake and waterways steering group

·    Youth Connections project

Providing regular updates on portfolio activity to the local board

·    At board business meetings: portfolio-holders can report back at this agenda item

·    Portfolio-holders lead board discussion on officer reports relevant to their portfolio

·    Emails to all local board members, when information needs to be timely

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal or written reports from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board portfolio holders be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

20 April 2015

 

 

Chairpersons Announcements

File No.: CP2015/04935

 

  

 

Executive Summary

This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the verbal update be received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers