I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 30 April 2015

6.00pm

Lynfield Meeting Room
Fickling Convention Centre
546 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Harry Doig

 

Members

David Holm

 

 

Ella Kumar

 

 

Nigel Turnbull

 

 

Michael Wood

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor

 

20 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: 021 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Puketāpapa Youth Caucus and Youth Advisory Panel Update                               7

13        Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members Update                                           9

14        Chairperson's Report, April 2015                                                                              11

15        Board Member Reports, April 2015                                                                           25

16        Puketapapa Local Board Discretionary Community Funding Round Three 2014/2015                                                                                                                                       63

17        Auckland Transport Report for April 2015                                                               65

18        Puketāpapa Community Grants Programme 2015/2016                                         75

19        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                   81

20        Local Dog Access Review: Statement of Proposal                                                 97

21        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014                                                                                                           117

22        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           131

23        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Proceedings                              135

24        Resolutions Pending Action Schedule, March 2015                                             141  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday 26 March 2015 and the minutes of its Long-term Plan meeting, held Wednesday, 22 April 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Puketāpapa Youth Caucus and Youth Advisory Panel Update

 

File No.: CP2015/06515

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is for the Puketāpapa Youth Caucus and Youth Advisory Panel representatives to provide a verbal update to the Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board thank the Puketāpapa Youth Caucus and Youth Advisory Panel representatives for their update.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members Update

 

File No.: CP2015/06516

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is for the Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members to provide a verbal update to the Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketapapa Local Board thank Governing Body Members for their update.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Chairperson's Report, April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/06517

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform the Puketāpapa Local Board on the Chairperson’s portfolio activities.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s Report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chair's report, 16 March-19 April 2015

13

bView

Report on attendance at NZ Planning Institute Seminar for Elected Representatives & Independent Commissioners on Resource Management Act – 14th April 2015

21

    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 









Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 





Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Board Member Reports, April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/06518

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       Board Member reports are attached for the month of April 2015, providing an update their portfolio work.

It is anticipated that Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receive the Board member reports

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

David Holm Report, 16 March-19 April 2015

27

bView

Harry Doig Report, 17 March-17 April 2015 and attachment, Wheel-Friendly Project - final reports

29

    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 



































Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Puketapapa Local Board Discretionary Community Funding Round Three 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2015/04096

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents applications received under Round Three of the Puketapapa Local Board 2014/2015 Community Funding programme.  The Puketapapa Local Board is required to fund, part fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.       The Puketapapa Local Board set a total budget of $33,412 for the community funding programme.

3.       Grants totaling $21,897 have been approved across two rounds to date, leaving a balance of $11,515 remaining for this third and final funding round.

4.       Nine applications were received in this round, requesting a total of $25,342.

 

Recommendation

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      consider the applications listed in Table 1 and agrees to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table 1: Puketapapa Local Board Community Funding Applications

Organisation Name

Project Title

Amount Requested

Action Education Inc.

Spoken word workshops in Puketapapa area schools

$5,000

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Printed youth resources in Puketapapa

$ 565

mainly music New Zealand Trust

Empowering vulnerable families through mainly music in the Wesley and Roskill south communities.

$2,000

Auckland Young Womens Christian Association T/A YWCA Auckland

Protect Self Defence "Safe for Life" workshops

$1,460

PHAB Association (Auckland) Inc

PHAB youth and young adult social group costs

$5,000

The Parenting Place - Attitude Youth Division

Mental health and wellbeing presentations and resources designed to build resilience in young people

$2,225

Auckland Deaf Society Incorporated

New Zealand sign language community classes term two 2015

$4,672

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Trust New Zealand (GRG)

GRG newsletter and outreach worker costs

$ 420

Chinese Senior Citizens Health Exercise Group Inc.

Tai Chi, Qigong and other health exercises

$4,000

Total

 

$25,342.

 

Discussion

 

5.       Nine applications were received in this third (and final round) of the Puketapapa Local Board Community Funding programme.

6.       The funding total requested is $25,342.

Community Funding Budget

7.       In March 2014, the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee resolved to continue the interim community funding approach for the 2014/2015 financial year (REG/20014/36).This interim community funding approach remains in place pending the implementation of the new Community Grants Policy on 1 July 2015.

8.       Grants totaling $21,897 have been approved across two rounds to date, leaving a balance of $11,515 remaining for this third and final funding round.

Local Board Views

9.       Local board feedback on these applications was sought at the 30 March 2015 workshop.

Maori Impact Statement

10.     Community funding is a general programme of interest and accessible to a wide range of groups, including Maori. Maori are therefore likely to benefit alongside other groups in the community.

General

11.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted annual plan.

12.     The decisions sought by this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Danielle Hibbard - Funding Coordinator

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Report for April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/06524

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area since the last report.

Monthly Overview

2.       The Transport Portfolio Lead briefing on transport matters in the Puketāpapa area took place on 13 April 2015. Officers from Auckland Transport attended to discuss

·      Customer service and HOP card matters

·      Bus Priority measures in the Local Board area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the report.

b)      agree that Auckland Transport work with Auckland Council to deliver the Keith Hay lighting project to Noton Road within a fiscal envelope of $330,000.

c)      agree that if the tender process indicates savings on the allocated $330,000, that this money be spent on the carpark design.

 

Reporting Back

Consultation Report

3.       There were no proposed roading changes forwarded to the Local Board for comment in the past month.

4.       PLB Resolution September 25, 2014

5.       b) note with concern the assertion in the Auckland Transport Report of August 2014 that “AT intends to move to an exact fare only being accepted on buses and in the future to a cashless system for buses” and requests that Auckland Transport makes no steps to implement this until there is full consultation with elected Auckland members and bus users.  In particular, the Board believes that allowance needs to be made for the needs of school children, non English Speakers and visitors to Auckland and that Auckland Transport investigate making hop cards available at high schools.

6.       Auckland Transport responds that a potential move to no cash fares or to exact cash fares on buses has been considered as part of wider discussions in relation to integrated fares and the future retail strategy.  Consequently, there have been no decisions made in respect of whether either, or both of these initiatives will be implemented or the timing of such implementation but there is not expected to be any movement in such a direction until at least 2016. 

7.       Any decision to proceed with the implementation of either, or both initiatives would not be made without taking account of feedback from key stakeholder groups.


Regional Land Transport Plan (‘RLTP’) Consultation

8.       The draft RLTP is being consulted on alongside Council’s Long Term Plan. Both documents were released for public consultation on 23 January 2015 and submissions closed on 16 March 2015.

9.       The RLTP represents the combined intentions of Auckland Transport, NZTA, and KiwiRail in terms of forward planning and priorities.

10.     Over 24,000 submissions were received on the LTP and RLTP and work on analyzing the submissions is ongoing.

Local Board Capital Projects

11.     Updates on the current projects being progressed by Auckland Transport on Puketāpapa Local Board behalf are detailed below.

Mt Albert Road Pedestrian Crossing Facility

12.     This project will convert the existing pedestrian refuge into a pedestrian zebra crossing.  It now has the necessary Traffic Control Committee approvals to proceed.  However a requirement for lighting at this location is being investigated. All new zebra crossings must have adequate lighting and this must be installed before the crossing is delivered.  Delivery of the upgraded crossing is a priority for Auckland Transport and officers are working with lighting technicians in order to expedite this.  However as lighting is a specialised field, delivery of the crossing may be delayed until June.

13.     Local Board Capital Projects approved

Project

Resolution

Update

Duncumbe Street

Nov 2014: confirms the project “Duncumbe Street Greenway” proceed to detailed design with the basic cycleway as described to a budget of $170,000.

Project Manager appointed and investigation has begun. The PM will discuss progress with TPL in May 2015.

Fearon Park

Nov 2014: Agree to add the widening of the path through Fearon Park to the Duncumbe

Street greenway proposal to a budget of $190,000.

AT have appointed a project manager.  He is in discussions with AC Parks to coordinate the upgrade of the park and the construction of the shared path.

Lynfield Reserve

Nov 2014: Agree to the installation of a shared path for the Lynfield Reserve to a maximum of $30,000.

This will be delivered by Auckland Council Parks and funded through the Auckland Transport capital fund.  A funding agreement was drafted by AT and the signed MoU was received back on 16 April.

Keith Hay Park Lighting project

Dec 2014: Agree to fund the Keith Hay Park Lighting Project ROC $330,000 subject to availability of funds within the 2014/15 financial year with priority given to the northern section (ROC $189,000) if full funds are not available.

Auckland Transport is currently engaging a consultant to complete the electrical design, utility liaison and consenting for the work. One this is completed a Firm Estimate of Cost will be brought back to the Board for consideration and approval.

 

 

March 2015 - The firm estimate of costs is expected to be known at the end of March and will come back to the Local Board in April for final approval to move to construction, if it falls within the LB’s allocation. Auckland Council and Auckland Transport can then work through who is best to deliver the project and in what timeframe.

 

 

April 2015 – the firm estimate of costs from the consultant has been calculated now that the lighting design is complete. The firm estimate of costs for both sections from the South Western Motorway to Noton Road (excluding the pathway by the kindergarten to Richardson Road) is close to the $330k mark.  This includes 45 lights.  To complete the pathway and light it through from Noton Road to Richardson Road would require additional funding as path widening needs to occur by the kindergarten as well as a realignment of the car park. Therefore to keep the costs for the lighting project within the 330k allocation suggested by the Local Board, it is recommended to light through only to Noton Road.  Final costs will only be known once the project is tendered. If the tender indicates savings on the estimate, AT requests an indication from the Local Board if the saving can be spent on the carpark design.

Parau/Duke Street

Nov 2014: Agree to fund the Parau Street/Duke Street safety project to $25,000.

Completed.

Ernie Pinches to Wesley Community Centre cycleway

Oct 2014: Move forward to discussions with the local community on the broad concept of the Sandringham Road Extension to Wesley Community Centre cycle link to gauge community support through its engagement advisor.

AT and the LB’s engagement advisor took the concept out to the community in December 2014/January 2015.

 

Oct 2014: Allocate $25,000 from the Transport Capital Fund for investigation of the Sandringham Road cycleway from Ernie Pinches Drive across SH20 to the Wesley Community Centre and War Memorial Park following successful consultation on the draft concept.

Consultation was completed in January 2015. Community support for the project was noted.

 

Feb 2015: Reconfirm Resolution CP2014/24495 that 25,000 from the TCF be released for investigation of the Sandringham Rd Extn cycle link from Ernie Pinches Drive across SH 20 to the Wesley Community Centre and War Memorial Park following successful consultation on the draft concept.

A project brief is being prepared and from there a project manager will be appointed.

 

 

The project brief has been completed and a project manager will soon be appointed.

 


Mt Roskill Safe Routes Scheme

14.     The detailed design process for the cycleway is well advanced and consents are expected to be lodged in May.  It has been agreed that he iwi request for rain gardens can be incorporated into the design. 

15.     The regional cycling and walking team has agreed to provide seven additional angle parks on Somerset Road in addition to the existing angle parking to offset some of the parking loss that is expected to happen on this stretch of road.

16.     Funding for construction is still unconfirmed.

Regional Public Transport Plan Variation

17.     Auckland Transport (AT) is proposing a variation to the Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP). The RPTP describes the services that are integral to the Auckland’s public transport network and the policies and procedures that apply to those services.

18.     The existing Auckland RPTP was adopted in 2013. Since that time, a number of public transport initiatives have developed to the stage where they now need to be formally incorporated into the RPTP. These include:

·    The proposed introduction of a new zone-based integrated fares system

·    Proposals for a new light rail transit (LRT) network on some major arterial routes in central Auckland (as previously set out in the Draft Regional Land Transport Plan).

·    Service and infrastructure changes arising from the Ferry Development Plan which was approved by the AT Board in December 2014

·    Revised service descriptions arising from community consultation on the new bus Network

19.     The scope of the proposed RPTP variation is limited to the issues listed above, together with any amendments that may be needed to address material in the existing RPTP that is now out of date. By limiting the scope of this variation, AT intends that it be completed by mid-2015. Workshops have been requested with Local Boards in May to discuss the matters above and provide an opportunity for Local Boards to ask questions and provide background in case Local Boards wish to prepare a submission to the RPTP revision.

20.     The preparation of a Draft RPTP will be completed in late April, and will be followed by a public consultation phase during May 2015. Hearings are planned for late May/early June for those who wish to present their views directly to AT.

Berm Planting Guidelines

21.     Auckland Transport is working on drafting a set of draft Operating Principles for Planting in the road berm. These will be discussed with interested Local Boards over the next two months at workshop or portfolio level, depending on the interest.

Auckland Transport News

Music at Panmure Station

22.     A piano has been positioned in the concourse of the new Panmure Station and has already attracted a range of talented (and not so talented but keen) performers eager to demonstrate their musical skills to fellow travelers.

23.     The idea has been inspired by the “Play me, I’m Yours” movement which has seen pianos and some amazing performances by pianists at stations and other transport facilities in the great capitals of the world.  AT hopes that the initiative will bring music and spontaneity to the interchange and add warmth and greater sense of community to the station.

24.     If the experiment proves successful at Panmure Station, the idea may be extended to other interchanges in Auckland.

Busway for East Auckland a Step Closer

25.     The Panmure to Tauranga busway designs are nearing finalisation.  Public information days and neighbourhood meetings have been held and information was sent to people in the area to get feedback before the consents for the project are lodged in late April.

26.     The key project is the Panmure Station to Pakuranga town centre section of the South Eastern busway.  Construction is likely to start in 2017, with the busway due to open by 2021.  Auckland Transport also announced that it is aiming to open the full busway to Botany by 2024, four years earlier than previously planned and extend bus lanes to Highland Park.  The Panmure to Pakuranga project includes:

·    Replacing Panmure roundabout with an intersection with traffic lights and more direct pedestrian crossings

·    Panmure to Pakuranga busway on lanes  separate to traffic congestion

·    Panmure to Pakuranga cycle and foot paths separate to traffic

·    Second Panmure Bridge for busway and shared cycle/footpath.

2015 Public Transport Fare Review

27.     The focus of this year’s public transport fare review is to better align short and long distance fares in preparation for a change to a simpler zone based system (integrated fares) next year.

28.     The New Network will see more frequent services on key routes at a minimum average of every 15 minutes, 7am to 7pm, seven days a week but may mean users may need to transfer services.  Integrated fares will allow passengers to transfer services with a minimum impact on fares.

29.     The changes to public transport fares through the 2015 review will see:

·    Small increases of between 5 and 10 cents for short distance (stage one and stage two trips) for those using the AT HOP card

·    Some cash fares will increase by 50 cents to increase the incentive for passengers to take advantage of fare discounts that AT HOP provides

·    No increases on longer AT HOP trips on buses and trains, other than for five stage journeys that receive a tertiary concession

·    Stage 6 and 7 child fares, using AT HOP, reduce by 5c and 16c respectively.

30.     Some fares on Hobsonville and West Harbour ferry services decrease by between 24c and 50c a trip.

31.     Tertiary and child concession fares will now be available on the InnerLink bus service

32.     The City Link bus service had received funding from the Heart of the City business organisation and Waterfront Auckland, however that subsidy has now ended.  Therefore AT has reluctantly introduced fares on this service.  AT HOP card users will pay 50c and cash fares for adults will be $1.00.  There will be discounted rates for students and children.

33.     On average, fares contribute 47% to the total cost of providing public transport services and the remainder is provide through government contributions and rates subsidies. Fuel prices make up only a small percentage of operator costs and by far the largest expense is wages.

34.     Public transport patronage growth has continued strongly during recent fuel price reductions showing customers are choosing to use improved services rather than sit in traffic congestion.

35.     Latest figures show that transport patronage is at an all-time high.  Bus patronage for the 12 months to January 2015 rose 9.4%, while rail patronage saw an annual rise of 20%.


Motorcycle Parking

36.     Auckland Transport is gearing up for an increase in motorcycle and scooter use by inner city commuters.

37.     While a sharp increase in public transport patronage is well-documented, an increasing number of people are also using two wheels to get to their destination.

38.     As a result Auckland Transport has added free, dedicated, motorcycle and scooter parking areas to its CBD parking buildings, in addition to existing bicycle parking areas. There is also a dedicated entry lane for motorbikes at Downtown car park, which complements the 112 dedicated spaces.

39.     The Civic car park has also been fitted out with more motorcycle and scooter parking and Victoria Street carpark will be developed in the near future.

Regional Signage

40.     A cross-Council project team led by Auckland Transport has been tasked with cleaning up the jumble of signs in the city to make it easier for us all to get around. At present our directional signage or “wayfinding” varies all over Auckland.

41.     Now there is a single council structure it’s time to make it simpler to travel around the region.  Auckland Transport expects to discuss this project with Local Boards over May and June of this year.

42.     Further information is attached.

Bus Priority Measures

43.     A programme to improve travel times and reliability for public transport continues to be rolled out across the region to support Auckland Transport’s frequent service network.

44.     The bus priority programme includes bus and transit lanes and traffic light phasing which is intended to create a more efficient bus service for public transport users.

45.     Completed to date is a new city bound bus lane on Symonds Street, a new link in the Fanshawe Street city bound bus lane at the Market Place and Fanshawe intersection, an inbound bus lane on Dominion Road (between Richardson Road and Denbigh Avenue) and other bus efficiency improvements on Ellerslie Main Highway, Onewa Road and Bolton Street in Blockhouse Bay.

46.     Also under consideration is a transit lane on Pah Road.

City Rail Link Contract Award

47.     The City Rail Link (CRL) has taken a significant step forward with the announcement of the appointment of two construction consortia to commence the first phase of the CRL construction in the Downtown area.

48.     The joint venture will progress the CRL work through and under Britomart Station and Queen Street to the Downtown Shopping Centre site with construction likely to start in early 2016.

49.     The contract involves establishing temporary accommodation for the Britomart Station’s ticketing and customer service operations, underpinning the former Chief Post Office building, to allow the construction of rail tunnels beneath and reinstating Britomart Station and upgrading urban space and surrounding roads.

50.     This will begin the building of a key missing link in the city’s public transport network.  Once completed, the CRL will turn a one way cul-de-sac rail system at Britomart, into a two way through system that will be able to carry 30,000 people an hour, providing an efficient and reliable transport choice.


Public Transport Numbers  Continue to Increase

51.     There has been another big jump in the numbers using public transport in Auckland. Annual patronage now exceeds 78 million boardings, an increase of 10%.  In March there were 8.4 million boardings, a jump of more than one million on March 2014.

52.     The big performer was rail, which reached 13.4 million passenger trips for the year, an annual increase of 21%.  March saw a monthly record high of 1.56 million train trips, an increase of 29% on March last year.

53.     The growth is put down to the enhanced travel experience and additional capacity provided by the new electric trains and greater service frequency introduced over recent years.

54.     Auckland Transport is aiming to have the full electric network operating by the end of July except for the link between Papakura and Pukekohe which will continue to use diesel trains.  These will be refurbished over time to provide an enhanced experience.  The electric trains will provide improved travel experience and more capacity on the Southern and Western lines.

55.     March was also a record breaking month on the Northern Express with patronage up almost 17% on the same month last year, the twelve month total reached 2.8 million.

56.     It was also a record for other bus services, patronage rose 8% to 56.6 million.  Ferry numbers for the year totaled 5.4 million trips, up 5% on an annual basis.

“Oi! Mind on the Road, not the phone” – Public Education Campaign

57.     Auckland Transport has launched its latest road safety Driver Distraction campaign, using the slogan, “Oi! Mind on the road, not the phone.  The campaign will focus on the widespread use of smart phones technology by car drivers.  Building on crash statistics, further AT research of 200 drivers aged 17-29 confirmed widespread use of social media, maps as well as texting and hand held calls whilst driving:

·    80% admit being distracted at some point,

·    62% have used their smart phones while driving

·    56% have used an app including maps and social media

58.     The campaign is to encourage people to change how they use or don’t use mobile phones in cars.

Issues Raised through/ by Board Members

Location or Name of Issue

Description

AT Response

Goodall Street

A request has been received for traffic calming in Goodall Street.

This is being investigated with a response likely before the end of June 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Signage Information

73

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Puketāpapa Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/05913

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to present the Puketāpapa Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme to be attached to the policy as an appendix.

4.       This report presents the Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board adopt the Puketapapa Community Grants Programme 2015/2016.

 

Comments

5.       The new Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014 and implementation will commence on 1 July 2015.

6.       The policy supports each local board to develop a Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016. This local board grants programme will guide community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme can include:

·       outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·       specific local board funding priorities

·       budget allocated to the grants programme

·       which grant types will operate locally, the number of funding rounds and when these will open and close

·       any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·       an indication of participation in multi-board funding

·       other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       An implementation plan is underway to support an integrated and simplified approach to grants programme administration. Funding staff from different departments are working together to ensure a co-ordinated approach, expected to benefit applicants and streamline internal processes.

9.       Once the local board community grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, funding rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Community Grants Programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme can be reviewed on an annual basis.

Māori impact statement

11.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

12.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels. Targeted advertising and promotion will be developed for target populations, including migrant and refugee groups, disability groups, Maori and iwi organisations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme 2015/2016

77

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Funding Programme Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/04902

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Otara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association.  A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area and for which site plans are included.

5.       The activity of the Association is of a local purpose rather than recreation nature. There are three of the 39 sites where the land is not classified as local purpose as set out in Attachment A.  The affected boards are asked to approve a lease under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977. Prior to granting the lease, public advertising of Council’s intention is required under Section 73(4) of the Reserves Act 1977. Iwi consultation pursuant to Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 is required on two sites where they are not contemplated in a Reserve Management Plan. Council staff will consider and work through a process if required to reclassify the kindergartens lease area from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       There are four of the 39 premises where the land the kindergarten is sited on is an unclassified recreation reserve. The affected boards are asked to support the classification of the reserves as set out in Attachment A as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommend approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

7.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where the group owns the building.

8.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

b)      approve a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Lynfield Kindergarten, Hillsborough Kindergarten, Roskill South Kindergarten and Mt Roskill Kindergarten, details specified in Attachment A, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B)

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012

c)      approve the granting of a lease for Hillsborough Kindergarten located on Keith Hay Park South, 660 Richardson Road, Hillsborough under Section 73 (3) of the Reserves Act 1977 subject to the further following terms and conditions:

i)        The public notification of the new community lease

ii)       Council staff will consider and initiate if required a process to reclassify the lease area of the Hillsborough Kindergarten from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977

d)      approve the classification of the reserve located at 108 Halsey Drive, Lynfield being Lot 65 DP 68507 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 and the registration of that resolution against the Title.

Comments

9.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

10.     A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

11.     This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

12.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

13.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

14.     The activity of the Association is of a local purpose rather than recreation nature. There are three of the 39 sites where the land is not classified as local purpose as set out in Attachment A.  The affected boards are asked to approve a lease under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977, required when the established activity does not fit within the present classification. Prior to granting the lease, public advertising of Council’s intention is required under Section 73(4) of the Reserves Act 1977 and approval from the Minister of Conservation or their delegate if required. Iwi consultation pursuant to Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 is required on two sites where they are not contemplated in a Reserve Management Plan.

15.     For the three sites Council staff will consider and work through a process if required to reclassify the kindergartens lease area from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     Where the land is an unclassified recreation reserve the affected boards are asked to support the classification of four reserves as set out in Attachment A as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) and Section 14 of the Reserves Act 1977, and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.  This classification will support the activity that is currently being undertaken and Parks staff has been consulted.

17.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

18.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments.

19.     A Community Outcomes Plan as approved will be an attachment to the lease and reported on annually by the Association.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

20.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

21.     A portfolio meeting has been held with each local board and they were presented with the proposal for the lease for multiple premises.

Māori impact statement

22.     The Association has long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

23.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

24.     There are no costs to the Local Board for approval of the community lease for multiple premises and costs for preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council. Costs will be met by Auckland Council for the public notification of those leases which require it. The initial costs are approximately $1500.00 for placing a public notice in the print media covering multiple sites. Costs may be incurred in the classification of unclassified reserves process and these will be covered by Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

85

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

95

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 











Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Local Dog Access Review: Statement of Proposal

 

File No.: CP2014/29603

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To decide whether to propose changes to local dog access rules on Monte Cecilia Park.

Executive Summary

2.       The local board resolved at its 30 October 2014 business meeting to undertake a review of local dog access rules on Monte Cecilia Park.

3.       If the local board decides to propose changes to local dog access rules on Monte Cecilia Park, the local board must adopt a statement of proposal for public consultation.

4.       To assist the local board, staff have identified three options that the local board may select from.

5.       Staff recommend adopting an option that would provide under control off-leash dog access in the naturally formed bowl of Monte Cecilia Park, while retaining under control on-leash dog access elsewhere in the park, including the high activity and more contemplative areas around the Pah Homestead and the Knoll (Option 3).

6.       If the local board decide to retain the current rules on Monte Cecilia Park (Option 1), the review process ends and no statement of proposal is required. If the board decide to adopt another option, staff will update the statement of proposal to reflect that option.

 

Recommendations

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      confirm that its preferred approach to local dog access in Monte Cecilia Park is to:

EITHER

Option 1: retain current under control on-leash rule, OR

Option 2: allow dogs under control off-leash, OR 

Option 3: provide under control off-leash area in the bowl and retain current under control on-leash elsewhere in park (staff recommended option)

b)      If either option 2 or 3 is selected, the Puketāpapa Local Board:

i)        confirm its intention to amend the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 pursuant to section 10(8) of the Dog Control Act 1996.

ii)       adopt the statement of proposal titled ‘Statement of Proposal Amendments to Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 – Puketāpapa Local Board Area May 2015’ in Attachment A for public consultation using the special consultative procedure.

iii)      confirm that the proposed amendments contained in the Statement of Proposal:

·        are consistent with the policy, principles and criteria for making dog access rules contained in the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012

·        are not inconsistent with any decision in relation to region-wide dog access rules contained in the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012

·        are in accordance with relevant legislative requirements in particular the Local Government Act 2002 and Dog Control Act 1996.

iv)      authorise the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws to make any minor edits or amendments to the Statement of Proposal to correct any identified errors or typographical edits.

v)      authorise the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws, in consultation with the local board chair, to make any amendments to the Statement of Proposal to reflect decisions made by the local board.

vi)      appoints [insert name] (as chair), [insert at least two more board members names] as a panel to receive, hear and deliberate on submissions and other relevant information and recommend changes to the Board.

c)      delegate to the Chairperson the ability to make changes to the panel appointed under vi) where this becomes necessary because of the withdrawal or unavailability of any of those persons.

 

 

Discussion

7.       Local boards have the delegated responsibility to review dog access rules for local park, beach and foreshore areas. This does not include the review of regional parks.

8.       The governing body has established a standard annual process to assist local boards with the review of local dog access rules as follows:

·        the local board will need to adopt a Statement of Proposal by May containing proposed changes to local dog access rules (the topic of this report). It is noted here that where no changes are proposed, the review process for that location ends at this point

·        the proposal (together with proposals from other local boards) will be publicly notified for submissions as part of the dog registration process in June

·        the local board will hold hearings, deliberations and make decisions on submissions by August

·        the governing body will review a report to update the bylaw on dogs in September

·        changes to dog access rules commence in October.

9.       The board resolved at its 30 October 2014 business meeting (PKTPP/2014/229) to undertake a review of local dog access rules on Monte Cecilia Park.

10.     The board prioritised the review of Monte Cecilia Park in response to concerns raised by dog owners, ahead of the wider review of dog access rules in the local board area scheduled to commence in September 2015.

11.     To assist the local board in making a decision, information and community views were obtained from:

·        council staff involved in parks and animal management through meetings

·        selected community groups, organisations, maori, residents and visitors. This included an on-line survey that attracted 118 respondents (87 dog owners and 31 non-dog owners).

12.     The decision required of the board is to decide whether or not to propose any changes, and where necessary to adopt a Statement of Proposal for public consultation and to appoint a hearing panel.


Decision-making requirements

13.     In making a decision on the statement of proposal, the local board must be satisfied that any proposed changes comply with a range of statutory, policy and delegated authority requirements.

14.     The most important statutory requirement is to ensure decisions on dog access provide for public safety and comfort and the needs of dogs and their owners. This means having regard to:

·        the need to minimise danger, distress, and nuisance to the community generally; and

·        the need to avoid the inherent danger in allowing dogs to have uncontrolled access to public places that are frequented by children, whether or not the children are accompanied by adults; and

·        the importance of enabling, to the extent that is practicable, the public (including families) to use streets and public amenities without fear of attack or intimidation by dogs; and

·        the exercise and recreational needs of dogs and their owners.

Section 10(4) Dog Control Act 1996

15.     The most important practical requirement is to make dog access rules easy to understand “on the ground”.

16.     Further detail of the decision-making requirements is provided in Attachment B.

Comments

17.     Dog access rules are an effective way to provide for public safety and comfort, protection of animals, property and habitat, and the needs of dogs and their owners.

18.     How this is to be achieved is guided by the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012. The policy seeks to manage requests for changes to dog access rules by ensuring all (and often polarised) views are considered in a way to achieve a fair and reasonable decision.

19.     The following is an analysis to assist the local board in determining whether or not to propose any changes.

20.     The current dog access rule is under control on-leash on the grounds of Monte Cecilia Park. Separate rules apply to playgrounds and buildings and are not part of the review.

Community and staff views

21.     Community views were sought in relation to four options:

·        prohibit dogs

·        allow dogs under control on-leash

·        allow dogs under control off-leash

·        a combination of rules.

22.     Feedback received from Auckland Council parks and animal management staff was that:

·        Animal management staff consider that some form of under control off-leash access may be appropriate based on the current usage of Monte Cecilia Park.

·        In contrast, a review of the concept plan for the Monte Cecilia Park and its redevelopment envisages increased use which may make under control off-leash access inappropriate.


 

23.     Of the 118 residents and visitors that responded to the on-line survey, local dog owners preferred under control off-leash dog access. In contrast, local non-dog owners preferred under control on-leash dog access. A full summary of location specific feedback is contained in Attachment A.

Options in relation to dog access on Monte Cecilia Park

Option[1]

Advantages and Disadvantages

Option 1 retain current under control on-leash rule

 

Effect of change

No change

Advantages

·    Provides for the level of public safety and comfort preferred by local non-dog owners.

·    Better provides for the safety and comfort of more vulnerable persons, including children walking to and from surrounding schools and older people using the park from nearby retirement villages and homes.  

 

Disadvantages

·    Dog owners want more under control off-leash dog access to better provide for their needs.  

Option 2 allow dogs under control off-leash

 

Effect of change

This option would give dog owners greater under control off-leash access. It would replace the current under control on-leash rule on all grassed areas and paths within Monte Cecilia park with an under control off-leash rule.

Advantages

·    Would provide the level of dog access sought by dog owners.

 

Disadvantages

·    Local non-dog owners prefer under control on-leash dog access to provide for their safety and comfort.

·    Monte Cecilia Park is undergoing redevelopment which may increase use. Allowing under control off-leash dog access may create pubic safety and comfort issues in the foreseeable future.

·    There are a number of more vulnerable park users, including children walking to and from surrounding schools and older people using the park from nearby retirement villages and homes.


 

Option

Advantages and Disadvantages

Option 3 (preferred option) provide under control off-leash area in the bowl, retain current under control on-leash elsewhere in park

 

Effect of change

This option would give dog owners an under control off-leash area within the natural formed bowl of Monte Cecilia park where they would previously have had only on-leash access.

Advantages

·    Provides a balance between the preferences of dog owners and local non-dog owners.

·    Retaining under control on-leash access around the Pah Homestead and the Knoll better provides for public safety and comfort around high activity and more contemplative areas while still allowing for the integration of owners and their dogs with those activities.    

·    Boundaries of under control off-leash areas are easily identifiable.

·    Better provides for the safety and comfort of more vulnerable persons, including children walking to and from surrounding schools and older people using the park from nearby retirement villages and homes.  

 

Disadvantages

·    Local non-dog owners prefer under control on-leash dog access to provide for their safety and comfort.

·    Monte Cecilia Park is undergoing redevelopment which may increase use. Allowing under control off-leash dog access may create pubic safety and comfort issues in the foreseeable future.

Recommendation

24.     Staff recommend to provide an under control off-leash area in the bowl, and retain current under control on-leash elsewhere in park (Option 3). 

25.     The reasons for this recommendation are that this option:

·        provides a balance between the preferences of local dog owners and local non-dog owners in a way that provides for public safety and comfort

·        dog access (albeit on-leash) is continued in high activity and more contemplative areas around the Pah Homestead and the Knoll

·        the under control off-leash area has easily identifiable boundaries

·        Option 2 would not provide for adequate public safety and comfort, and Option 1 may be unnecessarily restrictive to dog owners.

Next steps

26.     If the local board decides to retain the current rules on Monte Cecilia Park (Option 1), the review process ends and no statement of proposal is required.

27.     If the board decides to adopt changes to the current rules, the statement of proposal reflecting the board’s decisions (together with proposals from other local boards) will be publicly notified for submissions as part of the dog registration process in June 2015.


Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

28.     The views of other local boards have not been sought. 

Maori Impact Statement

29.     Managing dog access in areas of significance to Maori can help achieve outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. In this instance, no impacts have been identified.

30.     Feedback from Mana Whenua representatives at a Hui held in March 2015 related to the ability of iwi to determine dog access on Marae, a focus on control, responsible dog ownership, and ensuring the protection of sensitive ecological areas.

Implementation Issues

31.     There are no implementation issues associated with this decision to adopt a statement of proposal.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Statement of Proposal

103

bView

Decision-making framework and considerations 2014 programme version

111

     

Signatories

Authors

Justin Walters - Policy Analyst

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

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30 April 2015

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014

 

File No.: CP2015/05845

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Puketāpapa Local Board an overview of Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 July to 31 December 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       ACPL’s vision centres on “creating value from property assets” by providing commercial expertise and value for money to Auckland Council in managing its property portfolio, and acquisition and disposal activities.  The concept of “value” includes but is not limited to financial value. In addition to financial value, a growing aspect of ACPL’s work has been to use surplus council property to help achieve the council’s housing supply and urban regeneration objectives. We will also identify opportunities to add value by improving the use of council service property such as redevelopment of under-utilised sites.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent (SOI) 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

§ Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

§ Redevelopment/regeneration projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

§ ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

§ Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

§ Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

§ Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

§ The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      That the Puketāpapa Local Board receive the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly update 1 July to 31 December 2014.

 

 

Comments

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Puketāpapa Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from July to December is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages property owned by the council and AT that are not currently required for service or infrastructure purposes. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development but are being held for use in a planned future project such as road construction/widening or the expansion of parks.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six months and now totals 1306 properties, an increase of 121 since our January-June 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the six months ending 31 December 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $2.9m ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $11.8m against budget of $23m. The average monthly vacancy rate for the period is 1.68% which is under the SOI targets of 5%.

10.     A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

§ Current ACPL-managed commercial and residential property within the Puketāpapa Local Board

§ Each property’s classification or reason for retention

§ The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

§ The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported eg regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

13.     July 2014 to June 2015 Target

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

$36.4m

These recommendations include $33.2m of sites that are identified for development projects.

14.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

15.     2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m gross value recommended for sale

These targets include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net value of unconditional sales

 

Process

16.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with: the council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

17.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Puketāpapa area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

30C Giletta Road, Mt Roskill

Transferred from ACPD as non-service.  Rationalisation process commenced in June 2014.  AT submitted expression of interest for site to be retained and these issues are being explored. 

 

Redevelopment/Regeneration and Housing Supply Initiatives

Overview  

18.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into approximately 54 region wide council-driven regeneration and housing supply initiatives. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $415k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL-led developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

19.     ACPL is working with the wider council group to formulate a process or approach for identifying and realising optimisation opportunities that exist for service assets. This will provide opportunities to work with local boards on development opportunities that deliver wider strategic benefit consistent with the Auckland plan such as intensification, town centre regeneration and affordable housing. It will also improve service outcomes through obtaining more effective use of property assets.

20.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Strategy Action Plan, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects over three years that will improve housing affordability and the supply of affordable housing encompassing CHO involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

Local Activities

21.     A high level update on place-shaping and housing initiative activities in the Puketāpapa area is outlined below.

 

22.     Three Kings Quarry: ACPL is working with the Puketāpapa Local Board and council units on evaluating the implications of a proposed land exchange of reserve land at Three Kings Quarry. Fletcher Residential Ltd (FRL) lodged two plan changes to facilitate residential development at the quarry.  One plan change relates to a residential scheme confined to its ownership of the quarry (PA373), and the other seeks a comprehensive scheme that involves the reconfiguration and improvement of parts of the Three Kings Reserve to produce a different outcome for the community and users of the reserve (PA372).

23.     Since November 2014, FRL and Council have been discussing the details of the proposed configuration of a land exchange proposal.  As a result of those discussions, an amended exchange proposal has been prepared.  The main revisions proposed are an enlarged central park area, a relocated plaza/civic node area, and the inclusion of part of the banks around the Western Reserve in the exchange.

24.     Any exchange agreement would need to be approved by council in its capacity as the administrative body for the Three Kings Reserve and would be subject to the outcome of the plan change process and the approval of the Minister of Conservation.

Acquisitions

Overview  

25.     ACPL continues to support council and AT programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved council or AT budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

26.     From the commencement of the 2015 financial year, 1 July 2014 to 31 January 2015, 73 property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $56m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

27.     Over the past six months 15 properties were acquired to meet council legal, open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

713-743 Rosebank Road, Avondale

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Whau

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

28.     58 properties were also acquired over the past six months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects including AMETI (17 acquisitions) City Rail Link Property Acquisition (23 acquisitions) and Northern Strategic Growth Area (4 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

29.     ACPL also optimises the commercial return from assets it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. There are currently no ACPL managed business interests in the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

30.     This report is for the Puketāpapa Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

31.     Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. The importance of effective communication and engagement with Māori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 mana whenua groups for our core business activities.

32.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of wāhi tapu or joint management arising from the resolution of Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Puketāpapa Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

33.     Ongoing engagement and discussions are being held with Puketāpapa mana whenua, individual Tāmaki Collective iwi and the Maunga Authority in relation to Te Tātua o Riukiuta and the proposed land exchange.

34.     ACPL undertook to be part of council’s Māori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Māori. The MRP was finalised and approved by the ACPL Board in December 2014 and the focus will move to identifying priority areas for implementation. A copy of this is available on the ACPL website.

Implementation

35.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

123

bView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the local board area

125

cView

Property movement in the local board area

129

     

Signatories

Authors

Ebony Duff – Engagement Advisor, ACPL

Authorisers

David Rankin - Chief Executive, ACPL

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/04922

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·    two chairs and portfolio holder workshops.

·    individual board workshops in April.

·    a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June 2015.

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson). 

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

·    ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.

·    Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

·    How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

·    provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information.

·    provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities.

·    facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council.

·    develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices.

·    support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

·    the model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

·    the path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

·    one size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

·    all parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

·    capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

·    recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

·    revised approach.

·    the proposed operating model for the CDS unit.

·    supporting tools.

·    budget and implementation implications.

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.


Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd, Strategic Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Proceedings

 

File No.: CP2015/06520

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop proceedings.

Executive Summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop proceedings provides a record of the Board workshops held in March 2015.

These sessions are held to give an informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receive the Workshop Proceedings for 4, 11 and 18 March 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Proceedings for March 2015.

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 





Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action Schedule, March 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/06522

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide the Board with a schedule of resolutions that are still pending action.

Executive summary

2.       Updated version of the Resolutions Pending Actions schedule is attached.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receive the Resolutions Pending Action Schedule for April 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Resolutions Pending Action Schedule, April 2015

143

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

30 April 2015

 

 





    

    



[1]         The option of prohibiting dogs from the park is excluded because of the low preference for this option in the on-line survey.