I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 9 April 2015

6.30pm

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Denise Yates, JP

 

Members

Neil Henderson

 

 

Greg Presland

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Saffron Toms

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

Tua Viliamu

(Democracy Advisor)

 

2 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 813 9478

Email: Tua.Viliamu@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Update from Ward Councillors                                                                                    6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                     9

13        Claude Abel Reserve Pond Lily Control                                                                   23

14        Proposal for weed management projects in Waitakere Ranges

This report was not available when the agenda was compiled and will be tabled at the meeting.

 

15        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                             29

16        Update on member's attendance to the UNITEC Community Development Conference                                                                                                                                        35

17        Portolio update - Member Steve Tollestrup                                                             39

18        Portfolio update: Member Sandra Coney                                                                 43  

19        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

At its meeting on 28 November 2013, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board resolved (resolution number WTK/2010/5) to record any possible conflicts of interest in a register. 

            Register

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

·       Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

Neil Henderson

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

·       Weedfree Trust – Employee

Greg Presland

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

·       Titirangi Residents & Ratepayers Group – Committee Member 

·       Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

·       Combined Youth Services Trust - Trustee

Steve Tollestrup

·       Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

·       Community Waitakere – Trustee

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

Saffron Toms

       NIL

Denise Yates

·       Ecomatters Environment Trust – Trustee

·       Keep Waitakere Beautiful Trust – Trustee

·       Huia-Cornwallis Ratepayers & Residents Association – Co-chairperson

·       Charlotte Museum Trust – Trustee

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Committee member                               

 


Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council.

                                              

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

·       Living Cell Technologies Animal Ethics Committee – Member

Saffron Toms

·       Ark in the Park – Governance Group Member

 

There was no changes to the register.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         Confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 26 March 2015, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Update from Ward Councillors

 

An opportunity is provided for the Waitakere Ward Councillors to update the board on regional issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.


 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/04823

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Otara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association.  A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area and for which site plans are included.

5.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012 where the group owns the building.

6.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Approves the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

b)      Approves a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Waitakere Kindergarten, details specified in Attachment A, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

c)      Approves the inclusion of the following clause to the lease relating to the premises in their local board area:

i)        Auckland Council has adopted a Smoke-Free Policy to apply on Council land, which Policy Auckland Kindergarten Association is obliged to abide by during the Term.  Auckland Kindergarten Association will use its best endeavours to ensure its members, employees, invitees, contractors and agents abide by the Policy.

 

 

Comments

7.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

8.       A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

9.       This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

10.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

11.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

12.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

13.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments.

14.     A Community Outcomes Plan as approved will be an attachment to the lease and reported on annually by the Association.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

15.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

16.     A portfolio meeting has been held with each local board and they were presented with the proposal for the lease for multiple premises.

Māori impact statement

17.     The Association has long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

18.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

19.     Costs for preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

11

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

19

      

Signatories

Authors

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 








Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Claude Abel Reserve Pond Lily Control

 

File No.: CP2015/03861

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the Waitakere Ranges Local Board for the proposed plan to control Mexican Water Lily at Claude Abel Reserve.

Executive Summary

2.       At the November 13th 2014 WRLB carried a resolution that the WRLB “Notes that there is a range of views with regards to the management of the Claude Abel Reserve pond and that the board will have further face to face discussions with locals around management options”.

3.       Further engagement with a community representative resulted in an interested volunteer group investigating the feasibility of a working bee to carry out hand control of the Mexican Water Lily.

4.       Following meetings with the community representative and New Zealand Biosecurity Ltd, the volunteer approach was determined to be too risky in terms of Health and safety requirements, as well as potentially discouraging for volunteers due to the rate of regrowth after hand control.

5.       As such Auckland Council Local and Sports Parks West (LSPW) propose to return to the original recommendation reported to the WRLB on November 13th 2014; to proceed with agrichemical control following best practice, while also monitoring water quality.

6.       A staged agrichemical approach with a monitoring component has been prepared and is available as Attachment A - Claude Abel Reserve Pond Mexican Water Lily Control Plan.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Approves the proposed plan to control Mexican Water Lily at Claude Abel Reserve using a staged agrichemical approach that includes a monitoring component.

 

Discussion

7.       The Waitakere Ranges Local Board (WRLB) requested that options to control Mexican Water Lily in the Claude Abel Reserve pond be presented to Piha Stakeholders and local residents.

8.       At the November 13th 2014 WRLB meeting the Board received the public engagement feedback for the proposed options and carried a resolution that the WRLB “Notes that there is a range of views with regards to the management of the Claude Abel Reserve pond and that the board will have further face to face discussions with locals around management options”.

9.       Further engagement with a local community representative led to an investigation into the possibility of local volunteers carrying out hand control of the Mexican Water Lily.

10.     Two meetings were held with the community representative to organise a volunteer working bee and a group of local residents showed interest and enthusiasm in being involved in the hand control.

11.     Expert advice from New Zealand Biosecurity Ltd, who have previously carried out hand control of Mexican Water Lily at Claude Abel Reserve, was that the hand control method is a considerable health and safety risk to volunteers due to the depth and sludge like nature of the pond floor. In addition, due to the fast rate of regrowth of Mexican Water Lily, hand removal would require a considerably large amount of regular volunteer effort to keep the lilies at low numbers.

12.     The community representative determined that the health and safety risk to volunteers would be too great, as well as an awareness that volunteer efforts would potentially be futile and hence discourage them from participating in future volunteer projects.

13.     As such Auckland Council Local and Sports Parks West propose to return to the original recommendation reported to the WRLB on November 13th 2014, to undertake control of Mexican Water Lily as follows:

·    To proceed with Option 3 - eradication with approved agrichemical (glyphosate),   following best practice.

·    Before, during and after monitoring of the site to ensure agrichemical spray is successful with minimal adverse effects.

14.     A proposed method to control Mexican Water Lily using a staged agrichemical application has been prepared and is available as Attachment A - Claude Abel Reserve Pond Mexican Water Lily Control Plan.

15.     The control plan takes into account the communities concerns regarding agrichemical use by way of treating the pond in sections, as well as testing water quality before and after agrichemical treatment.

16.     Decomposing material will be monitored and can be removed off-site if further funding is allocated.

17.     Following the two year control plan to re-establish open water the pond will be added to an annual control schedule to maintain the Mexican Water Lily at low levels

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

18.     The Local Board Chair attended discussion with the community representative and was supportive of developing a staged approach that minimised any adverse impacts on the environment.

Māori impact statement

19.     Local iwi groups were sent an invitation to attend the initial consultation on the proposed options for lily control however no responses were received.

Implementation

20.     The best time to undertake spray work on lilies is November and December. The test area should be undertaken as soon as possible to allow for the first section of treatment to take place by the end of 2015.

21.     Best practice methods for reducing environmental impact whilst applying herbicide which is implemented by the operator over entire spray operation.

22.     The cost of the agrichemical control of Mexican Water Lily will be met by Local and Sports Parks West.

23.     No budget is currently available for the removal of decomposing material off site.


 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Claude Abel Reserve Pond Mexican Water Lily Control Plan

25

     

Signatories

Authors

Kaitlyn  White - Park Advisor

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

This control plan is projected to occur over a 24 month period. Following this the pond will be added to an annual control schedule to maintain the Mexican Water Lily at low levels.

Initial Test Patch

Spray a 9-10m2 test area of water lilies using inflatable boat to reach the area and undertake treatment.

·    Chemicals are to be applied using a knapsack at 3% Glyphosate and Organo Silicone at 5%.

·    Once Initial treatment has been completed, the test area will be monitored weekly for up to 8 weeks or as long as the treated material is present in the pond by way of taking photos and assessing the decomposition by sight and smell.

·    Water quality will be tested before and after agrichemical application.

Staged control of entire pond

If the test patch findings have minimal negative impacts on the pond environment the entire pond will be treated in patches of approximately 1/4 of the pond each control period.

·    Two controls are to take place each year between the months of November and December.

·    An inflatable dingy will be used to access the deep areas of the pond with a knapsack being the method of application.

·    The remaining material will be left onsite to decompose over time unless manual removal is required, then the applicable additional estimate and method will be utilized.

·    Each patch will be tested for chemical presence and oxygen depletion as well as monitored for sight and odour issues.

·    Follow up will be carried out as required, after initial control takes place. The need for control will be based on monitoring reports.

·    All spraying is to take place between the months of November and December when the lilies are most susceptible to agrichemical spray.

Agrichemical details

Aquatic herbicides can be effective tools to control unwanted vegetation, but no significant detrimental impacts to public health or the environment should result from their use.

Glyphosate is not effective on submerged or mostly submerged foliage and therefore is only applied to control emergent foliage. The methodology of 25% area of control per visit greatly reduces the amount of chemical potentially introduced into the water. It is absorbed by plant foliage and greenstems and is translocated through the plant from point of contact into the root system. The only risk to the rare flora specimens would be spray drift which is controlled through best practice industry standards.

Once glyphosate enters the water column, it is quickly adsorbed to soil particles. Microbial degradation begins immediately and glyphosate is broken down to its metabolite amniomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and CO2. Glyphosate is not expected to bioconcentrate (accumulate on a bio-organism).

Organo Silicone is the penetrant used with Glyphosate to enhance uptake and reduces the rain free period.

Water quality Testing

Water quality testing will occur where samples will be taken before and after agrichemical application. Samples will be analysed in a laboratory to determine:

·    Dissolved oxygen content;

·    Glyphosate levels; and

·    Surfactants levels. 

Best Practice

Best practice methods for reducing environmental impact whilst applying herbicide which is implemented by the operator over entire spray operation;

·    Site specific hazard identification – identifying and taking practicable steps to control hazards.

·    Clean, correctly functioning and calibrated equipment – free from unwanted residues, spray rates accurate.

·    Application carried out in optimal weather conditions – minimal to no wind presence, rain free period taken into account.

·    Safety equipment and attachments – Drift Shrouds, drift reduction nozzles etc.

·    Emergency Response Procedures – Spill management training and control measures.

Visible signs will be erected at the entrances to the Claude Abel Reserve to inform public that spraying is in progress. 

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/05011

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·    two chairs and portfolio holder workshops.

·    individual board workshops in April.

·    a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.


 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      Where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

 

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·        to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·        to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·        for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

 

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt, Kay McIntrye), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson). 

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

·        ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.


·        Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

·        How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

·        provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information.

·        provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities.

·        facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council.

·        develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices.

·        support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

·        the model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

·        the path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

·        one size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

·        all parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

·        capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

·        recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

·        revised approach.

·        the proposed operating model for the CDS unit.

·        supporting tools.

·        budget and implementation implications.


 

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

 

Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd, Strategic Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons, Manager, Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Update on members’ attendance to the UNITEC Community Development Conference

 

File No.: CP2015/05149

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       For Waitakere Ranges Local Board Members Steve Tollestrup and Saffron Toms to report back to the Waitakere Ranges Local Board on the UNITEC Community Development Conference which they attended in February 2015.

Executive summary

2.       Members Steve Tollestrup and Saffron Toms attended the UNITEC Community Development Conference as the representatives from the Waitakere Ranges Local Board.  Members will outline highlights and learnings from the conference for the benefit of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the report from Member Tollestrup for his attendance to the UNITEC Community Development Conference.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

UNITEC Community Development Conference - Member Steve Tollestrup

33

     

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Board Member participant report: UNITEC Community Development Conference

Steve Tollestrup

 

With my Local Board colleague Saffron Toms I received funding to attend the UNITEC Community Development Conference February 18-20.  The conference brought together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories of community development. The conference provided this through quality peer reviewed papers, presentations and practical skills workshops. Major themes included place-making, community economic development, diverse communities and re-claiming democracy.

Coming from a community development background I have had many opportunities to attend conferences on the topic. However, without reservation I can say that this was one of the most relevant and useful that I have participated in. The key to its success I believe was its focus on local issues and presenters rather than high profile key note speakers from outside. The focus on local New Zealand based community development provided a useful platform for a more focused series of workshops, discussions as well as problem solving.

With over 60 workshops and presentations participants were spoilt for choice. The programme was organised around five themed streams of enquiry: Diverse communities, Community Economic Development, Place-making, Community Development education and Reclaiming Democracy. While I managed over the two days to sample each stream much of my focus was on Community Economic Development and Reclaiming Democracy, the latter which had in part discussion on improvements in community and  local government engagement.

Just a few samples of workshops I attended are:

Finding our place in community led practice- putting people at the centre of places; changing how council delivers.

This workshop was focused on creating a place-based approach within the new super-city political structure that supports increasing community-driven initiatives and increasing the capability of local board members to maximise positive impacts for local people

Community development, contracts for service and the government – an unholy trinity

This workshop explored the tension between a contracting model that privileges tight specification of outputs, short time frames and rigid accountability mechanisms and contrasts community organisations grounded in a desire to work for a more equal, inclusive and just society.

How does your privilege play out?

A good community development practitioner usually has a fair sampling of major mistakes and stuff ups. Cissy Rock told hers with humour and intelligence using each one to provide a clear lesson on how each of us needs to be careful about our privileged view of how things are and should be.

 

PATH Planning

A wonderfully practical workshop based on marae based community planning in Whirinaki. PATH (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope) combines the best elements of a number of vision-building and future planning tools, and is useful for listening, planning and community building. The workshop was grounded in practice using case studies from Awa Restoration, Mokopuna Te Hikutu project, Te Raa Tuatahi (a solar project for their three marae) Toi Ora Raranga (weaving programme). I would definitely use this tool when simple and effective community planning was called for.

Avondale Creative Spaces

This workshop focused on place-making out west.  In partnership with the Whau Local Board Avondale Community Action group (ACA) developed a "Creative Spaces" program. This involved renting a vacant shop space for events, exhibitions and interactive creative projects, all of which involved local people.  ACA's 4 months of activity in the shop space and public artworks resulted in a greatly increased number of people volunteering to help with the survey, further funding from the board to employ coordinators for the survey and a large data base of people who wished to be involved with Avondale's future direction. The project was a major catalyst in kick-starting the social, environmental and economic transformation of Avondale town centre, and has successfully addressed the original problem of "why bother, its Avondale".  A very relevant workshop and presentation when considering the challenges we face in Glen Eden.

The conference which was held at UNITEC Henderson campus .also functioned as a networking opportunity and local resource identifier.

The conference was used for the launch of Hui E! Community Aotearoa a new community development journal.  If it keeps the ‘flax roots’ character of the conference and remains community and practioner based Hui E! will be a welcome addition to the Community development sector both here and perhaps overseas.

In future conferences, opportunity for local board contribution through workshops and presentation of written paper should be taken.


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Portolio update - Member Steve Tollestrup

 

File No.: CP2015/05074

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity for Member Steve Tollestrup to give an update with regards to activity within his portfolio areas.

2.       Portfolio holders are responsible for leading policy development in their portfolio area, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

3.       Member Tollestrup has lead for the portfolios of Community Development, Economic Development, Placemaking/Urban Renewal, Ethnic, Peace and Safety.

Executive Summary

 

Community Development

 

Empowered Communities Approach (ECA)

 

4.       The Mayor has set a challenge within the Long Term Plan Proposal for council to empower communities more and develop an approach that will increase resources and decision-making power back to local communities. This is also intended to provide new opportunities for local boards to engage and work more immediately with residents on unique local goals.

5.       As portfolio holder and alternate member for West Auckland on the Empowered Communities Political Advisory Group I have been briefed and given opportunity to advice and comment on the proposed Mayoral Empowered Communities Approach (ECA).

6.       The ECA is based on the council’s ‘Thriving Communities Initiative’ (2014). Changes proposed to the Community Development function include:

·        Transition delivery of community development services to a more empowered communities approach.

·        Move away from a more direct delivery and fund community groups to deliver more.

·        Opportunities for Local Boards to play a more active role.

7.       While the concept of empowered communities has much merit and is commendable, a concern by this board remains that a cost savings imperative is at work in this instance where local community groups and local agencies take up an increased workload but are not funded to the level for required resources and staffing, stressing further a very hardworking sector.

8.       Assurances of funding and ongoing council support has been made however these need to be clearly specified and outlined and remains one of the most serious areas for thorough evaluation.  Wide consultation with local boards and stakeholder agencies is presently taking place.

 

Swanson Community Meeting

 

9.       The local Board has continued to be supportive of a number of initiatives that strengthen community participation, connection and well-being. 

10.     In March with various stakeholders in Swanson I facilitated a community meeting designed to foster a collaborative community forum. This was considered important in the face of a number of important developments and local challenges, particularly intensified housing that is planned for the township and subsequent increase in population.  It was hoped that such a forum would provide a representative body able to liaise constructively with council and developers, participate more effectively in Swanson place-making and create an aligned voice to raise concerns.

11.     The meeting was very well attended with a wide range of community stakeholders. There was broad consensus to follow up with a second meeting in May requesting council and project developers to provide an update on the housing projects and to address community enquiries and concerns.

 

Greater Glen Eden Planning Workshop.

 

12.     Greater Glen Eden (GGE) established five years ago as a council funded initiative to provide increased local community networking has in recent months faced a number of challenges around funding and a clearer sense of purpose.

13.     Those involved agree that Greater Glen Eden continues to have an important role within the community and asked for support in forward planning and clarifying the network’s objectives.

14.     To meet that request I ran planning workshops with local consultants Reconnect NZ on a pro-bono basis for Greater Glen Eden.  The result was the development of a 12 month plan providing GGE with a clearer sense of direction and better defined objectives. These include a review of the current structure, increased networking capacity and improved communication including the use of social media. Progress will be reviewed in six months.

 

UNITEC Community Development Conference

 

15.     With my Local Board colleague Saffron Toms I received funding to attend the UNITEC Community Development Conference February 18-20. The conference brought together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories of community development.

16.     Major themes included place-making, community economic development, diverse communities and re-claiming democracy, with quality peer reviewed papers, presentations and practical skills workshops. For a full report please read the accompanying conference report.

 

Community Safety

 

Community Constable Office Lease

 

17.     The Local Board has been able to secure a lease in Glen Mall for the Community Constable to return back to the town centre. From early in the political term there has been a clear message from the community for improved access to the Community Constable and a desire for an increased sense of security in the town.

18.     The new offices and relocation of the Community Constable will provide both. In addition the Community Constable office will also be act as a shared hub with Community Patrols and Pacific Island Patrols as well as the Glen Eden Business Association (see below).

 

Economic Development

 

BID

19.     The Glen Eden BID has been supported into a shared office space by the local board. The office situated in the Retail and Business precinct of Glenmall will be shared with the Community Constable. The objective is to assist the BID have a more accessible and central presence for BID members and local business.

 

Glen Eden Pop-up Square

20.     The Glen Eden Pop Up Square has completed its first summer season. Running six days a week since mid-December with small themed events and entertainment the square has been at the heart of Glen Mall. It has provided a place for local people to meet, relax and enjoy lunch .outside beneath the shade of pergolas, umbrellas, reclining on bean bags or sitting at portable tables.

21.     The square was created to test public interest in a permanent public space. The square has had significant public feedback through surveys, online comment, business information and volunteered comment given by the public and kept. That information is now being reviewed and summarised in an evaluation report for the Local Board and Council. Special thanks are due for the determined effort of the BID Manager and local volunteers who worked hard to ensure continuity.

22.     The Pop-up Square will have its last day of the season on April 11th

 

Coastal Broadband

23.     With Robert Lundberg the Council Digital Policy Advisor I addressed the Economic Development Committee advocating that the committee establish a political working party to draft a submission for central government funding to upgrade rural broadband in Auckland. This was supported by a case study of Bethells and coastal village Broadband needs in our Board area. 

24.       The recommendations were that the Economic Development Committee:

a)      Request council’s Digital Advisors to develop a registration of interest for central government’s Rural Broadband Initiative and Ultrafast Broadband extensions

b)      Request council’s Digital Advisors to develop a digital enablement plan in line with central government recommendations

c)      Appoint four councillors including the chair to a political working party with delegated authority to draft the submission

d)      Request the council’s submission be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for approval or retrospective approval if already submitted.

The committee passed the recommendations unanimously

 

Youth Employment Strategy

25.     With my colleague Saffron Toms as Youth Portfolio holder I am meeting with members of council and the Glen Eden Youth Network to plan and development a youth employment strategy. Among the options we are developing is the Glen Eden Youth Employment Expo.

26.     The Expo will bring together various stakeholders in youth employment including employment advisors, recruiters, training providers and prospective employers.

 

Miscellaneous.

 

·        Attended the International Green Flag award Ceremony that recognised our Parks Staff for the completion and quality of the Parrs Park Playground.

·        Attended the Prospect School Powhiri and celebration as an enviro-school receiving two hives for the school. Prospect School should be recognised as a high achieving primary school with a low decile roll. Their commitment to their environment and community is noteworthy.

·        Attended the Waitakere R/R February meeting in the council funded refurbished community hall. 

·        Attended a Waitakere Community meeting called to discuss concerns and wider implications of an expanded perlite processing plant

·        Attended the Swanson Foothills Protection Society AGM

·        Attended the Friends of Arataki AGM.

·        Joined Laingholm residents at the celebrations for their newly refurbished community hall funded through the local board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the portfolio update from Member Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

09 April 2015

 

 

Portfolio update: Member Sandra Coney

 

File No.: CP2015/05244

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an opportunity for Member Sandra Coney to give an update with regards to activity within her portfolio areas.

2.       Portfolio holders are responsible for leading policy development in their portfolio area, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

3.       Member Coney has lead for the portfolios of Historic Heritage/Character and Parks area.

Executive Summary                                                              

 

W1 and Heritage Portfolio

 

Anzac Day

 

4.       A group of interested individuals and groups including the RSA has been meeting at the Local Board office for the last year to coordinate activities around the centenary of WW1.

5.       This has resulted in a programme of activities leading up to this year’s Anzac Day.

6.       The Local Board’s main activity is Salute to the Anzacs, a free concert and afternoon tea at the Titirangi War Memorial Hall with the Royal New Zealand Artillery Band which celebrated its 150th year last year

7.       The first half of the programme is a variety of music and the second half is commemorative with music from WW1.

8.       There will be displays about local men who went to WW1 in the hall before and after this event and following this at the Titirangi Library until 15 May.

9.       Our libraries have also organised a programme of displays telling us about the men who went to WW1 from the Titirangi and Manukau coast areas, and are holding some workshops to help people research their relatives or people from their area. Look for the programme at the Titirangi Library.

10.     Anzacs in the Archives – Belinda Battley of Archives New Zealand will talk about how to access digitised NZ Defence Force Personnel Files for WW1 at the JT Diamond Room, Waitakere Central Library, Tuesday, 14 April at 10am and Tuesday, 12 May at 10am.

Researching Records from WW1, all of these are at Titirangi Library:

 

·        Erica O’Flaherty, on Caring for family archives, 10.30 am Tuesday 21 April

·        Seonaid Lewis, on Researching WW1 records, 2 pm Wednesday 22 April

·        Maureen West, on Researching prisoner of war records, 10.30 am Thursday 23 April

 

11.     During April there will be displays in the windows of the Glen Eden Library

12.     And in conjunction with Te Uru, artist Cristina Beth will create a commemorative poppy wreath at the original site of the Titirangi War Memorial, at the top of the Soliders’ Memorial Walkway, opposite Te Uru. She will also install poppies at the Titirangi Roundabout and in conjunction with the Glen Eden RSA, outside the Glen Eden Library, and give an artist’s talk at 2 pm 25 April. People can call in at the Titirangi Community Gallery in Lopdell House in the weeks leading up to Anzac Day to help make poppies. Glen Eden Library is inviting people to come and sew a poppy on Monday, 13 April.

13.     On Anzac Day itself there will be displays in the Chapel of the Oaks in Waikumete Cemetery, organised by Friends of Waikumete Cemetery.

 

Other WW1 centenary activities

 

14.     The Board recently allocated some of its WW1 budget to the digitisation of a WW1 photo album held at the Titirangi RSA, the compilation of a brief history of the Titirangi Soldiers’ Memorial Church as the basis for some restoration work on the church, and research and writing for a history of the military sections of Waikumete Cemetery.

15.     I am also working on a second concert with the New Zealand Artillery Band, to be held at Swanson RSA probably on Sunday 9 August, the closest Sunday to the 100th anniversary of Chunuk Bair.

16.     I continue to chair meetings of the Council’s WW1 Political Steering Group and in that role attended a moving ceremony on board the Cunard Line cruise ship the Queen Elizabeth which was on its way to Sydney then Gallipoli for the 100th anniversary Anzac Service. I laid a wreath on behalf of Auckland which was to be taken to Gallipoli and on Queens Wharf Aucklanders were invited to place poppies on a “Poppy Wall” which was also on its way to Gallipoli. The Cunard line lost many ships during WW1, including the Lusitania. Masny of its liners were converted into hospital ships.

17.     I attend meeting of the Council’s WW1 Memorial Working Party which is working on a centenary art work or feature in Auckland Domain.

18.     On the heritage front, I have been involved in Auckland Transport’s plans for repairs to Huia Ford bridge, and I spoke on International Women’s Day, at a meeting in the Ellen Melville Hall, on the life of Ellen Melville, an outstanding woman who served for 33 years on the Auckland City Council (1913-46), stood for Parliament 7 times, was a pioneering woman lawyer and fostered many women’s associations dedicated to the political advancement of women and sport.

 

Parks Portfolio

 

Green Flag Awards

 

19.     It was great to celebrate with parks staff that the local board area had attracted two Green Flag parks awards: one at Waikumete Cemetery and the second for the Oratia beauty children’s playground at Parr’s Park. Green Flag Awards originated in Great Britain to recognise the best parks and green spaces.These international awards recognise the importance of the site from a historical, social, cultural and environmental perspective. Waikumete is the first cemetery in Australasia to win the award.

 

Huia Sea Wall

 

20.     What to do about the failed Huia Seawall has been exercising many over the summer. A public meeting in December 2014 saw the Council’s coastal expert, Paul Klinac, present two options: Option 1, armouring the beachfront with rock rip rap and extending westwards, and Option 2, “managed retreat”, which involved removal of the existing wall and some trees to restore a more natural edge, though with some loss of the Huia Domain area.

21.     Feedback on those options was presented to the Board’s 12 March meeting. There had been 84 submissions on the Council’s two options:  with 71% of respondents favouring repairing and extending the seawall and 29% favouring managed retreat.

22.     With Option 2, concerns raised included uncertainty about the extent of the erosion that would occur with “managed retreat”, the possibility of flooding, especially with future sea level rise and loss of infrastructure and shade trees.

23.     Following this, some members of the community organised a public meeting to present a third option: construction of a seawall that could be raised over time to enable the whole Huia Domain area to be preserved.

24.     A submission including 130 signatures was received supporting this option. Counting all submissions, this would give 62% for Option 3, 27% for Option 1, and 11% for Option 2.

25.     It is not clear how many people attended both the Council-led and community-led meetings – there was an overlap of only two names.

26.     Tonkin and Taylor was asked to evaluate the three options and to cost them. Costs were Option 1 $560,000; Option 2 (including reserve works) $860,000 and Option 3 $1,840,000.

27.     The Board has asked the Parks team to hold a second public meeting at which all three options will be discussed. This is due to be held on Tuesday 14 April. The Board is also meeting with iwi to discuss their views.

28.     Meanwhile, there has been some interest in a pohutukawa tree on the seaward edge of Huia Domain that has been undermined by wave action and is threatening infrastructure. The Board is awaiting an arborist’s report.

 

Claude Abel Lily Pond, Piha

 

29.     Over summer, the Local Board continued discussions with Piha locals who were offering to try manual removal of the invasive Mexican waterlily. Discussions with biosecurity experts  who had been involved with previous hand removal showed that volunteer hand removal would be hazardous (depth of pond, depth of sludge etc) and unlikely to be successful as in previous efforts hand removal did not remove the large tubers (up to 6 feet long) on the floor of the pond which quickly sprouted away. The Board is returning to its incremental spray plan but this will not happen until after winter. This is on tonight’s agenda.

 

Piha Stream erosion

 

30.     A resource consent application was lodged for this work behind the West Coast Gallery  to happen while stream depth is low. The Council’s environmental department wants more discussion on fish habitat as the Piha stream contains a number of rare species, so this is proceeding slowly.

 

Waitakere Quarry

 

31.     I attended my first meeting of the Quarry Consultative Committee and following this, went on a site visit to the quarry site. It is fairly clear that some cleanfill in the form of clay will need to be imported to enable restoration planting.  While there is great scope on the site for ecological restoration, I came away questioning the wisdom of inviting people to use the site for recreation. There are many hazards on the site including deep waterholes, cliffs, and crumbling rock. With so many better recreational destinations near at hand (Cascade Kauri, Lake Wainamu and Te Henga Beach etc) I wonder why people would go to an old quarry site in preference.


 

Dog Bylaw Review

 

32.     The Local Board has embarked on a review of dog bylaws on its beaches and adjoining reserves. The Board has held some consultations and soon will be calling for submissions on a proposal.


The Gap regional park

33.     Regional parks will be consulting the community soon about a “concept plan” for The Gap parkland. It is hoped that a track can be made up Gentle Annie sooner rather than later which will mean the Hillary Trail can be continued along the coast and avoid the road section, and Piha locals will be able to walk up from Piha, and down from Log Race Road. With the road into the parkland from near the Lookout, locals around the top of the hill are offered a number of ways of getting to Piha village without venturing down the road.

 

Other activities

 

34.     I was privileged to open the Karekare Beach races and enjoyed some hours at this iconic event. The sun was blazing and a large crowd turned out to watch the races.

35.     I spoke at the AGM of Friends of Arataki and attended the AGM of Waitakere Ranges Protection Society in late March.

36.     I went to watch the beginning of the Piha to Muriwai leg of the Hillary Run in the Piha Domain, and then positioned myself by the Marawhara Track where there was a hygeine station. All participants scrubbed their boots and ran through a long mat soaked in Trigene.

37.     On 28 March I met up with walkers on the Maungaroa Ridge Track who had done a walk with biosecurity experts studying kauri dieback. This was a walk organised by the Local Board as part of the Ecofest Festival. We cancelled a walk on my own property the next day, as heavy rain over night would have made the steep tracks slippery. This will be rescheduled for another date.

38.     On 31 March went with regional parks senior ranger Denis Cooper to look at the burned site at Kakamatua. Scary amounts of boneseed coming away though right now they are easily pulled. Regional parks is pursuing a weed control rather than replanting approach on this land.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the portfolio update from Member Sandra Coney.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Tua Viliamu – Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau