I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 April 2015

6.30pm

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Denise Yates, JP

 

Members

Neil Henderson

 

 

Greg Presland

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Saffron Toms

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Glenn Boyd

(Relationship Manager)

Local Board Services (West)

 

Tua Viliamu

(Democracy Advisor)

 

17 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 813 9478

Email: Tua.Viliamu@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Update from Ward Councillors                                                                                    5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Public Transport Users Association (PTUA)                                                   5

8.2     WEST: West Auckland Enterprise Skills and Training (formerly Waitakere WEA)                                                                                                                                6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

12        Auckland Transport Update Report, April 2015 – Waitakere Ranges Local Board 9

13        New community lease to Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi                                                                                                                         27

14        Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitākere River Valley 37

15        Raising public awareness of threats to Māui dolphins                                           93

16        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014                                                                                                             97

17        Waitakere Ranges Community Grants Programme 2015/2016                            109

18        Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals 115

19        Mangrove Management: Waitakere Ranges Local Board presentation to the Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel (Coastal)                                                                   129  

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

At its meeting on 28 November 2013, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board resolved (resolution number WTK/2010/5) to record any possible conflicts of interest in a register. 

            Register

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

·       Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

Neil Henderson

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

·       Weedfree Trust – Employee

Greg Presland

·       Portage Trust – Elected Member

·       Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

·       Titirangi Residents & Ratepayers Group – Committee Member 

·       Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

·       Combined Youth Services Trust - Trustee

Steve Tollestrup

·       Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

·       Community Waitakere – Trustee

·       West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

Saffron Toms

       NIL

Denise Yates

·       Ecomatters Environment Trust – Trustee

·       Keep Waitakere Beautiful Trust – Trustee

·       Huia-Cornwallis Ratepayers & Residents Association – Co-chairperson

·       Charlotte Museum Trust – Trustee

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Committee member                               

 


Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council.

                                              

Board Member

Organisation / Position

Sandra Coney

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

·       Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

·       Living Cell Technologies Animal Ethics Committee – Member

Saffron Toms

·       Ark in the Park – Governance Group Member

 

There was no changes to the register.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         Confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 9 April 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Update from Ward Councillors

 

An opportunity is provided for the Waitakere Ward Councillors to update the board on regional issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Public Transport Users Association (PTUA)

Purpose

Jon Reeves and Christine Rose from Public Transport Users Association are requesting to speak to the board regarding a proposal to retain Waitakere rail services and extend them to Kumeu.

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the deputation from Jon Reeves and Christine Rose and thank them for the presentation.

 

8.2       WEST: West Auckland Enterprise Skills and Training (formerly Waitakere WEA)

Purpose

1.       The WEST (West Auckland Enterprise Skills and Training (formerly Waitakere WEA)) have asked for an opportunity to update the board regarding their new strategic direction to continue meeting the needs of the Waitakere Ranges community. (22% of our 2014 students were from that community)

2.       WEA now WEST have contracted with Waitakere/Auckland Council since 2001 for Community Education, Advice and Information and support for migrant services. Following an extensive capability evaluation in 2014, in February 2015 we launched our new strategic direction,  focusing on improving community economic wellbeing – continuing to provide quality community education courses  but in future targeted around building individual’s readiness for employment and supporting small businesses to develop and grow. WEST believes that effective community development comes out of strong collaborative relationships and we will continue to focus on networking and enabling community initiatives across west Auckland.

3.       We request ongoing support from the Waitakere Ranges Local Board in 2015, in meeting the needs of the Waitakere Ranges community.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the deputation from West Auckland Enterprise Skills and Training and thank them for the presentation.

 

Attachments

a          WEST flyer........................................................................................... 137

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report, April 2015 – Waitakere Ranges Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/06419

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport’s activities in the Board area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Update Report for April 2015.

 

 

Comments

Discussion

Monthly Overview and Implementation Issues Update

 

LOCAL BOARD TRANSPORT FUND APPLICATIONS

           

1.       Attached is the current Local Board Transport Capital Fund – Financial update for the Local Board’s information.

 

RESPONSES AND PROGRESS REPORTS  

 

2.       Auckland Transport’s Public Transport has undertaken a review of the existing bus stop infrastructure along Captain Scott Road, this review has been undertaken to investigate the most appropriate locations for the upgraded infrastructure that will optimise the operation while providing an overall consistency in design for the network.  This review proposes the upgrade of three existing bus stops locations with the relocation of two additional bus stop locations along Captain Scott Road in the Glen Eden suburb of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area. The area subject to this review is shown in Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1: Captain Scott Road Bus Stop Locations

3.       Three bus stops have been identified for upgrade:

·        Outside 18 Captain Scott Road.

·        Outside 52 Routley Drive (located on Captain Scott Road).

·        Outside 76 Captain Scott Road.

 

4.       Two bus stops have been identified for relocation:

 

·        Relocation of the existing bus stop from outside 44 to outside 50 Captain Scott Road.

·        Relocation of the existing bus stop from outside 69 to outside 63 Captain Scott Road.

 

5.       Auckland Transport is now moving to consult directly affected landowners, residents, and businesses on the proposed changes.

 

DETAILED INFORMATION ON INDIVIDUAL CHANGES

·        Please find below details of the upgrade and relocation of the bus stops along this section of Captain Scott Road, Glen Eden.

 

6.       Outside 18 Captain Scott Road

 

·        Problem

The existing bus stop is unmarked and not installed to Auckland Transports Code of Practice (ATCOP) standards.

 

·        Proposed Solution

An upgrade of the existing unmarked bus stop by relocating the sign to allow for a 9.0m exit taper of no stopping parking restriction, a 15.0m marked out bus box with a lead in taper to the bus stop by using the existing no stopping restriction.

 

 

·        Benefits

The main benefit of this proposal is the introduction of road markings for the bus stop and the additional no stopping restrictions. This installation will better identify the location that is reserved for buses only and will provide additional manoeuvring space for buses to exit the bus stop freely.

 

·        Disadvantages and Mitigation

The disadvantage to this proposal is the loss of an additional three on street parking spaces.

 

7.       Relocated from outside 44 to outside 50 Captain Scott Road

 

·        Problem

The existing bus stop is parallel to another stop outside 52 Routley Drive (located on Captain Scott Road) and is unmarked and not installed to ATCOP standards.

 

·        Proposed Solution

Relocate the bus stop to outside 50 Captain Scott Road to ATCOP standards. This will require the installation of a new bus stop sign with adjacent 15.0m marked out bus box, a 13.0m exit taper of no stopping parking restriction utilising the exiting vehicle entrances and a 16.0m lead in taper to the bus stop of no stopping parking restriction.

 

·        Benefits

The main benefit of this proposal is the introduction of a staggered pair of bus stops to avoid conflict of traffic lane use if both stops are occupied at the same time. Another benefit of the upgrade to the bus stop is the introduction of road markings for the bus stop and the additional no stopping restrictions. This will better identify the location that is reserved for buses only and will provide additional manoeuvring space for buses to exit the bus stop freely.

 

·        Disadvantages and Mitigation

The disadvantage to this proposal is the loss of an additional two on street parking spaces.

 

8.       Outside 52 Routley Drive (located on Captain Scott Road)

 

·        Problem

The existing bus stop is unmarked and not installed to ATCOP standards.

 

·        Proposed Solution

An upgrade of the existing unmarked bus stop by relocating the bus stop sign so it is adjacent to the existing shelter, installing a 9.0m exit taper of no stopping parking restriction, a 15.0m marked out bus box and a 15.0m lead in taper to the bus stop of no stopping parking restriction.

 

·        Benefits

The main benefit of this proposal is that the upgrading of the existing layout will ensure that the bus will stop adjacent to the bus shelter. Another benefit is that the introduction of road markings for the bus stop and the additional no stopping restrictions which will better identify the location that is reserved for buses only and will provide additional manoeuvring space for buses to enter and exit the bus stop freely.

 

·        Disadvantages and Mitigation

The disadvantage to this proposal is the loss of an additional three on street parking spaces.

 

9.       Relocated from outside 69 to outside 63 Captain Scott Road

 

·        Problem

The existing bus stop is located in the intersection of Terra Nova Street and Captain Scott Road and is unmarked and not installed to ATCOP standards.

 

·        Proposed Solution

Relocate the bus stop to outside 63 Captain Scott Road to ATCOP standards. This will require the installation of a new bus stop sign with adjacent 15.0m marked out bus box, with a 19.0m lead in taper to the bus stop of no stopping parking restriction and exit taper of no stopping parking restriction.

 

·        Benefits

The main benefit of this proposal is the relocation of the bus stop away from the intersection to reduce the opportunity for possible conflict with vehicles entering and exiting Terra Nova Street and continuing along Captain Scott Road. Another benefit of the upgrade to the bus stop is the introduction of road markings for the bus stop and the additional no stopping restrictions. This will better identify the location that is reserved for buses only and will provide additional manoeuvring space for buses to exit the bus stop freely.

 

·        Disadvantages and Mitigation

The disadvantage to this proposal is the loss of an additional five on street parking spaces.

 

10.     Outside 76 Captain Scott Road

 

·    Problem

The existing bus stop is unmarked and not installed to ATCOP standards.

 

·    Proposed Solution

An upgrade of the existing unmarked bus stop by relocating the sign to allow for an exit taper over existing vehicle entrances, a 15.0m marked out bus box with a 15.0m lead in taper to the bus stop of no stopping parking restriction.

 

·    Benefits

The main benefit of this proposal is the introduction of road markings for the bus stop and the additional no stopping restrictions. This installation will better identify the location that is reserved for buses only and will provide additional manoeuvring space for buses to exit the bus stop freely.

 

·    Disadvantages and Mitigation

The disadvantage to this proposal is the loss of an additional two on street parking spaces.

 

SUMMARY OF CHANGES

 

11.     The bus stops proposed to be upgraded are:

·        Outside 18 Captain Scott Road.

·        Outside 52 Routley Drive (located on Captain Scott Road).

·        Outside 76 Captain Scott Road.


12.     The bus stops proposed to be relocated are:

 

·        Relocation of the existing bus stop from outside 44 to outside 50 Captain Scott Road.

·        Relocation of the existing bus stop from outside 69 to outside 63 Captain Scott Road.

 

CONSULTATION

Consultation background

 

13.     All proposed relocated bus stops and proposed upgraded infrastructure will be consulted on separately.  That means directly affected landowners, residents and businesses will only be consulted on the proposals that directly affect them.  The Local Board, however, will have the opportunity to comment on all proposals.

 

14.     As outlined above AT has already completed a corridor study to determine the most appropriate bus stop locations and infrastructure.  The main purpose of consulting directly affected landowners, residents, businesses, and Local Boards is to identify any issues which could affect the safe operation of the bus stops and surrounding road network or any development related issues i.e. a proposed subdivision, which may affect the proposed bus stop location and infrastructure.  As such, in most cases, Auckland Transport will only be seeking feedback on:

 

·        Any land development proposals or issues that may affect the proposed bus stop locations or upgrade.

·        Any safety issues with the proposed bus stop locations or upgrade.

15.     Other issues raised through the feedback process are unlikely to influence the final decision on the bus stop locations or infrastructure.

 

Consultation timeframes

16.     The proposed upgrade to the bus stops will have consultation carried out during January and February 2015.  Each consultation with affected landowners, residents and businesses will run for 2 weeks.  Waitakere Ranges Local Board will be provided with a further 2 weeks to comment on each proposal, during which time AT will provide a summary of the key points made by submitters and Auckland Transport’s response to these points; this should help you to provide more informed feedback.

 

Local Board Response

17.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

 

 

PROPOSED THRESHOLD TREATMENT ON BETHELLS ROAD BETWEEN WAITAKERE ROAD AND WAIRERE ROAD

 

18.     Auckland Transport (AT) would like to improve and increase drivers’ awareness at the 50km/h speed limit section of Bethells Road. The current threshold treatment conditions are not obvious to drivers.

 

Proposal

 

19.     Auckland Transport propose to remove the existing red patch ‘SLOW’ marking and install a new kerb build out with planting and red patch ‘SLOW’ marking with 50/70 speed limit signs. This would provide drivers with a clear message to slow down their speed while driving through this section of road.

Local Board Response

 

20.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

 

 

PROPOSED PARKING CHANGE ON HORSMAN ROAD, WAITAKERE

 

21.     Auckland Transport (AT) has recently received a number of complaints regarding visitor parking at the entrance to Goldies Bush on Horsman Road. AT has investigated this complaint and has identified two issues which appear to occur most notably during the weekends and the holiday periods.

 

22.     Auckland Transport acknowledges that there is limited space around the entrance to the Goldies Bush trail to accommodate visitor parking and that there is a risk that entrances to properties could be obstructed by parked vehicles.  Horsman Road varies in width and should vehicles park on both sides there are sections where the road would be impassable to most vehicles. This issue raised safety concerns amongst residents should emergency vehicles need access. AT considers the final section of approximately 180m to be most at risk of obstruction should vehicles park on both sides of the road. Horsman Road is a right hand bend in the final approach to Goldies Bush and vehicles parked on the eastern side can also reduce visibility.

 

23.     Auckland Transport recognises that there will continue to be demand for parking in this area and it is unlikely that this demand will reduce over time, however AT considers that this demand is confined to peak periods over the weekends and the holiday period.  Restricting both sides of Horsman Road would be excessive it is proposed to restrict the eastern side of Horsman Road as No Stopping At All Times from the entrance to Goldies Bush for a distance of 180m, see attached plan. Auckland Transport considers this will resolve the problems.

 

Local Board Response

 

24.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

 

 

SCENIC DRIVE (BETWEEN TITIRANGI ROAD ROUNDABOUT TO WEST COAST ROAD) – PROPOSED SPEED LIMIT CHANGES

 

25.     Scenic Drive between Titirangi Road and West Coast Road has been identified as a high risk rural road within the Auckland Region. Crash data indicates that over the past five years there have been 64 crashes reported along Scenic Drive, of which a significant proportion relates to speed or loss of control. Of these crashes, 6 resulted in a fatal or serious injury.

26.     Auckland Transport is seeking community feedback on a proposal to change existing speed zones on Scenic Drive. The objective of this speed limit change is to set speed limits which reflect the road environment and to encourage motorists to drive to the appropriate speed. This has the potential to reduce the frequency and severity of crashes.

 

27.     The following speed limit is proposed on this section of Scenic Drive:

 

·        50 km/h from Titirangi Road to a point 60 metres west of Tawini Road.

·        70 km/h from a point 60 metres west of Tawini Road to West Coast Road.

 

28.     This consultation seeks input from road users and the wider community who may be affected by these proposed changes.

 

29.     Following the consultation period Auckland Transport will consider all feedback received and make any required changes to the proposal based on wider community benefits. The final decision will then be made available to all submitters and the public.

 

Local Board Response

 

30.     The local board supported a speed reduction at this location. Their comments were that it is a straight stretch of road where drivers would naturally speed up, but there are many school children visiting the site, and tourist driving on and off it from the visitor and education centres. The Local Board also noted that they think there is a case for reduction of speed for the entire length of the Scenic Drive too.

 

 

SWANSON ROAD, SWANSON - PROPOSED NO STOPPING AT ALL TIMES (NSAAT) RESTRICTION

 

31.     Auckland Transport has received a number of concerns that have been raised with regards regarding visibility and access issues experienced when travelling around the bend in the vicinity of number 727 – 733 Swanson Road, Swanson.

 

32.     Swanson Road is an Arterial Road which carries a significant volume of traffic. The current eastbound lane width on Swanson Road is insufficient to accommodate through traffic and on-street parking safely. Therefore to ensure safety and accessibility, on-street parking is not permitted along the majority of the eastbound lane of Swanson Road. 

 

33.     At present Broken Yellow Lines (BYL) are provided along the northern side of Swanson Road up to the driveway of property number 733. While there are no BYL’s provided east of this location, a historical NSAAT sign is present in front of property number 731 to advise drivers of the NSAAT restriction in place along this section of Swanson Road. However site observations indicated that vehicles currently park on the northern side of Swanson Road east of property number 733. This is a safety issue as parked vehicles at this location not only restrict the through traffic flow on Swanson Road, it also has the potential to cause accidents as the forward visibility for eastbound vehicles is restricted due to the bend.

 

34.     Therefore to help improve visibility and accessibility around this bend, BYL’s are proposed at the location indicated on the attached aerial photograph to reinforce the existing NSAAT restriction. 

 

Local Board Response

 

35.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

 

ARAMA AVENUE, TITIRANGI - PROPOSED NO STOPPING AT ALL TIMES (NSAAT) RESTRICTION

 

36.     Auckland Transport has received a number of concerns that have been raised by residents with regards to the accessibility issues experienced at the end of the cul-de-sac, on Arama Avenue, in Titirangi.

 

37.     Site observations indicate that vehicles currently park at the end of Arama Avenue (at the turning circle), causing accessibility issues for properties located along this section of the road. Therefore, to help improve accessibility, a NSAAT restriction is proposed at the end of the cul-de-sac, in the location indicated on the attached aerial photograph.

 

Local Board Response

38.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

STOTTHOLM ROAD, TITIRANGI – PROPOSED NO STOPPING AT ALL TIMES (NSAAT) RESTRICTION

 

39.     Auckland Transport has received concerns that have been raised by the bus service provider in regards to traffic flow and safety on the intersection of Stottholm Road and Golf Road.

 

40.     Parked vehicles on the East side of Stottholm Road currently prevent buses heading in the southbound direction from passing queued traffic at the intersection with Golf Road. This is creating a safety concern where buses are blocking passing traffic and restricting visibility for other drivers.

 

41.     To help improve the situation AT are proposing to install NSAAT ‘Broken Yellow Lines’ on the road as shown on the attached drawing. It is also proposed to remove the existing bus stop on the south side of Golf Road, west of the intersection and realign the ‘Stop’ line, to provide parking and improve visibility.

 

Local Board Response

 

42.     The Local Board raised no objections to this proposal as no comments were received.

 

TRAFFIC / ROAD SAFETY ISSUES - SIMPSON ROAD AND METCALFE ROAD

 

43.     Auckland Transport has received a number of concerns from a local resident about the intersection at Simpson Road and Metcalfe Road.

 

Update

 

44.     Auckland Transport has undertaken an initial review of the information that has been provided.  Further detailed investigation now needs to be undertaken to carry out a comprehensive review of this intersection and options available to address the issues raised.

 

45.     This investigation will be assigned to the Traffic Operations North/West team for review, following which AT will be able to provide the outcome and recommendations of their assessment. 

 

46.     Auckland Transport is expected to complete the investigations by the end of June 2015.

 

SOUTH TITIRANGI RD SPEED BUMPS

 

47.     Auckland Transport has received from the Titirangi Ratepayers & Residents Association Executive a request that Auckland Transport install bollards down the centre line on South Titirangi Road to stop drivers avoiding the new speed cushions by driving down the middle of the road.

 

Update

 

48.     Auckland Transport is investigating this request and is expected to complete the investigations by early May 2015.

 


 

SWANSON PARK AND RIDE UPDATE

 

Update

 

49.     The key point for the Local Board to note is that the station works are not being progressed  at this stage due to budgetary constraints. Once the LTP is consulted and adopted by mid 2015 AT should have a clearer picture of when the station works will be progressed.

 

Park n Ride Update

 

50.     The works on site are approximately 3 weeks behind the original programme and now due for completion end of May for June opening.

 

51.     Interaction with the adjacent Penihana site has been difficult due to the late requirement by Penihana to remove/reinstate a track section over the Easter rail closure to enable stormwater connection.

 

52.     Earthworks are substantially complete with current focus on the rail side retaining structures.

Final stormwater connections to be completed by 20th April. The final car park will cater for up to 136 parking spaces.

 

53.     Project is on target for completion by the end of May with a formal opening planned on Sunday 7th June.

 

 

NEW FOOTPATH REQUEST SHETLAND STREET

 

54.     Auckland Transport has received a request for a new footpath through the Local Board Transport Lead.

 

Update

 

55.     Auckland Transport has added this to the new footpath list for assessment.

 

 

ROAD SURFACE ON HORSMAN ROAD IN WAITAKERE

 

56.     Auckland Transport has investigated the condition of the road surface on Horsman Road in Waitakere.

 

57.     Horsman Road, Jonkers Road, Caton Road and the other surrounding unsealed sections of the network have been inspected and found to be compliant.

 

58.     Additional works have been programmed to alleviate and temporarily resolve small corrugated sections. The gravel material will be graded and rolled to compact any loose material. Unfortunately, gravel material does become unbound without the proper construction and application of surfacing material to keep it contained.

 

59.     Auckland Transport has developed a seal extension programme of works. This programme consists of over five hundred unsealed roads which have a total length in excess of eight hundred kilometres.

 

60.     The seal extension programme is funded through the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). There are insufficient funds in the RLTP to fulfil all the objectives of the seal extension programme.

 

61.     Therefore, the strategy to tackle the large number of sites was to establish a guiding policy that can help in developing a priority list for this programme. The sites have been assessed based on a number of characteristics including traffic volumes, percentage of heavy commercial vehicles, incidents.

 

62.     Current budget allows for six sites to be programmed to receive seal extensions in the next ten years. Matakana Valley Road and Takatu Road have been identified in this programme and are scheduled to be completed over the next four years.

 

63.     Over time the seal extension priority list will be subject to periodic review to ensure that assessment characteristics are current and valid.

 

64.     Unfortunately, Horsman Road and the surrounding unsealed carriageways in this part of the rural network have been rated between priorities 101 -200 in the seal extension listing. This means a full seal extension is not planned within a ten year time frame.

 

65.     However, additional maintenance activities will be programmed to alleviate some of the concerns.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LB Transport Capital Fund - Financial Update

19

bView

18 Captain Scott Road

21

cView

50 Captain Scott Road and outside 52 Routley Drive

23

dView

63 & 76 Captain Scott Road

25

      

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected Member Relationship Manager (West), Auckland Transpor

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

New community lease to Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi

 

File No.: CP2015/04741

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Waitakere Ranges Local Board approval to grant a new community lease to Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated for part of French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi and support the area being classified as recreation reserve.

Executive Summary

2.       Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated formerly known as New Zealand Volunteer Maritime Search and Rescue Service Incorporated has a licence from the legacy Waitemata City Council for use and occupation of dedicated road known as The Parade, French Bay.  The licence commenced on 7 November 1979 and is able to be terminated by either party on giving two months’ notice.  The Coastguard owns the building known as The Base.

3.       The western portion of The Base is located on part of The Parade being unformed legal road.  Auckland Transport has confirmed that the licence dated 7 November 1979 for occupation of unformed legal road is valid.

4.       The eastern portion of The Base is located on part of French Bay Esplanade Reserve being Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 31265 which is held by Auckland Council.  The Coastguard wishes to secure a community lease for the eastern portion of The Base.

5.       French Bay Esplanade Reserve is made up of four parcels of land.  These parcels of land are held in fee simple by Auckland Council as unclassified recreation reserves.  In order to validate the Manukau Harbour Foreshore Reserves Management Plan covering this Reserve the four parcels of land need to be classified as recreation reserves pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease to Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated for a term of 10 years commencing 23 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal.  This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Supports Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 31265 contained in NA797/190, Area A shown marked on SO 51194, Area A shown marked on SO 52374 and Area C shown marked on SO 51268 to be a recreation reserve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment A) and recommends approval by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee;

b)      Approves granting a new community lease to Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated for part of French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi, being part of Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 31265 contained in NA797/190 (Attachment B) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 23 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment C);

iv)      Auckland Council has adopted a Smoke-Free Policy to apply on Council land, which Policy Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated is obliged to abide by during the Term.  Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated will use its best endeavours to ensure its members, employees, invitees, contractors and agents abide by the Policy;

c)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Comments

7.       Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated formerly known as New Zealand Volunteer Maritime Search and Rescue Service Incorporated has a licence from the legacy Waitemata City Council for use and occupation of dedicated road known as The Parade, French Bay.  The licence commenced on 7 November 1979 and is able to be terminated by either party on giving two months’ notice.  The Coastguard owns the building known as The Base.

8.       The western portion of The Base is located on part of The Parade being unformed legal road.  Auckland Transport has confirmed that the licence dated 7 November 1979 for occupation of unformed legal road is valid.

9.       The eastern portion of The Base is located on part of French Bay Esplanade Reserve being Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 31265 which is held by Auckland Council.  The Coastguard wishes to secure a community lease for the eastern portion of The Base.

10.     French Bay Esplanade Reserve is made up of the following four parcels of land (the Land):

·        Lot 1 on Deposited Plan 31265 and contained in NA797/190 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977;

·        Area A shown marked on SO 51194 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve by way of Section 3 (1) of the Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Act 1985.  No title available;

·        Area A shown marked on SO 52374 being the land excluding the rock wall and concrete columns supporting the building owned by French Bay Yacht Club is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve by way of Section 3 (1) of the Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Act 1985.  No title available;

·        Area C shown marked on SO 51268 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve by way of Section 3 (1) of the Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Act 1985.  No title available.

11.     With the Land remaining unclassified, the existing Manukau Harbour Foreshore Reserve Management Plan adopted by the former Waitakere City Council in August 2001 has no validity under the Reserves Act. 

12.     The Land has been administered for many years as a reserve for recreation purposes and the existing reserve management plan supports the reserve being continued to be treated in that way.  The Coastguard is contemplated in the plan and its activities are of a recreation nature.

13.     Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 empowers local councils to declare by resolution reserve lands held in fee simple to be classified for particular purposes as described under that Act.  No gazette notice is required and neither are there any requirements for public notification or iwi consultation.  Registration of council’s resolution again NA797/190 would ensure a permanent public record was retained to record the classification.

14.     The Coastguard was registered as an incorporated society on 10 September 1971 and is affiliated to Coastguard Northern Region and Royal New Zealand Coastguard Incorporated.  The Coastguard’s objectives are to:

·        be the body for the administration, promotion and development of Coastguard operations in the area of operation

·        save life at sea and aid vessels that require assistance

·        educate the boating public and the general public in boating law and safety

·        promote the health and safety of all participants in Coastguard activities

·        seek and obtain improved facilities and equipment for the advancement of Coastguard operations in the area of operation

15.     The Coastguard is made up of over 15 volunteers who give up their time for trainings and search and rescue call outs.  Volunteers are on a call out roster system.  When on call they are to be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week for 1 week in every 3-4 week cycle.

16.     The Coastguard’s future plans are to build a shed further down the esplanade reserve to house a large rescue vessel and gift a portion of that shed to the French Bay Yacht Club Incorporated for their yacht storage.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

17.     Council staff sought input from the Local Board portfolio holder on 16 February 2015.

18.     The Waitakere Ranges Local Board is the allocated authority to approve the granting of a new community lease.

Māori impact statement

19.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Implementation

20.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

21.     There is no cost implication associated with the approval of the lease.  The cost implications for Auckland Council associated with the classification process are estimated at $250.00.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Land at French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi

31

bView

Site Plan for Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated, French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi

33

cView

Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Land at French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi requiring classification

 

 

 

Text Box: Area A SO 51194 being 2063m²Text Box: Area A SO 52374 being 185m²Text Box: Area C SO 51268 being 39m²Text Box: Lot 1 DP 31265 being 278m²

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

 

Attachment B:  Site Plan for Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated, French Bay Esplanade Reserve, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi

 

Approximate Location Map and Lease Area

 

Reserve outlined in red

Licence for use and occupation of legal road outlined in blue

Lease area outlined in yellow

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

 

Name and Location of Land/Facility

French Bay Esplanade, 52 Valley Road, Titirangi.  The Base.

Name of the Community it serves

Titirangi, surrounding villages and Manukau Harbour users

Local Board Area

Waitakere Ranges

Name of Community Group

Titirangi Volunteer Coastguard Incorporated

Postal Address

PO Box 60-184, Titirangi, Auckland

Contact person

Craig Cummerfield – President

Name of Community Lease Advisor

Donna Cooper

 

 

Auckland Council and/or Local Board Outcomes

Performance Measure

Target

Achievements

LB Outcome 2:

Our unique natural environments are healthy and restored

-To provide water safety and rescue services to the community

 

AP 7.4 Acknowledge that nature and people are inseparable – build resilience to natural hazards

 

Provide a facility for the storage of rescue equipment

 

Provide a Search and Rescue training and rescue coordination base

 

Provide search and rescue vessel

 

 

Volunteers to manage the operations of the facility and coordinate crews

 

 

 

 

Facility upkeep

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental care

24 hours a day 7 days a week

 

24 hours a day 7 days a week

 

 

24 hours a day 7 days a week

 

Minimum 15 volunteers

 

On-call crews are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week

 

Ensure facility is keep clean and tidy and any graffiti is removed in a timely manner – weekly inspection

 

Ensure that council recycling bins are available at all times

 

Ensure that the leased area is clean and tidy and free of any litter or rubbish

(Annual report)

LB Outcome 3: 

Thriving communities

- Promote Coastguard training and engagement with local community

 

AP 5 Promote individual and community wellbeing through participation and excellence in recreation and sport

Search and Rescue training sessions

 

Provide a community water safety event

 

Participate in a local community event

 

Minimum of 40 sessions per annum

 

1 per annum

 

 

1 per annum

 

 

(Annual report)

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitākere River Valley

 

File No.: CP2015/02723

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks a resolution from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board to notify the draft Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitākere River Valley.

Executive Summary

2.       On 13 March 2014, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board approved the preparation of a Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitākere River Valley.

3.       This report describes the outcome of the research, consultation and plan preparation work that has taken place since June 2014.  The draft Local Area Plan proposed for public notification is included in Attachment A.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      approves the public notification of the draft Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitākere River Valley

b)      approves the proposed engagement methodology during the notification of the draft Local Area Plan from 29 April to 25 May 2015

c)      agrees to hold public hearings on the draft Local Area Plan in the week of 1st to 5th May 2015 if required.

 

 

Discussion

4.       Local Area Plans are part of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area programme.  Under the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008, the Auckland Council may prepare and adopt a Local Area Plan (LAP).  LAPs establish a process that is designed to reach a wide consensus among the community, tangata whenua and stakeholders on the valued features of the locality and its future character.  They outline objectives and actions to maintain or improve the distinctive and valued qualities of local areas over time, and achieve community outcomes.

5.       At its meeting on 13 March 2014, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board (Resolution number WTK/2014/25):

·    approved the preparation of a LAP for Bethells Beach/Te Henga and the Waitākere River Valley

·    requested that staff plan and implement a collaborative process of engagement during the preparation of the LAP with residents, ratepayers and businesses of Bethells Beach/Te Henga and the Waitākere River Valley, Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority, Ngāti Whātua and local and external stakeholders

·    requested that staff in the North West Planning Unit report monthly to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on progress via the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area portfolio holder and/or the Chair.


Research and background information

6.       The background reports for the LAP are a revised and updated edition of “Bethells/Te Henga/Waitākere Valley Local Area Background Report” prepared by Jenny Macdonald Consulting.  The former Waitākere City Council approved this report in October 2010, and released it for public feedback.  The documents include information on the heritage features and characteristics of the area, including:

·   socio-economic data and social infrastructure: census information and population trends, community facilities, groups and networks, transport and infrastructure

·   operative district plan and Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan framework

·   history, heritage and cultural values:  compilation of published information on early settlement and industry in the area, cultural heritage inventory and iwi cultural values assessment (by Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority)

·   ecological values: literature review

·   landscape values:  review of landscape assessments, assessment of recent changes in landscape values based on the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Monitoring Report 2012

·   parks and recreation:  Regional and Local Reserve Management Plans.

7.       These background papers were distributed at community workshops and feedback sought.  This information will also be available for the notification of the draft LAP.

 

Engagement activities and outcome

8.       The draft LAP and its associated research papers were informed by the feedback received from the community and iwi at a number of engagement events and activities, including:

·        an initial community workshop on 4 June 2014 where participants scoped issues and matters to be addressed by the LAP, formed working groups and identified sources of information.  Speakers with particular knowledge of the area were invited to talk, including Mary Woodward (author of “The Landscape of my Heart”), John Sumich (Habitat Te Henga), Colleen Pilcher (Waitākere Ranges Protection Society) and Trude Bethell (Bethells Cottages).

·        a Vision and Values workshop on 29 July 2014 that helped identify:

o   a 30 year vision for the area

o   values needed to achieve the vision

o   conflicts and contradictions that might get in the way of achieving the vision

o   commitments needed to make to achieve the vision

·        theme-based workshops in August and September 2014, supported by specialist Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff on the following topics: 

o   Cultural Heritage

o   Ecology and Ecosystems (two workshops)

o   Transport and walkways

o   Community and Economic Development and Civil Defence

o   Parks and Visitor Management

o   Waitākere Quarry (one workshop and a site visit)

·        an open day in August to make theme-based findings available and seek further input from the community

·        a draft discussion document, distributed to individual residents and open for comment from 31 October to 18 November 2014.  People were invited to indicate their support for the proposed objectives and actions, rank the actions by order of priority and comment on the actions.

·        a community workshop on the draft discussion document on 20 November 2014 to analyse the feedback received, discuss the ease of implementation and resources required for the different actions, and prioritise the actions

·        a final discussion document made available for comments from 15 January to 16 February 2015, inviting further comments from local residents and stakeholders

·        video “futurementaries” prepared by Year 7/8 students at Waitākere Primary School in December 2015, which showed students’ aspirations for the future of Te Henga Park, the Waitākere Quarry, train and bus transport services, and improvements to the school pool.

·        a photograph competition inviting local residents to submit their photographs of the area to illustrate the LAP document

·        an Open Day at the Te Henga (Bethells Beach) Community Day on 25 January 2015 to distribute and gather feedback on the discussion document

·        meetings and discussions with Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority to agree on the process of engagement, and seek input into and feedback on the content of the LAP at each stage of the plan preparation.  Te Kawerau developed a Cultural Values Assessment for the LAP area early in the engagement process in May 2014.  This was made available to the community.

·        internal meetings and workshops with relevant Auckland Council and Auckland Transport units to gather information, seek updates on emerging strategies and programmes and seek feedback on the content of the LAP action plan at each stage of the plan preparation.

 

9.       Communications with the community and stakeholders included:

·        monthly or two monthly newsletter updates on upcoming events and the LAP process

·        email communications, including records of consultation and discussion papers.  The contact e-mail list now includes around 150 local residents and representatives of stakeholder organisations

·        update on the Te Henga (Bethells Beach) community website, which was launched in October 2014

·        updates on the community facebook pages (‘Bethells Bongo’ and ‘Talking Stick’)

·        posters advertising community events on the community notice boards.

 

 

LAP Boundary

10.     Feedback on the proposed LAP boundary was sought early in the engagement process by way of newsletters to residents.  The comments that were received referred to the need to include the northern part of the drainage catchment of the Waitākere River into the LAP area.  However, this area is outside of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area and cannot therefore be included in the LAP per se.  However, residents of the whole catchment, including those outside of the proposed LAP area, have received mailed updates via newsletters and have been invited to participate in the LAP process.

11.     Further comments on the proposed boundary can be made through the LAP notification process.

 

Draft LAP notification and engagement

12.     It is proposed that the draft LAP (included as Attachment A) be publicly notified from 29 April to 25 May 2015.

13.     The LAP background reports, including records of engagement to date, will be made available to the public.

14.     During this period, a series of consultation events and activities will be organised, including:

·   Open days/public drop-in sessions in the area

·   Discussions with community groups and land owners to seek feedback on specific actions

·   Engagement with Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei and Ngāti Whatua Ngā Rima o Kaipara.

15.     It is proposed that submitters be offered the opportunity to be heard by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board in support of their submissions.  Hearings, should they be required, may be organised in the first week of June 2015.

Consideration

Local Board Views

16.     This draft LAP has been prepared in a manner consistent with past resolutions and expressed priorities of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.  The Local Board has been kept informed and has provided feedback to the project team during meetings with the Local Board Chair and Planning Portfolio Holder, and at workshops and community events. 

Maori Impact Statement

17.     The proposed area for the LAP is of significance to both Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Whatua.  Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei and Ngāti Whatua Ngā Rima o Kaipara deferred to Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority for input into the LAP early in the engagement process.

18.     The Cultural Values Assessment contributed by Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority has been used to inform the content of this draft LAP.  The iwi’s Cultural and Environmental Manager participated in the community workshops in June and November 2014.  The project team received input and feedback from iwi at each stage of the drafting process. 

19.     Further engagement is planned with Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei and Ngāti Whatua Ngā Rima o Kaipara to seek further feedback and input into the draft LAP.

General

20.     This report describes the consultation that has taken place with local residents and stakeholders.  It proposes a methodology for further engagement during the LAP notification period.

Implementation Issues

21.     There are no known implementation issues. Budget is available to support the public notification of the draft LAP and its finalisation within the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area programme OPEX budget for 2014-15.  However, the budget and timing for specific projects proposed in the Local Area Plan will be the responsibility of specific Auckland Council department, CCO’s, the Waitākere Ranges Local Board and community groups.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Local Area Plan for Te Henga (Bethells Beach) and the Waitakere River Valley

43

bView

Proposed Local Area Plan Boundary

89

cView

Map of Community Outcomes

91

    

Signatories

Authors

Claire Liousse - Principal Planner

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - GM - Plans & Places

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 















































Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Raising public awareness of threats to Māui dolphins

 

File No.: CP2015/05612

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval from the board of budget allocation to a project to raise public awareness of the critically endangered status of Māui dolphins.

Executive Summary

2.       Māui dolphins are a critically endangered species with an estimated population of 55 adults surviving. They are found in various areas off the west coast of the North Island, including off the coast of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area.

3.       In recognition of the need to protect this iconic species, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board included ‘measures to increase awareness of the plight of the Māui’s dolphin’ as a desired outcome in their Local Board Plan for 2014-2017.

4.       To give effect to this outcome the board environmental portfolio holder requested council staff to deliver a project involving two main components. These are:

·        Development of materials, such as flags, to be used to raise awareness of the critically endangered status of Māui dolphins at events held in the board area, particularly on the west coast. Approximate budget: $6,000.

·        One (or more) public seminars to be held in coastal communities in the board area as budget allows. The aim of these events would be to have an expert present to the community in an informal community hall type setting to educate about threats to Māui dolphins and inform them of ways they can take action to protect the species. Approximate budget $4,000.

5.       It is recommended that the board allocate $10,100 to this project to help raise awareness of the threat to Māui dolphins.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the ‘Raising public awareness of threats to Māui dolphins’ report.

b)      Approves allocation of $10,100 to a project to raise awareness of threats to Māui dolphins.

 

Comments

Background

6.   Māui dolphins are a sub-species of Hector’s dolphin and are a critically endangered species, with an estimated population of just 55 adults surviving. 

7.   They have a range from Maunganui Bluff to Whanganui, including the mouth of the Manukau and Kaipara Harbours.

8.   As a critically endangered species that lives off the coast of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area, protecting Māui dolphins has been recognised as a priority by the Waitakere Ranges Local Board. The Waitakere Ranges Local Board Plan for 2014-2017 identifies introducing ‘measures to increase awareness of the plight of the Māui’s dolphin’ as a desired outcome.

 

9.       To give effect to this outcome the board has committed a budget of $10,100 to protecting Māui dolphins in the 2014/2015 financial year. The board has also committed a further $11,000 to this cause in their draft budget for the next three year financial years (from 2015/2016 to 2017/2018).

10.     At a meeting with the environmental portfolio holder in February 2015 council staff were directed to use this budget to deliver a Māui dolphins project involving two main components.

Project Outline

11.     Part one – Awareness raising materials – approximate budget $7,000. Staff will work with a contractor to develop materials that can be used to raise awareness of the critically endangered status of Māui dolphins at events held in the board area, particularly on the west coast. The board have requested this include display materials such as flags for events.

12.     The board is also working to develop a pack to be used by event organisers in the board area to help them raise awareness of Māui dolphins – for example, through providing event organisers with materials to share with attendees. These materials will complement this project.

13.     Part two - Series of public meetings – approximate budget $3,000. Council will organise one (or more) public meetings in coastal settlements in the board area to raise awareness of the plight of Māui dolphins. These events will include an expert academic speaker as well as representatives from other charities or organisations who are working to raise awareness of Māui dolphins.

14.     Speakers at these events would aim to inform the public about threats to Māui dolphins and identify actions that members of the public living in the board area could take to help ensure the survival of the species.

15.     Ideally a series of events will be held but there may not be sufficient budget to fund this. Staff will work with the presenters to scope this project and will advise the board of exactly how many events can be held as this is clarified during project implementation.

16.     Staff will also work to identify if these events in the board area could be held in the same week as an Auckland Conversation event in central Auckland. This would help to ensure that awareness of Māui dolphins reached a regional as well as local audience.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

17.     This report seeks approval of funding for a local board project. As described above, the project has been developed based on guidance from the environmental portfolio holder and gives effect to outcomes identified in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Plan.

Māori impact statement

18.     Mana whenua were not consulted in the preparation of this report. However, it is recognised that this project may be of significance to mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki of Auckland’s marine environment. Staff will ensure that relevant iwi are invited to the public meetings planned as part of this project.

Implementation

19.     If approved this project should be able to delivered within existing budgets and resources, however, because the timeline is constrained there is a small risk that staff will not be able to procure materials and contracts in time to achieve delivery in this financial year.

20.     Board members will be kept updated on implementation of the project through regular quarterly reports from the Infrastructure and Environmental Services department and updates at environmental portfolio holder meetings. If there is a risk of non-delivery this will be highlighted to the board as early as possible so they can make a decision around re-allocation of resources.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Lucy Hawcroft - Senior Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014

 

File No.: CP2015/05526

 

  

Purpose

1.       To give the Waitākere Ranges Local Board an overview of Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 July to 31 December 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       ACPL’s vision centres on “creating value from property assets” by providing commercial expertise and value for money to Auckland Council in managing its property portfolio, and acquisition and disposal activities.  The concept of “value” includes but is not limited to financial value. In addition to financial value, a growing aspect of ACPL’s work has been to use surplus council property to help achieve the council’s housing supply and urban regeneration objectives. We will also identify opportunities to add value by improving the use of council service property such as redevelopment of under-utilised sites.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent (SOI) 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

§  Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

§  Redevelopment/regeneration projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

§  ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

§  Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

§  Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

§  Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

§  The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Accepts the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly update 1 July to 31 December 2014.

 

 

Comments

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Waitākere Ranges Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from July to December is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages property owned by the council and AT that are not currently required for service or infrastructure purposes. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development but are being held for use in a planned future project such as road construction/widening or the expansion of parks.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six months and now totals 1306 properties, an increase of 121 since our January-June 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the six months ending 31 December 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $2.9m ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $11.8m against budget of $23m. The average monthly vacancy rate for the period is 1.68% which is under the SOI targets of 5%.

10.     A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

§ Current ACPL-managed commercial and residential property within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board

§ Each property’s classification or reason for retention

§ The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

§ The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported eg regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

13.     July 2014 to June 2015 Target

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

$36.4m

These recommendations include $33.2m of sites that are identified for development projects.

14.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

15.     2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m gross value recommended for sale

These targets include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net value of unconditional sales

 

Process

16.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with: the council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

17.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Waitākere Ranges area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

40 Glendale Road, Glen Eden

Subject to flooding, purchased for project twin streams.  Potential future use options were explored via the Rationalisation Process. Expressions of interest to retain site were received during internal consultation and local board wish to retain.  ACPL to formally report to local board in 2015.

 

490 South Titirangi Road, Titirangi

Preparing for sale. ACPD to discuss public toilet relocation with local board.

 

1/16 Sarona Avenue, Glen Eden

 

Transferred from Stormwater as non-service. The property will commence the rationalisation process in 2015.

 

315A Glengarry Road, Glen Eden

 

Transferred from PSR as non-service. This property will commence the rationalisation process in 2015.

 

 

Redevelopment/Regeneration and Housing Supply Initiatives

Overview  

18.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into approximately 54 region wide council-driven regeneration and housing supply initiatives. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $415k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL-led developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

19.     ACPL is working with the wider council group to formulate a process or approach for identifying and realising optimisation opportunities that exist for service assets. This will provide opportunities to work with local boards on development opportunities that deliver wider strategic benefit consistent with the Auckland plan such as intensification, town centre regeneration and affordable housing. It will also improve service outcomes through obtaining more effective use of property assets.

20.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Strategy Action Plan, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects over three years that will improve housing affordability and the supply of affordable housing encompassing CHO involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

Local Activities

21.     Waitākere Central – 2-4 Henderson Valley Road, Henderson: This is a Waitākere Properties Limited legacy development that ACPL is now progressing. The mixed use development incorporates commercial and possible residential end uses. Minutes from a Waitakere City Council meeting set out approval for this development along with a request to keep relevant stakeholders updated. ACPL broached the opportunity for developing all vacant land with several developers and initially intended to progress an Expression of Interest (EOI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) mid-2014. However, following further assessment of economic activity in the area, ACPL recommended holding off proceeding with these processes until later in 2015 in order to optimise potential outcomes. Further work is also to be completed assessing parking requirements. The formal commencement of the Wilsher Village project may leverage engagement with the market to advance economically viable options on this site.  The project lies within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area but ACPL will continue to keep the Waitākere Ranges Local Board updated due to its local relevance. 

Acquisitions

Overview  

22.     ACPL continues to support council and AT programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved council or AT budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

23.     From the commencement of the 2015 financial year, 1 July 2014 to 31 January 2015, 73 property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $56m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

24.     Over the past six months 15 properties were acquired to meet council legal, open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

29 Te Ahuahu Road, Piha

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Waitākere Ranges

713-743 Rosebank Road, Avondale

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Whau

Lot 1 DP 28362 Martins Bay Road, Martins Bay

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Rodney

895 State Highway 16, Waimauku

 

 

 

179 Matua Road, Huapai

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Rodney

218 Matua Road, Huapai

Stormwater

Stormwater

Rodney

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

25.     58 properties were also acquired over the past six months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects including AMETI (17 acquisitions) City Rail Link Property Acquisition (23 acquisitions) and Northern Strategic Growth Area (4 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

26.     ACPL also optimises the commercial return from assets it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. A high level update on business interests in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area is outlined below.

Te Henga Quarry Waitākere

27.     Perry Resources is the quarry operator and pays a royalty to the council based on sales of aggregate.  Like other Auckland quarries, the performance of this quarry has been significantly above expectation in recent years.  A high level of sales means the quarry has exhausted the supply of available resource earlier than expected.  The anticipated closure date for the quarry is now 30 April 2015.

28.     Perry Resources is required to rehabilitate the quarry under the operating agreement with the council.  ACPL and Perry Resources have substantially negotiated a rehabilitation agreement and rehabilitation plan.  The agreement and plan have been subject to input from the Te Henga Quarry Consultation Committee and the council’s Parks unit.  ACPL and Perry Resources intend submitting a further iteration of the plan and agreement to the Te Henga Quarry Consultation Committee for consideration in mid April 2015. 

29.     Council responsibility for management of Te Henga Quarry will be passed over from ACPL to Parks during rehabilitation and at a future date that is yet to be determined.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

30.     This report is for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

31.     Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. The importance of effective communication and engagement with Māori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 mana whenua groups for our core business activities.

32.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of wāhi tapu or joint management arising from the resolution of Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Waitākere Ranges Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

33.     Te Kawerau-ā-Maki has notified ACPL that it seeks to better understand the process of how ACPL acquires and disposes of land in the Waitākere Ranges area.  They emphasised that properties in this area, most notably around Te Henga, have obvious cultural value to Te Kawerau.

34.     ACPL undertook to be part of council’s Māori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Māori. The MRP was finalised and approved by the ACPL Board in December 2014 and the focus will move to identifying priority areas for implementation. A copy of this is available on the ACPL website.

Implementation

35.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

103

bView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the Local Board area

105

cView

Property movement in the Local Board area

107

     

Signatories

Authors

Ebony Duff - Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

David Rankin - Chief Executive Officer

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 



Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Waitakere Ranges Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/05869

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to present the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme to be attached to the policy as an appendix.

4.       This report presents the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Adopts the Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016.

 

 

Comments

5.       The new Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014 and implementation will commence on 1 July 2015.

6.       The policy supports each local board to develop a Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016. This local board grants programme will guide community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme can include:

·        outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·        specific local board funding priorities

·        budget allocated to the grants programme

·        which grant types will operate locally, the number of funding rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·        an indication of participation in multi-board funding

·        other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making

8.       An implementation plan is underway to support an integrated and simplified approach to grants programme administration. Funding staff from different departments are working together to ensure a co-ordinated approach, expected to benefit applicants and streamline internal processes.

9.       Once the local board community grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, funding rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Community Grants Programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme can be reviewed on an annual basis.

Māori impact statement

11.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

12.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels. Targeted advertising and promotion will be developed for target populations, including migrant and refugee groups, disability groups, Maori and iwi organisations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Waitakere Ranges Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

111

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Funding Programme Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Waitakere Ranges Local Board – Local Grants Programme 2015/2016

Our Local Grants Programme aims to provide contestable and discretionary community grants to local communities.

 

Outcomes sought from the local grants programme

Our grants programme will be targeted towards supporting the following outcomes, as outlined in our local board plan:

·    The Waitakere Ranges Heritage area is protected

·    Our unique natural environments are healthy and restored

·    Thriving communities

·    Revitalised town centres and villages

·    Arts and culture flourish.

Our priorities for grants

The Waitakere Ranges Local Board welcomes grant applications that align with the following local board plan priorities:

Note:

·    these priorities relate to the local board initiatives as outlined in the local board plan

·    all applications will be assessed on their own merit

 

Projects and events that:

·    preserve, protect and  promote the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area

·    recognise the cultural and historical heritage of the local board area including projects and events connected with WW1 commemoration

·    protect and restore our natural habitats and biodiversity, including but not limited to projects that align with specific local board priority areas (Maui’s dolphin, kauri dieback and control of weeds and pests)

·    support people to connect with nature or  adopt environmentally responsible lifestyles

·    support our diverse communities to be healthy and safe and people feel that they are valued, connected and belong

·    promote youth well-being

·    enhance our centres while keeping their essential character

·    events which align with the Waitakere Ranges Local Parks Events Plan

·    local arts and events that recognise our inspiring settings and unique character

 

 

 

Lower Priorities:

We will also consider applications for other services, projects, events and activities.  However, these may be considered a lower priority.

The Waitakere Ranges Local Board has identified the following activities as lower priorities:

·    Events which promote a branded company advertising alcohol and fast food, particularly if the event has children and young people participating.

·    Events which do not align with the Waitakere Ranges Local Parks Events Plan

Investment approach

The Waitakere Ranges Local Board has identified the following grant types:

·    Quick Response Local Grants:

Maximum amount per grant up to $1,500

·    Local Grants

For grants over $1,500

Application dates

Grant rounds for [insert year(s)] will be as follows

Quick Response Local Grants

[insert year] funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round one

January

February

March

March

Round two

March

April

May

May

Round three

May

June

July

July

Round four

July

August

September

September

Round five

September

October

November

November

 

Local Grants

[insert year] funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round one

3 August 2015

11 September

October/November

November

Round two

1 April

15 May

June/July

August

 

 

 

Accountability measures

The Waitakere Ranges Local Board requires that all successful applicants to provide:

·    receipts and a photo of the projects or event are required for grants under $300.

·    for all events: the grant recipient will demonstrate their acknowledgement of the local board contribution, including inviting the local board members to the event.

·    an Invitation to the activity to be extended to the board

·    inclusion of local board logo on advertising and display of Local Board branding at events

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Local board advocacy and feedback on Long-term Plan 2015 – 2025 proposals

 

File No.: CP2015/05391

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides a summary of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

2.       This feedback is informing the Waitākere Ranges Local Board advocacy to the Budget Committee and will inform decisions that the Waitākere Ranges Local Board make on their locally driven initiatives (LDI) budgets.

Executive summary

3.       The LTP proposals were released for public consultation in January 2015, with local engagement and Have Your Say events held through until 16 March to receive feedback.  Feedback was also received through written or online forms, email and through social media.

4.       In total, the Council received and processed 27,383 pieces of written feedback of which 851 were received from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. In addition 40 people attended a Have Your Say event in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area on 3 March.

5.       This report provides a summary of the feedback received through the LTP consultation on proposals for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. It also summarises feedback on the regional proposals from people or organisations based in the Waitākere Ranges area. 

6.       This feedback is informing the Waitākere Ranges Local Board advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April. These discussions are timed to inform the Budget Committee prior to them making decisions on the LTP on 7 and 8 May.

7.       The feedback will also inform Waitākere Ranges decisions required in order to finalise LDI and advocacy content for their Local Board Agreements 2015/2016.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Confirms an updated list of advocacy points for the discussions with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April.

 

Comments

8.       The summary of the feedback received through the Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation relevant to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A.

9.       Each piece of written feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area and the feedback recorded from local engagement and Have Your Say events is in Attachment B.

10.     This feedback builds on the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s understanding of their community’s priorities and preferences. It will inform the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s advocacy to the Budget Committee at discussions on 24, 28 and 29 April.  At these discussions the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the key consultation issues of investing in Auckland, fixing transport, sharing rates and housing and development. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board may also provide feedback on regional proposals with particular impact locally and may advocate for specific local priorities where the Budget Committee is the decision maker, such as large capital projects. 

11.     The updated advocacy points from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board in relation to the LTP are in Attachment B.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

12.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board needs to consider any changes that it might make to their LDI budgets or advocacy in light of the feedback on the LTP proposals.

Māori impact statement

13.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Maori. The local board agreements are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Maori. The local board agreement is based on the local board plan which are both been developed through engagement with the community, including Maori.

Implementation

14.     Following the local board discussions with the Budget Committee on 24, 28 and 29 April the Budget Committee will make decisions on regional proposals on 7 and 8 May.  Local boards will then hold workshops from 14 to 20 May to finalise their local board agreements prior to them being adopted at board meetings between 9 and 16 June.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Long-Term Plan 2015 (LTP) consultation Feedback summary

117

bView

Advocacy document

125

     

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Curran – Local Board Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 consultation feedback report for Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Purpose

This report summarises all feedback received through Long-term Plan 2015 - 2025 (LTP) consultation on Waitākere Ranges Local Board (the local board) proposals. It also summarises feedback on the regional proposals from people or organisations based in the Waitākere Ranges area. 

The purpose of this report is to inform the local board of the views of their local community on the LTP proposals. This will build on the local board’s understanding of community priorities and preferences as established in the development of the 2014 Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan.

The feedback received will inform the local board’s decisions on allocation of their local budgets in their local board agreement for 2015/2016. It will also inform the local board’s discussions with the Budget Committee on local priorities in relation to the regional budgets and proposals.

Executive Summary

 

This is a summary of the feedback from Waitākere Ranges residents on regional and local proposals in the draft 2015/25 Long-term Plan (LTP).

This report gives a high level statistical overview of the results of local submissions to:

·     Waitākere Ranges  Local Board’s funding proposals for 2015/2016 and 20106 - 2025

·     Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s advocacy areas

·     General local issues

·     Regional proposals

The Waitākere Ranges local board consulted specifically on the following local proposals: 

2015/16

·     Walkway development in the Waitākere Ranges ($460k)

·     Implement the Waitākere pest plant plan ($80k)

·     Improve water quality in the west coast lagoons and Manukau harbour by working with local communities ($50k)

·     Activate Glen Eden town centre with events and activities in Glenmall

·     Support local community services, events and grants ($500k)

·     Enhance our local environment($370k)

2016/25

·     Revitalise Glen Eden town centre ($600k) and advocate for further funding

·     Continuing to deliver initiatives from our local board plan

Other proposals (key advocacy areas)

The local board also expressed an intention to advocate to the Governing body:

·     For greater investment in animal and plant pest control

·     To adopt the 10:20 programme of support for surf clubs in the region. 

Context

This report is being provided to the local board summarising the local consultation feedback received on the LTP.  A recent change in legislation enabled council to receive feedback in a wider range of forms, including in person at community engagement events, through written forms and on online through social media.  People were invited to attend ‘Have Your Say’ events held in their local board area to interact with decision makers.  These events replaced hearings and the feedback has also been collected and included in this report.

Feedback on the local board’s local proposals and on regional proposals from the Waitākere Ranges area was received either as written feedback, or in person at a Have Your Say event in the Waitākere Ranges local board office on 3rd March.  A total of 851 locally-based submissions were received – 3% of the regional total of 27,383.

Overview of feedback received on local proposals

Of the 434 respondents who made specific comment 67% indicated support of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s proposals for the local board area for the ten year plan.

Do you support the proposals for the local board area?

 

(434 respondents)

 

Of those who specified, 51% of submitters were male, 49% female.  People who identified as European made up 80% of submitters, and the preferred written submission format was a postal form, closely followed by the online form.

The Waitākere Ranges Local Board hosted a Have Your Say Event on 3rd March 2015.  A total of 40 people attended. This was an opportunity for the public to not only have their say on what was being proposed in the LTP, but also to seek further information from Council’s subject matter experts who were present.

Comments were collected at this event without identifying the provider.

Local board proposals for 2015/2016

A summary of the feedback received through each channel is provided below.

For comments from submitters that could be clearly aligned to a specific proposal, the most frequent are outlined below in order of support.  The majority of comments made clearly support Waitākere Ranges local board proposals for 2015 /2016.

Waitākere Ranges Local Board proposals for 2015/2016

 

Number of comments

Support

Do not  support

Other

 

Walkway development in the Waitākere Ranges ($460k)

89

65

19

5

Implement the Waitākere pest plant plan ($80k)

97

85

9

3

Improve water quality in the west coast lagoons and Manukau harbour by working with local communities ($50k)

92

 

78

10

4

Activate Glen Eden town centre with events and activities in Glenmall

85

55

29

1

Support local community services, events and grants ($500k)

87

68

17

2

Enhance our local environment($370k)

94

83

10

1

Note: the comment category ‘other’ tends towards not supporting the proposal.

 

Local board proposals for 2015/2025

For comments from submitters that could be clearly aligned to a specific proposal, the most frequent are outlined below in order of support:

Waitākere Ranges Local Board proposals for 2015/2025

 

Number of comments

Support

Do not  support

Other

 

Revitalise Glen Eden town centre ($600k) and advocate for further funding

109

75

25

9

Continuing to deliver initiatives from our local board plan

82

68

12

2

Note: the comment category ‘other’ tends towards not supporting the proposal.

 

Other Proposals

Comments from submitters that could be clearly aligned to the board’s highlighted advocacy areas were very limited in number, and no indicative conclusions could be drawn. 

Feedback received through Have your say events

The main local theme discussed was local environmental management with general conversation around maintaining levels of service, the effects of funding cuts, and the specialness of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area. 

Of the regional themes, transport issues were the main topic; support for prioritising cycle-ways and public transport was high, with some comments supporting park and rides.

Overview of feedback received on regional proposals from Waitākere Ranges local board area

The consultation on the proposed LTP focused on four key issues, Investing in Auckland, Fixing transport, Housing and development and Your rates, however people were also asked to provide feedback on the other regional proposals.  The written feedback received from the Waitākere Ranges local board area on the key consultation topics is summarised below, along with an overview of the other areas of feedback on regional proposals.

1)   Investing in Auckland

The question asked of Auckland’s residents and ratepayers was whether they agree with the proposed overall average general rates increase of 3.5 per cent each year, which will enable the proposed investment and spending outlined in the consultation document.

 

The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Waitākere Ranges area.

Investing in Auckland

 

Do people support the proposed 3.5% average rates increase?

 

(521 responses)

 

Level of rates increase supported

 

What level of rates do people support?


(133 responses)

 

 

Where should Council spend more or less?

 

This graph represents the number of comments suggesting where Council should spend more or spend less in relation to the relevant high-level activity areas.

 

 

2)   Fixing Transport

People were asked whether they supported the basic transport network or whether Auckland Council should invest more to get the Auckland Plan transport network that would address Auckland’s transport problems. They were then asked if the decision was made to invest in the Auckland Plan transport network, how they thought Aucklanders should pay for it.

The following graphs give an overview of the responses from the Waitakere Ranges area.

 

 

 

 

 2.a. Preferred transport option

 

What type of transport network?

 

Do people support the Basic transport network or the Auckland Plan transport network?

 

(505 responses)

 

 

2.b. Preferred transport funding option

 

 

How to fund the transport network

 

Do people support a fuel tax and further rates increase or a motorway user charge?

 

(499 responses)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.c. Areas for transport focus

 

Specific transport areas and priorities

 

The number of comments suggesting specific transport areas or priorities that Auckland Transport should focus on, or not.

 

 

3)   Housing and Development

People were asked if they supported council taking a more active role in the development of Auckland through replacing two existing Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) with a new development agency.

The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Waitakere Ranges area.

Development Auckland

 

Do people support merging CCOs to create Development Auckland?

 

(496 responses)

 

 

4)   Your Rates

Auckland’s residents and ratepayers were asked to provide their thoughts on sharing the rates burden, in particular they were asked:

·    what they thought the fixed portion of rates (UAGC) that everyone pays should be, and

·    whether they supported gradually reducing the business property rates from 32.8 per cent of all rates to 25.8 per cent over the next 10 years.

The following graphs give an overview of the responses from the Waitakere Ranges area.

UAGC

 

What level of UAGC do people support?

 

(500 responses)

 

 

Business rates

 

Do people support the proposal to gradually reduce business property rates over the next 10 years?

 

(509 responses)

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 




Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Mangrove Management: Waitakere Ranges Local Board presentation to the Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel (Coastal) 

 

File No.: CP2015/05774

 

  

Executive Summary

 

1.       On 25 March 2015, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board presented evidence to the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel to support the local board’s submission on the mangrove management rules in the proposed unitary plan.

2.       The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP) was notified in September 2013. The Waitakere Ranges Local Board made a submission (dated: 26 February 2014) to the PAUP, which is included as part of the overall Auckland Council submission to the Independent Hearings Panel.

3.       The hearings panel is a statutory body that is independent of Auckland Council. Its members were appointed by the Minister for the Environment and the Minister of Conservation. Information about the hearing is available on the Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel website: www.aupihp.govt.nz. This includes details about the hearing panel, process, hearing dates and topics, and evidence presented.

4.       As part of the hearing process, local boards are invited to speak to the hearings panel on topics where their position differs from the position of the Governing Body of Auckland Council.

5.       In its submission to the PAUP, the Waitakere Ranges Local Board considered the approach to mangrove removal in the PAUP was too enabling. Local Board chairperson, Sandra Coney, presented the evidence in Attachment A to the hearings panel on behalf of the Waitakere Ranges Local Board.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      Receives the report, and notes the evidence (Attachment A) on mangrove management rules presented to the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Waitakere Ranges Local Board submission to the Unitary Plan Independent Hearings Panel on Mangrove Management rules

131

     

Signatories

Authors

Brett Lane - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

Submission Waitakere Ranges Local Board

We agree with the evidence of Dr Carol Jean Lundquist on behalf of Auckland Council with regard to the functions and ecosystems services provided by mangroves (5.2).

We think that these functions and ecosystems services are insufficiently recognised within the PAUP which has given rise to a far too permissive approach with regard to removal.

Before amalgamation the Auckland Regional Council went through Plan Change 4 of the Auckland Regional Plan: coastal, which considerably freed up rules around mangrove removal. This took four years, had 151 submissions and was notified in 2011, after amalgamation.

There has been a strong reaction against Plan Change 4 by some communities. However, we consider this reaction to be somewhat misplaced. Policy analysis by Auckland Council showed that PC4 was more enabling than the rules of other regional coastal plans, such as those of Northland Regional Council, Waikato Regional Council and Bay of Plenty Regional Council.

While all these councils had more restrictive rules than Auckland Council, what they did have was funds to finance resource consent applications and removal activities, whereas this was not the case with Auckland Council.

I will refer later to this matter of financial support for mangrove removal. Generally, this Local Board thinks that Plan Change 4 go it right. The PAUP needs to be closer to this regime. 

The Waitakere Ranges Local Board has 82% land native vegetation cover, and considerable mangrove areas on the Manukau Harbour Coast. Our Local Board Plan has as a priority, protection and restoration of native eco-systems. 

The Board would like to remind the Panel that mangroves are indigenous native plants and mangrove areas have unique and not completely understood eco-systems. We consider it is perverse to treat the removal of mature indigenous flora as a permitted activity for usually no other reason than some people do not like the look of it.

Ironically, Dr Carol Lundquist tells us that all the experience so far shows that removal of mangroves does not result in sandy bays or harbour flats, but an expanse of muddy harbour bed. So, rather than improve amenity, mangrove removal can have unsightly effects.

It should be noted that this board does not oppose the proposed activity status for mangrove removal around infrastructure, or to enable access to jetties and the like.

Dr Lundquist stresses that the major cause of mangrove expansion is sedimentation from land disturbance.

She says “Links to catchment management are an important aspect to mangrove management, as mangroves are symptoms of, and responses to, catchment sediment loads.” 7.4

And further: “Further rules that require long-term seedling removal as maintenance of cleared sites and catchment management plans that reduce sediment loads are also, in my opinion, integral parts of mangrove management.” 7.6

We agree with this. We believe there is room within the PAUP to strongly link rules about mangrove removal to control of land-based activities.

We believe the PAUP does not sufficiently make this link.

We agree with the proposal of the EDS (4735) that a sediment management plan to effectively address the transport of sediment into the CMA should be necessary at the location where removal of mangroves is sought.

Dr Lundquist calls the rule making the removal of mangroves that can be demonstrated to be absent from an area before 1996, “arbitrary” (1.12) and we agree.

We also point out that by the time this plan becomes operative, the 1996 rule means we are talking about mature trees of up to 30 years of age.

The PAUP allows for removal by hand or hand-held tools, that is by bush bar or chain saw.

We do not agree with this.  If there is to be a rule allowing the removal of mangroves as a permitted activity we believe it should only apply to hand removal of seedlings.

This would create the least disturbance of the CMA, protect more mature mangroves and their established habitat, and provide better amenity, because areas would not be marred by unsightly and slow degrading mangrove stumps in the CMA.

Any other removal, we believe should be a restricted discretionary activity to enable full consideration of the environmental and amenity effects.

Every report about mangroves stresses that every situation is unique and the effects of each proposal need to be carefully assessed on a site by site basis. What happens in one place will not necessarily be replicated in a second. There is still a great deal not known about how particular environments will respond to mangrove removal.

The RMA is an effects-based regimen. The effects cannot be assessed with a permitted activity regime. The only prudent approach is to require a resource consent for removal of mangroves larger than seedlings.

We consider that applications for mangrove removal should be processed without a fee to remove financial barriers for communities wishing to remove mangroves. The cost of obtaining a resource consent was one of the criticisms of Plan Change 4. It is better to facilitate community wishes to undertake removal by removing the barrier of a fee, than by removing the ability of the consenting authority to consider the environmental effects.

We oppose the removal of mangroves including seedlings in any SEA as a permitted activity. The descriptions of SEAs in the CMA are not so exact that they can be relied upon to determine that mangrove values are not present. We cannot see how the removal of mangroves from an SEA without mangrove values would not be damaging to the quality of the SEA overall. We consider it is a contradiction to remove native vegetation from an SEA.

Our last point is we believe that land owner consent should be gained before mangroves are removed from the adjoining CMA. We are inclined to think this should always be the case, but we are particularly adamant that this should be the case for public land.

As it stands, the PAUP would enable any individual or group to remove mangroves within the rules and standards anywhere in Auckland, regardless of whether they own the adjoining land or regardless of whether the adjoining land owner agrees.

In public parks, especially those with strong ecological, conservation and landscape values, such as regional parks, removal of mangroves could have a considerable adverse effect on the parks’ values, on public enjoyment of the park, and the potential of the park for environmental education. There is no more bleak sight than the tide out where mangrove removal of mature mangroves has been carried out.

The CMA is the watery commons and is there for the enjoyment of all. The CMA adjoining public parks is particularly important and it should not be possible for mangroves to be removed in these areas without the owner, representing the public interest, giving permission before an application can be made.

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

  


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    WEST flyer                                                        Page 3


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2015