I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 14 April 2015

6.00 pm

Grey Lynn Community Centre
510 Richmond Road
Grey Lynn

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Shale Chambers

 

Deputy Chairperson

Pippa Coom

 

Members

Christopher Dempsey

 

 

Greg Moyle

 

 

Vernon Tava

 

 

Rob Thomas

 

 

Deborah Yates

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Desiree Tukutama

Democracy Advisor

 

9 April 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 307 6071

Email: Desiree.Tukutama@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


 

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Councillor's Report                                                                                                       7

13        Auckland Transport Update - April 2015                                                                    9

14        Waitemata Community Grants Programme 2015/2016                                           27

15        254 Ponsonby Road - report back on public consultation                                     35

16        Point Resolution Taurarua Development Plan                                                        95

17        Grey Lynn Park Development Plan                                                                         101

18        Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                                                                                 107

19        Endorsement of 'Becoming a Low Carbon Community - An Action Plan for the Waitemata Local Board area 2014-2017' plan                                                                            121

20        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           135

21        LGNZ conference and AGM 2015                                                                            139

22        Waitemata Local board Community Fees and Charges - July to Dec 2014        147

23        Proposed Parnell Inc Business Improvement District (BID) Expansion Boundary     163

24        Waitematā Local Board Submission on the Draft Regional Land Transport Programme                                                                                                                                     169

25        Recommendations from the Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee 1 April 2015                                                                                                                                     183

26        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                187

27        Deputy Chairperson's Report                                                                                  189

28        Board Members' Reports                                                                                         207

29        Waitemata Local Board Workshop Notes                                                               213

30        Reports Requested/Pending                                                                                    225  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         Confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 10 March 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

That an apology from Member CP Dempsey for leave of absence, be received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from www members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if -

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Councillor's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/05177

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to provide Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waitemata Local Board on Governing issues.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Receive the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Desiree Tukutama - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05178

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to local board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Waitemata Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and relevant Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         Receive the Auckland Transport Update – April 2015 report.

Comments

 

Project Updates

Grafton Bridge Taxi Trial

2.       Grafton Bridge provides a major link between Auckland's CBD and the Auckland and Starship hospitals - both high demand destinations for taxi passengers. Allowing authorised taxis 24-hour access to the bridge will improve access to the hospitals.

3.       The existing bus lanes will be converted to ‘bus and taxi’ lanes and the corresponding signage and road marking will be updated. 

4.       The Grafton Bridge Taxi Trial will commence in April 2015 and give taxis 24-hour access to the Grafton Bridge for a one year trial is supported by a vigorous monitoring regime.

5.       If results from the trial show no major negative impacts on general traffic operation, bus travel times, safety or traffic infringements, the new special vehicle lanes will be adopted on a permanent basis.

6.       Public feedback during the trial can be provided at:  https://at.govt.nz/staging/grafton-bridge-taxi-trial/

 

Projects Underway

Wynyard Quarter Interim Cycle Path

7.       Construction of the interim cycle path on the eastern side of Beaumont Street was completed in March 2015.

8.       Work on Westhaven Drive and the Beaumont Street zebra crossing has been put on hold while the trial findings are under review, and design and route options were reconsidered.  This work continues and a resolution is sought to provide a safe cycling connection between the Westhaven Promenade and North Wharf.

 

Wynyard Quarter Road and Public Space Improvements

9.       Stage One of the Wynyard Quarter streetscape works begin end of March/early April at Halsey and Gaunt Streets, starting with utility relocations. 

10.     The work is part of the road and public space improvements in Wynyard Quarter.  These works will be staged and take several years to complete. 

 

Major Projects Delivery Programme 2014-15 – Waitemata

Projects Under Construction (as of Apr 15)

 

Projects Delivered (2014-15)

PT Infrastructure

Parnell Station

 

PT Network (Bus Priority Programme)

Symonds Street Bus Lanes

PT Network (Bus Priority Programme)

Fanshawe Street Bus Lane Improvements and Fanshawe/Sturdy Street Intersection

 

 

PT Infrastructure

Newmarket Station Square Signage Improvements

Roading/Public Spaces

Wynyard Quarter Road and Public Space Improvements

 

Roading/Public spaces

O’Connell Street and Upper Khartoum Place

Walking & Cycling

Beach Road Walking and Cycling – Stage 2

 

Walking & Cycling

Beach Road Stage 1

Walking & Cycling

Carlton Gore Cycleway

 

 

 

Walking & Cycling

Wynyard Quarter Interim Cycle Path

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Update

11.     Newmarket Rail Station Artwork Fencing - The Board through the Arts Portfolio has endorsed a fence design that complements the adjacent Reuben Paterson artwork to proceed to construction. The Board allocated $5,000 for an upgraded fence design that will complement renewals work AT will undertake on the bridge over rail structure.  Update: The fence and foundation detailed design has been completed and building consent has been lodged with Council, in tandem, AT is seeking a price from contractors.  Construction is anticipated for end of April/early May 2015. The building consent application has been lodged and AT is planning implementation before the end of the 2014-15 financial.

12.     Drinking Fountains Programme – The Board resolved on 18 March 2014 [WTM/2014/37,WTM/2014/38] the intention to install three drinking fountains within the Waitemata ward.  A resolution was passed on 13 June 2014 to install a drinking fountain as part of the Upper Queen Street Bridge Cycleway project and on 10 March 2015 a resolution was made to install a drinking fountain as part of the Carlton Gore Cycleway project and as part of Nelson Street Cycleway project.  Update: AT is incorporating the drinking fountains in to the respective project implementation plans. 

13.     Waitemata Greenways Route G1 Grey Lynn Park Shared Path – The route was included in Auckland Council’s (AC) consultation on the Grey Lynn Park Development Plan.  Update: Auckland Council has engaged professional services for the design and delivery of the project.    

14.     Ponsonby Road Pedestrian Experience – The project for a continuous pedestrian experience supports one of the outcomes of the Ponsonby Road Plan.  Update:  The designs for the raised pedestrian table have been circulated to AC’s City Transformation Team for review.  A funding proposal will be brought to a Board for endorsement in May.  AT hopes to align any works on Ponsonby Road with the Ponsonby Road Resurfacing project. 

15.     Newmarket Laneways Streetscape Improvements – The Newmarket Laneways Plan is being managed by AC’s City Transformation Team.  AT will work alongside City Transformation to develop proposals for delivery.  Update: Following public consultation and confirmation of Council budgets under the LTP, AC’s City Transformation Team will bring a funding proposal to the Board for a decision. 

16.     The Board has $1,419,786 from 2012-13 to 2015-16 to allocate and has the ability to allocate the 2016-17 year budget of $469,789 at the board’s discretion.  Of the total $1,889,575, the Ponsonby and Newmarket projects will consume a significant portion of that budget once projects are identified for delivery.

 

Consultations

17.     AT undertook consultation with the Waitemata Local Board Transport Portfolio Leaders on the proposals listed in Attachment A should any further comments by the Board wish to be made.

18.     Projects that may be of particular interest to the Board are detailed below. 

 

Parnell Road Bus Priority Lane Project

19.     AT is improving bus reliability and travel time between Parnell and Newmarket by installing a southbound peak-time bus lane between St Stephens Avenue and Sarawia Street to support Auckland Transport’s frequent service network.

20.     This project and the Parnell Road/Parnell Rise Corridor Management Plan (CMP) were advanced as there was an opportunity to align with the planned resurfacing works on the upper end of Parnell Road. 

21.     AT met in workshop with the Board on 7 April to discuss the proposal, public consultation feedback, changes as a result of that feedback and the alignment of the project with the Parnell Road/Parnell Rise Corridor Management Plan. 

22.     As a result of public feedback, a clearway is proposed between 4-6pm, which means parking remains unchanged outside of the two hour peak period.  Cycle feeder lanes and Advanced Cycle Boxes have been included at the St Stephens/Parnell Road intersection. Signal improvement works planned for Ayr Street will be incorporated as part of the delivery of this project. 

23.     AT is seeking formal feedback from the Board on this proposal, Attachment B.

 

Park Road Bus Priority Lane Project

24.     AT is improving bus reliability and travel time between the Auckland Hospital to the Carlton Gore Road intersection to support Auckland Transport’s frequent service network.

25.     AT has undertaken surveys to quantify the benefits of installing bus lanes as three options were considered.  As a result, the option that had the most significant public transport travel time savings has been advanced.

26.     AT is seeking formal feedback from the Board on this proposal, Attachment C.

 

Nelson Street Cycleway

27.     The proposed Nelson Street Cycleway will link the Upper Queen Street Bridge to Quay Street will be delivered jointly with the NZ Transport Agency in two phases.

28.     The route will connect to and expand on the existing cycle network and align with the long term vision of building world class cycling infrastructure that promotes cycling as a safe and convenient mode of transport.

29.     Phase One includes a shared path from the Upper Queen Street Bridge to Nelson Street, via Canada Street and connecting via a new bridge to the disused Nelson Street Off-ramp that then connects to an on-road separated two-way cycleway on the western side of Nelson Street between Union Street and Victoria Street.

30.     Phase One is planned for completion towards the end of 2015.

31.     AT is seeking formal feedback from the Board on this proposal, Attachment D.

 

Transport Information/Media

 

32.     AT Car Share Request for ProposalAT is looking for a car share operator to launch a large scale scheme in Auckland based on Plug-in Electric Vehicles.  Car share schemes are based on members who pay a membership fee which entitles them to use a scheme-owned car on demand, for which they pay a per-trip charge based upon the time used.  There are already about five million people, world-wide, who are members of a car share scheme and the numbers of both users and cities with a scheme, are growing rapidly, changing transport habits in the process.  The scheme would initially have 250 – 300 vehicles which AT will match with a similar number of dedicated car parks around the city. It’s expected that, in time, the fleet would increase to at least 500 cars. 

33.     Open Streets Auckland 2015 –Sunday, 12 April from 10am – 4pm on Quay Street. Open Streets is an international initiative to claim the street for walking, cycling, playing and socializing and is a collaboration between AT, Waterfront Auckland, the Waitemata Local Board and Auckland Council: www.AT.govt.nz/openstreets

34.     City Rail Link’s Design Showcase - A design showcase for the City Rail Link’s three new stations and their adjacent public spaces is being held in Queen Elizabeth Square, daily from 10am to 4pm from Saturday 11 April to Wednesday 15 April: www.cityraillink.co.nz

35.     Space for motorcycles and Scooters - AT is gearing up for an increase in motorcycle and scooter use by inner city commuters.  An increasing number of people are using two wheels to get to their destination.  As a result Auckland Transport has added free, dedicated, motorcycle and scooter parking areas to its CBD parking buildings with a dedicated entry lane for motorbikes in the Downtown car park. The Civic car park has also been fitted out with more motorcycle and scooter parking and Victoria Street carpark will be developed in the near future.

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

17.       The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes. 

 

Māori impact statement

18.     Mana whenua and Mana waka are consulted on Auckland Transport’s capital programme and proposed changes to policy.

Implementation

19.       All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation. 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Consultations Report - March 2015

15

bView

Parnell Bus Priority Lane Project Consultation

17

cView

Park Road Bus Priority Lane Project Consultation

23

dView

Nelson Street Cycleway Consultation

25

 

Signatories

Authors

Priscilla Steel – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Team Leader

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Waitemata Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/04607

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to present the Waitemata Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme to be attached to the policy as an appendix.

4.       This report presents the Waitemata Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 for adoption (see attachment A).

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Adopt the Waitemata Community Grants Programme 2015/2016.

 

Comments

5.       The new Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014 and implementation will commence on 1 July 2015.

6.       The policy supports each local board to develop a Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016. This local board grants programme will guide community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme can include:

·    outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·    specific local board funding priorities

·    budget allocated to the grants programme

·    which grant types will operate locally, the number of funding rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·    an indication of participation in multi-board funding

·    other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making

8.       An implementation plan is underway to support an integrated and simplified approach to grants programme administration. Funding staff from different departments are working together to ensure a co-ordinated approach, expected to benefit applicants and streamline internal processes.

9.       Once the local board community grants programme has been adopted, the types of grants, funding rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Community Grants Programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of their grants programme. This programme can be reviewed on an annual basis.

Māori impact statement

11.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

12.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels. Targeted advertising and promotion will be developed for target populations, including migrant and refugee groups, disability groups, Maori and iwi organisations.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Waitemata Local Board Grants Programme 2015/2016

29

     

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Community Funding Programme Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Waitematā – Local Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

Our Local Grants Programme aims to provide contestable community and events grants to local communities and is operated under three grants schemes:

·    Quick Response Grants

·    Local Grants, and

·    Local Events

 

The new Community Grants policy includes the previous grants schemes under the activity areas of Arts and Culture, Events, Community Development, Environment and Natural Heritage, Historic Heritage and Sports and Recreation.

 

Outcomes sought from the local grants programme

Our grants programme will be targeted towards supporting the following outcomes, as outlined in our local board plan:

·    A distinctive, high-quality urban environment that embraces our heritage

·    Connected, accessible and safe transport choices

·    Waitemata, the innovative economic hub of Auckland

·    The natural environment is respected and enhanced

·    Quality parks, open spaces and community facilities created for people to use and enjoy

·    Strong communities that are inclusive, vibrant and engaged

 

Our priorities for the local grants programme

The Waitematā Local Board welcomes grant applications that align with the following local board plan priorities:

·    Our distinctive heritage and historic places is promoted and preserved

·    Improved pedestrian and cycling safety and travel options

·    Our streets work as great public spaces

·    A people-focused city centre, connected to a vibrant waterfront

·    Waste is minimised as we work towards zero waste to landfill by 2040

·    Our local waterways are cared for and levels of pollutants reduced

·    Our natural heritage is protected and enhanced

·    Residents are encouraged to grow their own food

·    Work towards Waitemata becoming a low-carbon community

·    More opportunities are created for people to enjoy our parks and open spaces

·    People are more active in local arts, events and recreation activities

·    We have places for children and people to gather, be active and be involved

·    Our communities can participate fully in community life

·    Maori culture and heritage is promoted

·    Support community-led initiatives and action

·    Improve actual and perceived safety in our community

·    Improve the health of our community

·    Develop and encourage community participation

·    Achieve equitable distribution of funds across the board area as a whole and support our diverse communities

·    Support voluntary contribution

 

Our fund objectives for local events

·    Develop and support events that are locally specific and environmentally responsible

·    Partner with established and emerging community-led events to support the development to their full potential

·    Enable events to be professionally run while remaining community-focused

·    Support events to be financially sustainable and to become a regular and celebrated part of the Waitemata event calendar

·    Encourage smoke-free events, particularly those targeting children, young people and their families

·    Ensure that local events cater for our young people, providing a range of free and safe opportunities for them to attend and perform

·    Support events of a certain scale with minimum grants of $5,000

 

Lower Priorities:

We will also consider applications for other services, projects, events and activities.  However, these may be considered a lower priority.

 

The Waitematā Local Board has identified the following activities as lower priorities:

·    Catering

·    Travel expenses

·    Ticketed events

·    Activities that primarily benefit a third party (e.g. activity to gain money for an organisation

·    Wages or operational costs

·    Commercial entities and promotion of commercial entities

·    Activities that primarily benefit communities outside the Waitemata area

 

In addition to the eligibility criteria outlined in the Community Grants Policy, the Waitematā Local Board will not fund:

Exclusion One:           Alcohol

Exclusion Two:           Legal Costs

Exclusion Three:         Debt Repayments

Exclusion Four:           Retrospective Grants

Exclusion Five:           Promotion of political goals or religious ministry activities

Exclusion Six:             Vehicles

 

Additional Exclusion for Local Events Grant Only:

 

Exclusion Seven:        Individual or team events, conferences, private functions or award ceremonies

Grants approach

The Waitematā Local Board will operate three grants schemes to support the Waitematā grants programme:

·    Quick Response Grants between $300 and $3,000 (four rounds a year)

·    Local Grants (two rounds a year)

Minimum amount per grant: $3,000

Maximum amount per grant: $7,500

·    Local Events (two rounds a year*)

Minimum amount per grant: $5,000

 

*Local Events Grant - please note that all funding for a given financial year may be allocated in the first funding round so event organisers are encouraged to apply as early as is practical

 

For each grants approach, the following budgets have been earmarked:

 Local Contestable grants Funding Allocation

Budget

 

Local Events

$TBC

Quick Response and Local Grants

$TBC

Multi Board Fund

$TBC

 

 

Application dates

Grant rounds for 2015/16 will be as follows

 

2015-2016 funding rounds

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Closes

May

July

September

January

Quick Response Grants

Local Grants

 

 

Local Events

 

 

 

 

Timetable for the different grant approaches

2015- 2016 funding rounds

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

 

 

Quick Response

Local Grants and Local Events

 

Round One

End of May

June

July

July

Round Two

July

August

 

August

Round Three

September

October

November

November

Round Four

End of February

March

 

February

 

 

Multi-board funding

We have agreed to work with the following local boards to administer funds which focus on central cultural and natural heritage, community group assistance and accommodation support when it benefits two or more board areas.

 

·    Albert Eden

·    Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

·    Orakei Local Board

·    Puketatapa Local Board

 

The amount contributed by Waitematā Local Board to support this fund will be agreed once budgets for 2015/16 have been confirmed.

 


 

Accountability measures

The Waitematā Local Board requires that all successful applicants to provide:

·    Accountability measure one – After the project, event or activity has been completed provide a report or record (e.g. photo, newsletter, press clipping).

·    Accountability measure two - Invitation to the activity to be extended to the board

·    Accountability measure three – Recognition of the Boards support, which may include the inclusion of local board logo (available on request) on advertising and display of Local Board branding/banners at events

 

Contact Details:

Waitematā Local Board

35 Graham Street

Level 2

Auckland

RESLocalBoard.Waitemata@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

254 Ponsonby Road - report back on public consultation

 

File No.: CP2015/00123

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present the results of the public consultation for the future development of 254 Ponsonby Road to the Waitemata Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The site at 254 Ponsonby Road was acquired in 2006 with the intention to create a mixed-use development and an urban square for the Ponsonby Town Centre.

3.       Community consultation on three concept plan options for the development of the site was held from September to December 2015.  698 responses were received (refer attachment A).

4.       There is no budget available in the draft Long-term Plan to deliver this project. Staff recommend no further action assessment of options is undertaken until such time as budget has been secured.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Receives the feedback on the three concept plan options for 254 Ponsonby Road that were subject to public consultation from September to December 2014.

b)      Note that subsequent to the start of the consultation period that budget for the delivery of any of the three concept plan options is no longer available.

c)      Agree no further action on 254 Ponsonby Road is taken until a budget is identified.

d)      Agree that submitters to the consultation on the three concept plan option are provided a summary of the feedback received and are advised that further progress with the development of 254 Ponsonby Road is deferred until such time as a budget for the development is secured.

Discussion

Background

5.       In 2006, the former Auckland City Council purchased 254 Ponsonby Road for $7.7 million to create a mixed-use development and an urban square for the Ponsonby town centre.

6.       The local board approved three concept plan options for public consultation at its meeting in August 2014 (Resolution WTM/2014/140).

7.       Concept plan options consulted on include:

·        Option one, which proposes 700m2 of open space with the balance of the site being developed for commercial/retail and residential use, at an estimated cost to develop the park of $1.1-1.2 million

·        Option two, which proposes 1,455m2 of open space with the balance of the site being developed for residential use, at an estimated cost to develop the park of $2.1-2.5 million

·        Option three, which proposes the full 2,347m2 site as open space, the estimated cost to develop the park is $3.3-3.5 million.

8.       Consultation on the three options took place from September to December 2014.  Feedback was received via:

·        an online survey

·        the Waitemata Local Board’s Facebook page

·        email.

9.       698 responses were received:

·        71 supporting option one

·        85 supporting option two

·        533 supporting option three

·        nine people did not support any of the options.

Comment

10.     Staff have analysed the feedback received and have summarised it into a number of main points for each option. Full feedback received is provided in Attachment A.

11.     The main points of feedback for option one are:

· best urban design outcome

·        a continuous retail façade, provides housing and business opportunities supporting the Auckland Plan

· best use of funds

· can be constructed immediately.

 

12.     The main points of feedback for option two are:

·        an affordable compromise between option one and three with a mix of open space and residential development

· good value for money

· provides for a market and a children’s play area

· includes a place for workers to have lunch.

 

13.     The main points of feedback for option three are:

· Provides a range of activities including:

-     a place to sit and relax, a respite from the busyness of Ponsonby Road

-     space for  markets and events

-     a children’s play area

-     a flexible space

-     a place for workers to have lunch

· Ponsonby has enough retail/cafes

· may attract antisocial behaviour.

 

14.     Other proposals for the site and general comments received include:

· there is enough open space in Ponsonby (Tole Street, St Mary’s Reserve and Western     Park) and another open space is not required

· providing a flexible pop-up park space

· concerns about the increasing traffic on O’Neill Street

· concerns with Nosh moving out of Ponsonby

· desire for development of the site be of a high quality.

 

15.     The local board asked staff to provide indicative costs to develop the site as a temporary pop-up park. The building would cost $130,000 to demolish plus there would be costs around tidying up the site and operating expenditure to manage the space. 

 

 

 

Budget provision

16.     At the time consultation on the three concept options commenced in September 2014, a budget of $492,000 was available in the 2014/15 financial year for the detailed planning and development of the proposed open space. Approximately $5,000 has been spent on design and consultation for the project. The remainder of the budget for the project was deferred in late 2014, and is no longer available this financial year.

17.     Subsequent to the completion of the consultation on the three concept plan options, the draft Long-term Plan 2015-2025 has been adopted for consultation. The draft Long-term Plan has no budget provision for this project.

18.     As the project budget for this financial year is no longer available and the draft Long-term Plan has no budget provision for the development of 254 Ponsonby Road none of the concept options are able to be implemented at this time.

19.     It is noted that while options one and two would generate income from the sale of the non-open space portion of the site, the Auckland City Council resolution to purchase the site required any income from the sale of the non-open space portion be reimbursed to the citywide development contributions.

Next steps

20.     To implement any of the three options for the site, budget will need to be sought through the Long-term or Annual Plan process, reprioritised from within existing budgets, or secured through some alternative funding mechanism.

21.     Until such time as sufficient budget is secured staff recommend that no further assessment of options is undertaken.

22.     Staff recommend that the submitters to the consultation on the three concept options are provided a summary of the feedback received and advised that further progress with the development of 254 Ponsonby Road is deferred until such time as budget for the development has been secured.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

23.     At its August 2014 meeting the Waitemata Local Board endorsed the three concept options for 254 Ponsonby Road for consultation with key stakeholders and the community.

Maori Impact Statement

24.     Auckland Council commissioned a report on Māori heritage values and opportunities to better engage with relevant iwi for the Ponsonby Road master plan and this report has informed the concept designs being prepared for the site. 

25.     For each of the options there are considered to be no specific impacts on Maori.

Implementation Issues

26.     The deferral of the 14/15 budget and the absence of budget in the draft 2015 Long-term Plan mean that none of the options consulted on can be delivered.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Feedback on consultation

39

     

Signatories

Authors

Shyrel Burt - Principal Policy Analyst

Emma Golightly - Team Leader - Parks and Recreation Policy

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

























































Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Point Resolution Taurarua Development Plan

 

File No.: CP2014/29155

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek formal adoption of the draft Point Resolution Taurarua Development Plan by the Waitematā Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board recognises the significance of Point Resolution Taurarua, in terms of its cultural, heritage, ecological and recreational importance.

3.       In order to allow informed decision-making in the future, and assist with programmed renewals, a development plan was commissioned in late 2013.

4.       Iwi engagement, key stakeholder, council stakeholder and public consultation has now occurred.

5.       The local board has been updated on iwi, stakeholder and council feedback throughout the development of the plan.

6.       In February 2015, a summary of the public consultation feedback was presented to the board and final amendments were discussed.

7.       A final draft development plan has been produced for the local board to formally endorse.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Formally adopts the Point Resolution Taurarua Development Plan April 2015.

 

Discussion

8.       Point Resolution Tauarua is a place of significant historic and heritage value to iwi, being the site of a pre-European pa and one of the few unmodified headlands in the area.

9.       The site also has heritage value as the location of Fort Resolution, a Victorian-era Russian Scare fort.

10.     In 2013, the local board commissioned the production of a development plan for the area, to create a clear design framework which will assist with the delivery of programmed renewals and also identify opportunities to improve the site through new capital projects in the short, medium and long term.

11.     Recognising the importance of connectivity, the draft plan also considers neighbouring areas including Judges Bay and St Stephens Church, as well as the Hobson Bay Walkway.

12.     The development plan identifies six design principles to assist with decision making and implementation of future projects. These principles are listed below:

·    improve cliff stability

·    enhance ecology and the natural environment

·    celebrate history

·    increase connectivity

·    enable recreation opportunities and

·    adoption of Te Aranga Maori Design principles

13.     Further information expanding on these design principles can be found in the final draft development plan, included as Attachment A.

 

Summary of key elements in the development plan

14.     Full details of all recommended improvements can be found in Attachment A, but a brief summary of the key proposals is included below:

 

·    Point Resolution Taurarua Reserve

improvements to the entrance, lighting, path network and stormwater infrastructure

weed control and ecological enhancement

cliff stabilisation

improved wayfinding and interpretation signage

 

·    Judges Bay Reserve/St Stephen’s Church

path renewals

improved wayfinding signage

weed management

improved pedestrian connection to Judges Bay Road

new pedestrian boardwalk connecting Parnell Baths to Judges Bay

street planting to connect reserves

 

·    Hobson Bay Walkway

programme of improvements to the existing Hobson Bay Walkway

new stair connection from Hobson Bay Walkway to Point Resolution Reserve.

 

Stakeholder engagement

 

15.     An engagement plan was prepared for this project and approved by the local board parks portfolio holders.

16.     The local board identified several key external stakeholders for early consultation on the draft plan as it was being prepared. These key stakeholders were:

·    Parnell Community Committee/Parnell Inc

·    Parnell Historical Society

·    Friends of Parnell Baths

·    Caroline Cameron (local historian and author).

17.     Several meetings and site visits were held with these key stakeholders to obtain feedback as the draft plan was developed, and the final draft was presented to them on 20 May 2014.

18.     During the development of the plan, several internal council departments have also been consulted including Biodiversity, Heritage, Stormwater and the Coastal Management Team.

 

Community Consultation

Wider public consultation occurred in November 2014 and included:

·    copies of the plan and feedback form on the council’s Shape Auckland website

·    an open day at the Parnell Festival of Roses on Sunday 17 November 2014.

·    on-site posters, a flyer drop to neighbouring properties, the Waitematā Local Board Facebook page and Twitter were used to advertise the open day and website address

·    copies of the plan and attachments were also sent to all key stakeholder groups.

19.     Following the public consultation period, council’s Research Investigation and Monitoring Unit (RIMU) analysed the online and hard copy feedback forms and produced a summary report.

20.     Key elements to note include:

·        41 responses received (20 online and 21 hard copy)

·        all five design principles were supported*, the most strongly supported being ‘enhance ecology and the natural environment’ followed by ’increase connectivity’

*Adoption of Te Aranga Maori Design Principles was included in the draft plan after the public consultation exercise

·        69% of respondents supported returning one of the canon back to the reserve

·        several respondents noted concerns about the existing structures not being robust enough for the location

21.     This summary report, included as Appendix B, was presented to the local board on 24 February 2014 and final amendments to the draft plan were discussed.

 

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

22.     Several discussions about individual components of the draft development plan have been held with the parks portfolio holders at their monthly meetings.

23.     A workshop to present the draft development plan was held on 29 July 2014.

24.     A local board decision report, seeking approval to go out to public consultation, was received at the 9 September 2014 business meeting.

25.     Local board members attended the public open day held at the Parnell Festival of Roses on 15 November 2014

26.     A local board workshop to review the feedback from the public consultation and identify any final amendments was held on 24 February 2015.

27.     The final draft development plan was presented to the parks portfolio holders at their monthly meeting on 2 April 2014, for their information.

Maori Impact Statement

28.     Throughout the development of the plan, Local and Sports Parks and the local board have been working with iwi to ensure that their views and aspirations are incorporated in to the development plan.

29.     On advice from Te Waka Angamua, in late 2013 the Waitemata Local Board Engagement Advisor engaged with all iwi that may have an interest in being involved with the project.

30.     Four iwi indicated they wanted to be involved:

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Paoa

·    Te Kawerau a-Maki.

31.     These four iwi were asked whether they would like to contribute to the project by providing Cultural Values Assessments (CVAs).

32.     All, except Te Kawerau a-Maki, responded that they wished to submit CVAs and provided fee estimates to undertake this work. Purchase Orders were subsequently issued.

33.     No CVAs were received.  The operational expenditure budget allocated for the CVAs was only available in the 13/14 Financial Year.

34.     Nevertheless, the Iwi representatives have been involved throughout the development of the plan. Their involvement can be summarised as:

·    Invited to initial stakeholder on-site meeting to discuss existing values and aspirations for the site (attended by all four Iwi representatives). Comments were minuted and circulated.

·    Invited to hui with local board to form relationships and discuss purpose for project and process (attended by all iwi representatives except Ngāti Paoa)

·    Invited to walkover with local board (attended by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei representatives).

·    At the walkover (and in a subsequent email), the representatives were asked for written feedback to follow up some of the discussion points raised during the walkover. As at the time of writing, this has not been received.

·    Invited to second meeting where the ‘first cut’ of the development plan was presented and feedback received (attended by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Te Kawerau a-Maki representatives). Comments were minuted and circulated.

·    Invited to a third meeting where the amended version of the draft development plan was presented and feedback received (not attended by any Iwi representatives). Comments were minuted and circulated.

·    In addition, written feedback (via email) has been received from Te Kawerau a-Maki. This identified their ancient and contemporary cultural interests in the area of Tāmaki including the Parnell/Pt Resolution area and highlighted several key elements to be considered, including the need for:

·    input and recognition in the design and implementation phases

·    integrated interpretation

·    protection of cultural/heritage features

·    cliff stabilisation.

35.     As a result of this ongoing engagement, adoption of Te Aranga Maori Design Principles has been included as one of the six design principles of the plan

 

Implementation Issues

36.     All of the proposals identified in the plan have been summarised in an action plan within the draft development plan.

37.     The action plan includes:

·    identification of the budget type (capex development, capex renewal or opex)

·    priority – short (1-3 years), medium (4-6 years) or long-term (7 years plus)

·    which design principles the proposal aligns to.

38.     Short-term priorities are being considered as part of the preparation of the Local and Sports Parks Waitematā Annual Work Programme for 2015/16

39.     Where existing asset renewals are due and budget is available, the renewals will be aligned to the draft development plan.

40.     Any capital expenditure top-ups required for renewals will be discussed with the local board for consideration from their Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget.

41.     Other elements within the plan that align to the proposed growth-funded budgets will also be considered, but won’t be finalised until the Long-term Plan is adopted.

42.     To assist the local board with their budget prioritisation, parks staff will obtain cost estimates for the short-term new developments identified in the action plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Point Resolution Taurarua Development Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Public Feedback Analysis (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Mark Miller - Parks Advisor - Waitemata

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Grey Lynn Park Development Plan

 

File No.: CP2015/00217

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek formal adoption of the draft Grey Lynn Park Development Plan by the Waitematā Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       Grey Lynn Park is a destination park located in Ponsonby, with a wide range of facilities catering for active and passive recreation.

3.       These include three sports fields, two playgrounds, a skate ramp, basketball and tennis courts, an extensive footpath network and two off-leash dog exercise areas.

4.       With the southern playground and other assets requiring renewal, and several projects potentially affecting the park, the Waitematā Local Board identified the need for an updated development plan to direct both renewals and future capital development.

5.       The draft development plan has considered the two previous development plans created in 2004 and 2008, as well as a newly commissioned community facility needs analysis.

6.       The plan includes concept designs for upgrades to both playgrounds, the in-park section of Greenway G2 and identifies other improvements and coordinated renewal requirements.

7.       The plan also presents an optimal location for any future sports pavilion/community facility, based on the best outcome for the wider park.

8.       Iwi engagement, key stakeholder, council stakeholder and public consultation have all now occurred.

9.       The local board has been updated on iwi, stakeholder and council feedback throughout the development of the plan.

10.     In February 2015, a summary of the public consultation feedback was presented to the board and final amendments were discussed.

11.     A final draft development plan has been produced for the local board to formally endorse.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Formally adopts the Grey Lynn Park Development Plan April 2015.

 

Background

12.     Previous park development plans have been written for Grey Lynn Park in in 2004 and 2008.  There is also a Management Plan for the park, which was written in 1987.

13.     Several key elements were identified as being necessary for a holistic, updated plan and these were:

·    a review and audit of the previous development plans for the park

·    creation of a new Community Facility Needs Analysis for Grey Lynn Park

·    concept designs for two upgraded playgrounds

·    designs for the in-park sections of Greenways route G1 – a priority Greenways route for the local board

·    identification of an optimal location for a possible future sports pavilion/community facility

·    identification of any planned capital projects for the park.

 

Community Facility Needs Analysis

 

14.     O’Connor Sinclair consultants were engaged to produce a community facility needs analysis in October 2013.

15.     The purpose of this study was to identify the current and future building and facility needs of all user groups in the park.

16.     This analysis reviewed previous park plans and captured the current and future demands of all community and sporting groups with a connection to Grey Lynn Park, through one-to-one interviews.

 

Proposed Playground upgrades

17.     Opus consultants were engaged to assess several playground renewals in the Waitematā Local Board area and identify opportunities to upgrade them, increasing their play value and appeal to a wider age range, where appropriate.

18.     For the two playgrounds in Grey Lynn Park, Opus worked with local school children to identify what they liked and disliked about the current playgrounds and seek ideas for further improvements.

19.     Concept plans and indicative equipment for both playgrounds are included in the final development plan.

 

Greenways Route G2

20.     The Waitematā Greenways route G1 extends from West End Road to the North-western cycle route at Arch Hill.

21.     The route passes through several parks and open spaces including Cox’s Bay Reserve, Hakanoa Reserve and Grey Lynn Park.

22.     The local board has funded a detailed design for the in-park sections of G1 (Hakanoa Reserve and Grey Lynn Park). The design forms part of the draft development plan.

         

Optimal location for any future pavilion/community facility

23.     The final draft development plan identifies an optimal location for a possible future pavilion/community facility, between the existing car park and the south west side of the number one field.

24.     This location was identified after reviewing the findings of the Community Facility Needs Analysis, and discussions with staff from the Local and Sports Parks and Sport and Recreation Teams.

25.     Benefits of this location include:

·    the rationalisation of buildings on the park – one new facility would allow the removal of several older buildings

·    improved pedestrian safety – no car movements through the park

·    improved views through the park and increased passive surveillance

·    better Greenways route alignment.

26.     Feedback has also been received from the Richmond Rovers Rugby League Club, who have expressed concerns about the proposed location and asked that if their preferred option to retain a building in its current location cannot be achieved, that an alternative location at the end of the main car park, between number one and number two fields, be considered.

27.     This alternative proposal has been considered by the Local and Sports Parks Team, Sports and Recreation Team, and the local board. 

28.     Whilst the Richmond Rovers’ proposal doesn’t meet the criteria identified in paragraph 24 above, the local board have committed to ongoing discussions with Richmond Rovers to see if a solution can be found that is of benefit to the club, the park, all user groups, and local residents. This has been communicated to Richmond Rovers in a response letter emailed on 27 March 2015.

 

Identification of planned capital projects

29.     The following planned projects were taken into consideration during the preparation of the draft plan:

·    installation of new floodlights on the number one field in 2014/15

·    planned renewal of the public toilet block in 2014

·    additional programmed renewals of park furniture and fixtures, currently on hold, pending the adoption of the new development plan.

 

Updated Draft Development Plan

 

30.     The Parks Sport and Recreation Design Team have produced the updated draft development plan, taking account of all the elements identified above, ongoing input from the local board and feedback from iwi, stakeholders and the general public.

31.     A copy of the final draft development plan is included as Appendix A.

 

Stakeholder Engagement

32.     All stakeholders with an interest in the park were interviewed as part of the community facility needs analysis, and their feedback has helped inform the updated development plan.

33.     A meeting was held at the Waitematā Local Board offices on 17 July 2014 to discuss the draft plan with the Grey Lynn Park Advisory Group.

34.     Representatives from Richmond Rovers also attended this meeting

35.     The group considered each element of the plan and provided valuable feedback on each element, which was be considered as part of the wider consultation process. 

36.     Specific additional items that the group advocated for included:

·    a new BBQ and picnic area adjacent to the northern  playground

·    consideration for new artwork locations within the park (NOTE: it was agreed by the local board that a development plan shouldn’t identify potential locations for artwork, and that any request for public art should be considered on its own merit, in line with the council’s Public Art Policy).

·    importance of resolving drainage issues in several locations

·    careful consideration of proposed swale planting, that may interfere with pedestrian movement between fields.

37.     A separate meeting was held at the Richmond Rovers club rooms on 24 July 2014 to discuss the draft plan with the Management Committee of the club, with an emphasis on specific elements that related directly to the club, their current operations and future plans.

38.     Initial feedback was provided and the club asked for a few weeks to discuss the plan with their wider club membership.

39.     A follow up meeting was held on 21 August 2014, and the key concern about location for any future building is summarised in paragraph 25 above. This was the only feedback provided by the club in their formal submission letter.

 

Community Consultation

40.     Wider public consultation occurred in November 2014 and included:

·    copies of the draft plan, attachments and feedback form on the council’s Shape Auckland website 

·    an open day at the Grey Lynn Festival on 29 November 2014.

·    on-site posters, a flyer drop to neighbouring properties, the Waitematā Local Board Facebook page and Twitter were used to advertise the open day and website address

41.     Following the public consultation period, council’s Research Investigation and Monitoring Unit (RIMU) analysed the online and hard copy feedback forms and produced a summary report.

42.     Key elements to note include:

·        62 responses where received (21 online and 41 hard copy)

·        The most strongly supported design principles were  ‘create a safe place for users’ followed by ‘create a sustainable and environmentally friendly park’

·        The least well supported design principle was ‘improved location of buildings and car park’

·        62% of respondents either supported or strongly supported the greenway proposal through the park

·        60% of respondents either supported or strongly supported upgrading the playgrounds

43.     This summary, included as Appendix B, was presented to the local board on 24 February 2015 at a workshop and any final amendments to the draft plan were discussed.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

44.     Several discussions about individual components of the draft development plan, including the playground upgrades and Greenway, have been held with the parks portfolio holders at their monthly meetings.

45.       Site visits to Grey Lynn Park have also been undertaken with the parks portfolio holders.

46.     A workshop to present the draft development plan, including the playground concept plans was held on 29 July 2014.

47.       A workshop to present the in-park Greenways design was held on 12 August 2014.

48.     Deputy Chair Pippa Coom attended the site visit on 31 October 2014 with a representative for Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki and the Parks Advisor.

49.     A workshop to review public feedback and discuss any final amendments was held on 24 February 2015.

50.     The final draft development plan was presented to the parks portfolio holders at their monthly meeting on 2 April 2015, for their information.

Maori Impact Statement

51.     Iwi engagement on this plan occurred prior to the public consultation period.

52.     On 26 August 2014 an email was sent to all 13 iwi that may have an interest in Grey Lynn Park, asking if they would like to be involved in the development of the plan.

53.     Three iwi responded to this email, indicating an interest:

·        Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki

·        Ngāti Te Ata

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua

54.     In addition, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara indicating that this activity was outside their area of interest and should be referred to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei for comment (who had also received the initial email enquiry).

55.     A meeting with the local board parks portfolio holders was arranged for 15 October 2014 and all iwi that had expressed an interest were invited.

56.     No iwi attended this meeting, so a revised meeting was arranged for 23 October 2014, but again no iwi were able to attend this meeting.

57.     A site visit was therefore arranged for 31 October 2014 to discuss the draft plan and seek input from the three interested iwi. A draft development plan was attached to the meeting invite with a request for comments from any iwi that couldn’t make the site visit.

58.     Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki attended the site visit and comments were received from the other two iwi.

59.     After the site visit a representative form Ngai Tai ki Tāmaki worked with the council’s Design Team to incorporate Te Aranga Māori Design Principles into the draft development plan.

Implementation Issues

60.     All of the proposals identified in the plan have been summarised in an action plan within the draft development plan.

61.     The action plan includes:

·    identification of the budget type (capex development, capex renewal or opex)

·    priority – short (1-3 years), medium (4-6 years) or long-term (7 years plus)

·    which design principles the proposal aligns to.

62.     Short-term priorities are being considered as part of the preparation of the Local and Sports Parks Waitematā Annual Work Programme for 2015/16

63.     Where existing asset renewals are due and budget is available, the renewals will be aligned to the draft development plan.

64.     Any capital expenditure top-ups required for renewals will be discussed with the local board for consideration from their Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget.

65.     Other elements within the draft development plan that align to the proposed growth-funded budgets will also be considered, but won’t be finalised until the Long-term Plan (LTP) is adopted.

66.     To assist the local board with their budget prioritisation, parks staff will obtain cost estimates for the short-term new developments identified in the action plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Grey Lynn Park Development Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Analysis of public feedback (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Mark Miller - Parks Advisor - Waitemata

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Manager Parks, Sports & Recreation

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Approval of a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association

 

File No.: CP2015/04787

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Albert-Eden, Puketepapa, Waitemata, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Kaipatiki, Devonport-Takapuna, Rodney, Mangere-Otahuhu, Howick, Otara-Papatoetoe, Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges and Whau Local Boards approval for a community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association. A report will go to each Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association (the Association) was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The Association’s stated objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care within New Zealand

3.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.  The benefits to Auckland Council and the Association are:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

4.       The Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area for which site plans are included.

5.       This report recommends the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises to Auckland Kindergarten Association for 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

6.       A Community Outcomes Plan will be an attachment to the lease and reported on by the Association (Attachment B).

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Approves the surrender of all current and expired Auckland Kindergarten Association leases from their local board area as specified in the Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans (Attachment A) subject to the granting of a new community lease;

b)      Approves a new community lease to Auckland Kindergarten Association for Parnell Kindergarten and Freemans Bay Kindergarten, with details specified in Attachment A, to the agenda report, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2015 with one 10-year right of renewal;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested;

iii)      The Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan as approved be attached to the lease document (Attachment B);

iv)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012.

Comments

7.       The Association has 39 community leases with Auckland Council across the region where the Association owns the building. These individual community leases have varying terms and conditions, commencement and end dates which can be complicated to manage for both parties. The Association approached Auckland Council to find an agreed solution. A community lease for multiple premises would align the 39 community leases with the same terms and conditions, commencement and end dates.

8.       A community lease for multiple premises will benefit both Auckland Council and the Association for the following reasons:

·    Consistency of management of the leases with the same terms and conditions

·    One report per annum on community outcomes

·    Streamlined management of the next right of renewal process

·    Enable a move from an operational relationship to a more strategic focus

9.       This will be the first community lease for multiple premises for Auckland Council.  Council staff can see benefits for other groups with multiple premises.

10.     Auckland Council legal advice recommends that the Association surrender their existing and expired leases as listed in Attachment A so that when a new community lease is approved it will commence from 1 April 2015.

11.     Attachment A lists the 39 premises separated into local board areas. Each local board is asked to approve the new community leases for the premises from their area.

12.     The Association was incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 28 February 1911. The association’s objectives are:

·    providing facilities for and undertaking early childhood education and care within New Zealand

·    promoting and encouraging early childhood education and care.

13.     Council staff has sought input from relevant Council departments

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Local Board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

15.     A portfolio meeting has been held with each local board and they were presented with the proposal.

Māori impact statement

16.     The Association have long standing community leases on the properties.  Maori are benefactors as users of the services and it is considered the granting of a new community lease for multiple premises will not have any adverse impact for Maori.

Implementation

17.     The recommendations within this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Schedule of Premises and Site Plans

111

bView

Auckland Kindergarten Association Community Outcomes Plan

119

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Donna Cooper - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 









Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Endorsement of 'Becoming a Low Carbon Community - An Action Plan for the Waitemata Local Board area 2014-2017' plan

 

File No.: CP2015/03669

 

  

Purpose

1.   To seek endorsement from the Waitematā Local Board for the ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community - An Action Plan for the Waitematā Local Board Area 2014-2017’ plan.

Executive Summary

2.   This report presents the ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community - An Action Plan for the Waitemata Local Board Area 2014-2017’ plan (referred to as the ‘action plan’ in this report) to the Waitematā Local Board for their consideration and endorsement (Attachment A).

3.   This report and plan give effect to the Waitematā Local Board Plan (2011) aspiration to develop a localised plan for reducing emissions ‘that will focus on reducing energy use, sustainable transport options, waste reduction, local food production and more effective and cooperative use of resources and land.’

4.   A draft localised carbon reduction plan was developed for consultation with communities as part of the development of the Waitematā Local Board’s 2014-2017 Local Board Plan. Attachment B to this report details submissions received and issues for deliberation in the development of the final plan. Consultation points were considered by officers and the Waitematā Local Board in February 2015 and the final draft is presented for consideration by the local board as attachment A to this report.

5.   The draft action plan identifies a number of different implementation processes and opportunities which give effect to reducing greenhouse gas emissions including the role of the local board in this implementation. If adopted the action plan will be implemented, where possible, using a combination of support for advocacy, and direct local and regional funding models.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Approves the “Becoming a Low Carbon Community – An Action Plan for the Waitemata Local Board Area 2014-2017’ plan

Comments

6.   The Auckland Plan lays the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a highly energy resilient, low carbon city through a focus on green growth. It sets as aspirational target of a 40 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2040.

7.   Launched in 2014 Auckland Council’s Low Carbon Auckland (Auckland’s Energy Resilience and Low Carbon Action Plan), Toitū te whenua, toitū te tangata (Low Carbon Auckland) sets out a 30 year pathway and a 10 year plan of action that will guide the first stage of Auckland’s transformation towards an energy resilient future and help deliver on the Auckland Plan’s aspirational target as detailed above.

8.   The opportunity to examine the connection between the Auckland-wide strategy and local action was identified by the Waitematā Local Board, who signalled in their 2011 Local Board Plan the desire to prepare a localised plan for reducing emissions. The action plan – which is the first of its kind in Auckland – seeks to define focus areas at a local level that will contribute to the Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emission reduction target.

9.   This action plan gives effect to the Waitematā Local Board Plan (2011) aspiration to develop a localised plan for reducing emissions ‘that will focus on reducing energy use, sustainable transport options, waste reduction, local food production and more effective and cooperative use of resources and land.’

10. A draft localised carbon reduction plan was developed for consultation with communities as part of the development of the Waitematā Local Board’s 2014-2017 Local Board Plan. Attachment B to this report details submissions received and issues for deliberation in the development of the final plan. Consultation points were considered by officers and the Waitematā Local Board in February 2015 and the final draft is presented for consideration by the local board as attachment a to this report.

11. The action plan summarises seven opportunities and actions for activity that can, at a local level, contribute to greenhouse gas reductions. These action areas are listed below, and are further detailed in Attachment A to this report:

·    Utilising Social Infrastructure

·    Walking the Talk

·    Good for Business

·    Low Carbon Transport options

·    Champions for Change

·    Engaging Households

·    Local Exemplars and Initiatives

 

12. The draft action plan identifies a number of different implementation processes and opportunities which give effect to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In addition the potential role of the local board in this implementation is identified including options for direct funding, advocacy, leadership, partnerships and recognition.

13. Thirty three specific action areas to give effect to this plan are identified in the action plan as per Attachment A to this report. Some of these action areas identify opportunities to implement the following Waitematā Local Board Plan key initiatives:

LB Plan Key Initiative

Low Carbon Community Plan - Action Area

Pilot a project with a residential Body Corporate to reduce energy use, water consumption and waste

Action Area 6.1

Implement programmes to support householder’s transition to low carbon lifestyle

Implement programmes to support sustainable new buildings with energy efficient designs, use of low impact materials and less waste

Action Area 6.3

Promote the Council’s free Eco-Design Service

Action Area 6.6

Implement programmes to support sustainable new buildings with energy efficient designs, use of low impact materials and les waste

Support businesses to adopt low-carbon practices

Action Area 3.1

Partner with business associations and Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) to design and deliver initiatives

Action Area 3.2

Continue to deliver Good for Business presentations with a focus on transitioning to a low carbon economy

Action Area 3.3

Lead the development of a low carbon programme targeted at supporting businesses to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adopt low carbon practices

Action Area 3.4

Support and profile exemplar businesses

Action Area 3.5

Encourage businesses to implement product stewardship schemes

Advocate to the governing body for Council-Controlled Organisations to include low-carbon targets in their Statements of Intent

Action Area 2.2

Use advocacy powers to ensure that the practices of the Auckland Council (including the CCOs) support the low carbon outcome.

 

14. This report presents the ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community - An Action Plan for the Waitemata Local Board Area 2014-2017’ plan (referred to as the ‘action plan’ in this report) to the Waitematā Local Board for their consideration and recommends that the local board endorse the action plan.

15. This action plan looked at ways to reduce energy use and waste, promoting sustainable transport options, encouraging local food production and promoting effective, cooperative and sustainable use of resources and land. It gives real effect to both local board and regional Auckland Council outcomes as they relate to sustainability, carbon reduction and caring for the environment.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

16. This action plan delivers on the Waitemata Local Board’s 2011 Local Board Plan’s vision in regards climate change, namely the initiative to ‘develop a localised plan for reducing emissions that will focus on reducing energy use, sustainable transport options, waste reduction, local food production and more effective and cooperative use of resources and land.’

17. The plan and actions for implementation are strongly aligned to the Waitematā Local Board Plan (2014-17) outcome area that ‘the natural environment is respected and enhanced’ and to the desired outcomes of ‘our communities help protect and enhance Waitematā's beautiful natural environments and ‘we are a low-carbon community’.

18. The Waitematā Local Board considered the draft version of this action plan in a workshop in February 2015 and has provided feedback to the development of this draft.

Māori impact statement

19. No specific consultation with Māori was undertaken for the Low Carbon Community – Action plan. However, individual projects noted in this report may impact on Māori, and Māori outcomes, who will then be consulted as part of the development of the implementation plan.

20. Engaging rangatira ki te rangatira or chief to chief, is the mechanism by which we will share information and work together. The local board plan describes some of the ways the board will work with Māori in Waitematā local board area and these mechanism will guide implementation of this plan.

Implementation

 

21. The Low Carbon Community - action plan is aspirational and as such, many of the proposals are not specifically funded from within regional or local board budgets. However there are opportunities to leverage some programmes which have been currently delivered from wider council departments such as Parks (Urban Forest Map), ATEED (Good for Business – Transitioning to low carbon economy in partnership with AECOM), Auckland Council Property (introduction of electric vehicles to the council fleet), and Solid Waste the development Resource Recovery Network for example, that will deliver on the aspirations of the plan.

22. Additional budget will need to be identified to fund some of the initiatives suggested in the Low Carbon Community – action plan. Currently, no provision has been made until 2016 for additional financial resources. However officers will work with the local board to identify opportunities for implementation where possible. 

23. Officers will seek to report on an annual basis to identify activity undertaken against each of the action areas outlined in the plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Action Plan for Becoming Low Carbon Community

125

bView

Low Carbon Action Plan Public Consultation

131

     

Signatories

Authors

Brent Bielby – Environmental Partnerships Team Manager

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Manager Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 






Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 





Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/05212

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), including local board involvement in developing the approach.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

3.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities.  The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across council departments and council- controlled organisations.

4.       A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

5.       A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the ECA.  Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them. The PAG meeting in March endorsed the proposed approach.  PAG feedback included the importance of meeting local needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach.  Two further PAG meetings will be held on 16 April and 4 May.

6.       An engagement programme with local boards is underway.  Key steps in this are:

·    two chairs and portfolio holder workshops.

·    individual board workshops in April.

·    a report to local board business meetings in May/ early June.

The final empowered communities approach and the CDS operational model will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee for endorsement in June 2015, for implementation in July-December.

7.       A targeted programme of community engagement is underway.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Receive the Developing the Empowered Communities Approach report.

b)      Where required by the timing of the existing business meeting, the local board either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June 2015.

 

Comments

Background

8.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach.

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more.

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

9.       The purpose of the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA) is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECAP will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

10.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A political advisory group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance as staff develop the empowered communities approach. Discussion has centred on what empowered communities look like, and what shifts are required within council to support them.

Political Advisory Group

12.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has been established to provide strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach.  Membership of the PAG includes the Mayor, six local board members (Andrew Baker, Efeso Collins, Vanessa Neeson, Peter Haynes, Julia Parfitt, Kay McIntyre), five governing body members (Cathy Casey, Linda Cooper, George Wood, Alf Filipaina, Penny Hulse) and a representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board (Karen Wilson). 

13.     At their meeting on 6 March 2015 the PAG endorsed the proposed approach.  The key points discussed were:

·    ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’: The approach is underpinned by a two-way relationship between council and the community; leading to improved outcomes for Auckland.

·    Describing empowered communities: an empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

·    How to support community empowerment: community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this. An empowered communities approach is a ‘way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities.

14.     Working in a way that empowers communities requires ‘whole of council’ shifts to:

·    provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information.

·    provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities.

·    facilitate and embed the empowered communities approach across council.

·    develop and implement creative new engagement and participation practices.

·    support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

15.     Other key feedback from the PAG included:

·    the model should involve high trust between council and the community and be based on building good relationships.

·    the path Māori have been on provides an example for the ECA, which should draw from the Māori Responsiveness Framework.

·    one size does not fit all and the model may look different across different activities of council and in different communities, reflecting the make-up of those communities and their capability and capacity.

·    all parts of council need to work collaboratively to make this work. This should include the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

·    capacity building is important and there need to be examples of how to do this effectively.

·    recognition that embedding this approach will take time.

16.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 16 April with the following:

·    revised approach.

·    the proposed operating model for the CDS unit.

·    supporting tools.

·    budget and implementation implications.

ECA timeline

17.     The key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

 

Date

Purpose

Local board business meetings

 

15-23 April

Context setting report

Political Advisory Group

 

16 April

Provide strategic advice on revised approach and proposed CDS model of operation

 

Chairs and portfolio holders workshop

20 April

Wider discussion of material presented at PAG

 

Local board workshops

21 April – 1 May

Discussion by individual boards

 

Political Advisory Group

 

4 May

Provide strategic advice on revised CDS model of operation

 

Local board business meetings

 

5 May – 3 June

Formal resolutions on proposal

Budget Committee

 

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Implementation

 

July - December

 

 

18.     For some local boards, the timing of the May-June local board business meetings may require the local board to either delegate, hold an extraordinary meeting or accept a late report so that the board can provide formal feedback during the period 5 May – 3 June.

Consultation and engagement

19.     Engagement with community stakeholders is ongoing, with initial feedback workshops held in March across the region. At the workshops, staff explored with participants what capabilities and ideas for empowering communities, equity issues and activities the community see themselves as best delivering. Engagement was sought on what is best kept as council core functions in relation to community development and safety.

20.     Internal staff consultation is ongoing as the approach is developed. A number of workshops have been held with staff from all departments in the operations division in the first instance.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     The empowered community approach aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

22.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the Local Board Plans 2014.

23.     Local boards views will be sought through the process outlined above.

Māori impact statement

24.     The ECAP has the potential to impact on Māori over time. Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua will be undertaken during the engagement phase to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

25.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

26.     The model will be implemented in CDS in 2015/2016. The approach will be rolled out across the whole of council over time.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd – Strategic Advisor, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

LGNZ conference and AGM 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05170

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report informs local boards about the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and conference in Rotorua from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 and invites local boards to nominate a representative to attend as relevant.

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government New Zealand annual conference and AGM takes place at the Rotorua Energy Events Centre from Sunday 19 July to Tuesday 21 July 2015.

3.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to 4 official delegates at the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The Governing Body will consider this at their meeting on 26 March 2015.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor as a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor as the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster as Chair LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council, and the Chief Executive.

4.       In addition to the official delegates, local board members are invited to attend.  Local boards should consider the relevance of the conference programme when deciding on attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Nominate a representative to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2015 annual general meeting and conference from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board’s work programme

b)      Confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

Comments

5.       The 2015 LGNZ Conference and AGM are being held in Rotorua. The conference commences with the AGM and technical tours from 09.30 am on Sunday 19 July 2015 and concludes at 2.30 pm on Tuesday 21 July 2015.

6.       The theme of this year’s conference is “Leading the Charge for our Communities”.  The programme includes:

·    Stephen Yarwood, former Mayor of Adelaide, will discuss performance and customer focussed culture - taking your people with you

·    David Meates, CEO of Canterbury District Health Board, will present on understanding what's important to communities and why a strong focus on the customer matters

·    Dr Lester Levy, CEO of New Zealand Leadership Institute, will discuss disruptive governance – how do we increase our performance and create a strong link from strategy to transparent financial performance

·    Kevin Roberts, Executive Chairman of Saatchi & Saatchi, on telling our story and selling the value of our sector

·    Penny Webster, Councillor at Auckland Council; Rob Cameron, Partner at Cameron Partners; and Dr Oliver Hartwich, Executive Director of the New Zealand Initiative will speak on funding for growth – transformation of local government

·    Dr William Rolleston, National President of Federated Farmers; Andrew Knight, CEO of New Zealand Oil and Gas; and Gary Taylor, Executive Director of the Environmental Defence Society will discuss resource management – how a growing economy can also support a healthy environment

·    Mayors Meng Foon, Stuart Crosby, Annette Main, David Ayers and Tony Kokshoorn will each present on right-sizing your town and making the important decisions – a response to economic and demographic change

·    Brenda Halloran, former Mayor of Waterloo, Canada, will talk about nation building – infrastructure and urban development

·    Brett Way of Central Hawkes Bay District Council and Rochelle Deane of Auckland Council will present on delivering local government expertise in the Pacific – a snap shot of the Local Government Technical Assistance Facility for Pacific Countries, (PacificTA) programme.

7.       The programme also includes a number of Master Class sessions including:\

·    Growing NZ's talent and economies – strategies to retain and attract skilled migrants

·    Local boards – connecting with the community

·    Engaging with iwi to grow local and regional economies

·    Collaboration, culture change and customer focus under the RMA

·    Getting the most from the One Network Roading Classification system

8.       Local boards should consider the relevance of the programme when deciding on conference attendance, with the expectation that no board will approve more than one member to attend the conference.

Annual General Meeting

9.       The AGM takes place on the first day of the conference.  Auckland Council is entitled to have four delegates to the AGM, one of whom is the presiding (or voting) delegate.  The 4 official delegates are likely to be the Mayor (or his nominee), the Deputy Mayor, Councillor Penny Webster (as Chair of Zone 1) and the Chief Executive (or his nominee).

10.     The Mayor is a member of the LGNZ National Council, the Deputy Mayor is the Mayor’s alternate for this position, Cr Webster is the Chair of LGNZ Zone One and a member of LGNZ National Council.   The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at their meeting on 26 March 2015.

11.     LGNZ request that local board members who wish to attend the AGM, register their intention prior to the AGM.

Costs

12.     The Local Board Services Department budget will cover the costs of one member per local board to attend the conference. 

13.     Registration fees are $1410.00 (incl GST) before 3 June 2015 and $1510.00 (incl GST) after that.  Full conference registration includes:

·    Attendance at conference business sessions (Sunday-Tuesday)

·    Satchel and contents

·    Daily catering

·    Simpson Grierson welcome cocktail function

·    Fulton Hogan conference dinner and EXCELLENCE Awards function

·    Closing conference function ticket

14.     The council hosted tours on Sunday 19 July 2015 are not included in the conference price. Local board members are welcome to attend these at their own cost.

15.     Additional costs are approximately $150 per night accommodation, plus travel.  Local Board Services will be co-ordinating and booking all registrations and accommodation and investigating cost effective travel.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

16.     This is a report to the 21 local boards.

Māori impact statement

17.     The Local Government NZ conference will better inform local boards and thereby support their decision making for their communities including Maori.

Implementation

18.     There are no implementation issues associated with the recommendations in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

LGNZ 2015 conference and master class programme

143

     

Signatories

Authors

Anna Bray – Policy and Planning Manager, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 




Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Waitemata Local board Community Fees and Charges - July to Dec 2014

 

File No.: CP2015/05014

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present the usage and revenue data from community facilities within the local board area for the period 1 July to 31 December 2014 and to highlight any significant impact of the new fees and charges that were introduced on 1 July 2014.

2.       To recommend community facilities hire fees for the 2015/2016 year.

Executive Summary

3.       On 3 March 2015, members of the Waitematā Local Board met at a workshop to consider the impact of the new hire fees introduced on 1 July 2014. Please refer to Attachment A for the fee schedule for 2014/2015.

4.       The council’s ‘Hire Fee Framework – For Hire of Auckland Council’s Community Facilities’ (the framework) was developed over a two-year period from 2012-2014 and was based on good practice principles. All local boards adopted the framework, although five chose to vary from the recommended fees and charges. These recommended fees and charges, which would help ensure fairness and transparency for all users, were introduced for all council facilities in the other local board areas across the region on 1 July 2014.

5.       There are five council-managed community facilities in the Waitematā Local Board area. After 1 July, the council received enquiries from one of the 50 regular hirers (as at 30 June) across all of the venues. This hirer accepted a transition arrangement until the end of September 2014. There were no cancellations. For the full list of regular hirers, please refer to Attachment B. Since 1 July 2014, the number of regular hirers has grown to 80.

6.       For a table of fees and charges per venue for the July to December period, please refer to the summary in Attachment C. Attachment D shows the number of sessions booked by activity type.

7.       The table below summarises the combined activity of the facilities for the July to December six-month period. Please note that some figures are reported as percentage points (pp), while others are shown as a percentage (%). Please refer to the glossary of terms (Attachment E) for more information on percentage points.

Utilisation

Visitors

Revenue

  -4.8 (pp)

  -16,184 (-15%)

+$9,383 (+10%)

 

8.       Overall, utilisation (booked hours divided by 10 available hours per day) of the Waitematā Local Board community facilities has decreased by 4.8 percentage points. In the same period, visitor numbers decreased from 109,580 to 93,396 (-15 per cent).

9.       Revenue increased by $9,383 (+10 per cent). This increase is in contrast to decreases in the utilisation and visitor numbers and is possible by a change in customer types to those paying a higher fee or an increase in the fees paid by customers.

10.     In July 2014, a new process was introduced to book the available spaces in most of the council-managed community facilities across the region and to ensure the cancellation charge was applied where appropriate. This has greatly helped to record more accurate utilisation and visitor numbers than in previous years.

11.     For the 2014/2015 financial year, revenue from community facilities is expected to increase for the Waitematā Local Board. This could help contribute to the maintenance of these facilities and reflects the good practice principles imbedded in the framework, including fairness to all users.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Agree that the 2014/2015 community facilities hire fees will remain, uninflated, for the 2015/2016 year, as per Attachment A and will apply to all new and existing hirers using the facilities.

b)      Request council staff to provide regular updates on the impact of the hire fees and the performance of council-managed community facilities as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Comments

12.     The framework was developed over a two-year period from 2012-2014 and acknowledged that ‘access to safe, affordable places for people to pursue their interests provides many benefits to the wider community…’ The framework included these good practice principles: public management, lawfulness, accountable, transparent (openness), value for money, integrity and fairness.

13.     When the framework was prepared, it took account of the wide range of legacy hire arrangements that were recorded or published. All local boards adopted the framework, although six chose to vary from the recommended fees and charges. When the new framework was implemented, it became clear that across some local boards there were a large number of exceptions to the published hire rates that had not been recorded in the past or visible to the organisation. This meant that there were a number of customer enquiries relating to the new fee structure. Customers facing significant price increases were offered transition rates until the end of September 2014.

14.     In April 2014, the Waitematā Local Board resolved to adopt the new fees and charges for the hire of council-owned community venues (Resolution number WTM/2014/54). Alongside this, the activity types eligible for discounts were confirmed.

15.     Members of the Waitematā Local Board met for a workshop on 3 March 2015 to consider the impact of the new hire fees introduced on 1 July 2014. Please refer to Attachment A for the fee schedule for 2014/2015.

16.     Impact of implementing new fees and charges

In the July to December 2014 period, the council received enquiries from one of the 50 regular hirers across all of the venues. This hirer accepted a transition arrangement until the end of September 2014. There were no cancellations. For the full list of regular hirers, please refer to Attachment B.

17.     Summary of utilisation, visits and revenue by local board area

Please note that some figures in the following graphs are reported as percentage points (pp), while others are shown as a percentage (%). For a table of fees and charges per venue for the July to December period, please refer to the summary in Attachment C. Attachment D shows the number of sessions booked by activity type.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waitematā Local Board – utilisation hours booked

 

Utilisation for the five local board council-managed community facilities all reported a decrease in utilisation. The overall average was a 4.8 percentage point decrease when compared with the same period last year.

Waitematā Local Board – visits

Visitors to the council-managed community facilities in the Waitematā Local Board area decreased on average by 15 per cent when compared with the same period last year, although three of the five facilities reported increases. (Please refer to the later graphs in this report for the figures for each facility.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exceptions/mitigating factors

Utilisation and visits at a facility level are shown on the two graphs below.

 

 

 

18.     Exceptions: Pioneer Women’s & Ellen Melville Hall

Utilisation decreased by 4.4 percentage points while visitors decreased from 40,587 to 26,611 when compared with the same six-month period in 2013/2014.

 

19.     Mitigating factors: In July 2014, a new process was introduced to book the available spaces in most of the council-managed community facilities across the region and to ensure the cancellation charge was applied where appropriate. This has greatly helped to record more accurate utilisation and visitor numbers, particularly with last-minute cancellations or ‘no shows’ for bookings. Back in 2013/2014, the utilisation and visitor numbers may not have reflected these actions by the users.

 

 

 

 

 

 

20.     Revenue

21.     The local board earned 10 per cent more revenue when compared with the same period last year and this is in contrast with the lower utility and visitor numbers. This is likely due to a change in customer types to those paying a higher fee or an increase in the fees paid by customers, as well as a tighter charging of cancellation fees.

22.     Following the workshop on 3 March 2015, local board members requested comparative information on actual revenue for venue hire against budget for their five council-managed facilities for the July to December periods for both 2013 and 2014. This graph is presented below.

In summary

23.     The table below summarises the combined activity of the five facilities for the July to December six-month period. Overall, utilisation has decreased by 4.8 percentage points. Over the same period, visitor numbers decreased from 109,580 to 93,396 (-15 per cent). Revenue increased by $9,383 (+10 per cent).

Utilisation

Visitors

Revenue

  -4.8 (pp)

  -16,184 (-15%)

+$9,383 (+10%)

24.     For the 2014/2015 financial year, the revenue from community facilities is expected to increase for the Waitematā Local Board. This could help contribute to the maintenance of these facilities and reflects the good practice principles imbedded in the framework, including fairness to all users.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

25.     The impact of the new community facilities fees and charges introduced on 1 July 2014 was work shopped with members of the Waitematā Local Board on 3 March 2015.

 

26.     The recommendations within this report fall within the Waitematā Local Board’s authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

27.     The fees and charges framework is not specifically targeted for Maori populations. However, it aims to be clear and transparent to all users, including Maori.

Implementation

28.     The recommendations in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Fee schdule for 20142015 Waitemata

153

bView

List of regular Hirers

155

cView

Summary of Fees and charges data July - December 2014

157

dView

Session booked by activity type

159

eView

Glossary of terms Waitemata fees and charges

161

     

Signatories

Authors

Jocelyn Watkin – Community Development Arts and Culture

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Attachment A: Fee schedule for 2014/2015 Waitemata Local Board

 

Hourly rate

as of 1 July 2014

Facility Category

Facility Name

Room

Peak Standard

Off-Peak Standard

Art facility

Artstation

Creative workshop 1

 $         50.00

 $         40.00

 

 

Creative workshop 2

 $         50.00

 $         40.00

 

 

Creative workshop 3

 $         50.00

 $         40.00

 

 

Creative workshop 4 (Hopetoun Villa)

 $         50.00

 $         40.00

Venues for hire

Freemans Bay Community Hall

Auditorium

 $         69.00

 $         55.20

 

 

Function Room

 $         44.00

 $         35.20

 

 

Long Room

 $         39.00

 $         31.20

 

Grey Lynn Library Hall

Side Room

 $         49.00

 $         39.20

 

Leys Institute Hall

Lecture Room

 $         44.00

 $         35.20

 

 

Supper Room

 $         24.00

 $         19.20

 

Outhwaite Hall

Main Hall

 $         34.00

 $         27.20

 

Pioneer Women’s & Ellen Melville Hall

Conference Room

 $         39.00

 $         31.20

 

 

Ellen Melville Room

 $         34.00

 $         27.20

 

 

Pioneer Women's Hall

 $         69.00

 $         55.20

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Attachment E to Waitematā Local Board community facilities fees and charges – July to December 2015

Glossary of terms

 

 

Term

Definition

B

Bookings

Number of slots/sessions booked by a hirer

C

Casual hirer

Group or individual who has made 5 or less bookings across the network of Community Facilities managed by CDAC per year.

Note:

This definition is for this this analysis only, and may not conform with other business use of the term.

H

Hirer

The entity who is party to the rental contract. A contract may relate to more than one booking.

O

Off peak

According to the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule. Discount rates applied

P

Peak

According to the 2014/2015 fees and charges schedule. Discount not usually applied.

Peak utilisation

Booked hours during peak times / Total available peak hours.

Percentage points

A percentage point (pp) represents the difference between two percentages on a 100 per cent scale. It is used for measures like utilisation so the changes can be put into the right context. For example, if utilisation increased from thirty per cent to forty per cent that could be stated in error as a 25 per cent increase. To put it in the right context means it would be a ten percentage point increase. Volume-based increases or decreases (e.g. visitor numbers or revenue) are reported as percentages.

 

R

Regular hirer

An entity that has made six or more bookings across the network of Community Facilities managed by CDAC.

Note:

This definition is for this analysis only, and may not conform with other business use of the term.

Revenue

Refers to revenue as reported in the financial accounts.

(Not what is reported as revenue for management accounting purposes i.e. in the omnibus reports)

U

Utilisation

Booked hours divided by 10 available hours per day.

 

Note: All comparison reporting in utilisation is presented as percentage point movements.

 

V

Visits

Number of people attending a bookable space at a Community Centre or Venue for Hire in any one session.

Note:

·      Community Facilities events that don't use the inside of a facility are not included

·      People attending the facility to only pick up or drop off an attendee of a bookable space are not included

·      A person is counted as a visitor more than once per day

If they leave and return to the facility for use of a different booking

Visit more than one Community Facility address per day.

 

.

.

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Proposed Parnell Inc Business Improvement District (BID) Expansion Boundary

 

File No.: CP2015/05619

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the approval of the Waitematā Local Board of the proposed Parnell Inc BID expansion boundary. Parnell Inc. operates as a Business Improvement District (BID) and is required, under the BID Policy (2011), to seek Local Board support of the proposed BID expansion boundary.

Executive Summary

2.       Parnell Inc. has begun a BID expansion. This is being done to increase their BID Programme to include the wider Parnell commercial area. If the ballot is successful the Parnell Inc. BID programme will represent both the current and expanded area with a combined BID target rate of $700,000 as of 1 July 2015.

3.       Under the Auckland Regional BID Policy (2011), Local Board support for the proposed BID boundary is required.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Approve the Parnell Inc. proposed BID expansion boundary.

 

Comments

4.       Parnell Inc. Business Association has been a Business Improvement District since 1999 and is one of 48 BIDs operating across the Auckland Region.

5.       Parnell Inc signaled their intention to expand their BID boundary at their 2014 Parnell Inc Annual General Meeting held on 2 October 2014.

6.       The proposed 2015 BID expansion includes businesses located in the area defined by the Domain boundary, Stanley St, Parr Road, Carlton Gore Road, George Street, Titoki St, St Stevens Avenue, Gladstone Road and The Strand.

7.       The Auckland Regional BID Policy (2011) states that:  Auckland Council officers may require evidence of support from affected parties and/or formal notification to the Local Board.

8.       If the expansion is successful Parnell Inc. will increase from 500 members to 900 members.  The BID target rate will increase from $309,557.60 to $700,000 as of 1 July 2015.

9.       A draft map of the proposed BID boundary expansion is attached as Appendix 1.

10.     Council officers are supportive of the proposed Parnell Inc. BID boundary expansion map.

11.     Parnell Inc have implemented a professional and detailed communication plan to all eligible voters starting in December 2014 and will continue through to the last voting date of 19th May.  This has ensured that all eligible voters have received a one on one visit or contact, provided with detailed information on the proposed boundary expansion and given the opportunity to enquire more about the BID programme and ballot process.

12.     The Auckland Regional BID Policy (2011) requires Parnell Inc. to host a minimum of 3 public meetings inviting eligible voters to an information briefing and a question and answer session.  This policy requirement has been completed with the last public meeting held on 31 March 2015.

13.     Waitematā Local Board allocated $9,295 towards the cost of producing the ballot pack brochure.  The brochure is currently at proofing stage.  The remaining funds will be used to produce the mobile billboard that will be on display during the voting period.  Council officers are currently assisting Parnell Inc. to gain approval for the mobile billboard from Auckland Transport and Licensing and Compliance Services.

14.     Election Services Ltd has been commissioned to provide an independent polling service for the Parnell Inc. ballot.  The ballot pack documentation is currently being finalised and Council officers are preparing the ratepayer database of eligible voters.

15.     Ballot packs will be lodged with NZ post on 24th April 2015.  The ballot period starts on 28th April and closes 12 noon 19th May 2015.

16.     Parnell Inc. will being an extensive voter campaign from 28th April to ensure voters vote and return their ballots by the due date.

17.     The ballot must achieve a return of votes of 25% or more and 51% of those returned need to be in support of the BID boundary expansion for the ballot to be successful.

18.     A report will be prepared by Council officers for the Waitematā Local Board June meeting. The report will include the ballot results, an overview of the expansion project and a recommendation for the Local Board to the 2015/16 Annual Plan.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     The result of the Parnell Inc expansion ballot conducted in April 2015 will determine if there is a sufficient level of support for the BID expansion.

20.     The Parnell Inc BID expansion project will be concentrated in the Waitematā Local Board area and will not impact on any other Local Board area.

21.     The Waitematā Local Board continues to support local businesses by building relationships with key sectors and helping Business Improvement Districts become strong advocates for the needs of local businesses and champions of economic growth.

22.     Waitematā Local Board supports the Business Improvement District approach as it brings together local businesses collectively to invest in improvements that enhance the local business environment such as delivering better security for the town centre.  A BID also has the ability to advocate and collaborate with the Council on behalf of local businesses.

Maori impact statement

23.     Maori Businesses located within the PIBA BID expansion boundary map will be balloted under the same policy regulations as non-Maori businesses.

Implementation

24.     There are no implementation considerations needing consideration.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment 1 Parnell BID draft Expansion Map March 2015

167

      Signatories

Authors

Gillian Plume - Team Leader BID Partnership

Authorisers

Penny Pirrit - GM - Plans & Places

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Submission on the Draft Regional Land Transport Programme

 

File No.: CP2015/05107

 

  

Purpose

1.       To present Waitematā Local Board’s submission on the Draft Regional Land Transport Programme.

Executive summary

2.       At the Waitematā Local Board business meeting held on Tuesday, 10 February 2015, the Local Board passed Resolution number WTM/2015/5.

 

13

Auckland Transport Update - February 2015

 

Resolution number WTM/2015/1

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson PJ Coom, seconded by Member CP Dempsey:  

a)      That the Auckland Transport Update – February 2015 report be received.

b)      That the Waitematā Local Board:    

i)       Notes the release of the Regional Land Transport Plan.

ii)      Delegates to the Transport Portfolio, Pippa Coom and Christopher Dempsey and Board Chair Shale Chambers to provide the Board’s feedback by 16 March 2015.  

c)      That Priscilla Steel, Elected Members Relationship Manager be thanked for attendance.

CARRIED

 

3.       A copy of the Waitematā Local Board Feedback on the Draft Regional Land Transport Programme is provided in Attachment A.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Receive the Waitematā Local Board Feedback on the Draft Regional Transport Programme.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Appendix A - Waitemata Local Board Submission on Draft Regional Land Transport Programme

171

      

Signatories

Authors

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitemata

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

16 March 2015

Waitematā Local Board submission on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015-2025

 

Introduction

1.    The Waitematā Local Board (the Board) welcomes the opportunity to submit on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015 -2025 (RLTP).

 

2.    The vision of the Waitematā Local Board is to foster ever-more vibrant, connected, healthy and thriving communities.  A city where there is an outstanding public transport system with well-connected buses, trains and ferries that all play a part in working towards a congestion free network.  Public transport is complemented by a network of cycle ways and greenways links, making it easy and pleasant for people to walk and cycle around Waitematā. 

 

3.    The Board is committed to working with Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and New Zealand Transport Agency to achieve an integrated and multi-modal transport system that connects communities and allows people to travel safely whichever mode they are using.

 

4.    The drafting of the Board’s submission on the draft RLTP was delegated to the transport portfolio holders and Chair at the Waitematā Local Board meeting on 10 February.

 

Resolution number WTM/2015/1

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson PJ Coom, seconded by Member CP Dempsey:  

 

a) That the Auckland Transport Update – February 2015 report be received.

b)    That the Waitematā Local Board:             

     i)   Notes the release of the Regional Land Transport Plan.

        ii) Delegates to the Transport Portfolio, Pippa Coom and Christopher Dempsey and Board   Chair Shale Chambers to provide the Board’s feedback by 16 March 2015.  

 

Submission Structure

5.    This submission is divided into six sections:

a.    Section One – Strategic Context

b.    Section Two – provides a high level executive summary of the Board’s position on the RLTP.  It identifies the key projects supported by the Board and the Board’s own transport priorities.

c.     Section Three – focuses on the process used to develop the RLTP and highlights the Boards support towards rebalancing the prioritisation model towards a multi modal approach. 

d.    Section Four – comments on specific projects of the Transport Investment Programme and outlines what the Board would like to see in the final RLTP

e.    Section Five – Transport funding

f.     Section Six – provides recommendations on improvements to the content and structure of the document to aid readability

 

Section One - Strategic Context

6.    Within the Auckland Plan there is a target to increase the proportion of trips made by public transport into the city centre during the morning peak traffic period from 47% of all vehicular trips in 2011 to 70% by 2040.

 

7.    15,000 more people commute into the city centre by public transport than in 2000. If driving instead, they would add over 100 cars a minute to the morning peak and need a carpark half the height of the Sky Tower.

 

8.    Buses make up 2.5% of vehicles coming into the city, but carry nearly a third of all commuters.

 

9.    The City Centre Masterplan elaborates on these outcomes and stresses the need for the city centre to be family-friendly, pedestrian-friendly and environmentally-friendly, a place we are proud of, feel excited about visiting and where we can do business and be entertained.

 

10.  The Local Board Plan, endorsed in October 2014, confirms the Boards support for viewing transport in a holistic way that considers great streets as more than just transport routes.  They are spaces where people feel comfortable to sit, walk, or watch the world go by.  Roads, cycleways and footpaths can shape our town centres and neighbourhoods. 

 

11.  The Waitematā Local Board area has a unique transport profile.  From the 2013 Census we know that 25% of households in the Waitematā Local Board area do not have a car compared to the Auckland average of 8% (in the city centre this rises to 51%).  In the Waitematā area 51% travelled to work by means other than a car/truck/van compared with the Auckland average of 17% (2013 Census data).

 

12.  The Waitematā Local Board has been nominated, and is now registered, with UNICEF as the first ‘child friendly local board’ in Auckland.  The Board is committed to actively promoting safety for children and advocating to Auckland Transport to ensure children have a range of transport options.

 

13.  Transport planning is innately a political process.  For over a hundred years, how we have moved around Auckland has seen radical shifts; from horse and cart, to horse buses, trams, heavy rail, and finally the motor car.  Each of these shifts has been subject to political processes.  The clearest example in recent times has been the development of the motorway system in Auckland.  Even though a 1950s report recommended the development of both a motorway system and a heavy rail public transport system to serve the growing population, investment only went into the motorway system.  This has led to significant and ongoing problems for Aucklanders.

 

14.  Climate change is a significant challenge for Auckland. Transport is the single biggest source of emissions for Auckland, with 39% of our cities emissions being from transport alone.  Changing the way we travel is a key area of transformation within the Low Carbon Auckland Plan to reduce emissions and the reliance on fossil fuels. The Board is in the process of adopting a localised plan to support the regional strategy with a key action area “Transition transport to low carbon options”. 

 

15.  The Board supports a final RLTP which facilitates liveable, healthy, sustainable communities, reflects local circumstances and is responsive to providing transport choice.

 

 

Section Two – High Level Summary

16.  The Waitematā Local Board recognises that the RLTP is a tool to inform Auckland Council’s decisions on the transport component of the 10-year budget. 

 

17.  The RLTP needs to clearly support the Auckland Plan by setting out a transport investment programme that supports the strategies for delivering the Auckland Plan’s vision, outcomes and transformational shifts over the next 10 years.

 

18.  There are currently a number of projects included in the transport investment programme outlined in the RLPT that the  Waitematā Local Board wishes to give its support to:

 

·    The construction of the City Rail Link

·    Franklin Road upgrade as part of the renewals budget

·    Investigation of a light rail system, and;

·    Investment into improving the City Centre Bus infrastructure,

 

19.  The Board supports a transport investment programme that is an enhanced version of the basic transport programme, which prioritises walking and cycling infrastructure, safety programmes and travel demand management, and greater investment in public transport (e.g. bus, rail, ferry, light rail etc.) to cater for a rapidly growing Auckland.

 

20.  The Board recognises that an enhanced basic transport programme would create a funding gap but considers that an increase in rates is an unacceptable means of mitigating this funding gap. 

 

21.  The Board supports a reprioritising of the programme towards public transport, maximising operational efficiencies and leveraging support from Government to reduce this funding gap.  If required the Board would also support the introduction of a regional fuel tax.

 

22.  Our key recommendations are:

 

·    Prioritise delivery of projects which move Auckland towards multi- modal transport choices

·    Complete the Auckland Cycle Network (70% by 2022) with safe, connected, dedicated cycleways

·    Ensure the road environment is constructed in a way that allows for safe and easy movement for people and provides for the “place” function of streets

·    Prioritise pedestrian and cycle safety including lower speed zones in the city centre, residential areas and school zones

·    Deliver the new residential parking zone schemes in central suburbs to manage commuter parking as soon as possible

·    Deliver the New Network across the region to provide integrated, frequent, reliable, affordable and accessible public transport

·    Make provisions for the Downtown Ferry Basin Development

·    Support the Auckland Harbour pathway project (Skypath)

·    Ensure every renewal and maintenance project is leveraged as an opportunity to improve the road design for all users

·    Recognise the challenge of climate change and the need for a transport programme that transforms the way we travel to reduce emissions

·    Include reference to the Auckland Council shared-governance model and recognition of the important advocacy role that local boards play within this governance framework.

·    Prioritise the specific projects attached as Appendix A.

 

 

Section Three – Process Used to Develop RLTP

Problem Definition (Section 4.1)

 

23.  It is important to be mindful how past political choices have influenced today’s choices and behaviours and how these political decisions have given rise to today’s transport challenges.

 

24.  Expectations about moving around Auckland are constant; most people want to move freely around the region at a minimal cost.  To state in the RLTP that expecting a level of performance from all modes (walking, cycling, scootering, car, bus etc.), in all locations at all times for all trips is unaffordable ignores the fact that past expenditure on roads, which provides for essentially one mode, has led to this particular situation of unaffordability.

 

25.  Aucklanders increasingly want choice and are choosing to use other modes of transport other than the motor vehicle when other options are made available.  This is reflected in public transport patronage, and increasing numbers of people cycling. 

 

26.  The unaffordability of a transport system that enables Aucklanders to have a choice in how they move around their city is not due to the “expectations” (pg. 22) of Aucklanders but due to past political choices that prioritised just one mode of transport to the exclusion of all others. Section 4.1 Problem Definition does not adequately recognise this component of the problem.

 

27.  The Waitematā Local Board supports rewording this section to reflect the past political choices to fund roads which has to a large degree influenced current choices. 

Strategic response for each mode (Section 4.4)

 

28.  The Board supports a One System Approach methodology and we agree that it makes no sense to plan these networks in isolation because people use them as one system. However the strategic response needs to go a step further in taking a multi-modal and increasingly inter- modal approach.  This considers how  modes are not just linked together but interconnected (a journey that combines a number of different modes for example made possible through bikes on trains/ferries or folding bikes on buses) . The RLTP also needs to respond to transport increasingly providing for shared mobility  (eg car share, public bike hire).

 

29.  Section 4.4.1 – the Board supports the Auckland Transport’s objectives and policies for public transport as set out in the RLTP.

 

30.  Section 4.4.2 – The Board is pleased to see the acknowledgement in the RLTP of the role that Auckland Transport plays in place-shaping as outlined in the objective Support and implement the Auckland Plan and enhance important “Place” values.

 

31.  Section 4.4.3 – Active modes of transport is more than just walking and cycling.  In order to reflect this, the Walking, Cycling and Travel Demand Management section should be expanded to encompass all active modes that people use to move around their neighbourhood such as scootering and skateboarding. 

 

32.  The Board also requests consideration and inclusion of public bike hire and car sharing opportunities in the Walking, Cycling and Travel Demand Management section. 

 

33.  Section 4.4.4 the Board would like to see Auckland Transport advocate for more ambitious road safety targets that do not presume death and serious injuries are an inevitable consequence of our transport network.  This approach would then be consistent with the “safe system” approach supported by the NZ Police, AT and NZTA.

 

34.  Section 4.4.5 – The Board supports more effective parking management to provide residents with access to parking in inner-city suburbs and to prioritise short term visitor parking in town centres that support local businesses and encourage shoppers.

 

35.  In submitting on the draft parking discussion document the Board supported the re-prioritisation of road space for walking and cycling.  We noted that this had been shown to improve the efficiency and safety of the road for all users and can be achieved in many locations without the loss of on-street parking.

 

36.  The Board supported the development of site specific responses to the proposal to reduce parking on arterial roads and felt that decisions should be taken on a site by site basis depending on the local context.  In some cases parking, as well as being a priority for residents on arterial routes, provides traffic calming and safety benefits to people who walk and cycle. The Board therefore does not support “phasing out” parking on all arterial routes as a policy to be included in AT’s final parking strategy (to be signed off by the AT Board at the end of March)

 

Prioritisation and Ranking

 

37.  The Waitematā Local Board would like to see a Transport Investment Programme in the RLTP that aims to meet the Auckland Plan vision and outcomes.  The Board recognises that the ability to respond to the need for different modes of transport will be a challenge within the current funding envelope but believes that such a challenge is achievable. 

 

38.  It is important that the prioritisation model reflects the Auckland Plan transformation shifts, in particular we would support a greater focus towards 3 of the 6 shifts:

·    Move to outstanding public transport within one network

·    Radically improve the quality of urban living

·    Strong commitment to environmental action and green growth

 

39.  This would result in public transport and active transport given greater weighting than currently provided for by Auckland Transport in the basic transport programme.

 

40.  We would welcome transparency on how the filtering process has reflected Local Board priorities, which have been widely consulted on with our communities.  Currently it is not evident how Local Board priorities have influenced the prioritisation. 

 

41.  We would also welcome transparency regarding how the filtering process has reflected the prioritised Auckland Plan transformational shifts in the basic transport programme.

 

Section Four – Transport Investment Programme

42.  As part of this submission the Board wishes to focus on the Transport Investment Programme (Basic Transport Network) presented in the RLTP and recommends how this plan can be enhanced towards greater public transport and multi -modal prioritisation.

 

43.  The Board is conscious that even if Aucklanders support investment in the Auckland Plan Transport Network it is unlikely that the required legislation to enable access to the alternative funding required will be achieved in time for year 1 or even year 2 of the RLTP.  Therefore our focus is the first years of the investment transport programme and how it needs to be re-focused to deliver communities’ priorities.

 

44.  We want to see the following key outcomes prioritised in the investment programme and the detailed list of projects attached as Appendix A funded. The projects listed have been extracted from information provided by Auckland Transport and prioritised taking into account the projects in the Local Board Agreement 15/16 and the Local Board Plan.  The Board has not been provided with the full transport work programme as requested

 

Multi Modal Prioritisation

45.  The Board welcomes the emphasis in the early years of the plan on deployment of fast, reliable new electric trains, the construction of the City Rail Link and the Waterview walking and cycling connection.

 

46.  The Waitematā Local Board Plan outlines the boards support towards the development of light rail as a means of connecting our transport network alongside the development of the City Rail Link. 

 

47.  There is concern expressed from the community that the current provision of public transport is not at an acceptable level to provide a viable alternative to car dependent commuters and that improvement to public transport is vital.

 

48.  An effective and efficient network needs to be in place before we will be able to achieve a behaviour change from a reliance of the car towards public and active transport.

 

49.  We support the full implementation of the public transport New Network.  Any delay will result in the postponement of many of the expected benefits including operational efficiencies. 

 

50.  The Parnell Rail Station is an essential connection for the University, Parnell Village, the Domain and Museum and Stanley St and Beach Road.  The station will service and integrate the local residential and commercial communities surrounding the area and will be a key enabler in the regeneration of Parnell.  The station supports the Auckland Plan vision of increasing use of public transport.

 

51.  As well as being transport routes, well designed streets are spaces that people enjoy being in, and they support better urban living and business activity. The Waitematā Local Board has been nominated, and is now registered, with UNICEF as the first ‘child friendly local board’ in Auckland.  It is important that all transport options consider safety for children and that people walking and cycling feel safe. 

 

52.  The Board continues to champion street design which delivers slower traffic, safer intersections and better footpaths and more cycle lanes and cycle facilities such as  advance top boxes and feeder lanes.  The Board advocates for more low speed zones in places like Karangahape Road, Richmond Road and Wynyard Quarter.  We support changing the Give Way Rule at side-street crossings to favour pedestrians and continue to champion two way cycling on one way streets where it has been assessed to be safe.

 

Completion of the Auckland Cycling Network

53.  The Board continues to advocate for the delivery of the completion of the Auckland Cycling Network by the Auckland Plan target.  The proposed delivery of 40% of the network by 2025 (from the alleged 33% currently “complete”) currently falls short of this target.

 

54.  Local Boards and stakeholder groups must have the opportunity to review and comment on the revised Auckland Cycling Network before it is endorsed as part of the new integrated transport programme.

 

55.  The Board recommends that Auckland Transport, as a minimum, adopt the principle that all routes on main arterials which connect town centres should provide best practice separated cycling infrastructure.  The Board encourages Auckland Transport to discontinue the current practise of counting bus lanes as cycle lanes and provide a dedicated facility for cycling along bus routes.

 

56.  The Board recognises that metro routes will create additional demand for connectors.  Therefore the priority for delivery of the ACN should be on connecting the inner and outer cycling routes e.g. North Western Cycleway, Sky Path, Grafton Gully, Beach Road, Quay Street and the North/South route.

 

57.  The Board is concerned at the current deficiencies in the “completed” ACN and the slow rate of delivery.  The Board requests that Auckland Transport continues to target resources to rectify deficiencies in the current “completed” network and urgently identifies quick wins that will extend the efficiency and use of the existing network.

 

58.  The successful completion of the network not only requires increased cycle investment but also requires internal prioritisation, leadership and commitment by Auckland Transport.

 

Implementation of Residential Parking Schemes

59.  The implementation of residential parking schemes for all central suburbs dealing with the negative impact of all day commuter parking is well overdue and needs to be prioritised for delivery in the early years of the RLTP.

 

60.  The Board supported the introduction of the trial residential parking zone in St Marys Bay by Auckland Transport in July 2012 to address concerns about commuter parking.  We support the St Marys Bay scheme being made permanent.

 

61.  We are supportive of appropriate use of residential zones, permits and/or time use restrictions to encourage short stays and to reduce conflicts between commuters and local businesses and residents.  Aside from managing current conflicts, such an approach will encourage a shift toward public transport and improve the safety and amenity of residential streets.  This incremental change supports the Auckland Plan’s transformational shift, “Move to outstanding public transport within one network”. 

 

Leveraging renewals for new street design

62.  Every renewal needs to be considered in terms of what can be achieved to maximise the existing budget taking a One Network approach.  For example maintenance projects provide an opportunity for arterials to be relooked at with new layouts that include bus lanes and cycle lanes, remove cycle pinch points and add better pedestrian crossings. 

 

63.  A recent example is the proposed resurfacing of Ponsonby Road, which was going to be undertaken on a like for like basis until the Board challenged officers to take a more multi-modal view. As a result there is now the opportunity to implement critical cycling and pedestrian infrastructure to improve safety of all road users.

 

Section Five – Transport Funding

64.  The Board acknowledges that an investment programme that delivers both the strategic direction of the Auckland Plan and Local Board priorities will result in a funding gap.  However the additional burden of a rates increase is an unacceptable option.

 

65.  We believe that in the first instance this funding gap should be reduced by reprioritising investment towards public transport and active transport modes to create what we consider to be an “Enhanced” version of the Basic Transport Programme.

 

66.  Secondly the Board believes that Auckland Transport needs to ensure it is maximising the opportunities available from Government to support the delivery of a more enhanced Basic Transport Programme and continue to advocate to Government to fund public transport investment to the same level as state highways.

 

67.  The Government Urban Cycling Investment Fund provides an opportunity for Auckland Transport to access up to 50% of the remaining $90 million over the next three years.  In order to leverage this funding the transport investment programme needs to include $15m per year over the first three years.  This is to enable match funding of the Investment Fund and leverage a further $15m per year from NZTA.  By not currently allocating any funding in the first three years of the basic programme this opportunity to source an additional $30m per year at a cost of $15m is essentially lost.

 

68.  The Board supports the position of Auckland Transport and Auckland Council advocating to Government to bring forward Government funding for the construction of City Rail Link.  This will alleviate funding in the first years of the plan, which can then be redirected to improving multi modal infrastructure in Auckland. 

 

69.  From the Board’s point of view there is an opportunity to actively work with the proposed new Auckland Development Agency to review transport assets strategically and take more of an urban design approach.   This could provide an opportunity to develop existing transport assets and release funds back into transport outcomes.  An example is the Hobson Flyover redevelopment.  This project could release land for redevelopment and leverage cost effective beneficial transport outcomes. 

 

70.  The Board does not support the introduction of a motorway user charge as a sole means of raising funds. 

 

71.  Motorway tolling needs to wait until we have significantly improved public transport to give people transport choices.  We also have concerns about the significant upfront and collection costs involved as well as the diversionary impact of motorway tolling onto local roads paralleling motorways such as Great North Road.

 

72.  If a funding gap remains the Board would support the introduction of a regional fuel tax. 

 

 

Section Six – Content Matters

73.  The RLTP is a public document seeking submissions from the community, but it is not entirely clear within the text when it is referring to the Basic Transport Network or the Auckland Plan Transport Network.  It is also not clear how these programmes track to the questions being asked of the community through the 10-year budget consultation.

 

74.  Where the text does not say otherwise the Board has assumed that the document is referring to the Basic Transport Programme.

 

75.  The document does not read as if it has been written in one voice, which inevitably results in disconnect between the sections. 

 

76.  Auckland Transport has a key role to play in place-making in partnership with local boards.  This role is reflected in the strategic theme described on pg. 18 to “transform and elevate customer focus and experience”.  It is important that Auckland Transport treats people as ‘citizens’ rather than customers.  The wording throughout the document should therefore reflect this.

 

77.  The RLTP outlines the fifth stage of filtering and the criteria by which projects have been filtered and assessed at this stage.  For completeness the document should also outline in a summary form the criteria and process used for the initial four stages of filtering.  The first four stages represent 50% of the filters by which any successful project must pass through.  Knowledge and understanding of these stages can assist readers to know the robustness of the overall process, and the consequent suitability of the projects that are outlined in the Basic and Auckland Plan proposal. 

 

78.  Attention needs to be paid to the use of tables and figures throughout the document to ensure the titles are consistent and accurate.  For example it is not clear what the purpose is of Figure 5 (pg. 20) and the table of pg. 63 utilises a different layout to previous tables.

 

Also note that the page 63 table, which does not have a label, inaccurately refers to the AMETI project as being the top priority project.  The prioritised list of projects in section 16 clearly identifies City Rail Link as the top priority with AMETI as number 2. 

 

79.  To aid readability of the document it is suggested that Section 9 “Supporting Auckland’s Growth and Intensification” section is moved towards the beginning of the document.  This section provides overall context of the impact of the anticipated population growth and therefore provides an element of justification for the proposals throughout the document.

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Recommendations from the Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee 1 April 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/05545

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee held on 1 April 2015 recommends the following for the board’s consideration for the Community Grants Fund for 2014/2015.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)    That the Recommendations from the Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee report be received.

b)    That the Waitematā Local Board Grants Committee recommends to the Waitematā Local Board business meeting scheduled to be held on 14 April 2015 that the following grants be made from the Board’s Community Grants Fund for Round Three 2014/2015:    

Organisation Name

Project Title

Amount Requested

Amount Granted

Comments/

Reasons

The Learning Collaborative

Academic coaching service delivery

$2,565

$0

Decline as supporting core curriculum of schools and is for profit

Bach Musica NZ Inc

Hire of a venue for ‘The Liturgy of St John Chrysostom’

$2,000

$0

Decline as there is a low community outcome

The Karangahape Road Business Association

A History of Myers Park publication

$5,000

$5,000

Approve subject to editorial approval by the Waitematā Local Board

Auckland Sexual Abuse HELP Foundation Charitable Trust

‘We Can Keep Safe’ a personal safety programme for children and their caregivers

$3,920

$1,960

Approve for AUT early childhood centre

Grafton Residents Association

Printing of four newsletters

$480

$480

Approve towards printing costs

Grafton Residents Association

Printing our heritage brochure of Grafton

$1,200

$1,200

Approve towards printing of the Grafton heritage brochure

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Volunteer Training: Delivery of basic youth and community counselling courses

$3,000

$0

Decline as the application is for ongoing service delivery rather than a specific community project

The People of Auckland Community Trust

Trust administration support wages for all trust activities

$10,400

$0

Decline as the application is for ongoing service delivery rather than a specific community project

Freemans Bay Residents Association

Freemans Bay Residents Association membership maintenance and a communication software package purchase

$1,800

$1,800

Approve towards software package and printing

Lifewise (legal name The Lifewise Trust)

Homeless Support Service design and install a sign and promotion

$5,000

$5,000

Approve towards community noticeboard and signage

The Black Grace Trust

Community outreach rehearsal with Black Grace Dance Company

 

$3,400

$1,496

Approve subject to delivery of live rehearsal(s) in Waitematā Local Board area

Action Education Inc.

Facilitator fee for spoken word workshops in the Waitemata area 

$5,000

$0

Decline as the application is for ongoing service delivery rather than a specific community project

Parnell Heritage

Printing of Parnell Heritage Journal issue five 2015

$2,500

$2,500

Approve towards printing and design costs

Splice (legal name, Methodist Mission Northern)

“A Splice of Auckland Life” television documentary and printing of a publication

$5,000

$5,000

Approve towards funding towards production cost and printing of RuffRag publication

Connected Media Charitable Trust

“The Outlook for Someday” free one-day film-making workshop in central Auckland

$741

$741

Approve

Rainbow Youth Incorporated

Establishing a youth executive to guide the Human Rights forum of the Asia-Pacific Outgames 2016

$2,000

$0

Decline and encourage to re-apply once the project has been further defined

Auckland Women's Centre

Positive parenting computer, indoor banners and tables for the community training room.

$2,867

$2,867

Approve towards folding tables, banners and replacement computer

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Young Women’s Christian Association T/A YWCA Auckland

Protect Self Defence "Safe for Life" workshops

$1,460

$0

Decline as there is insufficient evidence of community benefit

PHAB Association (Auckland) Inc

Youth worker wages contribution

$1,000

$0

Decline as the application is for ongoing service delivery rather than a specific community project

The Parenting Place - Attitude Youth Division

Mental health and wellbeing presentations and resources designed to build resilience in young people

$3,900

$3,900

Approve for presentations at Auckland Girls Grammar, St Peters College, St Paul’s college, St Mary’s College, Parnell College Western Springs College and handbooks

 

Migrant Action Trust

Employment forum and New Migrants JobFest equipment hire

$5,091

$1,292

Approve towards equipment hire and printing

Recreate NZ

Three 'Urban Youth' Social events/outings in Ponsonby, Parnell and Newmarket 2016

$1,500

$750

Approve towards costs of activities

Kelmarna Gardens Trust Board                            

Kelmarna Gardens Set-Up

$6,000

$6,000

Approve for materials and contractor costs

TOTAL

 

$69,824

 

 

$39,986

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Desiree Tukutama - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2015/05180

 

  

 

Executive Summary

 

This report was not available at the time of print and will be circulated separately with the agenda.

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Deputy Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/05181

 

  

 

Executive summary

 

This report covers my Waitematā Local Board activities during March 2015 as Deputy Chair, lead for the Community and Transport portfolios, Chair of the Grants Committee, Deputy Chair of the Central Joint Funding Committee and with positions on the Ponsonby Business Association Board and Ponsonby Community Centre Committee and Board liaison for the Parnell Community Centre.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the Deputy Chairperson’s Report be received.

 

Comments

 

Bikes in Schools: opening of a new bike track at Freemans Bay School

 

One of the highlights of the month was attending the bike track opening at Freemans Bay School on 20 March. This is the first bike track in the Waitematā area supported by the Bikes in Schools Trust. It was wonderful to see how excited the kids are to ride a bike. For many of the kids at the school who live in the city centre the track offers them the only safe opportunity to cycle.  (More details in Attachment A)

 

 


Portfolio Report: Transport

RLTP Presentation

 

All local boards and key stakeholders were given the opportunity to present to an Auckland Transport hearings panel on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015 -2025 (RLTP) as part of the consultation process.

 

I presented with the Chair on behalf of the Waitematā Local Board on 10 March (Presentation attached as Attachment B). As I mentioned in my introduction to the presentation it was a slightly bizarre process to present before the end of the public consultation period and before we had finalised our submission. A copy of the Board’s final submission submitted on 16 March is attached to the April agenda.

 

Franklin Road

 

Auckland Transport presented the feedback on the proposed Franklin road upgrade design and the revised options (below) developed on the back of that feedback at a meeting with Franklin Road residents on 9 March. 

 

Overall the residents at the meeting were positive about the new designs but were strongly opposed to cycle lanes due to safety concerns.   These concerns were outlined in a presentation to the Local Board public forum at the March business meeting on 10 March (available online).   Auckland Transport undertook to do a safety audit to ensure the final design is safe and is able to cater for all users.

 

 

Intersection of Curran St & Sarsfield St

 

For many years residents near to the intersection of Curran St and Sarsfield St have been seeking improvements to slow down drivers who speed up on the approach to the Harbour Bridge.  Unfortunately it took a serious crash in February for Auckland Transport to respond.

 

I arranged a site meeting on 2 March with residents and Auckland Transport representatives to discuss the various concerns about the intersection. On 30 March Auckland Transport responded at a follow-up meeting with a concept design which was positively received. Once the feedback from the meeting has been collated by the Herne Bay Residents Association the design will be finalised by AT for formal consultation.

 

Portfolio report: Community Development

Empowered Communities Approach

 

A whole new way for Council to work called “Empowered Communities Approach” is currently being tested with the Community Development and Safety Team.

 

Local Board members have been briefed and workshops held with the community (I attended the workshop for ethnic migrants) to explain the details and the opportunities arising from this approach.  As it is a major shift for Council I have included the following key messages about the new approach in my report:

 

Why we are doing this:

-     Supporting community-led development.

-     Working with communities to develop leadership, skills and capacity is a priority for Auckland Council under the Strengthen Communities goals of the Auckland Plan.

-     Mayor Len Brown proposed under the Long-Term Plan (2015-2025) to change how Auckland Council works around community development.

-     Much research and community consultation has been done by Auckland Council around empowering communities – the ECA is building on this work to bring it to life.

-     While we are developing a ‘whole of council approach’ Community Development and Safety are the first team to have this approach applied.
 

Purpose of engaging with communities:

-     You know what you need and want and, in turn, we need to hear that from you.

-     We would like to hear what you feel about the direction the ECP is taking and what it means for your communities.

-     Every community is different – a one-size-fits-all approach will not work across Auckland.

-     Council needs to be more responsive and flexible around community needs and priorities.

-     Resources and capacity varies across Auckland and council needs to ensure that each community has the same opportunities and platforms for empowerment.

-     There are benefits from empowering communities including: more responsive to community need; more flexibility and opportunity to change what may not be working; less bureaucracy; and, more opportunity for the communities to show innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship.

-     Auckland Council is committing to a new, innovative way of working. It recognises that for the ECA to be successful it has to change both the way it works, and how it works, to benefit Aucklanders.

 

Empowered Communities Approach:

-     ‘Empowered Communities: Enabling Council’ is an approached underpinned by a two-way relationship. 

-     A description rather than a definition is being used to ensure there is room for us all to see ourselves.


What is an empowered community?

An empowered community is one where individuals, whanau and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions, take action and make change happen in their lives and communities. This includes communities of place, interest and identity.

-     Community empowerment is about providing real opportunities for people to participate and fostering the conditions that support this.

-     An empowered communities approach is ‘a way of working’ that empowers people to play a more active role in the decisions that affect their communities’.

-     A ‘whole of council’ shift is required to:

Provide a gateway / portal into council resources and information

Provide more support for local boards and other areas of council to work together in joined-up ways with local communities 

Facilitating and embedding the ECA across council

Developing and implement creative new engagement and participation practices 

Support the devolution of resources / functions / control to communities.

 

-     Currently we are exploring ways to operationalise the Community Development and Safety team functions with a new focus on ways of working.

 

Feedback is currently being sought from community groups about what needs to change for Council to be “an enabling council” and communities to be called “empowered communities”.

 

Long Term Plan consultation

 

Consultation on the Auckland Council’s 10 year budget (LTP) closed on 16 March. 27,383 submissions were received in total with 1097 coming from the Waitematā Local Board area.  It was the first consultation process under Auckland Council’s new Significance and Engagement Policy that is required by the Local Government Act 2002.  Instead of hearings, submitters were invited to attend Have your Say events where all comments received were recorded as official feedback (Photo right - the Waitematā Have your say Event)

Personally I did not think the Have your Say events were an adequate alternative to Local Board hearings as there was limited ability to meaningfully engage and discuss issues with submitters.

 

Professional development

 

In March I started semester one at AUT University as I continue learning Te Reo Maori ( I completed two stage 1 papers in 2014).  I attend classes twice a week.

 

I have also appreciated the opportunity to take part in the training series “Making an Impact with Maori” provided by Council’s advisors.  On 25 March I joined councillors and local board members at Te Mahurehure Marae in Pt Chev for an immersive learning experience, designed to take elected members through the protocols and principles involved with entering a marae.

 

Workshops and meetings

 

During March I attended:

 

·    Street meeting on 2 March of Herne Bay residents and Auckland Transport to discuss the Curran St/Sarsfield St intersection speeding and safety issues

·    One of the presenters of the LGNZ webinar on 3 March in Wellington: Planning and Investment Opportunities for Cycling (Urban Cycleways Investment Programme) Photo right: delivering the Webinar with Cynthia Bowers, Deputy Mayor, Hawkes Bay District Council

·    Attended Long Term Plan – 10 year budget consultation events: Have your Say event at the Town Hall on 4 March,  the Grey Lynn community meeting on 11 March  (co-hosted with the Arch Hill and Grey Lynn Residents Association) and the Fix Our City: A Discussion with the Mayor co-hosted with Generation Zero at Auckland University

·    Meeting to discuss RLTP feedback on 5 March

·    HBDI Test result discussion with Board members (HBDI survey provided insight into thinking style preferences)

·    Friends of St David meeting on Sunday 8 March

·    Auckland Transport’s meeting on 9 March with Franklin Road residents to discuss the consultation feedback analysis and the revised options developed for the upgrade of Franklin Road

·    Ponsonby Business Association Board meeting on 10  March

·    Meeting to discuss the community grants template

RLTP presentation to Auckland Transport (Attachment B)

·    Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 10 March

·    Cycle Advisory Group meeting on 11 March

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 12  March

·    Meeting on 12 March to discuss the development of a Youth HUB in the City Centre

·    Site visit on Waima Street on 16 March organised by Arch Hill residents with representatives of Auckland Transport, NZTA, NZ Police, the Prostitutes Collective, and Newton School. David Shearer, MP also attended (photo right)

·    Grey Lynn community meeting on 17 March to discuss concerns arising from Auckland Transport’s proposals to remove parking at the Grey Lynn shops

·    Monthly Transport portfolio catch up on  18 March

·    Meeting with Albert-Eden and Puketapapa Local Boards to discuss progress on the Central Community Recycling Facility

·    Empowered Communities approach discussion with Local Boards on 20 March

·    Community Place-making champions group meeting on 23 March

·    Meeting to discuss the community grants policy and template

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 24 March

·    Communications update with the Local Board communications advisor

·    Making an Impact with Maori - Training for Elected Members. Visit to Te Mahurehure Marae for all local board members and councillors

·    Local Board Greenways Plans and Walking and Cycling Networks Collaboration Meeting on 26 March

·    Urban Cycling Investment Panel - meeting 3 in Christchurch  on 27 March

·    Cycle Advocates Network cycling summit in Christchurch on 28 and 29 March (Attachment C)

·    Central Local Board cluster briefing on the Auckland Development Agency proposal on 30 March

·    Briefing on the action plan arising from the Elected Member Survey undertaken in September 2014

·    Empowered Communities Approach workshop for ethnic migrants at the Fickling Centre on 30 March

·    Local Board workshop on 31 March

·    Meeting with Herne Bay residents for Auckland Transport to present recommendations on safety improvements to the Curran St/Sarsfield St intersection

 

Events and functions

 

During March I attended:

 

·    Between Tides art show on Westmere beach on 1 March (photo right)

·    Fixing Auckland’s Transport panel discussion on 2 March (Attachment D)

·    Auckland Arts Festival 4 – 22 March I attended various performances and the opening night drinks in the Festival Gardens (at the invitation of the AAF Trust)

·    Little Day Out at the Mt Eden Village Centre on 7 March

·    International Women's Day event in Khartoum Place on 9 March

·    Presented the 95bfm Green Desk on 10, 17 and 24 March

·    Grey Power meeting on 12 March at the Fickling Centre as part of a presentation on the LTP (I was invited to present on transport issues in the LTP)

·    Wet Hot Beauties performance in Judges Bay on 14 March (photo below)

·    White Nights on 14 March

·    Bike track opening at Freemans Bay School (Attachment A) on 20 March

 

 

Gifts:

Auckland Arts Festival tickets to the following shows:

-     Hikoi

-     Group F: Skin of Fire

-     Macbeth

-     I AM

-     Otello: the Remix

-     Bravo Figaro

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Bikes in Schools: Opening of a new bike track at Freemans Bay School

197

bView

Auckland Draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015 Presentation

199

cView

Report Back from CAN Summit

203

dView

Fixing the Traffic in a Successful Day

205

 

 

Signatories

 

Author

Pippa Coom, Deputy Chair

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 





Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2015/05182

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitemata Local Board:

Receives Board Members’ written and verbal reports.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Vernon Tava Board Members' Report

208

    






Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Waitemata Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/05411

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Waitematā Local Board workshop notes to the board.  Attached are copies of the proceeding notes taken from the workshops held on:

·    3 March 2015

·    12 March 2015

·    17 March 2015

·    24 March 2015

·    31 March 2015

 

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      Receive the workshop proceeding notes for the meetings held on 3, 12, 17, 24 and 31 March 2015

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

3 March 2015 Workshop Proceeding Notes

215

bView

12 March 2015 Workshop Proceeding Notes

217

cView

17 March 2015 Workshop Proceeding Notes

219

dView

24 March 2015 Workshop Proceeding Notes

221

eView

31 March 2015 Workshop Proceeding Notes

223

     

Signatories

Authors

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitemata

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

 

 


Workshop Proceedings 

Waitemata Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:  Tuesday, 3 March 2015

Time:                          9.00 am – 1.00 pm

Venue:                       Waitemata Local Board Room

                                    Level 2, 35 Graham Street, Auckland

 

Attendees

Chairperson:        Shale Chambers

Members:             Deborah Yates

                              Vernon Tava

                              Greg Moyle           (Item 1)

Apologies:             Rob Thomas

                              Pippa Coom

                              Christopher Dempsey

                            

LBS officers:         Trina Thompson

                              Eman Nasser

Item

Topic

Lead officer

Notes

 

 

1.

Myers Park Stage 2

David Little (Team Leader – Design), Oliver Kunzendorff (Senior Project Manager), Peter Everett (Road Development Manager Central)

·      Officers presented the board on progress of Myers Park Development Plan – stage 2 and sought the board’s feedback on the following three components: Poynton Terrace entrance, Kindergarten carpark, and Mayoral Drive underpass.

2.

2015/16 Fees and Charges for Hiring Community Facilities

Kat Tierney (Manager Community Occupancy)

 

·      Officers presented to the board on the current fees and charges for hiring community facilities and sought the board’s feedback on the new rates for 2015/16

3.

AT Update

Julia Boucher, Stefan, Gary Black (MWH), Adrian Grant, Pippa Mitchell, Irene Tse,

·      Officers updated the board on a number of transport projects including: Franklin Road, and Great North Road/Surrey Crescent Intersection.

4.

Newmarket Laneways Plan Update

Keren Neal (Project Leader)

 

·      Officers updated the board on the Newmarket Laneways Plan and sought the board’s feedback.

 

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

Eman Nasser - Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

 

 


Workshop Proceedings 

Waitemata Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:  Thursday, 12 March 2015

Time:                          9.00 am – 1.00 pm

Venue:                       Waitemata Local Board Room

                                    Level 2, 35 Graham Street, Auckland

 

Attendees

Chairperson:        Shale Chambers

Members:            Pippa Coom

                              Deborah Yates

                              Vernon Tava

                              Greg Moyle

Apologies:             Rob Thomas

                              Christopher Dempsey

                             

LBS officers:         Trina Thompson

                              Eman Nasser

Item

Topic

Lead officer

Notes

 

 

1.

Community Facilities Network Plan

Justine Haves (Lead Analyst)

Anita Coy-Macken (Principal Policy Analyst)

David Shamy (Principal Policy Analyst)

·      Officers presented the revised plan following initial consultation with Local Boards and the inclusion of libraries

2.

Community Facility Capex 2015/2016 Work Programme

Peter Loud (Snr Community Facilities Advisor)

·      The proposed 2015-16 renewal programme for Community Facilities was presented to the Board for comment

3.

Bi-monthly Report

Trina Thompson (Senior Local Board Advisor)

Eman Nasser (Local Board Advisor)

·      Officers provided an update on the key highlights and issues over the last two months in relation to the Boards work programme

 

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

Eman Nasser - Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

 

 


Workshop Proceedings 

Waitemata Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:  Tuesday, 17 March 2015

Time:                          9.00 am – 1.00 pm

Venue:                       Waitemata Local Board Room

                                    Level 2, 35 Graham Street, Auckland

 

Attendees

Chairperson:        Shale Chambers

Members:             Vernon Tava

                              Pippa Coom

                              Greg Moyle (Item 3)

                              Deborah Yates

Apologies:             Rob Thomas

                              Christopher Dempsey

                             

LBS officers:         Trina Thompson

                              Eman Nasser

Item

Topic

Lead officer

Notes

 

 

1.

City Centre Integration

Tim Watts (Manager City Centre Design), Oliver Roberts (Manager Local Board Communications), Andrew Guthrie (HED Programme Director), Gyles Bendall (Principal Specialist Urban Design), Sam Corbett (Principal Transport Planner)

·      Officers provided the Board with an update on the status of discussions regarding the Central Wharves, and the two pilots for City Centre Place Activation and City Centre Interventions.

2.

PT Network Review, Light Rail and CRL

Priscilla Steel (Elected Member Relationship Manager)

·      Officers updated the Board on the discussions around the PT Network including the proposed zonal fare areas and highlighted that the PT Central Network will be going out for consultation this year.

·      A presentation was provided on the current plans for Light Rail and update was provided on the timeframe for CRL

3.

North South Cycleway (Nelson Street Cycleway)

Priscilla Steel (Elected Member Relationship Manager)

·      Officers presented the updated plans for the proposed cycleway from Nelson Street off ramp to Victoria Street.

 

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

Eman Nasser - Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

 

 


Workshop Proceedings 

Waitemata Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:  Tuesday, 24th March 2015

Time:                          10.00 am – 12.30 pm

Venue:                       Waitemata Local Board Room

                                    Level 2, 35 Graham Street, Auckland

 

Attendees

Chairperson:        Shale Chambers

Members:             Vernon Tava

                              Pippa Coom 

                             Greg Moyle

Apologies:             Rob Thomas

                              Christopher Dempsey

                              Deborah Yates

                            

LBS officers:         Trina Thompson

                              Eman Nasser

                              Alice Fauvel

Item

Topic

Lead officer

Notes

 

 

1.

Debrief on “Have Your Say” and Community Events

Alice Fauvel (Engagement Advisor)

·      A debrief was undertaken with members on the LTP consultation approach and learnings identified.

2.

Civic Centre Options

Clive Fuhr (Manager Acquisitions and Disposals, AC Property)

Kate Cumberpatch (Acquisitions and Disposals Advisor, AC Property)

Tim Watts (Manager City Centre Design, CPO)

·      The Board was provided with an update on progress with the development of an Aotea Quarter Framework and a presentation on the proposed options for the civic centre.

 

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

Eman Nasser - Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

 

 


Workshop Proceedings 

Waitemata Local Board

 

Date of Workshop:  Tuesday, 31 March 2015

Time:                          9.00 am – 1.00 pm

Venue:                       Waitemata Local Board Room

                                    Level 2, 35 Graham Street, Auckland

 

Attendees

Chairperson:        Shale Chambers

Members:             Vernon Tava

                              Rob Thomas

                              Deborah Yates

                              Pippa Coom

                              Greg Moyle

Apologies:             Christopher Dempsey

                            

LBS officers:         Trina Thompson

                              Eman Nasser

                              Judith Webster

                              Alice Fauvel

Item

Topic

Lead officer

Notes

 

 

1.

Grey Lynn Community Centre

Cath Bathe-Taylor (Manager, Grey Lynn Community Centre), Peter (Chairperson)

·      Grey Lynn Community Centre Management presented a funding proposal for consideration

2.

Outcomes from LTP Consultation

Eman Nasser (Waitemata Local Board Advisor)

·      The initial results of the preliminary feedback (up to 7th March) of the Long Term Plan consultation was presented to the Board for consideration as well as the next steps following release of the full results.

3.

Parks Capex 2015/2016 Work Programme

Mark Miller (Parks Advisor), Jane Aicken (Manager Local and Sports Parks Central), Bruce Edwards (Team Leader Parks Operation), David Barker (Team Leader Parks Specialists and Programmes), Audrey Gan (Lead Financial Advisor),

·      Officers discussed the proposed parks capex 2015/2016 work programme with the Board.

 

Trina Thompson - Senior Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

Eman Nasser - Local Board Advisor, Waitemata

 


Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015

 

 

Reports Requested/Pending

File No.: CP2015/05184

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing a list of reports requested and pending for the Waitemata Local Board for business meetings.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         Recieves the Reports Requested/Pending report.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports Requested/Pending - April

227

    

Signatories

Authors

Desiree Tukutama - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Judith Webster - Relationship Manager

 



Waitematā Local Board

14 April 2015