I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 26 May 2015

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jill Naysmith

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Angela Fulljames

 

 

Sarah Higgins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Dr Lyn Murphy

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Gaylene Harvey

Democracy Advisor

 

19 May 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: Gaylene.Harvey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Auckland Council's Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the nine months ended 31 March 2015                                                                                                     7

13        Manukau Harbour Forum Work Programme for 2015/2016                                    79

14        Community Facilities Renewal expenditure 2014/2015                                         103

15        Landowner approval for proposed paddling club facilities at Clevedon Wharf Reserve                                                                                                                                     105

16        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards                                       115

17        Auckland Transport Update – May 2015                                                                 149

18        Review of alcohol bans 2015                                                                                    173

19        Amendment to Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016 193

20        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014                                                                                                           199

21        Member Professional Development Report - Back to the Future Conference: NZ Planners Institute 2015                                                                                                              219

22        Developing the Empowered Communities Approach                                           225

23        Urgent Decisions of the Franklin Local Board                                                       237

24        Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                   251  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               271

C1       Special Housing Areas: Tranche 7                                                                          271  

 


 

1          Welcome

 

The Chairman will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 April 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

A request for leave of absence has been received from Member Lyn Murphy which will be discussed at the meeting.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

Member Fulljames has requested the Board acknowledge the passing of Clevedon resident, Dorothy Street, on Wednesday 6 May – the member will provide more details on her contribution to the community at the meeting.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.


 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the nine months ended 31 March 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/03827

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive summary

2.       A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June.

3.       Auckland Council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) also present regular performance reports to the local boards.

4.       To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report, department report and CCO report:

5.       The attached omnibus consolidation contains the following reports this quarter

·    Local board financial performance report

·    Local Community Development, Arts and Culture (CDAC) activity overview

·    Local Sports Parks and Recreation overview

·    Local Libraries overview

·    Local Infrastructure and Environmental Services (IES) overview

·    Treasury Report

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the Auckland Council’s Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the period ended 31 March 2015.

 

Comments

6.       In consultation with local boards this omnibus report provides the elected members with an overview of local activities from council departments and CCO’s.

7.       The Performance Report contains departmental and CCO reports for inclusion and discussion. Some of these will be six monthly reports depending on their traditional reporting cycles.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       The report is presented to the Franklin Local Board members at a workshop prior to the ordinary meeting.

 

Maori impact statement

9.       Maori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report of the local board financials.  However, this financial performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Council's performance report for the Franklin Local Board for the nine months ended 31 March 2015

9

      

Signatories

Authors

Debbie Pinfold - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 







































































Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Manukau Harbour Forum Work Programme for 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/08300

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To consider allocating funding for the Manukau Harbour Forum’s 2015/2016 work  programme.

Executive Summary

2.       At its meeting of 14 July 2014, the Manukau Harbour Forum (the forum) resolved on a work programme to deliver on the Manukau Harbour Action Plan 2013-2015, recommending that the forum’s nine member boards contribute funding for this work programme for the three years. The work programme is comprised of the flagship sites programme, research hui and the communications plan (see Attachments B and C).

3.       The forum’s recommendations for funding of the first year of the work programme (2014/2015) were circulated to member boards in August 2014. At its meeting of 26 August 2014 the Franklin Local Board resolved as follows:

         Resolution number FR/2014/1

MOVED by Deputy Chairperson AJ Naysmith, seconded by Member BS Crompton:  

a)      That the Franklin Local Board supports the Manukau Harbour Forum action plan and work programme.

b)      That the Franklin Local Board agrees to contribute $8,500 in the 2014/2015 financial year towards the Manukau Harbour Forum action plan and work programme, to be paid from the board’s Manukau Harbour Forum operational budget line.

c)      That the Franklin Local Board agrees in principle to provide additional funding for the Manukau Harbour Forum action plan and work programme, of $15,800 in 2015/2016 and $15,800 in 2016/2017, subject to budget being provided in the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan.

4.       The forum’s resolution of 14 July 2014 estimated that the second year of the work programme (2015/2016) would cost $15,800 per member board. The forum has subsequently been provided with three options for year 2 of the communication plan with detailed costings, and the forum resolved to recommend an option which would result in a lower overall cost to member boards for the 2015/2016 work programme than estimated in its July 2014 resolution.

5.       At its 13 April meeting, the forum resolved on the second year of the work programme, recommending that member boards:

Resolution number MHFJC/2015/2

MOVED by Member BM Graham, seconded by Member D Wrightson:  

a)      That the Manukau Harbour Forum notes the information in the Update on Work Programme report.

b)      That the Manukau Harbour Forum recommends to member boards that funding be allocated to support a flagship sites programme and research hui in 2015/2016.

c)      That the Manukau Harbour Forum recommends option 2 for year 2 of the communication and activation plan for recommendation to member boards for funding.

d)      That the Manukau Harbour Forum thank officers for their attendance.

6.       The forum’s recommendation that member board fund year 2 of the work programme with option 2 of the communication brings the overall cost per member board to $11,889 for the 2015/2016 year. It should be noted that the cost per board of the work programme with option 2 of the communications plan is incorrectly stated in Attachment A as being $12,300.

           

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board support the request from the Manukau Harbour Forum and agree to allocate $11,889 to enable the Manukau Harbour Forum’s work programme for 2015/2016 to proceed.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Report on to the Manukau Harbour Forum on the 2015/2016 Work Programme and Communications Plan

81

bView

Flagship Sites Update

87

cView

Communications Plan

99

     

Signatories

Authors

Mary Binney - Local Board Advisor - Maungakiekie-Tamaki

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 






Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 













Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 





Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Community Facilities Renewal expenditure 2014/2015

 

File No.: CP2015/08872

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the approval of the Franklin Local Board to approve the outstanding balance of the 2014/2015 Community Facilities renewal budget.

Executive Summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board agreed the 2014/2015 Community Facilities renewal budget at its meeting on 23 September 2014. It approved a programme that included an allowance of $28,613 for twelve community hall renewal projects. At a workshop on 14 April 2015, the Board was advised that this allowance was no longer required.

3.       On the advice of officers, the Board agreed to allocate the remaining budget to the following projects:

·        Pukekohe War Memorial Hall (various works)

·        Matakawau War Memorial Hall (various works)

·        Beachlands Log Cabin (water tank replacement

·        Karaka Hall (anti-graffiti treatment)

4.       Since the workshop more detailed prices totalling $46,039 have been identified for the works.  Not all works are therefore able to be completed this financial year.

5.       Staff recommend that three priority projects be progressed at a total cost of $18,144:

i)        Beachlands Log Cabin water Tank replacement

ii)       Karaka Hall graffiti guard

iii)      various works at Matakauwau War Memorial Hall.

6.       It is recommended that the balance of funds of $10,469 be used to progress various works at the Pukekohe War Memorial Hall and that the installation of tactile ground indicators become a project to be undertaken as a renewal project in 2015/2016.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Franklin Local Board approves progressing the following projects totalling $18,144 from funding available within the 2014/15 community facility renewal fund:

·      Beachlands Log Cabin- Water Tank                                     $  6,607

·      Karaka Hall Graffiti Guard                                                    $  7,875

·      Matakawau Hall - Accessibility report improvements           $  3,662

b)      That the Franklin Local Board approves the balance of funds of $10,469 be used to progress various works at the Pukekohe War Memorial Hall and that the installation of tactile ground indicators become a project to be undertaken as a renewal project in 2015/2016.

Comments

7.       The Franklin Local Board agreed the 2014/2015 Community Facilities renewal budget at its meeting on 23 September 2014. It approved a programme that included an allowance of $28,613 for twelve hall renewals. At a workshop on 14 April 2015 the Board was advised at that this allowance was no longer required.


 

8.       On the advice of staff the Board informally agreed to reallocate these funds to the following projects:

·     Pukekohe War Memorial Hall (various works)                              $  4,450

·     Matakawau War Memorial Hall (various works)                           $  2,100

·     Beachlands Log Cabin (water tank replacement                           $  6,300

·     Karaka Hall (anti-graffiti treatment)                                               $  7,500

Total               $20,250

9.       Following the workshop more accurate pricings have been confirmed for the works as follows:

·     Beachlands Log Cabin - Water Tank                                             $  6,607

·     Karaka Hall Graffiti Guard                                                             $  7,875

·     Matakawau Hall - Accessibility report improvements                   $  3,662

Total                 $18,144

10.     The available budget is $28,613 budget so completion of these projects leaves $10,469. The Pukekohe Town Hall quote came in above initial estimates at $27,895. The major cost factor involved at Pukekohe Town Hall is the installation of tactile ground surface indicators which accounts for $14,000 of the quote received along with a slightly higher cost for the curb cuts.

11.     It is recommended that the balance of funds of $10,469 be used to progress various works at the Pukekohe War Memorial Hall and that the installation of tactile ground indicators become a project to be undertaken as a renewal project in 2015/2016.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

12.     The local board is the decision maker.

Māori impact statement

13.     The subject of this report has no impact for Maori.

Implementation

14.     The completion of the projects and expenditure identified is achievable if approval is given by the Board at this meeting.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Peter Loud - Team Leader Community Facilities

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Landowner approval for proposed paddling club facilities at Clevedon Wharf Reserve

 

File No.: CP2015/00004

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek landowner approval and an agreement to lease for the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated to construct a storage shed and parking area on Clevedon Wharf Reserve in Clevedon, and to construct a floating pontoon and jetty from the reserve.

Executive Summary

2.       The Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated (the club) propose to construct a storage shed and associated parking area on Clevedon Wharf Reserve and construct a floating pontoon and jetty from the reserve into Wairoa River.  This will enable club members to store kayaks close to the river and launch from the reserve and raise the profile of the sport (see Attachments A and B for location and site plans). 

3.       The club had a site allocation for the proposed works from the former Clevedon Community Board which lapsed in 2013. Resource consent for the shed, parking area, jetty and pontoon was granted in 2012. The club received funding from the former Manukau City Council and the Franklin Local Board towards the build. To secure further funding, the club needs landowner approval for the development of the parking area, and the jetty and pontoon works where they are located within the reserve, and an agreement to lease for the storage shed.

4.       As Clevedon Wharf Reserve is classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act and there is no reserve management plan, any agreement to lease will need to be publicly notified.  If no objections are received, it is recommended that the board provide landowner approval for the parking, jetty and pontoon works, and grant an agreement to lease to enable the club to secure funding and obtain the necessary regulatory consents.  Conditions around construction and reinstatement of the reserve can be provided by the Manager Local and Sports Parks South. On completion of the building and issue of Code of Compliance certification, it is recommended that the board approve a lease agreement with the club.

5.       Should submissions to the intention to lease be received, these must be considered by the board and a separate decision on the lease made. Alternatively the board can delegate the process and decision to a hearings panel. 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Franklin Local Board approve public notification in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, of the intention to lease approximately 198m˛ of Clevedon Wharf Reserve (58R Clevedon Kawakawa Road, Clevedon) to the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated, for the construction and use of a boat storage shed.

b)      That the Franklin Local Board approve an agreement to lease, if there are no objections to the intention to lease, for the area of Clevedon Wharf Reserve (58R Clevedon Kawakawa Road) indicated on the site plan (Attachment B) to the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated for two years commencing 1 July 2015 with a one-year right of renewal.

c)      That the Franklin Local Board grant landowner approval, in principle, to the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated to construct a parking area on Clevedon Wharf Reserve and a jetty and pontoon from the reserve, as indicated on the site plan (Attachment B).

d)      That the Franklin Local Board require that the granting of a lease and landowner approval be subject to the following:

i)        the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated securing funding for each stage of the project prior to the commencement of construction works for that stage.

 

ii)       the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated obtaining all regulatory consents required for the planning and development of the parking, shed, jetty and pontoon.

iii)      that construction works and reinstatement of the reserve are subject to conditions to be supplied by the Manager Local and Sports Parks South.

e)      That the Franklin Local Board approve the grant of a community lease to the Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated on the successful completion of the project (including the issue of building code of compliance certification) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - 10 years from the date of compliance with one 10-year right of renewal.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

iii)      an approved community outcomes plan to be attached to the lease document.

iv)      all other terms and conditions in compliance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

f)       That the Franklin Local Board note that the board will need to nominate a hearings panel to consider any submissions received following the public notification process and make a decision on whether to approve the lease.

Comments

Proposal

6.       The Clevedon Paddling Club Incorporated (the club) was formed in October 2009.  The membership has grown and currently comprises approximately 130 members from the surrounding areas including Hunua, Paparimu, Manurewa, Beachlands and Maraetai. 

7.       To make better provision for members moving forward, raise the profile of the sport and improve the health and wellbeing of the wider community, the club propose to construct a boat storage shed and associated parking at Clevedon Wharf Reserve (58R Clevedon Kawakawa Rd, Clevedon), and a jetty and pontoon from the reserve into Wairoa River (see Attachments A and B for location and site plans). The shed will require a lease while the parking and portion of jetty within the reserve require landowner consent. As the majority of the jetty and floating pontoon will be located within the coastal marine area landowner approval and not a lease is required to construct part of the jetty structure on the reserve and provide access. 

8.       The shed will store up to 75 kayaks, canoes and waka ama boats of which approximately 50 will be available for club member use and the remainder will be for private use. The club intend to make the 50 club boats available for use by South Auckland schools as the club intends to work with school groups via stake holders such as “Manukau on the Move”, to encourage participation in the sport. The club will seek funding to purchase the kayaks and waka ama in due course.

9.       The former Clevedon Community Board granted a site allocation for the proposed use of the land which expired in May 2013.  Resource consent for the shed, the parking area and the jetty and pontoon was obtained on 13 April 2012 and is still current (Council reference 40036). Building permits have yet to be obtained. 

10.     Construction of the shed will require the removal of a totara tree, trimming of several pin oak trees and works in the dripline of a number of other trees. This is addressed by the resource consent.  A water storage tank collecting roof water from the shed will be used to wash down the boats, lifejackets and other gear. 

11.     The lease area for the shed will be approximately 198m˛ (22m by 9m) and includes landscaping and access pathways surrounding the building.


 

12.     The parking area will be located on the south-western side of the shed. It will provide 13 parking spaces and be available for use by the general public. The club will be responsible for its construction, but it will be maintained by the council.  No toilets or office space are proposed, and the site will be connected to mains power supply. The shed and most of the parking area will be located above the flood plain.

13.     The club has received two grants - $87,000 from the former Manukau City Council to cover building materials, and $50,000 from the Franklin Local Board for the pontoon and jetty structures.  This funding equates to approximately half of the total amount required for the project. 

Approvals required

14.     Clevedon Wharf Reserve is held as a Recreation Reserve subject to the Reserves Act. The proposal is consistent with the recreation classification but as there is no reserve management plan in place the intention to lease the land for the boat storage shed must be publicly notified.

15.     If public notification results in no objections, than an agreement to lease can be granted. This allows the club surety of tenure while enabling the council the opportunity to ensure certain requirements are met. It is recommended that the requirements include the club showing they have funding in place to cover the costs of each stage of the build before they begin, and that funding for the shed and parking area be completed within two years of this approval. Additionally the club should have all the regulatory consents in place. Construction and reinstatement works can be managed by conditions set by the Manager Local and Sports Parks South. 

16.     It is recommended that the agreement to lease be granted for two years, with an option to renew for a further one year, if required. This allows the reserve to be made available for other development opportunities should the club not continue with their plans. 

17.     Landowner approval for the parking, jetty and pontoon can be related to the agreement to lease as it is understood that the club will not build these facilities unless approval for the shed is secured.

18.     If the work undertaken results in the successful completion of the project, upon the issue of a building code of compliance certificate it is recommended a lease be granted for 10 years with one right of renewal of a further 10 years, subject to terms and conditions complying with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.  A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club and will be attached to the lease with local board approval (Attachment B).

19.     Should submissions be received to the public notification for the intention to lease the reserve, they will need to be considered. The board can delegate this to a hearings panel.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

20.     The proposal was presented to the board at a workshop on 5 February 2015.  The board indicated support of the proposal.

Maori Impact Statement

21.     There are no known sites or places of significance or value to mana whenua within the vicinity of the site. An archaeological assessment of the Clevedon Wharf area was undertaken for the resource consent with no surface evidence of historic sites being evident.

22.     Consultation with the Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust was undertaken through the resource consent process with the iwi being supportive of the proposal.


 

Implementation Issues

23.     The jetty and pontoon are consented under resource consent 40036, and the ongoing maintenance will fall to the consent holder (the club). The jetty and pontoon will be constructed at a later stage once the shed and parking is built and funding obtained.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Site Location Plan

109

bView

Approved Resource Consent Plan and Lease Area

111

cView

Clevedon Paddling Club Community Outcomes Plan

113

     

Signatories

Authors

Sarah  Hodder - Parks and Open Space Specialist

Christine Benson - Advisor Community Lease

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

 

File No.: CP2015/07971

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport in the three months January to March 2015 and the planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the three months April to June 2015.

Executive summary

2.       Attachments include:

A – Auckland Transport activities

B – Travelwise Schools activities

C –         Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

D –         Report against local board advocacy issues

E – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly Report.

 

Significant activities during the period under review

Investment and Development

SMART (formerly SWAMMCP)

3.       Investigation into protecting a rail (rapid transit) corridor from Onehunga to the Auckland airport then connecting back to the main trunk line at Puhinui forming a rail loop.  NZTA and AT have completed the design work on the Kirkbride Interchange, which is now future proofed for rail.  Also the remaining SH20A corridor has been re-assessed for rail, taking into account the improvements that NZTA is proposing.  Work is also continuing on updating the business case for the project.

PT Development

Otahuhu Bus Rail Interchange

4.       Detailed design completion is expected in April/May 2015. Site pre-loading and rail platform enabling works are now underway.  The signal box will be lifted off the rail platform during Queens Birthday Block of Line. Main works are due to commence in July 2015 and scheduled for completion in March 2016 (subject to funding availability).  Go-live date for Interchange depends on the South Public Transport Operating Model  Network roll-out; currently scheduled for May 2016.

Half Moon Bay Ferry Upgrade

5.       The pontoon and gangway contract has been awarded for completion of fabrication by the end of June 2015.  Design of the wharf is on-going in readiness for consent submission to council mid-May 2015.

City Rail Link

6.       Enabling Works Package: Phase 1 Early Contractor Iinvolvement  design service contracts 1 and 2 awarded.  Construction is scheduled to commence early 2016.

7.       Main Works: Construction is subject to funding availability in the new LTP yet to be adopted by Auckland Council (assumed to be 2018).


 

EMU Procurement

8.       AT currently has a total of 51 three-car units in Auckland with 42 of these issued with provisional acceptance.  Five six-car services are operating during Manukau peak times.  Non-peak services have been operating between Britomart and Papakura and driver conversion trains are running out to Swanson on a regular basis.

PT Operations

Public Transport overall

9.       There has been another big jump in the numbers using public transport in Auckland.  Annual patronage now exceeds 78 million boardings, an increase of 10%. In March, there were 8.4 million boardings, a jump of more than 1 million on March 2014.

Rail Improvements

10.     The big performer was rail which reached 13.4 million passenger trips for the year, an annual increase of 21%.  March saw a monthly record high of 1.56 million train trips, an increase of 29% on March last year.  The growth is put down to the enhanced travel experience and additional capacity provided by the new electric trains and greater service frequency introduced over recent years.

11.     Auckland Transport is aiming to have a full electric network by the end of July, except for the link between Papakura and Pukekohe which will continue to use diesel trains.  These will be refurbished over time to provide an enhanced experience.  The electric trains will provide improved travel experience and more capacity on the Southern and Western Lines.

Bus Improvements

12.     March was also a record-breaking month on the Northern Express, with patronage up almost 17% on the same month last year.  The 12 month total reached 2.8 million.  It was also a record for other bus services as patronage rose 8% to 56.6 million.  Ferry numbers for the year totalled 5.4 million trips, up 5% on an annual basis.

13.     Growth on bus services is attributed to increased services and frequency, improving travel times from new bus priority lanes and a significant improvement in service punctuality being achieved by bus operators through new timetables.  Further service level increases and punctuality improvements are planned for later this year along with the introduction of double decker buses on a number of routes.  New network designs will also be introduced from later this year.

Road Design and Development

Te Atatu Road Improvements

14.     Road Corridor Improvement project on Te Atatu Rd from School Road/Edmonton Road intersection to SH16.  Building consents have now been obtained.  Three contractors been short-listed to submit a tender for the physical works.  Construction is targeted to start in July 2015 with a view towards completion around January 2017.

Albany Highway

15.     The Albany Highway North Upgrade is a 4km road widening of Albany Highway between Schnapper Rock Road and Albany Expressway.  Construction is approximately 25% complete.  The majority of the site is operating with a 30 km/hr speed limit, which results in a 2-3 minute delay to vehicles.  Disruption to neighbouring land owners due to construction is well managed, with some positive feedback received regarding the construction team's approach to resolving issues.


Lincoln Road Improvements

16.     The project involves widening Lincoln Road between Te Pai Place and Motorway Interchange to accommodate additional transit/bus lanes on both sides.  A stakeholders workshop was conducted in March to discuss the best identified options for storm water treatment sites. At the same time a meeting was arranged with Parks and Planning to come-up with best layout for the road access for the properties between Daytona Reserve and Lincoln Road.

Mill Road Improvements

17.     The Redoubt Road - Mill Road corridor provides an arterial road connection east of State High 1 between Manukau, Papakura and Drury and includes Murphys Road from Redoubt Road to Flatbush School Road.  The Notice of Requirement has been notified for the northern section of this project and submissions close in May 2015.  AT held public open days in mid-April.

Cycle Initiatives

18.     An information day has been held to share design concepts for the second stage of the Beach Road walking and cycling project.  Stage two will deliver a streetscape upgrade and continue the cycleway along Beach Road from the intersection with Mahuhu Crescent through to Britomart Place.  Construction is expected to begin in February and be completed in July.

Services

Road Safety

19.     A regional alcohol #Drunksense #Straightsense campaign was delivered.  The programme targeted males aged 18-25 years.  To reach the target audience, a combination of cinema advertisements, Facebook and social media activities were undertaken.  Localised interventions including promotions of key messages was undertaken at Auckland Council Movies in the Park, NRL Auckland Nines, Kumeu A&P Show and Pasifika.

20.     AT delivered a Red Light Running regional campaign supporting the installation of new red light cameras and locations in partnership with enforcement support by NZ Police.

Safer Communities and Schools Travelwise programme

21.     Over 120 students from 25 secondary schools attended the regional Travelwise Secondary Schools Summit on 18 March 2015.  The objective of this event was to introduce Travelwise leaders to the resources and skills they need to ‘get going’ on developing a successful Travelwise campaign for their school community.  Students participated in an AT Metro public transport challenge, and worked in teams to develop and present a road safety campaign that they would deliver in their school.

22.     In March 2015, 414 students and 77 Travelwise lead teachers attended four area-based Travelwise Primary student workshops.  The workshops were an opportunity for students and teachers to share ideas and be motivated to further develop road safety activities and initiatives in their schools.

23.     Since 1 July 2014, 79 new Walking School Buses have been established, exceeding the KPI by 43 new Walking School Buses.

24.     The following schools received safety infrastructure over the last quarter to support the schools’ travel plan initiatives:

·    Mayfield School

·    Koru School

·    Favona School

·    Otahuhu Intermediate

·    Otahuhu Primary School

·    St. Josephs School

·    Pakuranga College


Travel Demand

25.     Auckland Council and AT have jointly developed a business action plan for the Auckland Council Travel Plan.  The travel plan was approved for implementation by the Executive team at the end of January.  The travel plan is currently in the process of being approved by PSA delegates before it goes out for staff consultation.  Auckland Council also celebrated ‘Go By Bike Day’ with Cycle Information Sessions at the main centres.  The sessions included route planning advice for cyclists, safety tips and distribution of resources.

Walk 2 Work Day

26.     National ‘Walk2Work Day’ was held on Wednesday 11 March.  AT supported the day with a regional radio campaign, a dedicated web page and an online photo competition.  On the day, AT organised the ZM Black Thunder radio station vehicles to engage with people walking near Victoria Park and on Karangahape Road.  AT also worked with Living Streets Aotearoa to engage with people walking to work or to public transport at Devonport Wharf, and the Sunnynook and Smales Farm bus stations.

Road Corridor Delivery

Overview

27.     The Road Corridor Group is tasked with the responsibility for a wide range of activities within the Road Corridor.  These include but are not limited to:

·    The Delivery of roading and streetlight maintenance and renewal programmes

·    Managing the access, co-ordination and traffic management impacts of activities taking place within the road corridor

·    Promote design innovation and efficiency around how work is carried out on the network

·    The development of long term asset management plans and modelling which support the decision making process around the management of our roading assets.

 

January – March Quarter key highlights

28.     The Road Corridor Delivery Team have a Year to date (YTD) target to deliver 580.9 km of resurfacing or pavement  and footpath renewals.  Sealed roads require periodic resurfacing to keep the sealed surface waterproof with good skid resistance.  Roads are resurfaced using either an asphalt or chipseal coating.  Pavement rehabilitation is undertaken when the road pavement reaches the end of its service life and is either  too rough, or expensive, to maintain.  New pavements are designed with a life expectancy of 25 years.

29.     As outlined in figure 1, to date AT has delivered 489.5km or 85% of the YTD programme and is on  track to complete the full programme by the end of the financial year in June.

Figure 1:  Actual vs planned lengths (km) for February YTD

 

Renewal Activity

 

Full Year

Target

(km)

Completed length

at end of March

(km)

Completion v. Full Year Target

(%)

Pavements

36.4

24.3

67

Resurfacing

428.2

380.6

89

Footpaths

116.4

84.6

73

Total

580.9

489.5

85

 

30.     The renewal forward work programme for 2015/2016 will be published at the end of April.  This will identify the planned renewal works for roads, footpaths, structures and public transport.


 

31.     The streetlight tender process for the procurement of five contracts is well underway.  These contracts will commence on 1 July 2015 and coincide with a programme to replace 40,000 x 70w luminaires currently on the network with Light Emitting Diodes.  This is a five-year renewal programme aimed initially at residential streets.  A priority matrix will be developed for other key areas such as town centres.  The use of LEDs not only reduces electricity consumption by 50-60% but also plays a part in producing a clearer white light which helps in the overall effort to improve road safety.

32.     To date the management of the 6,885km footpath network has been subjected to the policies of the legacy councils and, as a result, has created inconsistencies across the region in standards and practice.  In response a regional footpath renewal strategy is now being developed.  The aim is to achieve a consistent and coherent approach to the renewal and maintenance of AT’s footpath assets.  The approach will also align with level of service requirements whilst taking into account key factors such as affordability and value for money for the ratepayers of Auckland.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the third quarter (2014/15) ending 31 March 2015

121

bView

Travelwise Schools activities broken down by Local Board

141

cView

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

143

dView

Local Board Advocacy Report

145

eView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

147

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager AT
Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 





















Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – May 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/07972

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on transport matters for the information of the Franklin Local Board and a register of transport issues in the Franklin Local Board area, as collated by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Franklin Local Board and its community, matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector, and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·     The Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund

·     Crown Road level crossing update

·     Third View Avenue (Beachlands) upgrade works

·     Proposed variation to the Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – May 2015’ and the attached issues register from Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South) be received.

Discussion

Franklin Items

A1. Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

4.       The Franklin Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is currently $434,966 per annum.

5.       The Board’s current LBTCF projects are included in the table below (in which ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

083

Pukekohe East Road-Mill Road/Harrisville Road intersection, Bombay/Pukekohe – installation of variable 70 km/h rural intersection activated warning signage (RIAWS)

·      FEC estimate of $67,000

·      On 26-Nov-13, the Board gave construction approval for the project based on the FEC of $67,000.

·      The nation-wide trial sites for RIAWS were only for the period from Jul-12 to Jul-14.

·      Waikato District Council has recently completed its Speed Limits Bylaw review to formalise the variable speed limit on the southern side of Pukekohe East Road-Mill Road.  AT approved the variable speed limit on the northern side of the road in Jun-14.

·      The NZTA is currently evaluating the results of the RIAWS sites around the country and will determine criteria and standards for the permanent approval of such sites by the middle of this year.  At this time, RIAWS signs can be installed to the new standard at this site as a permanent facility.


 

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

074

Third View Avenue, Beachlands – install 300m of new kerb and channel between Sunkist Bay Road and Cherrie Road (both sides)

·      FEC estimate of $230,000

·      On 15-Apr-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction.

·      Construction is largely completed and should be finished by mid-May.  The installation of new footpath funded by AT on the southern side of the road to coincide with these works has been completed.

254

Tobin Street carpark lighting improvements

·      ROC estimate of $35,000

·      On 26-Aug-14, the Board resolved to proceed to detailed design and costing stage.

·      On 10-Mar-15, the Board’s transport portfolio gave construction approval under delegated authority.

·      Construction completed in early May-15.  Final costs to be reported.

249

Pukekohe North streetlighting improvements

·      ROC estimate of $201,000

·      Project currently on hold

·      On 26-Aug-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction.

·      On 24-Mar-15, the Board resolved to put this project on hold pending further advice from AT on when its regional streetlighting upgrade project may be implemented in the Pukekohe and Waiuku urban areas.

250

Waiuku South streetlighting improvements

·      ROC estimate of $70,000

·      Project currently on hold

·      On 26-Aug-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction.

·      As per the above, this project has been put on hold.

348

Kaiwaka Road new footpath, Waiuku

·      ROC estimate of $50,000

·      On 26-Aug-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction.

·      Design is complete.  Construction is expected to start in May-15.

349

Pacific Street new footpath, Waiuku

·      ROC estimate of $67,500

·      On 26-Aug-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction.

·      Design is complete.  Construction is expected to start in Jun-15.

371

Whitford bus interchange

·      FEC estimate of $200,000

·      On 23-Sep-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction, based on the FEC of $200,000.

·      Construction is completed with the exception of final pavement markings and bus stop signage being carried out in the week beginning 11-May and streetlighting installation awaiting Vector work running a low voltage cable for the new lights.  Streetlighting work is expected to be completed by the end of June.

248

Hunua pedestrian facility

·      FEC estimate of $54,000

·      On 9-Dec-14, the Board gave approval to proceed with construction, based on the FEC of $54,000.

·      AT is currently finalising traffic control approval prior to calling tenders for the physical works.

 


 

6.       The Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below.

Franklin Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total funding available (across 5 FYs – 2012/12 to 2016/17)

$2,174,830

Completed projects reporting actual costs (Second View Ave kerb and channel; Patumahoe/Waiuku/Attewell Roads investigation; Pukekohe station overbridge; Ardmore School footpath; Harris St bench; Pukeoware School signs; Waiuku pavers upgrade; Third View kerb and channel projects x1; Awhitu flag lighting)

-$564,692

Projects approved for construction based on rough or firm estimates (Mill/Harrisville electronic signage; Third View kerb and channel projects x1; Kaiwaka Rd footpath; Pacific St footpath; Whitford bus interchange; Hunua pedestrian facility; Tobin St car park lighting)

-$974,500

Projects approved for construction but placed on hold (Pukekohe North x18 & Waiuku South x3 streetlighting improvements)

+$271,000

Funding still available to allocate

$906,638

 

A2. Update on Crown Road level rail crossing, Paerata

7.       A delay in the required relocation of power poles also caused a delay to the beginning of construction on the ‘hook turn’ project at the intersection of Crown Road and State Highway 22.  However, that power pole relocation by the utility company has now been completed.

8.       The construction contract for the ‘hook turn’ was awarded on 8 May and construction activity should begin within 10 working days of that date.

9.       Works are now expected to be completed by the end of June 2015.

A3. Third View Avenue (Beachlands) upgrade works

10.     Auckland Transport has a programme of work ‘Improvements Complementing Developments’ to construct new kerb and channel on both sides of Third View Avenue, including a footpath on the south side, from Shelly Bay Road to the cul-de-sac end backing onto the Spinnaker Bay subdivision.  The proposed works will connect to the new subdivision to the east via a new road being formed by the developer.

11.     The project involves the following, as shown on the plan at Attachment A:

·    Install subsoil drains and associated stormwater infrastructure

·    Construct new kerb/channel on both sides of Third View Avenue

·    Construct new footpath on south side only

·    Construct two retaining walls

·    Reshape berm area and infill existing water tables

·    Build up driveways to new existing kerb levels

·    Saw cut, reshape and seal carriageway to new channel levels.

 

12.     The proposed works will allow road connectivity for all road users from a previously no-exit street to the subdivision development to the east.

13.     To date Vector has relocated two power poles on the south side of the road near the cul-de-sac end.  Chorus is expected to finish extending and reconnecting telephone lines shortly.  Transfield will be on site by mid-May to start preliminary site clearance work, and construction is expected to be completed by July 2015.

A4. Consultation documents on proposed improvements

14.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Franklin Local Board for its feedback.  As the Board’s transport portfolio holders provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only.


 

15.     Proposed three new bus stops, Maraetai Drive, Maraetai – Auckland Transport has recently completed a review of the bus service for Maraetai Drive in Maraetai to investigate the existing infrastructure and to implement improvements where possible.  The review of this area has been undertaken to identify opportunities to optimise the operation and to enable enhanced service of the public transport for this service route.  This review has identified several gaps in the service network with large catchment areas lacking bus stops, making accessing the public transport network less appealing.

16.     Auckland Transport is therefore proposing to install new bus stops outside numbers 148, 165-167 and 225 Maraetai Drive, as shown on the plans at Attachment B.  The setting up of these new bus stops will necessitate the installation of yellow road markings and bus stop signs to identify the areas for the bus stops, the installation of no stopping restrictions on the entries and exits to the bus stops for buses to manoeuvre correctly, as well as installing the bus stops to current infrastructure standards.  These three bus stops will result in the loss of approximately 13 on-street parking spaces overall, however there is widespread on-street parking available in the surrounding areas, which can be utilised by vehicles affected by any parking removal.

General Information Items

B1. Proposed Variation to the Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP)

17.     Auckland Transport is consulting on a proposed variation to the RPTP until 4pm on Friday 5 June 2015.

18.     The RPTP is a statutory document that describes the services that are integral to Auckland’s public transport network and the policies and procedures that apply to those services.

19.     The current RPTP was completed in 2013 but there is now the need to update references to some public transport initiatives within the RPTP and to incorporate new initiatives, which include:

·    Simplified zone fares

·    Light rail

·    Ferry development plan

·    New Network service descriptions.

 

20.     The ‘Variation to the Auckland Regional Public Transport Plan – Statement of Proposal’ is now available on Auckland Transport’s website at www.at.govt.nz/rptp and sets out the proposed changes to the RPTP to reflect new policies and procedures that would apply to services relating to these initiatives above.

21.     Auckland Transport is not revising other parts of the RPTP at this time, and is not seeking feedback on matters not contained within the SOP.  Auckland Transport is planning a more comprehensive review of the RPTP in 2016, which will address other parts of the document.

22.     Written submissions on the RPTP variation outlined in the Statement of Proposal (SOP) can be made online at the website address above or by email to rptp@aucklandtransport.govt.nz  or by post to: Freepost Authority No. 233462, RPTP Variation, Auckland Transport, Private Bag 92250, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142.

B2. Auckland Council agrees interim levy for new transport fixes

23.     On 7 May, Auckland Council’s Budget Committee agreed to introduce the Mayor’s three-year interim transport levy to begin immediate work on Auckland’s transport challenges.

24.     To fill the $12 billion funding gap for the full Auckland Plan network, Auckland also opted for a Motorway User Charge.

25.     Given that a user charge would require legislation and take a number of years working with government to put in place, the three-year interim levy allows for immediate new investments of $500 million in transport.

 

26.     These new investments will include:

·    Increase in walking and cycling funding across Auckland of $124 million

·    $43 million for North-western busway and additional 45kms of bus lanes

·    Park and Ride extensions at Silverdale, Pukekohe and Papakura and a new facility for Westgate

·    Delivering arterial and local road networks

·    Public transport safety improvements for rail crossings.

 

27.     An interim levy was first signalled in the draft LTP published in December 2014.

B3. Travelwise Secondary Student Summit 2015

28.     Auckland Transport recently held its first regional Travelwise Secondary Schools Summit, with students from 25 schools across Auckland attending the Summit at Aotea Centre in the CBD.

29.     The day started with students and teachers taking part in the ‘AT Metro Challenge’ using AT Metro’s buses and trains to travel from Britomart to Newmarket and back.  The challenges taught them about public transport, road safety and cycling.  It was also an opportunity to provide ideas about how they could promote these themes at their own school.

30.     In the afternoon, students worked within their school groups to develop their ideas and to provide solutions for their schools’ transport issues.  Student groups had 60 seconds each to pitch their campaign to a ‘Dragons Den’ panel comprising Jerome Kaino (Auckland’s Blues captain and Auckland Transport ambassador), Sergeant Andrew Heath (NZ Police), and Randhir Karma and Andrew Allen (Auckland Transport’s Executive Leadership Team).

31.     The Dragons Den offered a real challenge for students, with the opportunity for a great reward and a chance to hear ideas pitched by all the other groups.  The interest level was maintained by reducing these to the ‘best bits’ and summarising them in 60 seconds.  It was a great opportunity to see Auckland’s youth share their perspectives and fantastic innovations around improving road safety and transport outcomes, and the Summit was a great success.

32.     The next step in this process will be the students implementing their campaign ideas in their respective schools’ programme.

Media Releases

C1. New road safety campaign

33.     Auckland Transport is launching a new campaign, called “Oi, Mind on the road, not the phone”, highlighting the high numbers driving while using their phones.  In Auckland, between 2009 and 2013 there were 5 fatalities as a result of drivers being distracted.

34.     However, numbers are probably under-reported, so the problem could be much bigger.  As 60% of the crashes are rear-end collisions, drivers are obviously taking their eyes off the road.

35.     People of all ages are using their phones behind the wheel and a third of all distraction-related crashes involve drivers in their 20s.  Two-thirds of people in this group are texting, using apps and social media, doing emails and making calls while driving.

36.     Research by Auckland Transport shows 30% of those who make calls have their phone up to their ear and 70% of those who make calls do it when the car is actually moving.  It was also found that 70% use apps for travel information while driving.

37.     The “Oi, Mind on the road, not the phone” campaign targets 16 to 39 year olds and includes a cinema advertisement plus radio and digital advertising.  Auckland Transport aims to raise awareness of the very real dangers of using mobile phones while driving and to introduce a gentle ‘nudge’ that will enable passengers to encourage drivers to leave their phone alone.

 

 

38.     Police Senior Sergeant Mark Chivers of Counties Manukau Road Policing Unit said it’s an offence to use a mobile phone while driving, the penalty is $80 and 20 demerit points.

39.     Driver distractions come under high risk driving in our “Fatal Five” – the five things that contribute to crashes and trauma on our roads.  We have a continued focus on these things in our on-going effort to reduce road trauma.

40.     He said the campaign with Auckland Transport is an opportunity for Police to demonstrate that any dangerous activity on our roads will not be tolerated.

41.     Check out the Oi advertisement here: https://youtu.be/VoiSay0qatM.

C2. Public transport numbers up again

42.     There’s been another big jump in the numbers using public transport in Auckland.

43.     Annual patronage now exceeds 78 million boardings, an increase of 10%.  In March there were 8.4 million boardings, a jump of more than one million on March 2014.

44.     It has been a big year with increased services across rail and bus and the gradual replacement of the diesel trains with new electric models.

45.     The big performer was rail which reached 13.4 million passenger trips for the year, an annual increase of 21%.  March saw a monthly record high of 1.56 million train trips, an increase of 29% on March last year.

46.     The growth is put down to the enhanced travel experience and additional capacity provided by the new electric trains and greater service frequency introduced over recent years.

47.     Auckland Transport is aiming to have a full electric network by the end of July, except for the link between Papakura and Pukekohe which will continue to use diesel trains.  These will be refurbished over time to provide an enhanced experience.  The electric trains will provide improved travel experience and more capacity on the Southern and Western Lines.

48.     Auckland Mayor Len Brown said the figures are good news for the City Rail Link.  "At this rate, Auckland will meet the Government's threshold for financial support for the CRL early in 2017, three years earlier than projected.  Growth has been accelerating since late 2013.”

49.     March was also a record breaking month on the Northern Express with patronage up almost 17% on the same month last year, the 12 month total reached 2.8 million.

50.     March was also a record for other bus services, patronage rose 8% to 56.6 million.  Ferry numbers for the year totalled 5.4 million trips, up 5% on an annual basis.

51.     Growth on bus services is attributed to increased services and frequency, improving travel times from new bus priority lanes and a significant improvement in service punctuality being achieved by bus operators through new timetables.  Further service level increases and punctuality improvements are planned for later this year along with the introduction of double decker buses on a number of routes.  New network designs will also be introduced from later this year.

52.     Meanwhile, Auckland Transport apologises for recent disruptions on the rail network including track and signal failures (operated by KiwiRail), mechanical breakdowns with the old diesel trains and staffing issues.

53.     General Manager AT Metro Mark Lambert said, “The new timetable from December 2014 introduced a 20% plus increase in services across the constrained Auckland rail network making it difficult to recover when there is an issue.  We are working with the rail operator Transdev to speed-up the recovery time when unfortunately inevitable failures occur.”


C3. Upgrade of key southern transport link open for comment

54.     A planned upgrade of a key transport link in south Auckland to improve safety and allow it to cope with traffic volumes doubling is now open for public comment.

55.     Auckland Transport has applied for Notices of Requirement to safeguard the route for the upgrade of Redoubt-Mill Road in Manukau so new housing areas can be built with supporting infrastructure in place.  Auckland Council has publicly notified the Notices of Requirement, with submissions open from Friday 17 April to 19 May 2015.

56.     Auckland Transport held public information sessions at Westfield Manukau’s centre court on Friday 17 April and Saturday 18 April.

57.     Auckland Transport Project Director Theunis van Schalkwyk said the planned upgrade is necessary because large housing growth in the area will double traffic volumes during the next 10 to 15 years.  Safeguarding the route through the Notice of Requirement process will provide certainty to both existing and future property owners.  New housing areas can then be built knowing where the transport infrastructure to support it will be.

58.     The current road is also unsafe, with four deaths and 283 crashes over four years.  The proposal improves the road alignment so it is safer for drivers.

59.     A significant amount of work assessing a number of alignment options, environmental, water, ecological and other potential impacts has been carried out over a number of years prior to the Notices of Requirement being lodged with Council. This included three different ecological assessments and a further review by an Otago University academic.

60.     The proposed project includes about 22,000 square metres of native planting, stream restoration, wetlands created, pest eradication and environmental monitoring during and after construction.

61.     Following public submissions there will be a public hearing by independent commissioners to consider Auckland Transport’s application.

62.     Project features include:

·     Redoubt Road widened to two lanes in each direction between State Highway One and Murphys Road

·     Westbound bus lane along Hollyford Drive and Redoubt Road towards Manukau

·     On road cycle lanes on both sides and an off road cycle and foot path for the length of the upgrade

·     Replacement of the existing Mill Road with a new arterial with two lanes in each direction between Murphys Road and Popes Road

·     Murphys Road widened to two lanes in each direction between Flat Bush School Road and Redoubt Road

·     Murphys/Redoubt Road intersection realigned and traffic lights added to improve safety

·     17m and 23m high viaducts at Puhinui Creek gully and South Mill Road gully above native bush

·     Widened footpaths on both sides of Redoubt, Mill and Murphys roads with pedestrian crossings at key intersections

·     Replacement planting and stream restoration

·     Improved stormwater facilities, including new wetlands areas

·     Landscaping of the new road corridor.

63.     To make a submission and read the Notice of Requirement documents, please contact Auckland Council.

64.     Visit the Redoubt Road – Mill Road Corridor website for more information on the project at www.at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/the-mill-road-corridor


C4. Short-list for Auckland’s passenger rail contract

65.     Auckland Transport has short-listed three companies that will be invited to tender to operate passenger rail services from 1 July 2016.  They are Serco NZ, Transdev Auckland and KiwiRail.

66.     Tender documents will be issued to the short-listed companies shortly and the new rail contract will take effect from next year, when the existing contract expires.

67.     There was a high level of interest internationally when Auckland Transport sought Expressions of Interest and the three shortlisted companies were selected after careful evaluation.

68.     The new contract will be performance-based and reflect the huge changes in the Auckland passenger rail system since the current contract was put in place in 2003.

69.     Auckland’s Metro rail service has been electrified since 2003 and modern electric trains will soon be operating on all lines.  Stations have been upgraded, new stations built and the Western Line has been double-tracked.  The number of services has significantly increased from 40,000 to 140,000 per annum since 2003.  Passenger boardings have passed a record 13 million a year and are climbing at record rates, with growth of 33% in March 2015 compared to the same month last year.  Annual growth for the March year was 21%.

C5. Proposed new Simplified Zone Fare system

70.     To support the new, more connected network of bus and train services, Auckland Transport announced on 11 May it is introducing a Simplified Zone Fare system.

71.     It is also changing the fare products and making it easier to find something that works for customers, whether they’re frequent travellers or visitors to Auckland.

72.     The current system is complex and can be difficult to understand, especially for those who are not regular users.  It is also inconsistent and results in different fares for similar trips.

73.     Simplified Zone Fares mean that for people using AT HOP cards for bus and train journeys, instead of being charged a separate fare for each ride, the fare will be calculated for the total journey regardless of whether patrons transfer between different services.

74.     The proposed zone map has 14 zones and boundaries are generally at 10km intervals from the CBD, so that radial trips of similar distance will pay the same fare.  Fares will be calculated according to the number of zones travelled through the entire journey and patrons won’t be penalised for transferring between bus and train services.

75.     Where zone boundaries occur at major interchanges like Newmarket, New Lynn, Otahuhu, Manukau it is proposed that there will be zone overlaps with stops being in both zones.

76.     Auckland Transport is also looking at a much simpler set of fare products.  AT HOP card users will have the choice of using the stored value on their card to pay for each journey, or a simple monthly pass that will allow unlimited bus and train travel across all zones.  A day pass is also proposed allowing unlimited travel on buses and trains, as well as inner-harbour ferries.

77.     A new Family Weekender pass is also proposed that would allow two children to travel free with each adult using an AT HOP card during weekends and public holidays.

78.     The proposed the Single All Day pass for all zones will cost $18.  The proposed cost for a Monthly Pass, all zones on buses and trains would be $200 to $210.

79.     At this stage ferry travel will not be included because the different ferry operators offer a range of weekly and monthly passes.  Auckland Transport is continuing to work on how it can bring ferries into the simplified zone fares system.

80.     Public consultation on the proposed zones and the fare products is open until Friday 5 June.

81.     Once the consultation is finished and the zones and fare products are confirmed, Auckland Transport aims to introduce the new system in the middle of next year.


 

82.     Find out more: www.AT.govt.nz/simplifiedzonefares

Issues Register

83.     The regular monthly issues register is Attachment C to this report.

Consideration

Local Board Views

84.     The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation Issues

85.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Plan of proposed upgrade, Third View Avenue, Beachlands

159

bView

Plans of proposed bus stops at numbers 148, 165-167 and 225 Maraetai Drive, Maraetai

161

cView

Issues Register – Franklin Local Board – May 2015

165

    

Signatories

Authors

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager; AT
Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 








Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Review of alcohol bans 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/04268

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt a proposal on the review of alcohol bans in the Franklin Local Board area.

Executive Summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board has the delegated responsibility to review all 67 existing local alcohol bans in its local board area by 31 October 2015.

3.       The purpose of the review is to identify which existing local alcohol bans meet the new higher statutory threshold to enable them to be retained. Alcohol bans that do not meet the threshold will lapse on 31 October 2015.

4.       As part of the review, the local board may choose to use a public submission process in order to get a fuller understanding of the impact of alcohol use in the current alcohol ban areas.

5.       To assist the local board, staff have undertaken an analysis of legacy council information and recent police data. This information was presented at local board workshops in early 2015. During these workshops the local board also expressed a preference for using a public submission process to complete the review.

6.       Staff recommend:

·        using a public submission process to complete the review and to adopt a proposal to facilitate this (Attachment C).

·        retaining four existing alcohol bans.

·        63 existing alcohol bans lapse unless sufficient evidence is provided through the public submission process.

7.       Staff will update the proposal as necessary to reflect the decisions by the local board.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Confirm the use of a public submission process to complete the review of alcohol bans in the Franklin local board area.

b)      Adopt the proposal titled “Proposal Review of Alcohol Bans – Franklin Local Board May 2015” in Attachment C for the purposes of the public submission process.

c)      Confirm that the proposal contained in Attachment C is in accordance with relevant requirements of the Local Government Act 2002 and Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014.

d)      Authorise the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws to make any minor edits or amendments to the Proposal to correct any identified errors or typographical edits.

e)      Authorise the Manager Social Policy and Bylaws, in consultation with the local board chair, to make any amendments to the Proposal to reflect decisions made by the local board.

f)       Appoints [insert name] (as chair), [insert at least two more board members names] as a panel to receive, hear and deliberate on submissions and other relevant information and recommend changes to the Board.

g)      Delegates to the Chairperson the ability to make changes to the panel appointed under (e) where this becomes necessary because of the withdrawal or unavailability of any of those persons.

Background

8.       Alcohol bans are an accepted and effective way of helping to reduce alcohol related harm. They limit the amount of alcohol consumed in public places. This helps reduce harm including levels of intoxication, noise, litter, harm and disorder.

9.       Recent amendments to legislation to require a review of existing alcohol bans against the new higher threshold is intended to ensure that alcohol bans are only retained in areas of high alcohol related crime or disorder.

10.     Alcohol bans are made under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014. Alcohol bans prohibit the consumption of alcohol in public places and are enforced by the New Zealand Police using powers of search, seizure, and arrest. Penalties include an infringement fee of $250.

11.     Local boards have the delegated responsibility to review existing local alcohol bans in their local board areas by 31 October 2015. This does not include a review of existing alcohol bans in areas of regional significance which is the responsibility of the Regulatory and Bylaws Committee, nor consideration of new alcohol bans which will be subject to a separate process to commence after 31 October 2015.

12.     Since the commencement of the review in November 2014, the local board at workshops has been presented with the statutory decision making requirements, review process options, legacy council information, and recent police data.

13.     The local board has expressed a preference to use a public submission process to complete the review. This process requires:

·     the local board to adopt a proposal by May 2015 (Attachment C).

·     the proposal (together with proposals from other local boards) will be publicly notified in June 2015.

·     the local board to hold hearings, deliberations and make decisions on submissions by August 2015.

·     any alcohol ban not deemed to meet the statutory evidence test will lapse on 31 October 2015.

14.     The public submission process is specifically designed to obtain evidence of alcohol-related crime or disorder from the public for those alcohol bans where legacy council information or police data is limited. The decision required of the local board is to decide which existing alcohol bans to propose to retain and which to propose to lapse unless sufficient evidence is provided through the public submission process.

Decision-making requirements

15.     In making decisions, the local board must be satisfied that any existing alcohol bans proposed to be retained comply with a range of statutory and bylaw requirements.

16.     Changes to the Local Government Act 2002 introduced a higher threshold to be met to allow an existing alcohol ban to be retained. Alcohol bans that do not meet the higher threshold will lapse on 31 October 2015.

17.     The most important requirements as outlined in the bylaw are:

·       evidence that the alcohol ban area has experienced a high level of crime or disorder that can be shown to have been caused or made worse by alcohol consumption in the area.

·       that the alcohol ban is appropriate and proportionate in the light of the evidence and can be justified as a reasonable limitation on people's rights and freedoms.

·     consideration of community-focused solutions as an alternative to or to complement an alcohol ban area.

·     consideration of the views of owners, occupiers, or persons that council has reason to believe are representative of the interests of owners or occupiers, of premises within the area to which the alcohol ban will apply.

·     consideration to using one of the following times for consistency:

i)     24 hours, 7 days a week (at all times alcohol ban).

ii)     7pm to 7am daily (evening alcohol ban).

iii)    10pm to 7am daylight saving and 7pm to 7am outside daylight saving (night time alcohol ban).

iv)   7pm on the day before to 7am on the day after any weekend, public holiday or Christmas/New Year holiday period (weekend and holiday alcohol ban).

18.     Further detail of the decision-making requirements is appended to the proposal in Attachment C.

Comment

Current local alcohol bans

19.     There are currently 67 alcohol bans in the Franklin Local Board area summarised in the table below. These have been independently assessed and evidence is included in Attachments A and B.

Type of alcohol ban area (number)

Alcohol ban time

Town centre (2)

7pm to 7am

Park, beach and foreshore reserve (8)

7pm to 7am

Cemetery (1)

7pm to 7am

Park, beach and foreshore reserve (18)

24 hours a day 7 days a week

Children’s playground (10)

24 hours a day 7 days a week

Skate park (1)

24 hours a day 7 days a week

Public reserve car park and public road adjoining car park (27)

24 hours a day 7 days a week

Evidence

20.     Evidence of alcohol-related crime or disorder has been obtained from legacy council files, and data from the New Zealand Police for the period 1 September 2013 – 30 September 2014 has also been supplied.

21.     Other sources of Auckland-wide alcohol-related crime or disorder information were investigated but did not provide evidence able to be linked to particular alcohol bans. Other sources included service request data lodged through the council call centre, graffiti and Ambulance and Emergency Service data.

22.     Evidence may also be gathered through a public submission process. Documented evidence may be provided by way of:

i)        a written account of incidents of alcohol-related crime or disorder people have witnessed prior to, after, or recently in relation to a particular alcohol ban having been introduced.

ii)       historical media articles.


Options

23.     For each of these areas, the local board has two options. To retain the alcohol ban (with or without amendments to areas or times) or to allow the ban to lapse.

24.     In terms of which alcohol bans to retain or lapse, the local board can review the summary of evidence provided for individual alcohol bans in Attachments A and B and choose to:

·     confirm the list of alcohol bans proposed to be retained (Attachment A).

·     confirm the list of alcohol bans proposed to lapse (Attachment B).

·     identify any changes to the list of alcohol bans proposed to retain (Attachment A).

·     identify any changes to the list of alcohol bans proposed to lapse (Attachment B).

25.     It is important to note that the statutory requirements of this review means the retention of alcohol bans must be determined on evidence of high levels of alcohol-related crime or disorder.

Recommendation

26.     Staff recommend:

i)        the use of a public submission process to complete the review and to adopt the “Proposal Review of Alcohol Bans – Franklin Local Board May 2015” to facilitate this (Attachment C)

ii)       retain the following four existing alcohol bans (Attachment A):

·   Maraetai Bay

·   Orere Point Library Grounds (car park and road adjoining car park only)

·   Pukekohe Central Business District

·   Waiuku Central Business District

iii)    allow the remaining 63 alcohol bans  to lapse unless sufficient evidence is provided through a public submission process to justify their retention (Attachment B).

27.     The reasons for this recommendation are:

i)        there is sufficient evidence of a high level of alcohol-related crime or disorder to retain four existing alcohol bans.

ii)       the alcohol bans retained are appropriate, proportionate, and reasonable.

iii)      the hours of alcohol bans retained are aligned to those contained in the bylaw.

iv)      the public submission process provides an effective and efficient way to obtain further evidence (in a useable format) to support decision making.

Next steps

28.     The proposal (together with proposals from other local boards) will be publicly notified in June 2015.

29.     Staff will update the proposal as necessary to reflect the decisions by the local board.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

30.     Since the commencement of the review in November 2014, the local board at workshops has been presented with the statutory decision making requirements, review process options, legacy council information, and recent police data.


 

Māori impact statement

31.     Managing alcohol related harm associated with people consuming alcohol in public places increases opportunities for health and wellbeing, which is consistent with the outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. 

32.     Feedback from mana whenua representatives at a hui held in March 2015 supported alcohol bans in principle, and believe that non-regulatory approaches should be considered to help reduce alcohol related harm.

Implementation

33.     There are no implementation issues associated with this decision to adopt a proposal.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Alcohol bans proposed to retain

179

bView

Alcohol bans proposed to lapse

181

cView

Proposal

185

     

Signatories

Authors

Kylie Hill - Policy Analyst

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 




Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 








Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Amendment to Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/06912

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To enable the Franklin Local Board to consider amending its Community Grants Programme 2015/16 to include criteria for school swimming pool grants.

Executive Summary

2.       The new Auckland Council Community Grants Policy was adopted in December 2014. This policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt their own local grants programme.

4.       This Franklin Local Board adopted its Community Grants Programme for 2015/2016 at its business meeting on 21 April 2015. At the time of adoption, it did not include criteria for the allocation of funding to schools for swimming pools. 

5.       Grants to school pools in Franklin began in 2009 when Franklin District Council entered into a three year funding agreement with three rural schools.

6.       The purpose of the fund is to enable the community to access school pools over summer by providing schools assistance with their running costs, enabling them to keep pools open over the summer period.

7.       School pool funding was carried on by the Franklin Local Board with annual funding allocations to schools each year from 2012 – 2014.

8.       At a previous business meeting on 23 April 2013, the board adopted criteria for the allocation of funding to schools for swimming pools as follows:

Resolution number FR/2013/79

That for 2013/2014, the following criteria and process for school pool capital grants be used to assess applications:

i)       Access of the pool to the wider community and school community.

ii)      Steps the school has taken to increase usage of the pool by the wider community.

iii)     There is an existing user agreement with at least one community user group/organisation (e.g. a learn-to-swim provider).

iv)     The school agrees to ensure there is a certified person to undertake water testing (i.e., has attained the NZQA unit standards in swimming pool water quality).

v)     Distance from a public swimming pool.

vi)     Evidence of pool usage for the previous summer, including number of keys sold.

9.       During discussions on its 2015/16 budgets, the board indicated that it wishes to retain the school swimming pool fund.  It is recommended that the fund is allocated under the Community Grants Programme as a local grant, to ensure all grants follow the same process and make it easier for the community to establish what is available – a ‘one stop shop’.

10.     The board is now being asked to consider amending its Community Grants Policy for 2015/16 to include criteria for school swimming pool grants.  This would be implemented via additional wording under the heading “community funding” based on the above criteria.

11.     An amended version of the programme is included as Attachment A, with “track changes” showing the suggested additional wording.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board amends the Franklin Community Grants Programme 2015/16 adopted at its business meeting on 21 April 2015 (refer resolution FR/2015/51) by adding the following wording under the heading “community funding”:

-     support access to school pools by the wider community for schools that can provide details of the following:

·    steps the school has taken to increase usage of the pool by the wider and school community.

·    there is an existing user agreement with at least one community user group/organisation (e.g. a learn-to-swim provider).

·    the school agrees to ensure there is a certified person to undertake water testing (i.e. has attained the NZQA unit standards in swimming pool water quality).

·    distance from a public swimming pool.

·    evidence of pool usage for the previous summer, including number of keys sold.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Franklin Community Grants Programme 2015/16 with additional wording

195

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Cain - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Franklin Local Board – Local Grants Programme 2015/2016

Our Local Grants Programme aims to provide contestable and discretionary community grants to local communities.

 

Outcomes

Our grants programme will support the following outcomes outlined in our local board plan:

·    cherished natural environment

·    thriving local economy

·    excellent transport connections and infrastructure

·    growth in the right place, at the right time

·    proud, safe, and healthy communities

 

Our priorities for grants

Franklin Local Board is keen to support its strategic goals through providing grants to local communities.  The board has developed the following specific objectives to guide applicants.

Events funding

With its funding grants, the board aims to:

•     promote environmental responsibility through supporting events that aim for zero waste (reduce, reuse, recycle)

•     encourage smoke-free events, particularly those targeting children, young people and their families

•     support events that celebrate our distinctive local communities and enable people to come together

•     support events which encourage visitors to spend more time in Franklin as a destination

•     support events that aim to be financially sustainable and become a regular and celebrated part of the Franklin event calendar

 

Community funding

With its funding grants, the board aims to:

•     support community groups to be effective and contribute to the community, particularly in shaping and developing their areas to be better and safer places

•     assist young people to move from school to work or further training

•     support initiatives that celebrate our arts, culture and heritage

•     work with local partners to help to make the community feel safe


 

·    support access to school pools by the wider community for schools that can provide details of the following:

-     steps the school has taken to increase usage of the pool by the wider and school community

-     there is an existing user agreement with at least one community user group/organisation (e.g. a learn-to-swim provider)

-     the school agrees to ensure there is a certified person to undertake water testing (i.e. has attained the NZQA unit standards in swimming pool water quality)

-     distance from a public swimming pool

-     evidence of pool usage for the previous summer, including number of keys sold.

 

Environmental funding

With its funding grants, the board aims to:

•     support local environmental initiatives

•     encourage activities that reduce waste to landfill, prevent illegal dumping and preserve the beauty of our environment

•     support the prevention of kauri dieback in our native forests

•     encourage a weed and pest-free natural environment

•    support community initiatives to enhance waterways and the coastline, including as beach clean-ups and planting


Lower Priorities
:

The Franklin Local Board has identified the following activities as lower priorities for funding:

·    Travel

·    Salaries

·    Catering

·    Vehicles

 

Investment approach

The Franklin Local Board has allocated budgets to support the local grants programme as follows:

·    Quick Response Local Grants: 50% of total fund per annum

Ř Minimum amount per grant: $200

Ř Maximum amount per grant: $2,000

·    Local Grants: 50% of total fund per annum

The Franklin Local Board will support match funding as part of the Local Grants fund.

 

Application dates

Grant rounds will be as follows:

Quick Response Local Grants

Funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round One

July

August

September

September

Round Two

September

October

October

November

Round Three

January

February

March

March

Round Four

March

April

May

May

Round Five

May

June

July

July

 

Local Grants

Funding rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round one

20 July 2015

31 August

September/October

October

Round two

19 February

31  March

April/May

May

 

Accountability measures

The Franklin Local Board requires successful applicants to provide:

·    For local grants (over $2,000) - a self-review, including how the group achieved their planned outcomes, to be supplied to the local board with an accompanying photo of the activity or event.


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 July to 31 December 2014

 

File No.: CP2015/09218

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To give the Franklin Local Board an overview of Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 July to 31 December 2014.

Executive Summary

2.       ACPL’s vision centres on “creating value from property assets” by providing commercial expertise and value for money to Auckland Council in managing its property portfolio, and acquisition and disposal activities.  The concept of “value” includes but is not limited to financial value. In addition to financial value, a growing aspect of ACPL’s work has been to use surplus council property to help achieve the council’s housing supply and urban regeneration objectives. We will also identify opportunities to add value by improving the use of council service property such as redevelopment of under-utilised sites.

3.       This report sets out a summary of ACPL activities for the past six months that contribute to our seven key outcomes as outlined in our Statement of Intent (SOI) 2014 to 2017 and noted below. Activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

4.       ACPL’s seven key outcomes:

·    Properties managed for the council and Auckland Transport (AT) are maintained to be fit for purpose and achieve optimum net returns.

·    Redevelopment/regeneration projects involving other sector partners are efficiently planned and managed to help achieve a quality compact Auckland.

·    ACPL contributes exemplar housing developments to increase the supply of housing in Auckland, particularly in the more affordable spectrum of the market, working with partners.

·    Council business interests are managed to protect long term value and achieve budgeted net income. 

·    Property acquisitions are undertaken in a commercially robust manner and in accordance with the council and AT agreed requirements and relevant legislation.

·    Properties are disposed of for the council in a commercially robust manner once declared surplus.

·    The council is provided with a commercial perspective on planning and development initiatives to support effective implementation of those initiatives.

5.       Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A, B, and C.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board accepts the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly update 1 July to 31 December 2014.

 


Comments

Workshops and Meetings

6.       A schedule of Franklin Local Board workshops and meetings attended by ACPL representatives from July to December is included as Attachment A. The list includes property specific meetings and workshops relating to general property management and the ongoing portfolio Rationalisation Process.

Property Portfolio Management

7.       ACPL manages property owned by the council and AT that are not currently required for service or infrastructure purposes. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development but are being held for use in a planned future project such as road construction/widening or the expansion of parks.

8.       The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six months and now totals 1306 properties, an increase of 121 since our January-June 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

9.       ACPL’s specialist property knowledge and understanding enables us to optimise revenue streams and identify future opportunities.  ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the six months ending 31 December 2014 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $2.9m ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $11.8m against budget of $23m. The average monthly vacancy rate for the period is 1.68% which is under the SOI targets of 5%.

10.     A Properties Managed schedule is included as Attachment B of this report. The schedule details:

·        Current ACPL-managed commercial and residential property within the Franklin Local Board

·        Each property’s classification or reason for retention

·        The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

·        The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported eg regional or local board.

11.     A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment C. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

12.     ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.


Performance

July 2014 to June 2015 Target

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

$36.4m

These recommendations include $33.2m of sites that are identified for development projects.

13.     In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m gross value recommended for sale

These targets include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30 net value of unconditional sales

Process

14.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with: the council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

15.     Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Franklin area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body. Further details are included in Attachment B.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

172, 174, 180A, 180B Manukau Road, Pukekohe

Released by AT as not required for infrastructure purposes.  ACPL progressed through the Rationalisation Process to evaluate future use requirements and considerations.  Presented to the Governing Body in July 2014, recommending that Pukekohe Long Term Plan be completed before a decision made.

78 Queen Street, Waiuku

An adjoining property owner expressed interest in purchasing this property. No alternative uses were identified during the rationalisation process.  To be presented for clearance in 2015.

95 Tegal Road, Drury

Stopped road.  PSR confirms no requirement for access via theis site.  Rationalisation process commenced in December 2014. Local Board engagement to be progressed in 2015.

Crisp Avenue (adjoining 23), Pukekohe

Accessway reserve, transferred from ACPD as non-service. Rationalisation process commenced in December 2014. Local Board engagement to be progressed in 2015.

Redevelopment/Regeneration and Housing Supply Initiatives

Overview

16.     ACPL is contributing commercial input into approximately 54 region wide council-driven regeneration and housing supply initiatives. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $415k to in excess of $100million. ACPL works closely with the local boards on ACPL-led developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role.

17.     ACPL is working with the wider council group to formulate a process or approach for identifying and realising optimisation opportunities that exist for service assets. This will provide opportunities to work with local boards on development opportunities that deliver wider strategic benefit consistent with the Auckland plan such as intensification, town centre regeneration and affordable housing. It will also improve service outcomes through obtaining more effective use of property assets.

18.     ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Strategy Action Plan, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. We have an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects over three years that will improve housing affordability and the supply of affordable housing encompassing CHO involvement. We are currently actively working on 13 such projects.

Local Activities

19.     17&21 Massey Ave, Pukekohe and 33 Edinburgh Street, Pukekohe: This is a long term strategic development opportunity that has been cleared for sale.  ACPL are now working through future options.

Acquisitions

Overview  

20.     ACPL continues to support council and AT programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved council or AT budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

21.     From the commencement of the 2015 financial year, 1 July 2014 to 31 January 2015, 73 property purchases were completed for the council and AT to the value of $56m. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements. 

Council Acquisitions

22.     Over the past six months 15 properties were acquired to meet council legal, open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. These included the following acquisitions in or neighbouring the Franklin Local Board area.

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

47-49  Great South Road, Takanini

Legal

Legal

Papakura

 

398 S Weymouth Road, Weymouth

Stormwater

Stormwater

Manurewa

255 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush

City Transformation

City Transformation

Howick

 

111 Flat Bush School Road Stage 6, Flat Bush

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Howick


 

PROPERTY

STAKEHOLDER

PURPOSE

LOCAL BOARD

426 Ormiston Road (4C2) Lot 201, Flat Bush

Community Policy & Planning

Open Space

Howick

426 Ormiston Road (4C2) Lot 204, Flat Bush

Community Policy &  Planning

Open Space

Howick

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

23.     58 properties were also acquired over the past six months on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects including AMETI (17 acquisitions) City Rail Link Property Acquisition (23 acquisitions) and Northern Strategic Growth Area
(4 acquisitions). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

24.     ACPL also optimises the commercial return from assets it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. A high level update on business interests in the Franklin Local Board area is outlined below

Whitford Quarry

25.     The return to Auckland Council from Whitford Quarry has been in excess of budget in the past six months.  As a result of the combined landfill operating agreement, ACPL is also progressing an opportunity to take managed fill material from an ACPL Development site onto the Waste Disposal Services site to be used as daily cover material.

Waste Disposal Services

26.     Auckland Council (AC) shareholding in Waste Disposal Services (WDS) is an equal interest unincorporated joint venture (JV) formed in 1993 between AC (previously Manukau City Council) and Waste Management (previously Transpacific Industries (NZ) Limited) (WM). WDS is a Council Controlled Trading Organisation and is responsible for the on-going development and operation of the Whitford landfill and the operation of East Tamaki Refuse transfer Station.

27.     The JV is currently expected to continue to 2041 in line with the resource consent time frame, although this is dependent on the volumes of waste is put to the landfill and the closure activities.  With the continued initiatives of waste minimisation by AC, the volume of waste being sent to all landfills in Auckland has been decreasing, with the resultant effect of lowering the cash flow from this investment.  

28.     In March 2015, Mr Kerry Stotter retired as the Chair of the Executive Committee of WDS, a role he has held since 1993. 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

29.     This report is for the Franklin Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

30.     Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. The importance of effective communication and engagement with Māori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 mana whenua groups for our core business activities.

 

31.     Key engagement activities include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of wāhi tapu or joint management arising from the resolution of Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. ACPL will advise the Franklin Local Board as appropriate of any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

32.     ACPL undertook to be part of council’s Māori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Māori. The MRP was finalised and approved by the ACPL Board in December 2014 and the focus will move to identifying priority areas for implementation. A copy of this is available on the ACPL website.

Implementation

33.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of meetings and workshops

205

bView

Properties Managed by ACPL in the Local Board area

207

cView

Property movement in the Local Board area

217

     

Signatories

Authors

Marian Webb – Local Board Liaison, ACPL

Authorisers

David Rankin – Chief Executive, ACPL
Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Member Professional Development Report - Back to the Future Conference: NZ Planners Institute 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/08714

 

  

Purpose

1.       Providing a report for information on the Back to the Future Conference: NZ Planners Institute 2015 that Member Fulljames attended in April.

Executive summary

2.       At the Franklin Local Board meeting on 24 March 2015, the board resolved:

Resolution number FR/2015/1. MOVED by Member BS Crompton, seconded by Member SJR Higgins:  

a)      That the Franklin Local Board nominates the Chairman, Andrew Baker and Member Angela Fulljames to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2015 annual general meeting and conference from Sunday 19 July 2015 to Tuesday 21 July 2015 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board’s work programme.

b)      That the Franklin Local Board confirms that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

3.       Member Fulljames has subsequently indicated she would prefer to attend the New Zealand Planning Institute’s conference “Back to the Future” from 14-17 April in Auckland. The reasons for this are to upskill in the area of placemaking and planning.  Given the Franklin Local Board area is experiencing significant population growth, she considers it an opportunity to learn more about good examples of processes and design outcomes. Member Fulljames feels it is important that there is knowledge within the local board to ensure innovative thinking to deliver the principals of excellent placemaking.

4.       Due to the timeframe the Board approved this request for a change under urgent decision on 8 April 2015, which was noted by the Board at their subsequent meeting on 21 April 2015.

5.       Members are required to provide reports to the Board on any training opportunities they have undertaken.

6.       Refer to Attachment A for a detailed report on the conference.

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the report from Member Angela Fulljames regarding the Back to the Future Conference: NZ Planners Institute 2015 held on Tuesday 14 April to Friday, 17 April 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Member report on professional development course

221

Signatories

Authors

Gaylene Harvey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 




Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Developing the Empowered Communities Approach

 

File No.: CP2015/07672

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the Empowered Communities Approach (ECA), and enables the Franklin Local Board to provide formal feedback. Resolutions will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 June 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council.

3.       The Community Development, Arts and Culture Department of the Operations Division is leading the development of ECA, with support from Local Board Services and others.

4.       The purpose of the ECA is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family.

5.       The proposed approach builds on the Thriving Communities Action Plan Ngā Hapori Momoho (April 2014).

6.       The proposed approach is guided by the principle of Empowered Communities: Enabling Council resulting in improved outcomes for Aucklanders. The approach identifies what will change, what council will do and enabling ways of working.  

7.       The proposed approach was reported to local boards and the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in April 2015.

8.       The key functions of the new operating model are to support local boards, build community capacity and capability, increase diverse community input into the work of council, catalyse the approach across the whole of council and build the capacity of the organisation to work in ways which empower communities. 

9.       There will be a shift from delivering community development activities directly to communities, to using community development practices to achieve local board and governing body aspirations and outcomes.

10.     The proposed operating model will consist of three components which together will better support the delivery of local board plans as well as address complex community issues across Auckland. These components are provisionally called: local community brokers, the community practice hub and Auckland-wide response.  

11.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

12.     Community development and engagement is at the heart of the role of local boards. The local board plans all include a focus on developing strong communities. Proposed changes to council’s community development approach are of significant interest to local boards. 

13.     To date the ECA has been informed by the following input from local boards: Political Advisory Group (PAG), two chairs and portfolio holders’ workshops and individual local board workshops.

14.     Community and council staff consultation has also informed the approach.

15.     The final PAG meeting is on 4 May 2015. Feedback from that meeting is either attached to this report, or where local board meetings are early in May, will be tabled at the meeting.

 

 

16.     The transition timeline is for work to be done on models and roles from now until the end of June. From July to December the approach will be implemented to meet local board needs and in 2016 as the approach matures and evolves it will be extended across the council family.

17.     This report enables the Franklin Local Board to make resolutions on the ECA. These resolutions will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 June 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board make resolutions on the proposed Empowered Communities Approach, for consideration as part of the report to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in June.

 

Comments

Background

18.     The Mayor’s Proposal for the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) includes developing a more empowered community approach to the work of Auckland Council. The proposed changes to the community development function are:

·    to transition delivery to a more empowered community approach

·    to move away from direct delivery (and therefore save overheads) and fund community groups to deliver more

·    for local boards to play a much more active role by allocating more funding through them.

19.     The purpose of the ECA is to develop a new, more effective and empowering approach to the way council delivers services and supports community activities. The ECA will establish a new operating model for the Community Development and Safety (CDS) unit which will shift its service delivery to have a greater focus on local and community empowerment, with a view to embedding this way of working across the council family. 

20.     The proposed approach builds on the Thriving Communities Action Plan Ngā Hapori Momoho (April 2014).  It will bring to life the principles, focus areas and actions by providing a clear operational direction to enable implementation of the plan across council.

21.     The approach also provides an implementation framework for the High Performing Council’s special focus area ‘Engaging and Enabling Communities’. The approach could play a significant role in building best practice across the organisation in the four high performance behaviours: develop, serve, collaborate and achieve.

22.     The approach is guided by the principle of Empowered Communities: Enabling Council resulting in improved outcomes for Aucklanders. The approach identifies what will change, what council will do and enabling ways of working.  This approach was reported to local boards and the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in April 2015. More information is provided in Attachment A.

The new operating model

23.     A primary focus for the new unit will be on working with other parts of council to provide community development support, expertise and assistance to local board projects and activities so that every opportunity for council to work in ways that are enabling of communities is maximised. There will be a shift from delivering community development activities directly to communities, to using community development practices to achieve local board and governing body aspirations.

24.     The key functions of the new operating model are to:

·    support the council to work seamlessly together at local board level

·    build community capacity and capability

·    increase diverse community input into the work of council

·    embed the approach across the whole of council and build the capacity of the organisation

·    to work in ways that  empower communities.

25.     The proposed operating model will consist of three components which together will better support the delivery of local board plans as well as address complex community issues across Auckland. These components are provisionally called: local community brokers, the community practice hub and Auckland-wide response.  

26.     The local community brokers are strategic roles. They will be co-located alongside local board services teams. They will work alongside local board advisors to support and join up the work of all departments delivering on local board outcomes and will support devolving more resources to the community. The broker’s work programme will be based on local board outcomes. The role will be tailored to meet local board and community needs and they will provide a portal into council for the community.

27.     The community practice hub consists of a dedicated team of expert practitioners with skills including community development, facilitation and project management. They will work alongside the local board teams to deliver programmes and tools, capacity building for communities, inclusive engagement and participation programmes and also provide operational support for local community brokers, local boards and across the council family.

28.     The local community brokers will work with the local board members and advisors to identify which projects offer opportunities to work in a more empowered communities way and are priorities for support from the community practice hub. The hub will then develop a work programme incorporating priorities from across local boards.

29.     If new community priorities start to emerge, the local community brokers will work with local board members and staff to agree next steps. The community practice hub will have some capacity to support work on emerging issues if they become local board priorities.

30.     The Auckland-wide response will be a team of people with specialist skills. They will work on significant and/ or complex issues that would benefit from an all of Auckland approach, internal systems and processes and barriers and activity where a regional response delivers efficiency/ effectiveness benefits.

31.     Different responses will be needed around Auckland taking into account community capacity, strength and resilience. This range of responses will need to cover those areas where there is well developed community capacity to opportunities to further development community capacity and newly formed communities.

 

32.     The impact of the approach will be that:

·    local boards are able to access tailored and strategic support

·    community development practice enhances the work of the whole of the council family

·    communities have more access to resources and support to do things for themselves

·    the empowered communities approach is embedded throughout the organisation.

33.     There are a number of empowering initiatives and activities, both new and existing, which could be further developed to empower communities.

34.     A reduction in the cost to deliver community development over time is expected, starting with savings in the 2015/2016 financial year.

35.     Community development and engagement is at the heart of the role of local boards. The local board plans all include a focus on developing strong communities. Proposed changes to council’s community development approach are of significant interest to local boards. 

36.     This report provides the opportunity to provide formal feedback. This will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee on 4 June 2014.


 

Political Advisory Group

37.     A Political Advisory Group (PAG) has provided strategic advice and guidance to staff during the development of the empowered communities approach. 

38.     At their meeting on 16 April 2015 the PAG supported:

·    the key functions of the new unit

·    the three components of the new operating model (local community brokers, community practice hub and Auckland-wide response).

39.     Other feedback from the PAG included the need to consider the relationship with the Māori Responsiveness Framework and the need for staff to have cultural competencies. There was also discussion around whether the local community brokers should be located within Community Development and Safety or Local Board Services, and comment that local board outcomes are the same as community aspirations.

40.     Staff will report back to the PAG on 4 May with the following:

·    revised approach and model

·    approach to devolving resources

·    tools to support implementing the approach.

41.     Feedback from the PAG meeting on 4 May forms attachment 2 to this report.  However, due to the timing of this PAG, where local boards are meeting early in May this will mean the tabling of attachment 2.

ECA timeline

42.     The remaining key milestones are shown in the table below.

Stage

Date

Purpose

Budget Committee

7-8 May

LTP budget decisions including CDS budget for 2015/2016

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

4 June

Endorse ECA and the CDS operational model

 

Consultation and engagement

43.     The community was consulted through a limited number of community-led, and staff run, workshops around the region. Staff were also consulted.

44.     The key points from the consultation were:

·    use a high trust model that is values based

·    value what communities bring to the table

·    one size does not fit all

·    capacity building is critical and a fresh approach is required

·    a whole of council approach

·    respond to the diversity of Auckland’s communities.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

45.     The ECA aims to provide a much more active role for local boards in community development.

46.     ECA builds on the strong focus on community led planning and development in the local board plans 2014.

 

 

47.     Local board chairs met to consider ECA on 30 March. The following four principles arose from this meeting:

·    local boards need to be empowered themselves so that they can in turn empower their communities in a way that suits the area.

·    local board outcomes are community outcomes and need to be central to and drive the community empowerment approach and focus under the direction of the local board.

·    community empowerment is not as simple as channelling funds through community groups, which has risks. Community empowerment is an approach and any change to the current needs to be carefully staged and made appropriate for each local board.

·    within change there are always opportunities but they carry risks which can be minimised through careful planning, full engagement of the main parties and undertaken within a timeframe that is feasible for significant change to take place.

48.     Local boards’ formal views are sought through this paper. This builds on earlier opportunities to provide informal feedback at local board workshops during April and at two workshops for local board chairs and portfolio holders.

49.     The summary feedback from the chairs and portfolio holders meeting on 20 April was:

·    the budget approach and costs associated with the proposed model are required to be able to make an informed response. There was also desire for better utilisation of the budget to achieve improved outcomes. Additionally, it was unclear how the model will deliver more resources to local boards.

·    the broker role needs to operate on a continuum that is tailored to local boards and can deliver across the continuum from those with contracted out services to communities with less capacity to take on additional services.

·    the broker role bests sits in local board services but the overlap with local board advisor roles needs to be explored.

·    the community practice hub services are valuable but local boards do not want to have to pitch for resources. A bottom up approach is preferred and the hub should also use resources from other areas of council and the community.  It was also unclear where the expertise exists to deliver the hub services.

·    uncertainty over what the Auckland wide response team will deliver and concern that it will not deliver local board priorities.  Local boards could be supported to work collaboratively on common issues as community development is delegated to local boards.  The community brokers can collaborate to tackle the systemic issues. Regional issues should be funded by the governing body and Community and Social Policy can cover these Auckland wide issues.

·    the need to respond to diverse and disempowered communities.

·    the transition process was unclear and raised concerns over delivery in coming months.

There were also recurring themes from early discussions:

·    one size does not fit all

·    the model needs to focus on delivering local board priorities, which are the same as the communities’ priorities.

Māori impact statement

50.     The ECA has a direct relationship with the Māori Responsiveness Framework, which sets out two key areas of activity; the first being understanding the rights and interests of Māori. The second, and closely intertwined, is acting on the needs and aspirations of Māori.


 

51.     To be a High Performing Organisation a key component is engaging with and enabling communities, which means considering and understanding Māori needs and issues and having the capability and capacity to improve process and systems to enhance involvement. The approach described in this report sets out a shift in the way the organisation delivers services, which includes improving outcomes for Māori. The Council Māori Responsiveness Leadership Group has been established to enable better outcomes with Māori in the areas of cultural, social, economic effectiveness for Māori and treaty settlements and moving to a more empowered community way of working will help make progress in all these areas.  

52.     There are a number of initiatives underway which can help inform the Empowered Community Approach such the Māori Input to Decision Making project in the south of Auckland. This, and other activities being undertaken in partnership with Mana Whenau around the environment, provide strong examples of how Māori can be engaged with and participate to embed the proposed approach to communities.   

53.     Engagement with mataawaka and mana whenua is ongoing to enable staff to understand potential impacts.

54.     A representative from the Independent Māori Statutory Board sits on the PAG.

Implementation

55.     The transition timeline is for work to be done on models and roles from now until the end of June. From July to December the approach will be implemented to meet local board needs and in 2016 as the approach matures and evolves it will be extended across the council family.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Empowered Communities: Enabling Council

233

bView

Feedback from PAG meeting 4 May 2015

235

     

Signatories

Authors

Helen Dodd - Local Board Strategic Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

 

Feedback from Political Advisory Group (PAG) 4 May 2015

 

At the meeting, PAG received an update reflecting adjustments to the overarching empowered communities approach and model. This was in response to feedback from local boards and the Independent Māori Statutory Board member at the PAG meeting16 April.

 

The adjustments are:

 

·    the components of the new operating model have been adjusted. The three components are  strategic brokerage tailored to each local board and way of operating, a community practice hub and a small scale enabling hub focused on addressing organisational-wide barriers to enabling communities, organisational capacity building and Auckland-wide issues and strategic relationships

·    Māori responsiveness is reflected throughout the empowered communities approach and operating model, with the new unit being responsive to local board priorities, the Māori Plan and Auckland Plan.

 

A summary of the key points raised in discussion at the 4 May meeting is:

 

·    support for council to deliver an empowered communities approach

·    a desire to see more resources released into local delivery with uncertainty about how this will happen with the three parts of the model shown

·    recognition that one size and one pace will not work for all. More time is needed to work through the budget and transition issues

·    where is the strategic broker role best located

·    the approach needs to cover the whole of council

·    progress is being made on the Maori transformational shifts but there is more work to be done.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Urgent Decisions of the Franklin Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/06809

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing the decisions made under urgency between the April and May business meetings for information.

Executive Summary

2.       Three urgent decisions have been processed since the April 2015 business meeting in regard to the following:

a)      Allocation of Local Civic Functions budget for ANZAC day services made on 21 April 2015 (refer Attachment A).

b)      Landowner approval for Memorial Board Sign and naming of playground at Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe – made on 5 May 2015 (refer Attachment B).

c)      Reallocation of the Local and Sports Park Capital and Renewal Works Programme 2014/15 for the Bledisloe Park carpark – made on 15 May 2015 (refer Attachment C).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board notes the following urgent decisions:

Allocation of Local Civic Functions budget

a)      That the Franklin Local Board grants $500 from the Local Civic Functions budget to the Pukekohe RSA Pipe Band.

b)      That the Franklin Local Board approves the expenditure of up to $300 from the Local Civic Functions Budget for two additional wreaths to be delivered to members to lay at the Bombay and Buckland ANZAC services.

 

Landowner approval for Memorial Board Sign and naming of playground at Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe

a)      That the Franklin Local Board grants landowner approval to name the playground at Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe “Clipper Ship Ganges Children's Playground”.

b)      That the Franklin Local Board grants landowner approval to the Pukekohe Historical Society to erect a memorial sign adjacent to the playground located next to John Street in Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe, subject to the following conditions:

i)        That the exact location and orientation of the sign is agreed with the Parks Advisor prior to construction (including any conditions as necessary to safeguard trees and ensure reinstatement of the reserve).

ii)       That the sign be constructed and installed by a suitably experienced contractor approved by the Parks Advisor.

iii)      That the sign be of the same style as the historic trail signage through Pukekohe township, and that the final content is approved by the council communication’s team.

iv)      That further investigation be carried out by the applicant on the possibility of adding iwi content to the reverse side of the sign; which can be added at a later date.

 

 

Reallocation of the Local and Sports Park Capital and Renewal Works Programme 2014/2015

That the Franklin Local Board approves the reallocation of the $93,000 in the Local and Sports Park Capital and Renewal Works Programme 2014/2015 for the new Bledisloe Park car park from the following:

i)     Waiuku Sports Park                                                                         60,000

ii)    Pine Harbour Lighting                                                                       33,000

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Allocation of Local Civic Functions budget

239

bView

Landowner approval for Memorial Board Sign and naming of playground at Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe

241

cView

Reallocation of Parks Renewals budget for 2014/2015 for Bledisloe Park Carpark

247

     

Signatories

Authors

Gaylene Harvey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 







Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 


 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/07973

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing visibility on issues considered at Franklin Local Board Workshops, which are not open to the public.

Executive Summary

2.       Workshop notes are attached for 14 April 2015, 21 April 2015, 28 April 2015, 5 May 2015 and 12 May 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the workshop notes for 14 April 2015, 21 April 2015,
28 April 2015, 5 May 2015 and 12 May 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes : 14 April 2015

253

bView

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes : 21 April 2015

261

cView

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes : 28 April 2015

263

dView

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes : 5 May 2015

265

eView

Franklin Local Board Workshop Notes : 12 May 2015

267

    

Signatories

Authors

Gaylene Harvey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 








Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 



Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 




     

 


Franklin Local Board

26 May 2015

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Franklin Local Board excludes the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Special Housing Areas: Tranche 7

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

In particular, the report contains information which, if released, would potentially prejudice or disadvantage commercial activities..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.