I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 13 July 2015

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Adele White

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Jim Donald

 

 

Lucy Schwaner

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Steve Udy

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Lynda Pearson

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

3 July 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 572 0151

Email: lynda.pearson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Chair's Report                                                                                                                7

13        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       9

14        Auckland Transport Update – July 2015                                                                   11

15        New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Taylor Property Group Limited at 279 Botany Road, Howick

File No.: 43319, SP11220                                                                                            
49

16        Review of Alcohol Bans 2015                                                                                     53

17        Community Facilities Network Plan                                                                          59

18        Urgent Decisions                                                                                                       123

19        Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016                                                129

20        Workshop Notes                                                                                                        135  

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 15 June 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/13285

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Chair to update the meeting on projects and issues which the Board has been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       An opportunity for the Chair to verbally update the meeting on projects, issues, events, and progress the board has made since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Chair’s verbal report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Councillor's Update

 

File No.: CP2015/13287

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

Executive Summary

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the verbal report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – July 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/13399

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on transport matters for the information of the Howick Local Board and a register of transport issues in the Howick Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Howick Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·    the Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund

·    new Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

·    Response to Howick Local Board June 2015 resolutions

·    Introduction of double decker buses

·    AMETI update

·    Mill Road update

·    Travelwise update and school awards

·    New funding for Urban Cycleways Programme.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)   Receives the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – July 2015’ and the attached issues register from Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South);

b)   In relation to project #272 Bucklands Beach walkway improvements under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

i.    Endorses the strategic vision for pedestrian improvements along the entire length of The Parade;

ii.    Notes the rough costings provided for the project by Auckland Transport;

iii.   Agrees to consult with the public and key stakeholders on the strategic vision for the proposed walkway improvements (with technical assistance provided by Auckland Transport); and

c)      Authorises the completion of detailed design and costing for the section of proposed walkway between points C and D (as shown at Attachment A) as a matter of priority on pedestrian safety grounds.

 

 

 

Discussion

Howick Items

 

A1. Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

4.       The Howick Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is $871,903 per annum.

5.       The Board’s active projects are included in Table 1 below (NB: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost):

Table 1:

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

009

Walkway and amenity improvements at Half Moon Bay (HMB) Marina

·      FEC estimate of $422,000

·      $27,000 received from 2011/12 Local Board Discretionary budget

·      $395,000 balance from LBTCF

·      The FEC for the entire project is $422,000.  As $27,000 has been received from the Board’s 2011/12 discretionary budget, the amount required from the LBTCF is estimated at $395,000.

·      On 8-Jun-15, the Board approved the project for construction.

·      TCC approval and the consent for earthworks and trees are currently being progressed.  Development of the contract for physical works will be done in parallel with these processes.  It is expected that tenders for the physical works will be called in Sep-15.

155

Burswood Business Area enhancements

·      FEC estimate of $318,730

·      $104,000 received from Council’s Business Area Planning Unit

·      $214,730 balance from LBTCF

·      On 10-Nov-14, the Board approved the project for construction.

·      Delivery is expected in Jul/Sept-15, starting with calling for tenders in July and physical works commencing in late August.

156

Highland Park bus shelter installation

·      FEC estimate of $29,000

·      Adshel will remove the existing single shelter and install a new double Classic shelter.

·      On 8-Dec-14, the Board approved the project for construction, based on the FEC of $29,000.

·      Installation was carried out in the third week of June.

217

Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals (i.e. installation of metering signals on Pigeon Mountain Road to create breaks in the flow of traffic exiting Half Moon Bay ferry terminal in the afternoon peak to allow opportunities for the backup in traffic on side roads to clear)

·      ROC revised to $280,000

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board approved the project to proceed with detailed design and costing based on the revised ROC of $280,000.

·      Public consultation was completed in March and submissions were considered at the Transport Portfolio meeting on 31-Mar-15.

·      On 20-Apr-15, the Board resolved that AT should proceed to complete detailed design and costing.

·      Detailed design should be completed by the end of Jun-15.  A Stage 3 safety audit is also required before the detailed design and firm costing can be finalised but can be undertaken concurrently.  AT expects to report to the Board’s Aug-15 meeting to seek approval for construction.

272

Bucklands Beach walkway improvements (along length of The Parade)

·      ROCs for various sections as shown on plans at Attachment A as follows (* indicates alternate option):

A-B = $134,000

B-C = $496,000

C-D = $57,000

D-E = $104,000

E-F = $803,000 or $97,000*

F-G = $324,000 or $115,000*

G-H = $97,000

H-I = $224,000

I-J = $152,000

J-K = $93,000

·      Total ROC = either $2,484,000 or $1,569,000 with alternate options

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved a Little Bucklands Beach walkway (either side of Grainger Point) project to progress to detailed design and costing stage.

·      The Board, AT and AC Parks subsequently worked together to investigate options for further pedestrian improvements along the length of The Parade.

·      On 8-Jun-15, the Board resolved to expand the scope of the earlier project to include pedestrian improvements along the entire length of The Parade.

·      Included at Attachment A are maps of the length of The Parade, itemising proposed pedestrian improvements in various sections and ROCs for each section.

·      Given the size and impact of the project, it is anticipated that the Board may wish to consult with its community prior to approving further design work.  The cost of the entire project is also outside the LBTCF funding accessible to the Board at this time.

·      AT therefore awaits further direction from the Board before taking further action, but in line with the discussion at the Transport portfolio meeting on 26-May-15, some draft recommendations have been provided.

276

East Tamaki streetlighting upgrade (Kerwyn Avenue, Andromeda Crescent, Lorien Place & Arwen Place)

·      ROC estimated at $58,000

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved this project to progress directly to construction based on the ROC.

·      Installation/construction is completed.

·      AT extended the scope of the project and spent nearly $100k.  AT will cover the extra cost over and above the $58,000 allocated by the Board.

·      Final cost still to be advised.

279

Chapel Road pedestrian signals

·      FEC estimate of $261,282

·      On 11-May-15, the Board approved this project for construction based on the FEC estimate of $261,282.

·      A report seeking TCC approval for the project is in preparation.

274

Point View Drive footpath

·      FEC estimate of $137,400

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board approved this project for construction based on the FEC of $137,400.

·      Construction was completed in May-15.

·      The final cost is yet to be reported but will be approximately $110,000.

396

Half Moon Bay (HMB) new ferry facility

·      $2.5m allocated*

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board allocated up to $2.5m towards a new ferry facility at HMB, *subject to AT allocating at least $1m towards the project.

·      NZTA subsidy approval for approximately 50% of the proposed $4.3M project is confirmed.

·      A progress update is included at item A2 below.

 

6.       The Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below:

Howick Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total funding available ($871,903 p.a. across 5 FYs – 2012/13 to 2016/17)

$4,359,515

Completed projects reporting actual costs (3x driver feedback signs; Ti Rakau & Cockle Bay bus shelters; Pedestrian improvements at Meadowlands/Whitford/Millhouse; Crooks Road streetscape improvements; The Parade footpath)

-680,521

Firm estimates for projects given construction approval (East Tamaki streetlighting upgrade; Point View Drive footpath; Burswood Business Area enhancements; Highland Park Adshel double bus shelter; Chapel Road pedestrian signals; HMB walkway/amenity improvements)

-1,095,412

Maximum allocation towards new Half Moon Bay ferry facility

-2,500,000

Rough estimates on projects at detailed design stage (Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals)

-280,000

Funding available to allocate (assuming construction approval given to all projects and full $2.5m required for HMB ferry facility)

($196,418)

Rough estimates on project requiring further direction (Bucklands Beach/The Parade walkway improvements - two alternate costings provided)

$2,848,000

or $1,569,000

 

 

A2. New Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

7.       The design for the pontoon and gangway has been completed and the fabrication contractors are progressing well to have the pontoon units ready for storage by July 2015.

8.       The gangway and shelter structure is being prepared ready for inspection and acceptance prior to being placed into storage in readiness for Stage 2.

9.       The Stage 2 design contract for the fixed walkway is being progressed in preparation for building consent lodgment.

10.     Traffic engineering in support of the bus turnaround area and landside design is being progressed.

11.     An Auckland Transport internal delegation report is being finalised ready for Resource Consent lodgment for the end of June 2015.

12.     Meetings/Hui with Mana Whenua are ongoing, with engagement expected to progress throughout the duration of the Stage 2 physical works.

13.     An initial review into the current and proposed vehicle movements has been completed and this is being worked through with Auckland Transport’s PT Operations team.  Works will continue over the next period in collaboration with Sealink as the adjacent operator.

14.     The overall project budget for the pontoon and fixed walkway is $4.3M, although firm budget will not be known until the detailed design phase is sufficiently developed.  Further work is ongoing to determine the budgetary requirements in more detail.  The project is still on target for completion in September 2016.

15.     For information, included at Attachment B are FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) that have been prepared on the project.  These FAQs have been incorporated into the main project page on Auckland Transport’s website:  https://at.govt.nz/halfmoonbayferryfacility

 

A3. Response to Howick Local Board’s June 2015 resolutions

16.     At its last Board meeting, under item 16 “Auckland Transport Update – June 2015”, the Howick Local Board passed the following resolutions:

Resolution number HW/2015/82

That the Howick Local Board:

d)      Requests Auckland Transport to scope potential park and ride sites for the Half Moon Bay ferry terminal in the Howick Local Board area and provide feedback to the Board by December 2015.

e)      Requests Auckland Transport review the relocation of the Picton Street bus stop in light of the concerns raised in public forum and previously by the Board.

 

17.     In relation to resolution HW/2015/82 d) above, Auckland Transport will scope potential park and ride sites for Half Moon Bay and report back to the Board by December 2015 as requested.

18.     In relation to resolution HW/2015/82 e), Auckland Transport is currently reviewing the relocation of the bus stop but a formal response was not available prior to the report deadline.  It is expected that a formal response will be provided in time for the Board meeting on 13 July.

 

A4. Introduction of double-decker buses

19.     Auckland Transport has an urgent requirement to address capacity constraints on some bus routes.  The central corridors, Northern Express and services from Botany to the CBD are experiencing growth rates of 10%, 6.5% and 7% respectively, with peak seated capacity utilization from 80% to 95%.  Strategically, the Auckland Plan looks to double public transport trips to 140 million by 2022.

20.     There is a need to address capacity constraints and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the bus New Network corridors without increasing bus volumes.

21.     The use of double-decker buses is the first step in the progressive strategy for increasing capacity on high demand routes and is aligned to delivering improved customer experience, reducing congestion and increasing patronage.  Customer growth is expected to be in the region of 20%-30% over the first four years of introduction.

22.     Double-decker buses are due to start on the Botany route (city centre to Botany via Newmarket) in October 2015.  Mount Eden, Waiheke and Northern Express routes are due to commence in early 2016, with further routes to follow progressively.  Over the next ten years, it is planned that up to 13 key routes may be converted to double deck bus operation.

23.     Historically trees have not been proactively managed on sections of these key routes, and double-deckers cannot run safely on routes with hazards above the ground.  Tree work is therefore required to mitigate this risk and manage the safe carriage of passengers.

24.     Where trees do intrude into the road corridor, Auckland Transport will seek to avoid their removal except as a last resort.  Minor pruning or maintenance will in some situations be the only requirement, but where major tree surgery, tree removal or mitigation planting is required, there will be consultation.  In some cases, the need for removing trees may be able to be avoided by altering kerb lines and other similar measures.

25.     Aside from trees, other obstacles that are being carefully checked are shop verandas, utility service poles and cables.  As a result of this process, alterations to verandas, or the relocation of poles and cables may also be required.

26.     Local boards that include routes where it is planned to operate double-decker bus services will be individually briefed about the specific measures necessary within their local board areas to accommodate them.  A workshop with the Howick Local Board has been scheduled for 16 July.

 

A5. Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI)

27.     Design changes to the plans for Stage 2a from Panmure to Pakuranga following public consultation include the widening of Williams Avenue to allow for parking on both sides of the road whilst maintaining two lanes of traffic.

19.     Feedback from the June workshop with the Howick Local Board was fed into discussions between the NZTA, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport on the detail on the timing of the Reeves Road flyover and Ti Rakau Drive busway to Botany.  The team will be updating the Board as soon as the Auckland Transport Board has had the opportunity to consider the issue.

 

A6. Mill Road update

20.     The notification period for the Notice of Requirement for the proposed Mill Road-Redoubt Road corridor upgrade closed on 26 May.

21.     In total, 286 submissions were received, with 20 of the 300 directly affected properties along the corridor entering a submission.  Of the submissions received, 216 were pro-forma submissions in opposition.

22.     The submissions will now be assessed and considered prior to a hearing anticipated later this year.

 

A7. Consultation documents on proposed improvements

23.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Howick Local Board for its feedback.  As the Board’s transport portfolio holders have been delegated to provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only.

24.     Proposed Electronic School Zone for Our Lady Star of the Sea School, Orangewood Drive, Howick – In March 2015 Auckland Transport consulted on a proposal to install electronic flashing Active School Warning signs in the vicinity of Our Lady Star of the Sea School.  Approval was subsequently given for the electronic signs at two locations along Orangewood Drive.  During installation it was found that sign ‘B’ experienced wireless reception difficulties, meaning it was not possible to install the sign where first intended as the signs need to be switched on and off by wireless transmission from a location within the school grounds.  Auckland Transport has therefore proposed an alternative location for sign ‘B’ where wireless communication from the school has been confirmed, as shown on the plan at Attachment C. The new location maintains good visibility for approaching traffic from the east.   Sign ‘A’ will be installed on Orangewood Drive where originally proposed, to the west of the intersection of Summermist Drive.

General Information Items

 

B1. Travelwise update and school awards

25.     The Travelwise programme is an innovative schools-based programme that aims to improve road safety and achieve a reduction in the number of vehicles driving to and from school at peak times.  It does this through encouraging and increasing alternative modes of travel, and providing safer facilities for all road users.

26.     There are currently 408 schools on the Travelwise programme.  At those schools Auckland Transport supports activities and events, helps with policies and systems, promotes road safety for children and drivers, offers scooter and cycle training, and runs Back to School and Slow Down promotions.  Most of the schools have student groups who help with running the programme as well as a Lead Teacher who is the central point of contact for Auckland Transport.

27.     Since its inception in 2005, Travelwise has achieved the following results:

a.   There are approximately 202,000 students involved in the programme

b.   75% of all Auckland school aged students attend a Travelwise School

c.   Safe School Travel Plans have helped:

·    Reduce car travel by taking 12,736 car trips off the road in the morning peak

·    Save 2,596,000 km in car travel, about $20.35m a year on congestion, and about 150,000 litres of fuel

·    Reduce CO2 emissions by 735 tonnes each year

·    Improve safety around Auckland schools – crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists aged 5 to 13 have reduced by 58% at schools with Safe School Travel Plans.

28.     The schools listed below have been awarded for their outstanding Travelwise achievements in 2014.  The awards are based on four criteria:

a.   Mode share shift from when the school first starts as a Travelwise School

b.   Their inclusion of road safety and active travel in the curriculum

c.   The efforts to involve the school community in road safety and mode share

d.   The inclusion of these matters in the ethos and organisation of the school.

 

29.     If a school is high achieving in all of these areas they are awarded Gold (e.g. mode shift of more than 4%), medium achievement is awarded Silver, and medium to low achievement is awarded Bronze.

30.     Award winners in the Howick Local Board area are:

Gold award winners

Silver award winners

Bronze award winners

·    Baverstock Oaks School

·    Botany Downs Primary School

·    Elim Christian College

·    Howick Primary School

·    Macleans Primary School

·    Mission Heights Junior College

·    Mission Heights Primary School

·    Our Lady Star of the Sea School

·    Bucklands Beach Intermediate School

·    Bucklands Beach Primary School

·    Elm Park School

·    Pigeon Mountain Primary School

·    Point View School

·    Somerville Intermediate School

·    Wakaaranga School

·    Farm Cove Intermediate School

·    Flat Bush School

·    Macleans College

·    Pakuranga Heights School

·    Riverina School

·    Willowbank School

 

31.     In previous years, a celebration has been planned near the end of the financial year, and the awards given out related to the previous school year.  This year Auckland Transport is looking to plan an event for the end of Term 4 to celebrate 2015 Travelwise achievements following feedback from schools that they would prefer to receive their awards in the same school year as the results are achieved.

 

B2. Auckland Council adopts 10-year budget

32.     Auckland Council has adopted its 10-year budget, setting rates, introducing an interim transport levy and agreeing on the level of investment in the region for the next 10 years.

33.     In addition to general rates increases, to help fund a number of crucial transport projects including busways, cycleways and walking options over the next three years, an interim transport levy will be introduced while the council works with central government on a transport accord to find alternative funding sources.

 

B3. New funding for Urban Cycleways Programme in Auckland

34.     On 25 June 2015, the Minister of Transport confirmed the Government’s 2015-18 Urban Cycleways Programme (UCP) projects.  Auckland projects to be included in the UCP will help ease congestion and make cycling a safer, easier and more attractive transport option for Aucklanders.

35.     The Auckland programme, to be jointly delivered by Auckland Council, the NZTA and Auckland Transport, will be used to accelerate key projects and help establish cycling as an integral part of Auckland’s transport network in line with the long-term vision set out in the Auckland Plan.

36.     The focus for the next three years will be improving cycling facilities in the city and to the city, along eastern and western corridors.  Improvements will also be made at key public transport hubs in Glen Innes and New Lynn.

37.     Auckland’s Urban Cycleway Programme comprises:

a.   A City Centre Network of separated cycleways and intersection treatments expected to increase the number of journey per day to more than 8,500 journeys each day.  The total estimated cost of $20.33 million is made up of an estimated $7 million local share, an estimated $7 million National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) share and a $6.33 million Urban Cycleways Fund (UCF) share

b.   An additional 10.8km of cycling routes providing eastern connections to city centre.  The total estimated project cost of $39.03 million is made up of estimated equal shares of $13.01 million from local, NLTF and UCF shares

c.   A safer and more direct route to the city centre for residents from the western suburbs, including improved links to the North Western cycleway and connections with the Waterview shared path.  The total estimated cost of $11.37 million is made up of an estimated $4.57 million each from local and NLTF shares, as well as $2.23 million from the UCF

d.   Improved links to the New Lynn and Glen Innes public transport interchanges.  The total cost of $18 million is made up of an estimated $7.41 million each from local and NLTF shares, and $3.18 million from the UCF.

 

38.     Of most relevance to Howick Local Board area residents are the eastern connections to city centre package of improvements and improved links at the Glen Innes interchange.

39.     The eastern connections include the Glen Innes to Tamaki Shared Path, the Eastern Waterfront City Connection and the Parnell Routes (Newmarket to Strand).  This will include a mix of separated and on-road cycle facilities resulting in an additional 10.8km of the Auckland Cycle Network.

40.     These projects will provide safer and more direct routes for people to cycle from the Eastern suburbs into the city centre.  The separated cycling routes will offer an attractive and comfortable route, and encourage people to cycle to work, school, public transport hubs, and recreationally.  Construction is anticipated to begin in mid-2015 and be completed by mid-2018.

41.     The Glen Innes interchange link will provide local feeder routes from the transport hub to nearby suburbs and schools, and through to the Auckland Manukau Eastern Transport Initiative (AMETI) area.  Construction is anticipated to begin in early 2016 and be completed by mid-2018.

42.     Included at Attachment D is a map of Urban Cycleways Funded projects in Auckland.  Included at Attachment E is a map of the proposed Auckland Cycle Network.

43.     To find out more about the Urban Cycleways Programme, visit the NZTA website: www.nzta.govt.nz/UCP

44.     Visit Auckland Transport’s website for other cycle projects and areas: https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/cycling-and-walking-programme/

 

B4. Public transport patronage

45.     The summary patronage performance for May 2015 is presented below (NB: SOI = Statement of Intent):

 

46.     AT Metro patronage totalled 78.6M for 12-months to May – growth of +9.5% against an SOI target of 73.7M.

47.     Rail patronage totalled 13.7M for the 12-months to May – growth of +21.8% against an SOI target of 12.1M.

48.     Northern Express patronage totalled 2.8M for the 12-months to May – growth of +16.8% against an SOI target of 2.5M.

49.     Bus patronage totalled 56.6M for the 12-months to May – growth of +6.8% against an SOI target of 53.7M.

50.     Ferry patronage totalled 5.5M for the 12-months to May – growth of +7.1% against an SOI target of 5.4M.

 

 

 

B5. Waterview tunnel update

51.     The last pre-cast concrete piece in the giant Waterview tunnel puzzle was produced on 26 June at a purpose-built factory in East Tamaki, which has cast the 24,000 segments being used to line the motorway tunnels for the NZTA’s Waterview Connection project.

52.     Each segment, weighing up to 10.5 tonne is one of 10 which make up 2,414 rings of concrete lining.  Each ring is 2 metres wide and 14 metres in diameter.

53.     The segments are delivered to the project site in Owairaka, where the tunnel-boring machine ‘Alice’ has been installing the segments at a rate of six linings every 24 hours that the machine is operating.

54.     The Waterview Connection project interchange and tunnels will link the Northwestern and Southwestern Motorways to complete the Western Ring Route.  The connection is planned to open to traffic in early 2017.

Media Items

 

C1. Have Your Say on the Preferred Approach for East West Connections

28.     The NZTA and Auckland Transport are seeking community feedback on the preferred approach identified by both organisations for the East West Connections project to improve freight connections into and out of the Onehunga-Penrose industrial hub as well as the reliability of bus services between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park.

29.     East West Connections (along with AMETI) was identified in the Auckland Plan as one of the top three transport priorities for Auckland.  The investigations into this project also forms part of the Auckland Accelerated Projects capital funding package included in the 2014 budget and is a key priority for central government.

30.     For Onehunga-Penrose a staged full connection on the north side of the Māngere Inlet between SH1 to SH20 has been identified as the best long-term solution to the current transport issues.

31.     The preferred approach for Onehunga-Penrose will improve the reliability of freight journeys in the area and will provide an additional route which makes the transport network more resilient for all users.  It will also improve pedestrian and cycling facilities and connections for buses and general traffic.  In addition to the transport improvements, there are opportunities to achieve some positive environmental outcomes, particularly for the Māngere Inlet.

32.     This project is all about improving access into and out of Onehunga-Penrose and for this reason the new connection is expected to be a “limited access” state highway, not a motorway.

33.     As well as the approach for Onehunga-Penrose there has been substantial work undertaken to identify how to speed up bus services between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park and improve connections.  These improvements are aimed at supporting Auckland Transport’s Frequent Network, which will have buses and trains at least every 15 minutes from 7am to 7pm, seven days a week.

34.     New facilities are also proposed along the route between Māngere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park to improve cycle and pedestrian safety.

35.     The NZTA and Auckland Transport held a series of open days between 20 June and 4 July encouraging people to come along to find out more about the projects, ask any questions, and provide feedback on the preferred approaches.

36.     Community feedback on the Mangere, Ōtāhuhu and Sylvia Park bus and cycle improvements and the preferred approach for improving freight connections to the Onehunga-Penrose industrial hub is open until 17 July at www.nzta.govt.nz/east-west and www.at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/east-west-connections.

 

Issues Register

37.     The regular monthly issues register is Attachment F to this report.

Consideration

Local Board Views

38.     The Howick Local Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation Issues

39.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Proposed pedestrian improvements and rough order of cost along the length of The Parade, Bucklands Beach (LBTCF project #272)

23

bView

Frequently Asked Questions - Half Moon Bay new ferry facility

33

cView

Plan of proposed site for electronic Active Warning Sign, Orangewood Drive, Howick

37

dView

Urban Cycleways Funded Projects in Auckland

39

eView

Proposed Auckland Cycle Network

41

fView

Issues Register - Howick Local Board - July 2015

43

     

Signatories

Author

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Roger Wilson – Council Engagement Manager; Auckland Transport

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 




Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

 

 




Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 






Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

New Road Names Approval for the subdivision by Taylor Property Group Limited at 279 Botany Road, Howick

File No.: 43319, SP11220

 

File No.: CP2015/12684

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for two new road names created by way of subdivision at 279 Botany Road, Howick.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Howden Lane’, ‘Whale Lane’, ‘Ko Lane’ and ‘Hollis Lane’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria.

4.       Comment was sought from eleven iwi with links to the Howick Ward, including Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki. Five iwi responded. Each iwi supported or did not raise concern with the proposed road names. No Maori names were proposed by the applicant.

5.       The names ‘Howden Lane’ and ‘Ko Lane’ proposed by the applicant are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval the road names ‘Howden Lane’ and ‘Ko Lane’ proposed by the applicant, for the new roads created by way of subdivision at 279 Botany Road, Howick, noting that these names meet the relevant road naming criteria.

 

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for Council’s approval.

7.       The residential subdivision will be serviced by new roads that come off Botany Road. The development will require the creation of two new private ways. In this case, road name approval is being sought for the two private ways within the subdivision, Lot 100 and Lot 101.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 279 Botany Road, Howick

 

Road Number

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

 

Lydia Lane (preferred name)

Lydia Ko, professional golfer from New Zealand who became the No. 1 ranked woman professional golfer.

Lot 100

Howden Lane (first alternative name)

Charles Ritchie Howden, the game of golf was introduced to New Zealand in Dunedin in 1871 and he was main man behind this introduction, later becoming known as the Father of New Zealand Golf

 

Whale Lane (alternative name)

Ivan Whale, had a quarry business in Onehunga, involved in golf clubs

 

Ko Lane (preferred name)

Lydia Ko, professional golfer from New Zealand who became the No. 1 ranked woman professional golfer. Ko also has several meanings in Maori, such as: “place over there”, “to sing”, “to resound”, “to dig”, “young girl, babe, darling”.

Lot 101

Hollis Lane (first alternative name)

Olivia Hollis (nee Kay), she has long been regarded as New Zealand’s finest woman golfer who totally dominated her era of competitive golf from the 1920’s to 1950’s

 

Glading Lane (alternative name)

Bob Glading, 2 times NZ open champion, passed away age of 94

 

       

Figure One: Location and Layout of the new Roads

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The first alternative and alternative names for Lot 100 ‘Howden Lane’ and ‘Whale Lane’, and the preferred and first alternative names for Lot 101 ‘Ko Lane’ and ‘Hollis Lane’ are consistent with the road naming guideline criteria.

11.     The applicants’ preferred name for Lot 100 ‘Lydia Lane’ was not considered consistent with the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, with ‘Lydia Avenue’ already existing in Auckland. The alternative name ‘Glading Lane’ for Lot 101 was not considered consistent with the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, being similar to Gladding Place in Manukau, which may cause confusion for emergency services, communication and mail services in future years. Overall, the two road names for Lots 100 and 101 are not recommended for approval.

12.     The proposed suffix of ‘Lane’ for Lots 100 and 101 are considered appropriate as per the road naming guidelines as the new roads are a narrow roadway (private way) between the proposed lots of the subdivision.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     All six proposed names were accepted by NZ Post.

16.     The six proposed names were not opposed by Iwi. It is noted only four iwi responded from the Howick Ward over a 15 working day period including Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, and Te Kawerau a Maki, of which no iwi opposed any of the proposed names.

17.     Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki were also consulted and concluded that “We can only but support the access and use of our Maori names so we do not seek to oppose your suggestions but we simply cannot support them”. This consultation was in relation to previous name choices for the subdivision which were not used, however, I am of the opinion that given Maori names were not put forward by the applicant; this correspondence applies to the current proposed road names put forward.

18.     Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki also provided three alternative names, being “Michael’s Green Jacket Drive”, “Tautarangi’ Eseinhauer Road”, and “Lydia’ Worldly Way”. These names are not considered to meet the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, being long names for short roads, including apostrophes, and being named after living persons. 

Financial and Resourcing Implications

19.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

20.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

21.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Review of Alcohol Bans 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/13267

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To confirm the date, time and location of hearings on the review of alcohol bans.

Executive Summary

2.       Local boards have delegated responsibility to review the local alcohol bans in their local board areas.   

3.       The purpose of the review is to identify which existing local alcohol bans meet a new higher statutory threshold to enable them to be retained.  Alcohol bans that do not meet the threshold will lapse on 31 October 2015.

4.       15 local boards have decided to undertake public consultation, to obtain a greater understanding of the impact of alcohol related crime or disorder in the current alcohol ban areas.

5.       The public consultation period runs from 19 June to 17 July 2015, where residents and stakeholders are being asked to provide evidence of alcohol related crime or disorder in their local parks, reserves, or open spaces (see Attachment A – submission form).

6.       Public hearings will take place in August 2015 for those submitters who have indicated that they wish to be heard. These will be heard by the designated Alcohol Ban Review Hearings Panel of the local board, as per the local boards’ resolution at the May business meeting.

7.       The Alcohol Ban Review Hearings Panel is charged with determining which existing alcohol bans should remain and which should lapse, and making recommendations to the full local board by 31 October 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives this report.

b)      Notes that the board has agreed at the 11th May 2015 business meeting:

·        to undertake public consultation, to obtain a greater understanding of the impact of alcohol-related crime or disorder in the current alcohol ban areas

·           that a hearings panel will hear from members of the public on this issue.

c)      Confirms that hearings on this issue will occur on Thursday, 6th August, 2015 at 9.30am at the Howick Local Board Meeting Room, Pakuranga Library Complex, 7 Aylesbury Street, Pakuranga.

d)      Confirms that deliberations on this issue will occur on Thursday, 24th September 2015 at 1pm at the Howick Local Board Meeting Room, Pakuranga Library Complex, 7 Aylesbury Street, Pakuranga.

e)      Notes that the above dates will also be advertised in The Eastern Courier.

f)       Notes the report received in May, which set out the proposal to review alcohol bans in the local board area and outlined the process for the review of alcohol bans.

 

 

Background

8.       Alcohol bans are an accepted and effective way of helping to reduce alcohol related crime.  They limit the amount of alcohol consumed in public places.  This helps reduce crime including levels of intoxication, noise, litter, harm, and disorder.

9.       Alcohol law reforms in 2013 resulted in amendments to the Local Government Act 2002 requiring all existing alcohol bans to be reviewed by 31 October 2015.  The purpose of the review is to identify which existing local alcohol bans meet a new higher statutory threshold to enable them to be retained. Local boards will determine which existing alcohol bans should remain and which should lapse, based on the new statutory threshold.

10.     Any existing alcohol bans not reviewed by 31 October 2015 will lapse (expire).  New alcohol ban requests will be addressed from 1 November 2015 on a priority basis.

11.     15 local boards have decided to undertake full public consultation, to obtain a greater understanding of the impact of alcohol use in the current alcohol ban areas.  In addition, a designated alcohol hearings panel will hear from members of the public on this issue.

12.     The public consultation process begins on 19 June 2015, and public hearings will take place in August-September 2015.

13.     The public submission process is specifically designed to obtain evidence of alcohol-related crime or disorder from the public for those alcohol bans where legacy council information or police data is limited.  The decision required of the local board is which existing alcohol bans to retain and which to lapse.

14.     The Regulatory and Bylaws Committee is also involved with this process.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

15.     This report seeks confirmation of hearings dates, times and location, for the Alcohol Ban Review Hearings Panel.

Māori impact statement

16.     Managing alcohol related crime and harm associated with people consuming alcohol in public places increases opportunities for health and wellbeing, which is consistent with the outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau.

17.     Feedback from mana whenua representatives at a hui held in March 2015 supported alcohol bans in principle, and believe that non-regulatory approaches should be considered to help reduce alcohol related crime and harm.

Implementation

18.     The public should be informed about the date, time and location of the hearings.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Submission Form

55

     

Signatories

Authors

Chantal Creese - Senior Policy AdvisorPolicy and Planning, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan

 

File No.: CP2015/13282

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Seek the Howick Local Board’s support for the draft Community Facilities Network Plan (Attachment A) and associated draft Action Plan (Attachment B).

Executive Summary

2.       Community facilities are vital to local communities as they provide space where people can connect, socialise, learn and participate, and contribute to improved lifestyles and sense of belonging, identity and pride among residents.

3.       The draft Community Facilities Network Plan (the network plan) is a long-term aspirational plan to guide council’s investment in the provision of community facilities over the next 20 years. It introduces a more holistic approach to the planning and provision of community facilities to keep pace with Auckland’s growing and diverse population, fill gaps in provision and ensure existing facilities are fit for purpose. The aspiration is to deliver strategically placed and integrated community facilities.

4.       The scope includes arts and culture facilities, community centres, libraries, pools and leisure centres and venues for hire (community and rural halls). The network plan provides direction on optimisation, major upgrades of existing facilities, development of new facilities and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

5.       The strategic direction articulated in the network plan will be implemented by a comprehensive set of actions in the long-term draft Action Plan. To focus resource in the short term (1-3 years), actions have been prioritised. Actions with funding in the first five years of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 will be progressed first, along with network priority actions in spatial priority areas and actions with opportunities for optimisation. For each action local boards will be closely involved in determining the best response to meet community need and aspirations.

6.       The network plan has been developed through an extensive process involving several rounds of engagement and input from local boards. Most recently a revised draft network plan was discussed with local boards through workshops in March and April 2015. The majority of local boards were supportive. Discussions with local boards at the workshops have resulted in some changes to the network plan as outlined in this report.

7.       After reporting to local boards, the next step is to seek the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee’s approval of the network plan and draft Action Plan in August 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      supports the draft Community Facilities Network Plan and associated draft Action Plan to guide council’s investment in the provision of community facilities

b)      notes that local board views will be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015.

 

 


Background

8.       The network plan has been developed with cross departmental collaboration. The plan is informed by a review of current state and research from New Zealand and comparative international cities. Key milestones in the development of the network plan have been:

            February 2014

            Completion of current state review and research.

            March 2014

            Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REG/2014/37)
Approval of timeframes to develop the Community Facilities Network Plan and presentation of current state and research findings.

            March 2014

            Local board cluster workshops;
Presentation on current state and research findings and discussion of key issues.

            June 2014

            Local board briefing on the first draft network plan.

            August 2014

Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REG/2014/98)
Endorse draft Community Facilities Network Plan for engagement with local boards and key stakeholders.

            August – Sept 2014

            Workshops with local boards and key stakeholders on the draft network plan.

            October - Nov 2014

            Report to all local boards seeking formal feedback on the draft network plan and providing a summary of key stakeholder feedback.

            December 2014

            Decision to incorporate libraries into the scope of the network plan;
Local Board briefing on libraries research.

            February - Mar 2015

            Workshops with local boards on revised draft network plan.

Comment

9.       Aligned with the Auckland Plan, local board plans and relevant strategic action plans, the network plan articulates why council provides community facilities.

10.     Community facilities contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing space where people can connect, socialise, learn and participate in a range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. Community facilities contribute to improved lifestyles and a sense of belonging, identity and pride among residents.

11.     The network plan identifies the challenges and opportunities for future community facility provision. Challenges include gaps and duplication in current provision, fit for purpose issues, increasing costs of maintaining the network and a growing and diversifying population. Opportunities include greater integration in the planning and delivery of community facilities, partnership opportunities and optimisation opportunities.

12.     Four objectives articulate a new approach for the provision of community facilities which respond to these challenges and opportunities:

·        work across all types of community facilities in integrated and coordinated planning and ensure future decisions are based on clear and robust evidence;

·        maintain, improve and make the best use of our existing network of community facilities where these continue to meet community needs;

·        focus investment on developing fit for purpose, integrated and connected community facilities; and

·        explore opportunities to leverage and support partnerships with other providers.

13.     The provision frameworks in the network plan outline the objectives, functions and provision approach for each type of community facility. This will guide the identification of gaps in the network and the types of spaces required to deliver fit for purpose facilities and respond to growth.

14.     The long-term draft Action Plan lists actions to investigate potential gaps in the network and existing facilities with performance issues. A fundamental component for implementation is integrated and holistic planning across all types of community facilities, including those facilities outside council’s network. Each action will require detailed investigation, involving the local board and the community, to determine the appropriate response. The network plan includes detailed guidelines which can be adapted to guide the investigation process.

15.     Local boards will play a significant role in determining the appropriate response for facilities or needs in their area. The governing body will make final decisions on the acquisition, divestment or major upgrades of community and allocation of funding over $1 million.

16.     There are over 100 actions in the long-term draft Action Plan, and these will be implemented over time within the available resource and financial constraints. Actions have been assessed to determine those that are network priorities (highlighted in blue in the draft Action Plan). In the short-term, actions with capital funding in the first five years of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 will be progressed first, along with network priority actions in spatial priority areas and actions with opportunities for optimisation.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

17.     There have been several rounds of engagement with local boards during the development of the network plan. Most recently a revised draft network plan (with libraries included) was discussed with local boards through workshops in March and April 2015. The majority of local boards were supportive of the revised network plan, in particular the:

·        vision, outcomes and objectives for community facilities;

·        move towards integrated and holistic planning and the evidence based approach to community facility development;

·        aspiration to develop more connected and integrated facilities and opportunities to pilot this approach at existing facilities; and

·        strategic improvements outlined in the Action Plan.

18.     The following table outlines key themes from local board feedback and the associated response or amendments to the network plan.

 

Local Board Feedback

Response OR Amendments

Scope

·    Scope of the network plan does not include all community leases, sports clubs and non-council facilities that perform similar functions as council-owned community facilities.

·    The network plan acknowledges the importance of all community facilities in meeting community needs. Section 1.2 explains not all leased and non-council facilities are listed in the plan as they are bound by lease terms or they are not in council’s jurisdiction.

·    Section 1.2 of the network plan has been amended to clarify what it means for facilities to be included in scope.

·    Section 1.3 outlines the approach to consider all community facilities in the implementation of the network plan.

·    New action added to investigate and plan for the provision of leased facilities.

Prioritisation weightings

·    Some boards felt the actions relating to gaps are given advantageous weighting over actions for existing facilities.

·    Some boards felt established areas of the region are disadvantaged against new growth areas.

·    Some boards felt spatial priorities are given too much weighting when not all boards support the concept.

·    Boards felt weighting for local board priority was too low.

 

·    Section 5.2 (prioritisation) has been amended so the purpose is to determine which actions are network priorities.

·    The criteria and weighting now focus on three components: network importance (40%), community importance (40%) and building condition (20%).

·    Local board priority has the highest weighting within community importance.

Implementation approach

·    Clarity on local board and community involvement in the implementation process.

·    Investigation process needs to be adaptable for different communities.

·    Clarity on the application of the new empowered communities approach to community facilities.

 

·    Section 5.1 articulates how the Network Plan and Action Plan will be implemented, including emphasis on local board and community involvement in this process.

·    Strategic improvement action will develop tools to implement the new empowered community approach to community facilities planning and development.

Wording and action amendments

·    Number of requests to amend wording of specific sections and actions.

·    Minor wording amendments have been made to the network plan and Action Plan to address feedback and improve clarity.

·    Action Plan has been updated to reflect any recent progress.

Māori impact statement

19.     Section 2.2 of the network plan outlines how council will implement the Maori Responsiveness Framework in relation to the planning and development of community facilities.

20.     The provision of community facilities contributes to improving wellbeing among Maori communities by providing spaces to connect, socialise, learn skills and participate. Maori are users of all types of council’s community facilities. At aquatic facilities Maori make up 14% of users (compared to 9% of the population), 11% of leisure facility users and 9% of community centre users. Maori are under-represented as users at arts and culture facilities compared to the Auckland population.

21.     The implementation of the network plan should improve provision and accessibility for the benefit of all Aucklanders, including Maori. The strategic improvement action to undertake research on non-users will help understand why some sectors of the population are under-represented as users of community facilities. This research should also provide useful information on improving accessibility and addressing barriers for non-users and under-represented sectors of the population.

22.     The broader picture of community facility provision recognises that marae and kohanga reo are important social infrastructure for Maori and the community. Officers from Te Waka Angamua are scoping a project to address the future provision and development of marae facilities. Opportunities for aligned provision and/or partnerships with marae facilities will be considered in the implementation of the Community Facilities Network Plan.

Implementation

23.     The Community Facilities Network Plan is aspirational and provides a road-map for council’s investment in community facilities over the next 20 years. The ability and timeframe to implement the network plan and associated actions is dependent on the level of budget allocated for community facility planning and development through future LTP and Annual Plan processes. The current tight fiscal environment means council needs to focus its attention on the greatest need. This plan provides direction for council to ensure the city gets the right facility in the right place at the right time.

24.     A detailed implementation plan is being developed with cross-department collaboration. The implementation plan will address coordinating implementation across the different departments, progressing individual actions and reporting on implementation.

25.     The draft Action Plan will be reviewed on an annual basis to reflect progress and re-evaluate priorities where necessary. Local boards have requested annual updates on the implementation progress.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Community Facilities Network Plan

63

bView

Community Facilities Network Action Plan

111

     

Signatories

Authors

Anita Coy-Macken - Principal Policy Analyst

David Shamy - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 











Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 



































Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Urgent Decisions

 

File No.: CP2015/13357

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to bring to the Board any urgent decisions made outside of the business meetings.

Executive Summary

2.       On 9th December 2013, the Howick Local Board agreed an urgent decision process where it was not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum.  The process delegates authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to make an urgent decision on behalf of the local board.  The process requires any urgent decisions made to be reported to the full board at the next ordinary business meeting. This report is to bring before the Board those decisions made under that process during November 2014.

3.       The Chair and Deputy Chair agreed to allocate the remaining discretionary operational budget prior to 30th June 2015 following a board discussion at a workshop on 18th June 2015.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Notes the urgent decision made on 30th June 2015 to allocate the remaining discretionary operational budget as detailed in the attached Urgent Decision recommendations a) to g) (Attachment A).

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Urgent Decision

125

      

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 





Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016

 

File No.: CP2015/13297

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a list of reports requested and issues pending for the Howick Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       A list of reports requested and issues pending is updated monthly and presented at the Board meeting to keep members informed of progress on outstanding reports and issues.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 – 2016 schedule.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Issues Register

131

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015

 

 

Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/13298

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report attaches the workshop notes taken for the period stated below.

Executive Summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the Board shall be closed to the public, however, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop notes for the period stated below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the workshop notes for workshops held on 4th, 11th, 18th and 25th June 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Notes

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Teresa Turner - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

13 July 2015