I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 29 July 2015

9.30am

Level 26, Room 1
135 Albert Street, Auckland

 

Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Mike Lee

Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Dick Quax

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board (alternate)

Member David Taipari

 

Ex-officio (without voting rights)

All other Councillors

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 8 members)

 

Quorum must include at least 2 named voting members

 

Rosie Judd

Democracy Advisor

23 July 2015

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8661

Email: rosie.judd@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Areas of Activity

 

·         Provision of regional facilities and open space

·         Regional frameworks for local facility and open space provision

·         Encouraging healthy lifestyles through participation in sport and recreation sectors

·         Facilitating partnerships and collaborative funding models across the sport and recreation sectors

·         Performing the delegation made by the Governing Body to the former Parks, Recreation and Heritage Forum,  under resolution GB/2012/157 in relation to the Dog Policy

 

Responsibilities

 

Within the specified area of activity the Committee is responsible for:

 

·         In accordance with the work programme agreed with the parent committee, developing strategy and policy, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

·         Making decisions within delegated powers

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million other than for land purchases which shall have a limit of $5 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

 

 

 

 

 

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC – WHO NEEDS TO LEAVE THE MEETING

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Only staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB)

 

·         Members of the IMSB who are appointed members of the meeting remain.

·         Other IMSB members and IMSB staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs)

 

Representatives of a CCO can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the CCO.

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               9

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    9

5.1     BMX track, Merton Reserve, St Johns - East City BMX Club; Jude Eades 9

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                              10

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                        10

9          Parks, Sports and Recreation - Acting General Manager's Report                      11

10        Delegation for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island                             23

11        Approval to classify land at 35 to 41 Access Road Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings)                                                                   25

12        Approval to classify Lot 72 DP 46353 as recreation reserve on Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve                                                                                                     37

13        Classification of Randwick Park (42R Secretariat Place) Manurewa                    49

14        Proposed reclassification of 28 Racecourse Parade Reserve, Avondale             57

15        Approval to publically notify Muriwai Lifeguard Amenities Trust's request to vary their surf club licence                                                                                                           67

16        Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme                                               71

17        Regional sport and recreation work programme 2015/2016                                  79  

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies from Chairperson Cr CE Fletcher, Mayor LCM Brown and Deputy Mayor PA Hulse have been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 9 June 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input. Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter. The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders. A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       BMX track, Merton Reserve, St Johns - East City BMX Club; Jude Eades

Purpose

1.       Jude Eades, East City BMX Club wishes to update the committee regarding progress on the BMX track in Merton Reserve, St Johns.

Executive Summary

2.       Staff and the East City BMX Club have been working on options for the relocation of the BMX track.

Recommendation

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the presentation and thank the representatives of the East City BMX Club for their attendance.

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) days notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation - Acting General Manager's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/13210

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Committee on activities undertaken by the Department of Parks, Sports and Recreation to support implementation of plans and policies of Auckland Council.

Executive Summary

2.       This report has been written to update the committee across a range of issues and progress with respect to approved work programmes.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the update report from the Acting General Manager – Parks, Sports and Recreation.

Comments

Operations Stability – Achievements and Highlights

3.       Parks, Sport and Recreation delivered $114 million (91% of a forecast) of capital projects for the 2014/15 financial year.   In addition, projects already commenced will be completed in the early part of the 2015/16 financial year.   The community will be able to realise the benefits of these new facilities and park developments.

4.       The Devonport /Takapuna Local Board have allocated $150,000 to the Korean Garden Trust to facilitate the initiation of Stage 1 of the Korean Garden Project at Barrys Point Reserve, Takapuna.  The associated funding agreement has now been signed off.

5.       The upgrade of the Victoria Wharf, Devonport, is effectively complete, apart from surface texturing and marking, as well as furniture and fitting installation.  A joint official opening of both the Wharf and Devonport Marine square took place on 24 July.

 

6.       Work is in progress on the de-silting of the Onepoto Domain Ponds, Northcote. The purpose of this joint Parks and Stormwater project is to increase capacity and amenity value of the existing ponds in the reserve. The majority of the works are anticipated to be completed in July. Bags with silt will be stored in a secure area of the park for de-watering and are expected to be removed to landfill in December 2015.

 

 

7.       FIFA U-20 World Cup: Seddon Fields pitches 2 and 3 were used as a training venue throughout the World Cup.

8.       Creation of the Auckland Domain Committee: made up of Governing Body, Waitematā Local Board and Independent Māori Statutory Board members.

9.       Epilobium hirtigerum, commonly named as Hairy Willow herb, is a nationally critically threatened native plant which has been located growing in the grass area surrounding the carpark of the Henderson Service Centre.  Parks and ES working together have placed signage and pegs to highlight and protect the area and inform the public and local contractors.  The plant is one step below extinction and with the care the plant is now getting it is flourishing.

10.     The new Community Ecological Restoration contracts have been finalised and negotiations with the community completed. These contracts are new community-engagement type contracts where Parks is working with the community to engage with volunteers and community groups in the delivery of park services.

11.     The new Crum Park artificial field and courts with flood lights were opened in June. The local Bay Olympic Football club players couldn't wait for it to arrive and to use the field, as the previous field would become unusable during the wet winter months.

12.     There have been several good wins lately in working with other units of Council to join up and deliver our services.  These have been at Westgate with Auckland Transport, Te Rangi Hiroa and Henderson with ACPL, and Trust Stadium with Regional Facilities.

13.     On 27 June, Papakura Local Board members and local parents celebrated the 30th anniversary of the Children's Forest in Redhill. For 30 years the community has been planting trees to commemorate the birth of their children.

14.     Sport and Recreation investment into Auckland: Sport NZ has advised new investment of $1.3 million into Auckland to support the implementation of the Sport NZ Community Sport Strategy and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action plan.  Work is underway between Sport NZ, Aktive, Regional Sports trusts and Council to ascertain how investment is effectively used.  An update on progress is outlined in the agenda report Sport and Recreation Work programme 2015/2016.

15.     Sport NZ ActiveNZ Survey 2014 – Auckland Report: Parks Sport and Recreation department and RIMU have agreed to partner with Sport NZ to produce an Auckland report on the national Active NZ survey.  The report should be available by December 2015 and will provide a view on volunteering in sport and recreation, participation trends, where people go to be active, and why people take part in sport and recreation activities.


16.     Youth Speak Sport Summit 2016: A partnership has been formed and planning is underway for the second Youth Speak Sport Summit.  This follows the successful 2013 event where a number of ideas were developed into youth for youth led projects which are being delivered under the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan.  Elected members will be invited to the afternoon session so that young people can share their ideas and solutions.

17.     Facility Partnership Funding Programme: The budget from the Facility Partnership Funding programme is now encompassed in the Local Board $10 million capex fund. A period of transition will now occur given that funding committed or ring-fenced to specific projects need to accommodate community-led and multiyear timeframes.  Funds committed prior to the cessation of the programme will be monitored until project completion.  An annual progress report will be provided to this committee. In 2014/15 funding was allocated to approximately 45 projects. Staff have developed funding agreements which include key deliverables for each project as is the norm.

18.     Leisure achieved a $2.3 million improvement to their net position for 2014/15 which has seen Leisure’s net operating position decrease from a -$10.8m in 2012/13 to -$6.26M.  This improvement is a result in growth in the business with an increase in memberships and more of the local community choosing to use their local Leisure centre to be active, growth in enrolments in our Learn to Swim programme and the addition of two new Early Childhood Learning centres in the north.  Leisure has also worked hard to take advantage and leverage off the size and scale of the network of 41 pools and leisure centres and as a result we been able to reduce some key fixed costs and better utilise resources across the network resulting in significant cost reduction. Finally, Leisure has been working hard to develop and embed a culture of continuous improvement which is encouraging staff to critically look at all aspects of our business and proactively look for improvements and strive to do better today than what we did yesterday. Staff are being empowered to make changes and encouraged to put themselves in the customer’s shoes and understand the customer’s needs. All of these have contributed to Leisure’s improving financial position.

19.     The final facility management contracts were finalised and transitioned on 1 July which was the final phase of a long procurement process that saw the retendering of 18 facility management contracts. There are now four organisations contracted to operate approximately half of our network of 41 Council-owned Pools and Leisure Centres. They are:

·        YMCA of Auckland

·        Community Leisure Management (CLM)

·        Olympic Pool and Fitness Centre Limited

·        Belgravia Leisure

20.     Each of these organisations has a strong background in successfully operating community aquatic and recreation facilities and delivery of effective programmes and services to inspire the community to be active. We look forward to working closely with them over the coming years to continue to activate Aucklanders.

21.     The Maunga Authority adopted the 2015/16 Tūpuna Maunga Operational Plan. The operational plan provides direction for the following 12 months and key relationships and program focus.

22.     The Integrated Management Plan (IMP) for the Tūpuna Maunga has been started with the notice of intent being advertised in late June. The IMP is programmed to be completed by mid-2016.

23.     The Botanic Gardens Camellia Garden shelter was re-dedicated as the Neville Haydon Pavilion on Wednesday 1 July. This was done to honour the significant contribution made by Mr Haydon to the advancement of camellias. Around 60 camellia enthusiasts from around the country attended the dedication. Most of the camellias at the Botanic Gardens were donated by Neville Haydon, and he has been at the forefront of research into developing petal blight resistant varieties.

24.     The Duder Regional Park bach on the foreshore at Umupuia has been upgraded and will be open to the public in late August. This is a new bach opportunity for our visitors. In a stunning location within 30 metres of the beach, it will become very popular with the public.

25.     As part of the southern sectors annual asset management programme, our park ranger team completed 7km of walking track upgrades within the Hunua Ranges.

26.     Release of 60 popokatea (whiteheads) into the Shakespear Open Sanctuary occurred with key partners the New Zealand Defence Force, Shakespear Open Sanctuary Society and Ngati Manuhiri participating.

27.     Public planting days have been very successful, with over 60,000 trees planted across six parks.

28.     Possum control work at Te Muri Regional Park was completed, with the removal of 270 animals.

29.     The renewal of the Les Ward shelter in the Pararaha Valley at Whatipu has been completed.  The shelter provides a place where campers can prepare a meal in most weather, as well as a location to clean up and obtain water without the need to use the stream, as they had previously.  The composting toilet in the Pararaha Valley campsite has also been relocated and is now more central to the camp site.

30.     A number of events, including guided walks and talks on the Māori Lunar calendar and traditional ocean voyaging and navigation, are being run at the Arataki Visitor Centre and in the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park, celebrating Matariki. These have been well attended with attendance exceeding expectations.

31.     Gate access to the northern car parks, campground and Muriwai Surf Lifesaving Club has been improved, with the installation of an automated gate providing easier access and the ability to avoid locking people in, as they are able to leave the park after formal gate closing times, but unable to get back into the park until the park opening hours.

32.     The completion of the previously reported toilet at Little Huia has been a great improvement to the Little Huia area of the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park.  The toilet building is relatively discreet and has been commented on favourably by a number of people.

33.     Replacement of aging car park edging with bollards to clearly define the parking areas, but to still allow people to freely walk into the park without stepping over the previous barriers, has been completed through a number of areas, mainly in the southern edge of the Waitakere Ranges. 

34.     Installation of LED lighting highlighting the Pou at the Arataki Visitor Centre has been completed, with some finishing work on the lighting plinth still required.  Although the LED lighting is able to display a range of colours the Pou is highlighted red between dusk and 10.00pm.

35.     Muriwai had some major dune protection work completed north of Okiritoto Stream, with root balls trucked in and dune fencing completed, to block informal vehicle accesses into the dune system and protect the back dune areas.  This work supports the vehicles on beaches work that is being coordinated through regional parks and includes Police, Defence Force Operations, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara and regional park rangers on the beach in the last three months, and is ongoing.

36.     The acquisition of a 77 hectare addition to Te Rau Puriri Regional Park was completed at the end of June.  The land includes a long coastal strip, some unique land features and archaeological sites and connects previously acquired (17 hectare) northern land known as the ‘Prawn Farm’ into Te Rau Puriri Regional Park. Development planning to protect and activate the park for visitors to enjoy will be undertaken with iwi, the community and stakeholders in the future.

 

 

 

Issues/Challenges

37.     An oak tree failed in Symonds St Cemetery, the third in three years. The arborist has requested a report on the health of the trees in the upper section of the cemetery and NZTA have been asked to undertake some research into the effects of drainage and vibration from the SH1 on-ramp adjacent to Symonds St Cemetery.

38.     There have been multiple incidents of vandalism at sports fields in the south with barriers being broken down and cars driven over the playing surfaces causing damage. Parks staff are working with police on catching the culprits.

39.     Waitawa Regional Park has been partially closed to the public since July 2014 following major slips across the park. Engineers and contractors have just completed construction of remedial works to the main road through to the beach. Part of the repairs also included reconfiguring the cutting through to the wharf to make it safe. This work will allow the park to be fully re-opened in August.

40.     The closure period provided a window of opportunity for staff to carry out planned development works. Another 5km of mountain bike track has been constructed, and a new campervan site has been created in the old manufacturing plant site, which will be open for the summer season. Visitor monitoring indicates that the park will receive over 129,000 visitors in its first year of operation.

41.     Senior Ranger Conservation, Barry Green, retired after 40 years with regional parks.

 

Projects

42.     An upgraded playground at Costley Reserve in Freemans Bay was opened this month. The overall design includes significant improvements to the surrounding landscaping, improves sightlines from the surrounding roads and makes the playground a much safer and more enjoyable element of the reserve.

 


 

43.     Following consultation with the kids and families of the Motairehe settlement on Great Barrier Island, the playground at Motairehe has been renewed (see below)

44.     ‘POP Ping Pong Parnell’ at Heard Park in Waitematā came to an end, finishing a very successful Waitematā Local Board founded Public Arts project in parks and open spaces, after previously being at Aotea Square and Britomart.

45.     Victoria Park Skate Park addition of new items: driven by skating community, who canvassed users and then arranged for several skate-related companies to sponsor new items. Two additional items are also being funded by the Waitematā Local Board.

 

 

46.     Merton Reserve BMX track: work is underway on remediation of the BMX track at Merton Reserve, following the discovery of asbestos on the track in November which closed the track for over six months.  Work commenced in June, and involves spreading a thick layer of lime that will cap the track area. This is good news for the club who will finally be able to get back on track in preparation for spring competitions. 


 

47.     Central sports field upgrades/renewals include:

·        Ostend Domain - sandfield renewal and new lights to replace old lights on field 1 (doubling the number of Waiheke pitches available for training after dark) plus new lights on tennis courts

·        Margaret Griffen - new lights on field 1 to replace old

·        Crossfield - new sandcarpets laid on fields 1 and 2

·        Hamlin - sandcarpet renewal on fields 1 and 2

·        Fergusson Domain - sandcarpet renewal on Field 1

·        May Rd - new lights installed on field 6

·        Warren Freer – sandcarpet renewal on field 1

 

Greenways/Path Networks:

 

48.     Waiheke’s walkway network has had a winter makeover through the renewal programme.  Ten walkways totalling 5km have been renewed across the island, helping to bring them up to current safety and accessibility standards.

 

            

 

49.     New paths installed at Churchill Park, Madills Farm, Glover Park cliff top and Cannon Park (Orākei Local Board area).  

50.     Auckland Transport’s Dominion Rd Parallel Cycle Routes project completed: crosses Centennial Park and Paddington Green (Albert-Eden Local Board). Significant improvements have been made widening paths, installing signage and improved park lighting.

51.     Howlett Reserve, Waterview: NZTA SH16/20 mitigation projects include a new aggregate path for over 800m, weed clearance and revegetation planting of over a third of the total reserve.  

52.     Arbor Day celebration took place in Auckland Domain where volunteers and council staff spread mulch around oaks by the grandstand. This was a very successful day.


 

53.     Sandspit Reserve playground upgrade in consultation with the Franklin Local Board: a mix of traditional and natural play elements.

 

54.     Howick: Stockade hill upgrade of the walkway to the war memorial monument.

 

55.     Completion of the Bledisloe Netball Carpark Upgrade in the Franklin Local Board.

           

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56.     Howick: Stockade hill upgrade of the walkway to the war memorial monument.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


57.     The new Otahuhu Pool and Leisure Centre will be opened on 8 August as part of the Tōia – Otahuhu Recreation Precinct official opening. Final preparations and commissioning are now taking place and the facility is looking fantastic. Community Leisure Management (CLM) will operate the pool and leisure centre and have a strong connection with the Otahuhu community through their previous links with operating the Otahuhu Recreation Centre.

58.     The Batger Quarry Wall stabilisation project has been completed within timeframes and budget.

59.     A reticulated water supply to livestock, houses and future park visitor needs was completed at Te Muri Regional Park. The work included a treatment station to supply potable water.

60.     The upgrade of the Mt Roskill War Memorial Cenotaph area has been completed.  This project was based on a concept design competition with local tertiary students, and delivered in association with the Puketapapa Historical Society.  The cenotaph was upgraded with a memorial wall and roll of honour, increased hardstand area for events, planting and furniture and has received excellent feedback from the community.

61.     The upgrade of Costley Reserve (Herne Bay) has been completed.  This project featured regrading of the play area to remove retaining walls and fencing around the playground, and installation of a ‘treehouse’ themed playground, designed to sit naturally amongst the surrounding bush.  Some minor fencing, pathwork and steps, planting, and furniture was also included.

 

62.     Renewal of netball court lighting and Installation of lights around the league field at Ostend Domain.

63.     Renewal and replacement of old sports field lighting with new flood lights at Margaret Griffen Park.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

64.     There has been no specific engagement with Local Boards in relation to this update report. Programmes and initiatives associated with Local and Sports Parks, together with Pools and Leisure are led by Local Boards. Local Boards are consulted with respect to specific operational aspects of Regional Parks and Cemeteries within their District.

Māori impact statement

65.     There has been no specific engagement with Māori in relation to this update report. The report briefly summarises the status of initiatives and projects which are however, on an individual basis, the subject of engagement with Māori.

Implementation

66.     No issues.


 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authoriser

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Delegation for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island

 

File No.: CP2015/13774

 

 

Purpose

1.       To amend the delegation for decision making for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island.

Executive Summary

2.       There are two operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island. Gooseberry Flats Cemetery in Tryphena has on average two-three burials per year, and Whangaparapara Cemetery has on average one burial every two-three years.

3.       The Great Barrier Local Board has requested that delegation for decision making for operational cemeteries is changed to rest with the local board. This would allow them to be more responsive to the needs of their local community.

4.       This would be an exception, and the only one that is anticipated across the region.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      amend the delegation for decision making for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island so that the delegation sits with the Great Barrier Local Board for the activities listed in table one below:

Activity

Responsibility

·    Burial and sexton activities including grave aftercare and maintenance

·    Maintenance of cemetery records

·    Grounds maintenance of cemeteries

·    Monitor and ensure compliance with Cemeteries and Crematoria Bylaw, and other relevant legislation

·    Investigate and respond to complaints

·    Planning and delivery of capital development and renewals programme

Great Barrier Local Board

·    Regional cemetery planning

·    Implementation and oversight of regional cemetery management database

·    Contract management for

burial and sexton duties contract

Regional Cemeteries

·    Acquisition of land for cemetery purposes

Governing Body

Comments

5.       Responsibility for decision making for operational cemeteries across Auckland rests with the Governing Body, although local boards are kept informed.


 

6.       Responsibility for decision making for closed cemeteries rests with local boards.

7.       Currently, the Auckland cemeteries team is responsible for managing the 32 council operated cemeteries across the region. This includes responsibility for burial and sexton activities, maintenance of the grounds either through staff or contractors and delivery of the capital development and renewals programme. The team is also responsible for managing interments at closed cemeteries and maintaining cemetery records for the region.

8.       The Auckland cemeteries team would retain the role of cemetery planning, and oversight of the regional cemeteries records system.

9.       Delegation for acquisition of land for future cemetery provision would remain with the Governing Body.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Great Barrier Local Board has requested this change to delegations for operational cemeteries on the island and support the proposed changes.

11.     Consultation on this matter has taken place during the development of the Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan.

Māori impact statement

12.     The matters raised in the report are of interest to Ngāti Rehua Ngātiwai ki Aotea.

13.     The Ngāti Rehua Ngātiwai ki Aotea Trust Board is a key partner to the Great Barrier Local Board and is supportive of this proposal.

Implementation

14.     It is proposed that this would be implemented and budgets transferred effective from the start of the financial year on 1 July 2015.

15.     Operational budgets will be transferred from cemeteries to the Local Board. Capital budgets have remained with the local board, so there would be no change required.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Catherine Moore - Manager Auckland Cemeteries

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Approval to classify land at 35 to 41 Access Road Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings)

 

File No.: CP2015/11646

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the classification of land at 35 to 41 Access Road Kumeu, being Lot 1 DP 95110, as a local purpose reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Executive Summary

2.       The land at 35 to 41 Access Road, Kumeu, as occupied by the Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated, is held by council in fee simple as an unclassified recreation reserve and subject to the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment A).

3.       The land is described as being Lot 1 DP 95110 comprising 4131m² and is a recreation reserve pursuant to section 306(4) of the Local Government Act 1974, on the subdivision of the adjoining block owned by the Kumeu and District Agricultural Society Incorporated.

4.       A community lease dated 16 July 1980 was granted by the former Rodney County Council to the Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated over Lot 1 DP 95110 for 33 years as from 16 July 1980 with a right of renewal for a further 33 years and includes the right in perpetuity for the renewal of the lease for periods of 33 years. The community lease states that the council owned Lot 1 DP 95110 as a reserve for local purposes. This is incorrect as the land is an unclassified recreation reserve.

5.       Council staff recommend that Lot 1 DP 95110 be classified as a local purpose reserve (community buildings) to validate the current lease to Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated and its local purpose activity.

6.       Subject to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to the classification of Lot 1 DP 95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings), the final requirement will be for council staff to arrange to register the resolution against NA51D/919 being the title containing Lot 1 DP 95110, in order to retain a permanent public record of the reserve classification. This undertaking will in effect validate the existing lease.

Recommendation

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the classification of Lot 1 DP 95110 (Attachment A) as a local purpose reserve (community buildings) pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Comments

7.       Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated built its hall in 1980 and has a ground lease for the land at 35 to 41 Access Road, Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110 comprising 4131m².

8.       The lease dated 16 July 1980 was granted by the former Rodney County Council to the Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated over Lot 1 for 33 years commencing 16 July 1980 with a right of renewal for a further 33 years and includes the right in perpetuity for the renewal of the lease for periods of 33 years. The lease states that the council owned Lot 1 DP 95110 as a reserve for local purposes. This is incorrect as the land is an unclassified recreation reserve.


 

9.       Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 empowers local councils to declare by resolution reserve lands held in fee simple to be classified for particular purposes as described under that Act. There is no requirement under section 16(2A) for any prior public advertising or consulting with local Iwi.

10.     At its business meeting of 4 May 2015, the Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee resolved to support the classification of Lot 1 DP95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings) pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977(Attachment B details resolution number RODPC/2015/16).

11.     Subject to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to the classification of Lot 1 DP 95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings), the final requirement will be for council staff to arrange to register the resolution against NA51D/919 being the title containing Lot 1 DP 95110, in order to retain a permanent public record of the reserve classification. This undertaking will in effect validate the existing lease.

12.     The lease renewal was originally included in the bulk renewals component of the Rodney Local Board Community Facilities Community Lease Workplan 2013/2014 as presented to the Rodney Local Board at its business meeting of 9 September 2013. The Rodney Local Board resolved to approve the renewal of the lease to Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated (Resolution number RD/2013/254 b) iii), as shown in Attachment C). Prior to the drafting of the lease renewal documents, council staff established that during 2010 the former Rodney District Council had sited Pomona Hall on land within the Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated lease area adjacent to the main hall. No formal occupancy arrangement stating rights and responsibilities was put in place at this time. Kumeu and Districts Community Centre Incorporated has formally requested to exercise its right to renew the current lease and also enter into a new lease for the Pomona Hall.

13.     Subject to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to the classification and on completion of the classification process, council staff will report back to the Rodney Local Board with respect to the renewal of the ground lease and a new lease for the council owned Pomona Hall (Attachment D GIS aerial view showing Kumeu and Districts owned community centre and the council owned Pomona Hall at 35 to 41 Access Road Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110).

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The Rodney Local Board Parks Culture and Community Development Committee at its business meeting of 4 May resolved to support the classification of Lot 1 DP 95110 as a local purpose reserve (community buildings) pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment B being action memo from resolution number RODPC/2015/16).

15.     The Governing Body Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee is the delegated authority to approve the classification of Lot 1 DP95110 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Māori impact statement

16.     There are no significant changes or impacts for Maori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

17.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

18.     The cost implications for Auckland Council associated with the classification process are estimated at $50.00. Auckland Council Property Department holds a budget for this work.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

GIS aerial view of 35 to 41 Access Road, Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110

29

bView

Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee resolution RODPC/2015/16

31

cView

Rodney Local Board resolution RD/2013/254

33

dView

GIS aerial view showing Kumeu and Districts owned community centre and council owned Pomona Hall at 35 to 41 Access Road, Kumeu being Lot 1 DP 95110

35

     

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Advisor Community Lease

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Approval to classify Lot 72 DP 46353 as recreation reserve on Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve

 

File No.: CP2015/11738

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the approval of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee for the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as a recreation reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Executive Summary

2.       The Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve Management Plan as approved by the former Rodney District Council 29 June 2000 assumes that Lot 72 DP 46353 comprising 1.9981 hectares and known as Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve, is already classified under the Reserves Act 1977 as a recreation reserve.

3.       There is no record of any such reserve classification on NA17A/497, being the title for Lot 72 DP 46353.

4.       Lot 72 DP 46353 therefore remains today as an unclassified recreation reserve, held in fee simple by Auckland Council and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act.

5.       With Lot 72 DP 46353 remaining unclassified, the existing reserve management plan adopted by the former Rodney District Council in June 2000 is not valid under the Reserves Act.

6.       Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act empowers local councils to declare by resolution reserve lands held in fee simple to be classified for particular purposes as described under the Reserves Act.  There is no requirement under section 16(2A) for any prior public advertising or consultation.

7.       In this case, Lot 72 DP 46353 has been administered for many years as a reserve for recreation purposes and the existing reserve management plan has supported that the reserve be continued to be treated in this respect.

8.       At its business meeting of 4 May 2015, the Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee resolved to support the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as a recreation reserve (Attachment D). The approval of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee is sought to the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as a recreation reserve. The final requirement will be for council’s Reserves Act Specialist to register the resolution against NA17A/479 being the title containing Lot 72 DP 46353. The purpose of this is to ensure that there is a permanent public record of the reserve classification. This undertaking will in effect validate the existing reserve management plan and its recommendations in terms of the Reserves Act.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the classification as recreation reserve of Lot 72 DP 46353 on the Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Comments

9.       The Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve Management Plan as approved by the former Rodney District Council 29 June 2000 assumes at page 1 that Lot 72 DP 46353 comprising 1.9981 hectares and known as Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve, is already classified under the Reserves Act 1977 as a recreation reserve (Attachment A).

10.     Unfortunately, there is no record of any such reserve classification on NA17A/497, the title containing Lot 72 DP 46353.

11.     Lot 72 DP 46353 was originally acquired by the Crown as a recreation reserve pursuant to Section 13 of the Land Subdivision in Counties Act 1946.   Later, after section 44(1) of the Counties Amendment Act 1961 had come into force, Lot 72 transferred from the Crown to the ownership of the Rodney County Council as a recreation reserve.

12.     With Lot 72 DP 46353 remaining unclassified, the existing reserve management plan adopted by the former Rodney District Council in June 2000 has no validity under the Reserves Act.

13.     Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act empowers local councils to declare by resolution reserve lands held in fee simple to be classified for particular purposes as described under that Act. There is no requirement under section 16(2A) for any prior public advertising or consulting with local iwi.

14.     In this case, Lot 72 DP 46353 has been administered for many years as a reserve for recreation purposes and the existing reserve management plan has supported that the reserve be continued to be treated in that way.

15.     Subject to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as a recreation reserve, the final requirement will be for council’s Reserves Act Specialist to arrange to register the resolution against NA17A/479 being the title containing Lot 72 DP 46353. The purpose of this to ensure that there is a permanent public record of the reserve classification. This undertaking will in effect validate the existing reserve management plan and its recommendations in terms of the Reserves Act.

16.     This action to validate the Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve Management Plan will in turn support the proposed new community lease to Baddeleys & Campbells Beach Tennis Club Incorporated (the Club).

17.     The Club holds a ground lease with the former Rodney District Council for the site at Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve (Attachment B). The lease commenced on 1 September 1995 with final expiry on 31 August 2014 and is currently rolling over on a month to month basis on the same terms and conditions.

18.     The Club has requested to enter into a new community lease on part of the Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve being Part Lot 72 DP 46353 (Attachment C) in accordance with Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve Management Plan, the Reserves Act 1977 and Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

19.     Subject to the approval of the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee to the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as recreation reserve, council staff will report back to the Rodney Local Board Parks Culture and Community Development Committee for a decision of the community lease to the Baddeleys and Campbells Beach Tennis Club, following the completion of the process to correctly classify the Baddeleys Beach Reserve as recreation.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

20.     The Rodney Local Board Parks Culture and Community Development Committee at its business meeting of 4 May 2015 resolved to support the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as recreation reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 (Attachment D being action memo from resolution number RODPC/2015/15).

21.     The Parks Recreation and Sport Committee is the delegated authority to approve the classification of Lot 72 DP 46353 as recreation reserve pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Māori impact statement

22.     There are no significant changes or impacts for Māori associated with the recommendations in this report.

Implementation

23.     The recommendations contained in this report do not trigger the Auckland Council Significance Policy.

24.     The cost implications for Auckland Council associated with the classification process are estimated at $50.00. Auckland Council Property Department holds a budget for this work.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Copy of sheet 58B from Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve Management Plan

41

bView

Club leased area as outlined in red on original lease

43

cView

GIS aerial view of Lot 72 DP 46353 on Baddeleys Beach Recreation Reserve

45

dView

Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee Resolution RODPC 2015 15

47

     

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Advisor Community Lease

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Classification of Randwick Park (42R Secretariat Place) Manurewa

 

File No.: CP2015/13850

 

Purpose

1.       To approve classification of Randwick Park (42R Secretariat Place) under the Reserves Act 1977 (the Act). This will enable the Manurewa Local Board to implement the Randwick Park master plan.

Executive Summary

2.       Randwick Park is currently zoned POS3 (sport and active recreation) and is held in fee simple as unclassified reserve.

3.       In June 2012, the Manurewa Local Board adopted a master plan to guide the development of Randwick Park. This included the provision of a community pavilion and an early learning centre. It also provides for continued use of the park for sport and recreational activities.

4.       In order to implement the Randwick Park master plan, the reserve needs to be classified under the Act. Accordingly, it is proposed that the community pavilion and early learning centre sites are classified as Local Purpose (Community Buildings) and the balance of Randwick Park is classified as recreation reserve.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the classification of  portions of Lot 136 DP 120831, Lot 136 DP 134985 and Lot 501 DP 146272 as Local Purpose (Community Building) reserve under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as per attached survey plan (in the agenda), for the purposes of establishing an early learning centre.

b)      approve the classification of portions of Lot 502 DP 152375, Lot 52 DP 107193, Lot 136 DP 134985 and Lot 501 DP 146272 as Local Purpose (Community Building) reserve under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as per attached survey plan (in the agenda), for the purposes of establishing a community pavilion.

c)      approve the classification of the remainder of the reserve: being Lot 52 DP 107193, Sec A SO 69467, Sec B SO 69467; Lot 136 DP 134985; Lot 136 DP 120831; Lot 502 DP 152375; Lot 204 DP 137348; and Lot 501 DP 146272, as recreational reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

Comments

 

Background

5.       A community assessment was undertaken of Randwick Park in 2011. Safety, accessibility, poor layout and limited recreational opportunities were identified as contributing to the under-utilisation of the park. The assessment also found a lack of community facilities in the area.

6.       In June 2012, the Manurewa Local Board adopted a master plan for Randwick Park (MR/2012/125) (Attachment A). The master plan provides for sport and recreational activities, a community pavilion and an early learning centre. Since that time:

·     a resource consent was granted in June 2014 to upgrade Randwick Park

·     a resource consent was also granted for the community pavilion and a building consent issued in October 2014 - construction is expected to commence in August 2015

·     the Manurewa Local Board granted land owner approval (MR/2014/5) to the Taonga Education Centre Charitable Trust in January 204, subject to resource consent and classification under the Act.

Classification of Randwick Park

7.       The Act requires reserves to be classified in accordance with the intended activities for the reserve. Classification by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee is required to enable the Randwick Park master plan to be implemented by the local board.

8.       The site for the early learning centre would need to be classified as Local Purpose (Community Buildings) for a lease to be granted to the occupant. The site for the community pavilion would also need to be classified as Local Purpose (Community Buildings). A plan of the proposed lease areas for the community pavilion and early learning centre is attached (Attachment B). The remaining parts of the reserve should be classified as recreation to be compliant with the Act.

 

Community Pavilion

Early learning Centre

Sports Park

Description

The pavilion building footprint is 438m2 with a total leasing footprint of 1546m2

It will contain office space, kitchen facilities, toilet/changing facilities and a wider civic area

The gross floor area for the centre would be 556m2 with a total lease area of 2100m2

The centre would provide early learning services for up to 100 children and employ 12 staff

A 7.098 hectare sports park which is being redesigned to include:

·   Large sports fields (2)

·   Junior sport field

·   Practice field

·   Cricket practice nets

·   Volleyball court

·   Multi-use courts

·   Skate park

·   Walkway

Lot 502 DP 152375 Lot 52 DP 107193, Lot136 DP 134985 Lot 501 DP 146272

Lot 136 DP 120831 Lot136 DP 134985 Lot 501 DP 146272

Lot 52 DP 107193 Sec A SO 69467/Sec B SO 69467

Lot 136 DP 134985 Lot 136 DP 120831 Lot 502 DP 152375 Lot 204 DP 137348 Lot 501 DP 146272

Proposed Classification

Local Purpose (Community Buildings)

Local Purpose (Community Buildings)

Recreation reserve

Next Steps

9.       If the Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee agree to the proposed classification of Randwick Park, a notice will be placed in the New Zealand Gazette. Once published the Local Purpose (Community Buildings) and recreation reserve classifications would be registered against the title containing Randwick Park.


Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The Manurewa Local Board approved the Randwick Park master plan in June 2012.

Māori impact statement

11.     Ngāti Ata, Ngai Tai ki Tamaki and Te Ākitai o Waiohua have been involved in the Randwick Park Masterplan and the Riverton Reserve redevelopment process.

12.     Randwick Park census area comprises 34 per cent Māori. It is expected that the park redevelopment will increase sporting and recreational opportunity for Māori. The Randwick Park Marlins League group currently uses the park regularly. The community pavilion will provide a gathering point for all, including Māori, alongside public civic space for performing and events.

13.     Randwick Park is a community located in Manurewa in an area bounded by the Southern Motorway, Alfriston and Porchester Roads, and the Papakura stream. The population is multicultural with a large number of Māori, Pacific, Asian and European residents. Children and young people under the age of 15 make up approximately a third of the population. A large part of the community resides in an area of high social deprivation.

14.     With Māori early learning participation in Manurewa currently at 90 per cent an early learning centre will likely attract and increase early learning education for Māori.

Implementation

15.     Resource consent for the early learning facility is still pending, and the classification does not pre-empt a consent application being successful. Resource consent costs are being met by the applicant.

16.     The survey costs to enable classification have already been met as part of the Randwick Park redevelopment project. The gazette notice cost of approximately $1,000 will be met through the redevelopment budget.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Randwick Park Masterplan

53

bView

Proposed Lease Areas - Randwick Park, Manurewa

55

     

Signatories

Author

Erin Clarke - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Proposed reclassification of 28 Racecourse Parade Reserve, Avondale

 

File No.: CP2015/14067

 

Purpose

1.       To reclassify 28 Racecourse Parade, Avondale Lot 6, DP 16112 (see Attachment A and C) from recreation reserve to local purpose (car park) reserve, pursuant to s 24(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Executive Summary

2.       Lot 6 DP 16112 is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve, subject to the Reserves Act, and vested in the Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes.

3.       Lot 6 DP 16112 is currently being used informally for public car parking. In order to formalise this activity the reserve needs to be reclassified from a recreation reserve to a local purpose (car park) reserve.

4.       At a meeting of the Whau Local Board on 20 May 2015, resolution number WH/2015/65 was carried with a recommendation to the Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee that Lot 6 DP 16112 be reclassified from recreation reserve to a local purpose (car park) reserve subject only to a request that the board has further conversation around the proposed car parking.

5.       The successful reclassification of Lot 6 DP 16112 will enable the public car parking and associated access to be formalised. The proposed parking area will also provide an important active frontage to the proposed housing development on 24-26 Racecourse Parade (see Attachment B).

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the reclassification of Lot 6 DP 16112 from a recreation reserve to a local purpose (car park) reserve.

Comments

6.       Lot 6 DP 16112 is currently open space and forms part of the Avondale Central Reserve that is adjacent to the Avondale racecourse. Lot 6 is used in an informal way by the public as a car parking area for the Council leased playing fields in the centre of the Avondale racecourse and for the central reserve.

7.       The adjoining property known as 24-26 Racecourse Parade, has been identified for a proposed housing development and is registered as a Special Housing Area. The proposed development is consistent with the Avondale Town Centre Action Plan and subsequent Master Plan, the Local Board, public engagement through the Avondale Community Action Group and the town centre zoning under the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan.

8.       ACPL will be seeking proposals from developers to deliver the proposed housing development at 24-26 Racecourse Parade. Developers will be guided by a reference design prepared by ACPL (see Attachment B). Although the development will have its own parking and vehicular access off Racecourse Parade, it is important that the housing development’s frontage to the reserve is activated by having an access and parking area on the reserve side of the development.


 

9.       The access and parking on Lot 6 DP 16112 is intended to have several purposes:

·    to provide public parking for the Council leased playing fields in the centre of the Avondale racecourse and for the central reserve;

·    to provide an active frontage for the adjoining proposed housing development at 24-26 Racecourse Parade;

·    to improve passive visual security for the adjacent reserve.

10.     Lot 6 DP 16112 and the adjacent property are zoned as Town Centre in the proposed Auckland Unitary Plan with a sub-precinct overlay.

11.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires reserves to be classified in accordance with their principal or primary purpose. Therefor the proposed re-classification is required to reflect the current primary purpose. Lot 6 DP 16112 is currently used for informal car parking and the primary purpose following the proposed development will continue to be car parking.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

12.     The reclassification of Lot 6 DP 16112 was discussed at a local board business meeting with the Whau Local Board on 20 May 2015 where the local board resolved (resolution number WH/2015/65).

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   recommends to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee that Lot 6 DP 16112 be reclassified from a recreation reserve to a local purpose (car park) reserve

b)   notes that the board request further conversation around car parking.

Māori impact statement

13.     Iwi must be consulted on the reclassification as required under section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

14.     On 5 June 2015 six iwi authorities were contacted by email and letter regarding the potential reclassification of 28 Racecourse Parade Road, from a recreation reserve to a local purpose (car park) reserve. Feedback was requested from the following iwi.

a)           Ngāti Whatua

b)           Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

c)           Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei

d)           Te Kawerau-ā-Maki

e)           Te Ākitai Waiohua

f)                        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

15.     Iwi engagement was completed on 3 July 2015 and none of the iwi contacted expressed any comments or objections in relation to the proposed re-classification.

General

16.     Staff from other Council departments have contributed to this report, including:

a)   Auckland Council Property Department.

b)   Parks, Sport and Recreation

c)   Community Development, Arts and Culture


Implementation

17.     If the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee endorse the resolution to reclassify Lot 6 DP 16112, the council is required under section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act to publish a single notice in a local newspaper declaring the intention to reclassify Lot 6 and specifying the reasons for doing so. The notice must invite written objections and the council must wait for at least one calendar month to receive any such objections.

18.     There is no significant cost associated with the reserve reclassification except for staff time. The costs of a notice in a local newspaper seeking written objections will be approximately $800.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Lot 6 DP16112 Title Plan

61

bView

Reference Design

63

cView

Adjoining land titles

65

     

Signatories

Author

Michael Bush, Development Manager, Auckland Council Property Limited

Authorisers

Allan Young, Manager Development, Auckland Council Property Limited

David Rankin, Chief Executive Officer, Auckland Council Property Limited

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Approval to publically notify Muriwai Lifeguard Amenities Trust's request to vary their surf club licence

 

File No.: CP2015/14464

 

Purpose

1.       To approve public notification of a request from the Muriwai Surf Lifeguard Amenities Trust to vary their licence at Muriwai Regional Park and the appointment of an independent commissioner to hear submissions and decide variations to the licence.

Executive Summary

2.       Muriwai Surf Lifeguard Amenities Trust (MSLAT) has applied to vary the licence for the new surf club facility at Muriwai to better reflect their requirements and enable management of the facility within the provisions of the licence.

3.       Since the opening of the new building in February 2013, Muriwai Volunteer Lifeguard Service’s (Muriwai Surf Club) use of the facility and the high demand for use by other community groups has made it difficult for MSLAT to operate within the constraints of the licence.

4.       MSLAT wish to remedy this and have requested the following variations to their licence:

·        An increase in the total numbers permitted in the facility from 120 to 250 people at any one time.

·        Provision in the licence for the Muriwai Surf Club to take up a club liquor licence that includes areas outside the area allocated for use by the surf club including the downstairs dining hall and lawn areas.

·        Provision in the licence allowing the surf club to supply alcohol to other clubs and groups who hold a sub licence to occupy the facility.

5.       Staff have made a preliminary assessment and consider MSLAT’s rationale for varying their licence to have merit. However, as the variation would considerably change conditions in the licence and because the views of the public are not yet known a full assessment has not been undertaken.

6.       Under the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 public notification of the variation is required.

Recommendations

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve public notification of the Muriwai Surf Lifeguard Amenities Trust request to vary the following aspects of their licence at Muriwai Regional Park:

i.      increase the maximum total number of people permitted in the facilities at any one time from 120 to 250,

ii.     permit the Muriwai Volunteer Lifeguard Service to take up a club liquor licence for the surf club facility, including both levels of the surf club building and the lawn areas within the licence foot print,

iii.    permit the Muriwai Surf Club to supply alcohol to other clubs and groups who hold a sub licence to occupy and undertake club activities at the surf club facility.

b)         approve the appointment of an independent commissioner to hear submissions and make recommendations and decide variations to the licence

c)         note that the Hearings Committee has the delegation to appoint an independent commissioner.

Comments

Background to request

7.       In 2009 the Reduced Quorum of the Auckland Regional Council’s Parks and Heritage Committee resolved to grant a licence to the Muriwai Surf Club. The Muriwai Surf Club then formed the Muriwai Surf Lifeguard Amenities Trust (MSLAT) and transferred the licence to MSLAT to enable wider community utilisation.

8.       The new surf club facility was completed and opened in February 2013 and is currently utilised by the Muriwai Surf Club and nine other clubs and community groups on a regular basis. The facility is also available to be booked by other individuals and community groups for events and functions.

9.       Since commencement of the licence MSLAT have identified a number of aspects they would like changed to better reflect current use and desired future use of the surf club facility.

Requested variations and Impacts

Increase from 120 to 250 people permitted in the facilities

10.     Currently during the summer season the maximum occupancy limit of 120 is regularly exceeded due to the number of participants undertaking activities based at the surf club.

11.     An increase from 120 to a total of 250 people permitted in the facilities will allow the Muriwai Surf Club and other sub licenced groups to operate within the conditions of the licence when undertaking normal club activities e.g. weekend nipper programmes, full club events and functions.

12.     The increase to 250 people will allow full club events to take place at the surf club. The variation would also increase the number of people permitted at corporate or private functions throughout the year. The current restriction of only one corporate or private function per month permitted to have more than 100 people between 1 October and 31 March each year would remain unchanged.

13.     To accommodate the increase to 250 people the Auckland Council District Plan - Operative Rodney Section 2011 requires additional car parking on regional park land adjacent to the surf club building.

Change to liquor licence area

14.     The current licence enables the Muriwai Surf Club to take up a liquor licence only for the areas allocated for their exclusive use only. This comprises the first floor of the facility including the first floor lounge area and deck. The variation would permit consumption of alcohol in these areas on a regular basis including the downstairs dining hall and lawn areas within the licence footprint.

15.     Special liquor licences for events and functions are required and regularly approved for other parts of the facility.

16.     A special licence would still be required when alcohol is supplied to users of the facility that are not Muriwai Surf Club members, invited guests or members of reciprocal clubs e.g. privately booked functions.

Sale of alcohol to user groups who hold a sub licence

17.     Under liquor licencing regulations, other clubs and groups that hold a sub licence for regular use of the surf club facility are considered reciprocal clubs. The Surf Club’s liquor licence provides for supply of alcohol to these groups. However, as it stands the MSLAT’s licence for the surf club facility to operate the surf club only permits supply of alcohol to Muriwai Surf Club members and their invited guests.

18.     Permitting supply of alcohol to sub licenced groups will negate the requirement for these groups to obtain special liquor licences for each club meeting or event as currently required.

Staff assessment of request

19.     Given the scale and nature of use that has developed since licence was granted, staff consider MSLAT’s rationale for varying their licence has merit, particularly where it intends to improve the ability to manage the facility within the constraints of the licence and realise the community investment in the facility. A number of clauses in the licence will need to be amended to accommodate the proposed variations. Various impacts associated with this have been discussed with MSLAT however staff have refrained from undertaking a full assessment until the views of the public are known.

Requirement for public notification

20.     In 2009 the Auckland Regional Council publically notified the intention to grant a licence for the new surf club facility. During consultation process a number of submissions were received that focused on the intended use, maximum numbers permitted in the facility and consumption of alcohol on the premises. As the variation proposes to considerably change conditions in the licence that were originally included as a result of matters raised in submissions, under the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 public notification is required.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     Staff have discussed MSLAT’s licence variation request with the Chair of the Rodney Local Board and further feedback will be formally sought from the Local Board once the request has been publically notified.

Māori impact statement

22.     As this report only seeks approval to publically notify MSLAT’s request to vary their licence there is no other readily identifiable impacts on mana whenua at this time.

23.     It is anticipated mana whenua will have particular interest in the car park development triggered by a potential increase in total numbers permitted in the surf club facility. The views of mana whenua will be sought through individual consultation ahead of publicly notifying the request.

Implementation

24.       The request to vary the licence will be notified in accordance with Reserves Act 1977.

25.     Once submissions are received staff will report to the hearings committee seeking the appointment of an independent commissioner to hear submissions and make recommendations and decide variations to the licence.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Dafydd Pettigrew - Parks and Open Space Specialist - Region Wide

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

 

File No.: CP2015/14204

 

Purpose

1.       To ask the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee to adopt the implementation programme for the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy (CGP) was adopted in December 2014. The CGP guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants to individuals, groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The CGP covers grants for community development, arts and culture, events, sport and recreation, environment and heritage, and includes a:

·        local component (21 local grants programmes and a ‘multi-board’ grants programme, governed by local boards and aligned with local board plans),

·        regional component (six regional grants programmes aligned to strategic directions in the Auckland Plan, with governing body decision-making).

4.       Schedule Six of the CGP sets out the context for the allocation of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme (RSRGP) which has an annual budget of $507,000. (See Attachment A).

5.       The 17 June workshop of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee provided an opportunity for the committee to provide feedback on any additions or exclusions they may wish to make to Schedule Six. The committee confirmed that no further changes were sought.

6.       Funding round dates are provided for the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 rounds.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve implementation of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme for 2015/2016 and 2016/2017.

Comments

7.       The 17 June workshop confirmed that no further additions or exclusions were sought from those provided in Schedule Six of the CGP. The workshop members did raise some areas they would like to ensure are included in analysis and reporting such as the ratio of applications for one off projects and multiyear and the ratio of recreation to sport applications.

8.       It is envisaged a workshop will be held in October 2015 to provide a more in depth overview of grant applications, with formal reporting for decision-making at the 18 November Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

9.       Local Boards were consulted as part of the development of the Community Grants Policy. The purpose of the RSRGP is to invest in region wide initiatives that will deliver the Auckland Recreation and Sport Strategic Action Plan. As outlined in the policy, the grants programme will support regional sector organisations.

10.     Local sport and recreation initiatives are funded via the local grants programme.

Māori impact statement

11.     Grants provide a direct, tangible way of supporting Aucklanders’ aspirations for their city and responding to regional needs and opportunities including those of Māori. The CGP outlines how Valuing Te Ao Māori and enabling Māori outcomes will be considered in assessment and requires that council:

·        engages effectively with Māori to promote funding opportunities available through the wider CGP programme,

·        provides capacity building support to potential applicants to improve Māori access to funding opportunities

·        have (or co-opt) appropriate expertise to assess applications which seek to deliver Māori outcomes

12.     Staff will work to ensure the above requirements are met including inviting expertise onto the staff assessment panel. Applications will also be assessed using work available from the draft Te Whai Oranga – the Maori Sport and Recreation Plan.

Implementation

13.     RSRGP applications will be considered once a year. As projects cannot be funded retrospectively as outlined in the CGP, applications for the 2015/2016 will be for projects, programmes or services delivered post 1 December 2015.

14.     The timing of the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 funding rounds are outlined in the following tables:

2015/2016

timetable:

Funding round opens

Funding round closes

Workshop

Committee Decision

Projects to occur after

 

30 July 2015

7 Sept 2015

(tbc) Oct 2015

18 Nov 2015

1 Dec 2015

 

2016/2017

timetable:

Funding round opens

Funding round closes

Workshop

Committee

Decision

Projects to occur after

 

26 Nov 2015

28 Jan 2016

(tbc) April 2016

 

18 May 2016

1 July 2016

15.     Reporting requirements for successful applicants are also outlined in the CGP requiring the provision of evidence of expenditure, outputs and outcomes against the criteria. As allocations are also required to be consistent with the delivery of the Auckland sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, updates on grant recipient programmes will also be provided annually to this committee via the ASRSAP annual report.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A: Schedule Six - Community Grants Policy 2014

75

Signatories

Author

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Authoriser

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Regional Sports and Recreation Grants Programme:

‘Aucklanders: more active, more often’

Auckland offers sport and recreation opportunities without equal in the southern hemisphere which inspire and encourage all Aucklanders to be more active, more often and to live healthy lifestyles. Recreation and sport is a part of the fabric of Auckland that makes it vibrant, fun and interesting, attracting people to live, work, visit and invest here. There are activities for everyone, as part of everyday life, in ways and places that appeal to them.

‘Our Vision’ – Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

Purpose

The purpose of the Regional Sports and Recreation Grants Programme is to support implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASARSAP) This plan was developed with extensive input from the wider recreation and sport sector, and contains actions for both the sector and Auckland Council. The grants programme will support regional sector organisations in their efforts to inspire and encourage Aucklanders to be more active, more often.

Funding Outcomes

The outcomes sought through this fund are:

Participation

·    There are affordable and accessible options for participation in informal physical activity, recreation and sport.

·    Our diverse communities enjoy healthy and active lifestyles.

·    Māori participation in sport and recreation activities has increased.

Infrastructure

·    Participants in a wide range of physical activities, recreational activities and sports are equally able to access suitable facilities and outdoor environments.

Who and what the fund is targeting

Applications are invited from organisations that meet the criteria for regional funding, and are:

·    Recreation and sport ‘umbrella organisations’ with a region-wide mandate

·    Regional federations or groupings of local or sub-regional sports code organisations

·    Sport and recreation providers or advocacy groups

·    Iwi and other Māori organisations active in the sport and recreation sector.

 

 

Regional Sports and Recreation Grants will be targeted towards the following purposes:

·    Supporting more equitable access to those sport and active recreation activities that do not currently benefit from dedicated or council-subsidised facilities and outdoor environments.

·    Programmes that enable children and young people to develop skills which will help them have lifelong participation in sport and recreation.

·    Providing or supporting easier and more affordable access to populations with low participation rates in sport and recreation, particularly:

Māori

Children and young people

Populations with health and wellbeing needs

Those facing other barriers, such as access to transport and information

Criteria to qualify for regional grants

To be considered ‘regional’ for the purposes of the Community Grants Policy, applicants must be able to show that their service, project or activity displays the following characteristics:

Primarily addresses regionally determined priorities

·    The service, project or activity aims to deliver outcomes that have been determined by the governing body, and they cannot reasonably be delivered and managed at the local or multi-board level, and

·    The activity may have some local impact and benefit, but the activity is primarily of regional significance and it would be unreasonable to expect the relevant local board(s) to meet the cost.

AND, that their service, project or activity is:

Regional in terms of scale and/or significance

·    The number of participants or users of the service, or the size of the audience is clearly regional in scale, and/or

·    The applicant can demonstrate that there will be clear benefits from coordinating decisions and activities at a region-wide level (e.g. where they are operating a programme at multiple sites across Auckland), and/or

·    There is another clear marker of regional significance (e.g. the project targets an ecological area acknowledged by Auckland Council to be regionally significant).

AND / OR, their service, project or activity is:

Regional in terms of impact and/or reach

·    The service, project or activity is available and reasonably accessible to anyone in Auckland regardless of their location, and/or

·    It targets a specific population group or niche audience that is clearly spread across the region, and

·    The applicant organisation can demonstrate that it has sufficient profile within that population group or niche audience to attract participants, users or audiences from across the region.

Funding opportunities

This grants programme contains two distinct grant types: ‘one-off’ project grants, for standalone initiatives, and multi-year strategic relationship grants.

Project grants

Project grants will be awarded through a contestable process once per year. The committee may run a second funding round later in the year to target specific priorities or if there are unspent funds. These grants will primarily support programmes as indicated above, but the council will consider supporting other innovative projects or initiatives that achieve the overall outcomes of the programme.

Strategic relationship grants

Auckland Council wants to enter multi-year funding relationships with a small number of strategic organisations operating at the regional level. These organisations are – or are capable of becoming – the ‘cornerstones’ of a thriving sport and recreation sector in Auckland. Refer to paragraphs 159-165 of the Community Grants Policy for more information about strategic relationship grants.

Exclusions

Auckland Council’s Community Grant Policy states that the following activities will not be funded through any Auckland Council grants programmes:

·   Debt servicing or repayment

·   Legal expenses

·   Activities that promote religious ministry or political purposes

·   Medical expenses

·   Public services that are the responsibility of central government (e.g. core education, primary health care)

·   Physical works – e.g. improvements to community buildings – that require consents or permits, prior to the necessary consents or permits being obtained (grants may be awarded in principle, but funds will not be released until all conditions are satisfied)

·   Purchase of alcohol.

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants maybe available to support a partnership between the council and another organisation to improve access to non-council owned facilities or outdoor recreation and sport assets. However, grants cannot be used for the development of new or existing facilities.

How grants will be allocated

The governing body committee for this programme is the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee of Auckland Council. Potential applicants for project grants will complete an application form. Council staff will assess these applications and present their recommendations for the committee’s consideration. The committee will make allocation decisions and set any grant conditions.

Potential applicants for strategic relationship grants will be invited to submit Expressions of Interest in the first instance. The governing body committee will select applicants to proceed to the next stage, with advice from council staff. Those applicants will be invited to develop comprehensive proposals for assessment, with a final decision by the governing body committee.

Investment approach

The budget allocated for the 2015/16 Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme is $507,000

Funding opportunities

This grants programme contains two distinct grant types: ‘one-off’ project grants, for standalone initiatives, and multi-year strategic relationship grants.

Project grants

Project grants will be awarded through a contestable process once per year. The committee may run a second funding round later in the year to target specific priorities or if there are unspent funds. These grants will primarily support programmes as indicated above, but the council will consider supporting other innovative projects or initiatives that achieve the overall outcomes of the programme.

Strategic relationship grants

Auckland Council wants to enter multi-year funding relationships with a small number of strategic organisations operating at the regional level. These organisations are – or are capable of becoming – the ‘cornerstones’ of a thriving sport and recreation sector in Auckland. Refer to paragraphs 159-165 of the Community Grants Policy for more information about strategic relationship grants.

Accountability measures

All successful applicants to the Regional Sport and Recreation grants programme will be required to provide:

·      Accountability measures (e.g. evidence of grant expenditure, information about what you have delivered and who participated)

·      Outcome measures/reporting - how the groups/organisations have evaluated their projects/activities, how the community has benefited and what the group/organisation has learnt.

 

Accountability and reporting obligations will vary depending on the size and terms of the grant. Information about these requirements is included in the application form and will be specified in the funding agreement.


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Regional sport and recreation work programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/14205

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval for the sport and recreation region wide work programme for 2015/2016 including disbursement of the Aktive/Regional Sports Trust Group strategic partnership grant for 2015/2016.

Executive Summary

2.       The Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee held a workshop on 17 June 2015 to consider priority projects in the draft regional sport and recreation work programme for 2015/2016.  The workshop was well attended with fourteen councillors and Independent Māori Statutory Board members present.

3.       The Committee provided support in principle for the work programme pending formal reporting to the July committee meeting.

4.       This report provides formal oversight of information covered at the workshop and timeframes associated with the work programme (see Attachment A).

5.       This report requests approval to release the 2015/2016 strategic partnership grant to the Aktive/Regional Sports Trust group.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the sport and recreation region wide work programme for 2015/2016.

b)      approve disbursement of the $552,000 strategic partnership grant to the Aktive/Regional Sports Trust group to deliver on agreed priority Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan initiatives for 2015/2016.

Comments

Sport and recreation region wide work programme 2015/2016

6.       The Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee held a workshop on 17 June 2015 to consider key activities in the draft regional sport and recreation work programme for 2015/2016.  The workshop was well attended with fourteen councillors and Independent Māori Statutory Board members present. The workshop provided a briefing on the following areas:

·          scope of the draft Sports Facility Network Plan and timeframes for completion

·          proposed priority investment areas for the Aktive/Regional Sports Trusts group strategic partnership grant

·          oversight of sport and recreation access and provision grants outside of the scope of the Auckland Council Community Grants Policy, December 2014

·          ex-Hillary Commission funding held by Auckland Council

·          progress on work for the Sustainability of Sport project

7.       The proposed priority projects for the sport and recreation region wide work programme was outlined at the workshop and is provided in Attachment A. Staff will report progress to the committee as outlined.

 

 

Future use of Hillary Commission Funding

8.       In June 2002, Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC, now Sport NZ) ceased the annual funding through the Community Sport Fund. The fund was administered through territorial local authorities and supported sport and recreation projects and initiatives. 

9.       The fund was allocated to councils on a population based approach and was distributed to the community through a combination of contestable grants and loans

10.     Following the end of the Community Sport Fund, SPARC advised councils that any remaining Community Sport funding held or returned via loan repayments could be allocated in a manner consistent with the desired outcomes of the fund.

11.     Prior to Auckland Council, councils took a varied approach with most using remaining funds for capital projects or allocated in grants to sport and recreation groups.

12.     At amalgamation Waitakere ($1.1 million) and Auckland City Council ($1.39 million) had remaining Community Sport Funds due in the most part to their approach of funding low interest loans to sport groups clubs which have since been repaid.

13.     Four options were discussed at the 17 June Parks Recreation and Sport Committee workshop. These were:

a)         Develop a separate region wide contestable grants programme.

b)         Allocate as part of the new Community Grants Policy (CGP) Regional Sport & Recreation Grants Programme

c)         Allocate towards the implementation of Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) priority initiatives.

d)         Allocate as part of a proposed Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme to address inequities across sport and recreation in Auckland.

14.     Option d) would provide a budget to support community access to non-council facilities in areas of high demand, establishment operational support to new recreation facilities, including multisport hubs, support major hubs such as netball, and provide a fund to incentivise new multisport/co-location. This is a gap area for sport and recreation funding support and would support and increase the sustainability of sport and recreation facility provision. The fund would provide a budget to implement the Sport Facility Network Plan once completed.

15.     A further option raised at the workshop was to use the Hillary Commission funding to repay some or all of the sport and recreation based community loans that existed at the time of amalgamation in 2010. Of the 45 community loans held with council, thirteen loans totaling $1.2 million are to sport and recreation community organisations. ($123,000 Waitakere, $746,000 Auckland, $338,000 Papakura and Franklin). A report on the status of the 45 community loans is going to the Finance Committee in August. 

Aktive/Regional Sports Trust Group (Aktive/RSTs) strategic partnership grant

 

16.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy 2014 outlines a number of grants areas that are out of scope of the policy, for example:

Grants provided as part of broader strategic relationships with key partner organisations operating regionally (eg Aktive and Citizens Advice Bureaux), where the service, role or expertise provided by the funded partner is key to the council delivering its own objectives and long term outcomes for that activity or sector

17.     Previous reports to council have outlined the Aktive/RST’s funding and activities including Aktive’s involvement on the ASRSAP– Senior Leaders Implementation Group. This group is responsible for ensuring wider sport and recreation sector engagement and commitment to delivering the plan including an annual report to be presented to council at the November Parks, Recreation and Sport committee.

18.     The ASRSAP - Senior Leaders Implementation Group identified priorities for years one to three of implementation. Using insights from the Sustainability of Sport project against priority areas within the ASRSAP, four key initiatives have been identified for the Aktive/RST 2015/2016 investment. These are:

·          volunteer development and retention

·          sport sector engagement and buy in to develop the Sport Facility Network Plan

·          programmes and services that improve sport sector capability including multisport

and facility partnerships and viable business operating models

·          development of school/community clusters to increase utilisation of school sport and recreation facilities by community

19.     A funding agreement will be developed and that ensures clear accountability and KPIs for each of the four areas. Progress will be reported as part of the ASRSAP updates.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

20.     Local Boards were consulted during the development of the ASRSAP including capturing local board views on the priority year one to three initiatives. 

21.     Local Boards’ nominated representatives for the joint Local Board/Governing Body Sustainability of Sport Panel. Local Board panel representatives also attended a workshop in April 2015 to provide feedback on priority areas for the 2015/2026 work programme including potential investment priorities for the Aktive/RST grant. The ASRSAP and the Sustainability of Sport insights have assisted in determining both the work programme and priorities for investment.

Māori impact statement

22.     The ASRSAP includes actions focusing on improving the health and well-being of Māori. Initiative 3.7 – Partner with regional Māori sports organisations to identify opportunities to increase participation by Maori in recreation and sport activities, including programmes in Te Reo, Māori settings and cultural activities.

23.     ASRSAP key initiative 15.2 sets out the task for Te Waka Angamua and partners to lead the development of Te Whai Oranga – the Māori Sport and Recreation Plan; this will be reported to the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee in due course. Te Whai Oranga and the ASRSAP will guide delivery of specific programmes that will benefit Māori and improve delivery of against outcomes.

24.     The ASRSAP - Senior Leaders Implementation Group has identified the need to prioritise and targeted population groups to “support recreation and sport programmes that increase physical activity in target populations with identified health and wellbeing needs such as Māori, Pacific Island and low socio-economic populations” (ASRSAP 3.6). The work to deliver on this is embedded in funding agreements with third parties such as Aktive.

25.     To ensure Aktive are supported to deliver of Māori outcomes in partnership with Māori, they have developed a Māori outcomes framework and are in the process of forming an Establishment Māori Advisory Group with support for Te Waka Angamua. The Establishment Māori Advisory Group will develop a terms of reference and then work to confirm final representation on the group.

Implementation

26.     Implementation of the work programme and progress reporting are outlined in Attachment A.


 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Parks Recreation and Sport Committee work programme

83

Signatories

Author

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Authoriser

Mark Bowater – Acting General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

29 July 2015

 

Sport and Recreation region wide programme 2015/2016 and draft priorities 2016/2017 (new projects for this timeframe)

Programme/Project

 

Description

Timeframe

Staff contact

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014 – 2024 Implementation

Annual Report on progress against implementation

Oversight of proposed priority Initiatives for 2016/2017.

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/planspoliciesprojects/plansstrategies/Councilstrategies/Pages/sportrecreationstrategicactionplan.aspx

 

First annual progress report 11/2015 (following this round, will be programmed for annual report to PRS Committee in August each year)

 

Anita Coy-Macken  (Parks & Recreation Policy) & Sharon Rimmer (Sport & Recreation Partnerships)

Regional Sport & Recreation Grants 2015/2016 Funding Round

ASRSAP  - supports  a number of  participation initiatives

Implementation of the new Community Grants Policy 2014 via the 2015/2016 Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme. Fund of $507k. Details provided in Schedule Six of the Auckland Council Community Grants Policy 2014.

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/newseventsculture/communityfundingsupport/Pages/grantspolicyandprogrammes.aspx#community

 

Funding round opens 04/2015, closes 09/2015, decisions 11/2015

Ken Maplesden

Sport & Recreation Partnerships – Parks Sport and Recreation dept

Aktive/Regional Sports Trust Group

strategic partner grant 2015/2016

(region wide)  ASRSAP - key initiatives 8.1, 10.2, 15.1, 13.1,

Oversight of strategic partnership grant to Aktive/Regional Sports Trust Group. Investment of $552k based on Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024 priority areas and insights from the Sustainability of Sport Project. (note is outside of scope of Community Grants Policy 2014)

 

Overview provided at 06/2015 workshop, confirmation/decision to 07/2015 PRS Committee

Ken Maplesden

 

Sport Facility Network Plan

ASRSAP  - key initiatives 7.2, 7.7, 7.10, 10.2

Regional plan identifying priorities for sports facility provision, including: council provision and investment requirements, to inform acquisition of land, capex programme and community access investment programme.

Draft to 11/2015 PRS Committee

Final to 03/2015 PRS Committee

Paul Marriott-Lloyd

Parks and Recreation Policy

Auckland Council Golf Course Provision Discussion Paper  - key initiative 7.2, 7.7, 7.9, 7.10

 

Investigation of the long-term council ownership of golf courses across the region and the public/private provision of golf to support changes in demand.

Draft to 03/2016 PRS Committee

Final to 07/2016 PRS Committee

Potentially adoption by Governing Body required

Paul Marriott-Lloyd

 

Sport and recreation grants outside

scope of Council Grants Policy.

ASRSAP – supports a 8.1, 8.2,  and a number of participation and infrastructure initiatives

 

 

Overview and options regarding funds outside scope of the Community Grants Policy 2014 including: community access/operating grants and Hillary Commission fund. Gain PRS Committee approval for proposed strategic region wide guidelines.  (fund to enable investment that provides supply solutions, addresses inequity in provision and budget to implement the proposed Sport Facility Network Plan).

Overview PRS workshop  06/2015

Initial findings & draft strategic region wide guidelines reported to 11/2015 PRS Committee.

Final decisions timed for 2016/17 annual plan & PRS Committee timetables 03/2016.

Ken Maplesden

 

Sustainability of Sport Project

ASRSAP  - key initiatives 6.4, 17.3

Insights project aimed at understanding the opportunities and risks facing the community sport and recreation sector. Development and implementation of Action Plan.

Action Plan implemented and progress reported twice yearly to PRS Committee. First report 11/2015

Ken Maplesden

 

Regional Sport & Recreation Grants 2016/2017 Funding Round

ASRSAP - supports  a number of  participation initiatives

Implementation of the new Community Grants Policy 2014 via the 2016/2017 Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

Funding round opens 11/2015, closes 01/2016, decisions 05/2016 PRS Committee

Ken Maplesden