I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Seniors Advisory Panel will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 27 July 2015

10.00am

Room 1

Level 26
135 Albert St
Auckland

 

Seniors Advisory Panel

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Devlin

 

Deputy Chairperson

Russell Rigby

 

Members

Dr Judy Blakey

 

 

Dr Cathy Casey

 

 

Janet Clews, CNZM,QSO, JP

 

 

Roger Fowler, QSM

 

 

Joan Lardner-Rivlin, QSM

 

 

Sonny Niha

 

 

Richard Northey, ONZM

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

 

Barbara Watson

Democracy Advisor

 

21 July 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8105

Email: barbara.watson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          Understanding the activity needs of our older people                                              7

6          Housing Update                                                                                                             9

7          Global Auckland                                                                                                          63

8          Seniors Advisory Panel Programme Update                                                           65

9          Information items                                                                                                         71

10        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday 15 June 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if -

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)      The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)     The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)      That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)     the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

Understanding the activity needs of our older people

 

File No.: CP2015/14046

 

Purpose

1.       Seeking input from the panel on how Pools and Leisure can better respond to the activity needs of older Aucklanders

Executive Summary

2.       The Leisure Unit in the Parks, Sports and Recreation Department of Auckland Council is looking to develop a more detailed picture of the specific activity needs of older Aucklanders.  This includes understanding barriers, motivations and benefits that pertain to the broad demographic and the different segments within it.

3.       Staff seek the panel’s input both as experts and as individuals to help generate a clearer picture of considerations important to older people.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)      provide feedback on the information received.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Signatories

Author

Glenn Lucas, Business Development Manager, Leisure - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authoriser

Greg Morgan - Lead Officer Support

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

Housing Update

 

File No.: CP2015/14474

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update to the Seniors Advisory Panel on the housing programme overall and key initiatives underway to help meet the housing needs of senior Aucklanders.

Executive Summary

2.       Population projections released in March this year by Statistics NZ suggest that there could be an additional 255,600 people aged 65 years and over living in Auckland by 2043 – this would be a growth rate of 150% across that three decade period.

3.       The Auckland Plan identifies that over time older people in Auckland will need different types of housing options, including greater ability to age in place.

4.       Auckland Council has a comprehensive housing programme in place to improve housing supply, choice, quality and affordability. Key elements of the programme include:

·     the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

·     the Auckland Housing Accord and Special Housing Areas

·     the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy; and 

·     the Housing Action Plan.

5.       Auckland Council currently provides supported housing for around 1500 older adults. The Auckland Development Committee recently agreed to seek a community housing provider/s to partner with to deliver Housing for Older Persons services.

6.       There are a range of other initiatives in place which will contribute to meet the housing needs of senior Aucklanders including the Auckland Housing Bond, affordable housing requirements in Special Housing Areas, rental quality and security initiatives and funding for emergency housing.

7.       There are also a range of emerging opportunities which could potentially be leveraged to meet the growing housing needs of senior Aucklanders, and the Seniors Advisory Panel’s input is sought on these.

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)      note the contents of the report and provide feedback on the housing programme overall and the specific housing initiatives currently in place.

Comments

Background

8.       The Auckland Plan identifies that although older Aucklanders currently enjoy high levels of home ownership, this is forecast to decline and older people will need different types of housing options than currently available. It states that the mix of housing in a neighbourhood should allow people the choice of a suitable dwelling within the same community as they move through different life stages.

9.       There are a range of housing targets in the Auckland Plan, some of which particularly impact on seniors, including:

·     Reduce housing-related hospitalisation by 35% by 2020

·     Reduce the proportion of households which spend more than 30% of their income on housing costs to 20% by 2030

·     Reduce the disparity in home ownership rates between Māori and Pacific peoples and the overall rate, to less than 10% by 2030.

10.     The 2012 Housing Action Plan (HAP) includes 32 actions to improve housing supply, affordability, quality and choice using council’s key roles as facilitator, planning authority, service provider, regulator and advocate. The HAP contains the following two actions:

Action 5: Enable redevelopment projects on existing Council Housing for the Elderly sites while maintaining at least the existing number of units for older people in the Council property portfolio.

 

Action 9: Use existing Council-owned housing stock to help grow the Community Housing sector by investigating the management options of Council-owned housing stock including transfer of assets to existing community housing providers or forming a specialist housing provider for older people.

11.     The Government’s Positive Ageing Strategy provides a framework for developing and understanding policy with implications for older people. It is co-ordinated by the Office for Senior Citizens and hosted by the Ministry of Social Development, and is updated and re-released every year.  Goal 3 of the Positive Aging strategy is “affordable and appropriate housing options for older people”. Actions to progress this goal have focused on:

·     Assistance to help low-income older people with housing costs - this includes accommodation supplement from central government, rates rebates from local government and HCNZ’s income-related rental accommodation.

·     Research to better understand the housing repairs and maintenance challenges facing older people - a research programme is investigating how older people’s houses can be better maintained so people have more choices about their housing as they get older.

·     Improving the energy efficiency of current housing stock - the Government’s Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart programme provides a subsidy for homeowners to improve the heating and energy efficiency of their homes through insulation and energy efficient heating. Housing New Zealand Corporation has a programme of improving its rental stock, so housing is warm and dry.

·     Protecting the rights and interests of residents in retirement villages - The Department of Building and Housing developed a Code of Practice for retirement villages in 2008 which was updated in 2013.

12.     As the recently released 2013 census series report on Older Aucklanders shows (see Attachment A), there are currently over 163,000 Aucklanders aged 65 years.  The largest number lived in Hibiscus and Bays, Howick, Orakei and Henderson-Massey local board areas.

13.     The census report outlines the noticeable differences in where and how people in ‘older-old’ age groups (those aged 85 years and over) live compared to people in ‘younger-old’ age groups. As people enter ‘older-old’ ages they are more likely to live in retirement villages or rest homes or in other situations where they can receive care and support. It is not surprising to see that the local board areas with larger proportions of those aged 85 years and over had more housing available specifically for this age group, for example, in Orewa.

14.     Population projections released in March this year by Statistics NZ suggest that there could be an additional 255,600 people aged 65 years and over living in Auckland by 2043 – this would be a growth rate of 150% across that three decade period. The rate of growth will vary across that time period however, with generally higher growth in numbers expected in the next two decades as the baby boom cohort move through into older age groups. 

15.     The Auckland Region Housing Market assessment prepared by Darroch Limited in 2010 makes projections to 2026 regarding Auckland’s housing market using 2006 Census data1. It states that retired people who rent are at a high risk of experiencing financial housing stress. In 2006 more than 55% of retired households, who were renting, were paying more than 30% of their gross household income in household costs. More than 25% of those households were paying over 50% of their incomes in housing costs.


16.     The report projects that those aged over 50 will experience the largest growth in household financial stress. The 50-64 year age group is projected to experience a 131% increase in stressed households while the 65+ age group is expected to experience a 132% increase. This compares to 29% for those aged under 30 and 37% for those aged 30 to 39.

Discussion

17.     Auckland Council has a comprehensive housing programme in place to improve housing supply, choice, quality and affordability. Key elements of the programme include:

·     the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

·     the Auckland Housing Accord and Special Housing Areas

·     the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy; and

·     the Housing Action Plan.

18.     The programme is set out at a high level against the Auckland Plan priorities and targets in Attachment B.

19.     A range of initiatives are currently being delivered which will significantly contribute to the housing needs of senior Aucklanders. These are:

·    Housing for Older Persons Partnership Project

In June 2015 the Auckland Development Committee agreed to seek community housing provider/s to partner with council to deliver Housing for Older Persons services. The agreed objectives for the partnership include maintaining at least the current level of provision and protecting that number permanently, maintaining at least the current place management level of service, improving the average quality and making it more fit-for-purpose, and contribute to Auckland Plan strategies by significantly increasing the number of housing units across the portfolio catering for older persons.

·    Housing Bond

In December 2014, Auckland Council confirmed that it would serve as a guarantor of up to $6M, for a $30M fund to be raised from socially responsible investors to invest in new community housing. The initial offering of Auckland Housing Bonds during 2015-2018 will be enough to fund up to 200 homes. Council’s guarantee will translate into a $6-8,000 reduction in cost for each dwelling. The loans will be available to registered community housing providers including those who specialise in older persons housing.

·    SHA affordable housing

Special Housing Areas developing more than 15 new dwellings must provide around 5-10% of affordable housing. Most developments to date have opted to provide “relative affordable” housing where the new dwellings must be sold to first home buyers at a price of 75% or less than the median Auckland sales price. Smaller housing types (eg studio or 1 bedroom homes) have been one response to meeting the relative affordable target, and this will help meet the growing needs of older Aucklanders.

·    Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan

Enabling quality urban growth and providing for growth in a compact urban form is a key strategic direction within the PAUP. The primary policy approach is to provide for housing choice and affordability and focus residential and business growth in centres, within neighbourhoods and along frequent transport routes. The PAUP seeks to enable higher residential densities and the efficient use of land in neighbourhoods around centres, in areas close to the frequent public transport routes and facilities,  open spaces, community facilities, education and healthcare facilities.

·    Rental sector

Auckland Council has been working collaboratively with a range of partners to trial and advocate for a minimum quality standard for rental housing – sometimes described as a rental “WOF”. In July 2015 the Government announced that insulation and a working smoke alarm would be required in all rental properties by 2019 and in social housing this year. Auckland Council believe this is a good first step but have expressed concerns about the compliance model which relies on landlords/tenants, as well as the narrow range of issues addressed.

·    Rental sector

The Housing Project Office and the Community Development Arts & Culture team at council have been working collaboratively with the government on a project to better understand tenants’ needs for tenure security and develop options to address them. The project reinforced the findings of the Productivity Commission in 2012 which stated “insecure tenure has a detrimental impact on tenants, particularly older people and families with children”. The next phase of the project is to investigate the feasibility of a range of options identified.

·    Emergency housing

Auckland Council has allocated $830,000 to tackle emergency housing, homelessness and rough sleeping in its 10-year budget. This is an increase of $470,000 on funding in the previous budget. The Long-term Plan (2015-2025) provides $250,000 per year for the next two years for emergency housing providers to develop new accommodation for Aucklanders who, due to a range of circumstances, are in desperate need of somewhere temporary to live. Council’s assistance options include waiving regulatory costs, subsidising professional fees associated with new spaces and contributing to start-up costs for stand-out emergency housing proposals.

20.     There are also a range of emerging opportunities which could potentially be leveraged to meet the growing housing needs of senior Aucklanders.  These include:

a.    The potential for Development Auckland to enable large-scale affordable housing projects which specifically include components targeted at seniors housing.

b.    The potential to develop long-term affordable rental housing which provides targeted seniors housing options. This may be under a long-term lease on council land or using large scale institutional investment.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     Local boards have the opportunity to put forward their views prior to any recommendations regarding specific SHAs progressing to the Governing Body.

Māori impact statement

22.     The Housing Project Office has developed a Papakāinga Programme in partnership with Te Waka Angamua (the Māori Advisory and Strategy unit within council), and with input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.  A number of the papakāinga proposals currently in development include kaumatua housing.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Older Aucklanders - Results from the 2013 Census

15

bView

Auckland Council housing programme (draft)

61

Signatories

Author

Rohan Bush - Principal Advisor Housing

Authorisers

Ree Anderson - Project Director for Housing

Greg Morgan - Lead Officer Support

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 















































Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

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Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

Global Auckland

 

File No.: CP2015/14450

 

Purpose

1.       For the panel to provide advice to Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) on ensuring that the development of an Auckland global identity and story is inclusive of older people.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland is about to embark on a review of its global identity and story by asking a diverse range of Aucklanders what makes their city unique.  If Auckland is to remain competitive on an increasingly fast-paced world stage and sustain a vibrant and competitive economy, Auckland needs to stand out from global competitors.

3.       Last year a review of progress against the Auckland Economic Development Strategy identified nine priorities which were endorsed by the governing body and are being progressed.  Developing the Auckland global identity and story is one of these priorities.  The Auckland Plan outlines how a distinctive identity and story would capitalise on Auckland’s attributes, help to differentiate Auckland and enhance its international reputation by providing a coherent value proposition to attract skilled migrants, investors, innovators, visitors, entrepreneurs and events.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)      provide input to ATEED on the development of an Auckland global identity and story.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Signatories

Author

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Greg Morgan - Lead Officer Support

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

Seniors  Advisory Panel Programme Update

 

File No.: CP2015/14295

 

Purpose

1.       To receive up-to-date information regarding the Seniors Advisory Panel’s work programme and how the panel’s advice has been used.

Executive Summary

2.       This report provides an overview of the panel’s programme of work and makes it possible for panel members to see how staff are using the advice and input provided by the panel. The lead officer requests staff, where possible, to indicate how advice from the Seniors Advisory Panel is applied.

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the Seniors Advisory Panel Work Programme Update for July 2015.

Comments

3.       The Panel provided feedback on using the International Day of the Older Person to communicate important themes. Information networks and the diversity and richness of older people’s lives are significant areas. The reporting staff member acknowledged the panel’s feedback and has subsequently researched the theme for the IDOP 2015 and advises that one theme being used internationally is ‘Sustainability and Age Inclusiveness in the Urban Environment.’ Planning has begun for an event to be sponsored by the Seniors Advisory Panel.

4.       The panel wrote to the council re the Empowered Communities Approach and advised that in making changes to deliver the empowered communities model, the council should continue to enable the facilitation of the Multi-sector action plan to prevent family, whanau and sexual violence in Auckland.

5.       The panel’s input to the Community Facilities Network Plan in 2014 has been acknowledged.  Amendments were made to the draft network plan in response to the panel’s advice. In particular, the following new section 2.7.7 was added:

Community facilities are of tremendous value to seniors. The “drop in” aspect of community facilities allows for informal connections to be made, while also encouraging seniors to socialise within regular groups. In a digital age, many seniors require assistance with obtaining information on-line, and having access to computers is important. Many seniors have fixed incomes and have a greater reliance on public transport, therefore the accessibility and affordability of community facilities are key issues.

 

Panel input

Response OR Amendments

Drop in space is important

Section 4.2 Community Spaces has been amended to include drop in space as part of provision framework.

Section 4.3 Libraries spaces includes informal gathering space as part of the provision framework.

Access to and help with technology is important

Section 4.2 Community Spaces has been amended to include technology equipment and services as a core space requirement.

Accessibility and affordability is vital

Section 3.4 ‘what community facilities should look like’ has been amended to include accessibility and affordability as a key quality of fit for purpose community facilities.

Section 3.3 objectives includes supporting strategic placement of community facilities with other key infrastructure and transport.

 

6.       Panel members attended Age Concern’s Vulnerable Older Peoples’ Symposium in May.

7.       Planning has continued with members of the Disability Advisory Panel and staff on behalf of Development Auckland to progress the housing summit the panels will host this year.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Advice and feedback provided - July 2015

67

bView

Work Programme - July 2015

69

 

Signatories

Author and

Authoriser

Greg Morgan - Lead Officer Support

 


Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 



Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 



Seniors Advisory Panel

27 July 2015

 

 

Information items

 

File No.: CP2015/14065

 

Purpose

1.       The Chair will give a verbal update on any items of interest, and will invite members to give brief updates on matters of relevant significance to the panel’s work.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Seniors Advisory Panel:

a)      receive the information.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Signatories

Author

Barbara Watson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Greg Morgan - Lead Officer Support