I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Great Barrier Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                  

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 12 August 2015

10.00am

Claris Conference Centre
19 Whangaparapara Road
Claris
Great Barrier Island

 

Great Barrier Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Izzy Fordham

 

Deputy Chairperson

Susan Daly

 

Members

Jeff Cleave

 

 

Judy Gilbert

 

 

Christina Spence

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Fyers

Democracy/Engagement Advisor

 

3 August 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 301 0101

Email: jacqueline.fyers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                        5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                      5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                              5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                              5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                         5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                   5

7          Petitions                                                                                                     5

8          Deputations                                                                                                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                            5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                      6

12        Allocation of discretionary capital budget to local boards                   7

13        Local and sports park annual work plan - Great Barrier Island          15

14        Delegation for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island          21

15        Auckland Transport Report – August 2015 – Great Barrier Island     25

16        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

For the quarter - 1 April to 30 June 2015                                              
43

17        Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report                                             67

18        Annual Report for Great Barrier Local Board                                       69

19        Quarterly Performance Report for the year ending June 2015           85

20        Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2015                                                                    129

21        Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act (ARAFA) Funding Model Review - Local Board Input                                                                  139

22        Future Urban Land Supply Strategy                                                    161

23        Wild Things conference 12-13 August 2015                                       191

24        Chairperson's report                                                                             199

25        Board Members' Reports                                                                      213

26        Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Proceedings                           225  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairperson IM Fordham will welcome everyone in attendance. Member JC Cleave will

lead a karakia.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 8 July 2015, as a true and correct record.

confirm the Annual Plan Hearings minutes, held on Wednesday, 26 March 2014, as a true and correct record.

confirm the Local Board Plan Hearings minutes, held on Thursday, 28 August 2014, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Great Barrier Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Allocation of discretionary capital budget to local boards

 

File No.: CP2015/14059

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      This report seeks direction from Local Boards on the proposed discretionary fund for local board capital expenditure (Capex fund) regarding the:

·    model for allocating the fund

·    criteria for the fund.

Executive Summary

2.      The Governing Body has created a discretionary fund for capital expenditure for local boards. Local boards are to work with staff to develop a formula for allocation and criteria for qualifying projects.

3.      The Capex fund enables local boards to deliver small local asset based projects, either directly, in partnership with the community, or through joint agreements between boards.

4.      The Capex fund will be managed over three years. Local boards can use their entire three year allocation for one project or spread it over the three years for smaller projects.

5.      Local boards provided views on how funding should be allocated during the review of the Local Boards Funding Policy (LBFP) in 2014. The resulting funding formula for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) allocates 90 per cent based on population, 5 per cent on deprivation and 5 per cent on land area. The same allocation formula can be used for the Capex fund to maintain consistency in the policy. Staff note however that the link between costs and land area is weak and leads to major shifts in the allocation of funding.

6.      A formula based approach provides limited funding for the Great Barrier Island and Waiheke boards. Local boards should consider what level of funding over three years is appropriate for these boards. Staff recommend setting funding at one per cent of the fund for Great Barrier and two per cent for Waiheke.

7.      Using the Capex fund is preferable to LDI funding as the Governing Body funds the consequential opex. Boards should consider whether they need to continue to use LDI funding for minor (less than $1 million) capital projects.  Boards should also consider whether they need to be able to bring forward regionally funded projects using the Capex fund.

8.      The proposal to allocate a Capex fund to local boards will require an amendment to the LBFP. This will amend the Long-term Plan and requires the use of the special consultative procedure.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Provide feedback on the allocation of Capital expenditure (Capex) funding to local boards.

 

 


 

Comments

Background

9.      The Governing Body has created a discretionary fund for capital expenditure for local boards. On May 7 the Budget Committee passed the following resolution:

a)   Provide a new Local Board discretionary capex fund of $10 million per annum noting that this will incorporate the existing Facilities Partnership Fund.

b)   Approve the following parameters for this fund:

i.          The fund may be managed as a three year amount

ii. Local Boards may use the fund to build council owned assets, add to an existing council funded renewal or new capital project, work in partnership with an external provider or seed fund a community project.

10.    The Budget Committee requested that staff and local boards develop a formula for allocation and criteria for qualifying projects to report to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Purpose of the Capex fund

11.    The purpose of the fund is to ensure locally important projects are given appropriate priority. It is envisaged that the fund will be used for projects similar to those historically funded by the local improvement projects (LIP’s) or small local improvement projects (SLIP’s).

Funding Allocation Model

 

Principles for funding allocations

12.    The core principles for allocating funding to local boards are an:

·    equitable capacity for each local board to enhance well-being

·    administrative effectiveness

·    transparency.

Attributes for funding allocation

13.    The Local boards funding policy (LBFP) makes allocations on the following basis:

·    90 per cent based on local board population size

·    5 per cent based on the relative level of deprivation of the board

·    5 per cent based on the land area of the board

·    Waiheke and Great Barrier Island are funded for a fixed amount set by the Governing Body.

14.    The following table shows the level of local board support for the use of the above factors for allocating LDI recorded during the review of the LBFP.

Local Board Attribute

Local Boards that supported use during last review of LBFP

Relationship to need for funding

Staff Comments

Population

21

Strong

Strongly relates to demand for services

Deprivation

17

Weak

Little objective evidence for relationship to demand for services 

Geography

16

Weak

High distortion effect on allocation that does not relate to need for services

 

15.    A key decision for the allocation of the Capex fund will be to determine the appropriate level of capital funding for Great Barrier Island and Waiheke. The discussion document considers the two current allocation models used to fund these boards:

·    LDI allocation: Great Barrier Island and Waiheke receive the same proportion of the Capex fund as they currently receive of the total funding pool for Locally Driven Initiatives. (This is 2.3% of the total pool for  Great Barrier Island and 2.7% for Waiheke)

·    Transport Model: Great Barrier Island receives 1 per cent and Waiheke 2 per cent of the total funding pool.

16.    Five models have been considered for allocating the Capex fund between all boards based on the population, deprivation and land area attributes of the boards:

·    Model A: All boards funded based on 100% population

·    Model B: All boards funded based on 95% population and 5% deprivation

·    Model C: All boards funded based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area

·    Model D: Great Barriers receives 2.3% and Waiheke receives 2.7% of total funds, remaining funds allocated to all other boards based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area

·    Model E:  Great Barriers receives 1% and Waiheke receives 2% of total funds, remaining funds allocated to all other boards based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area.

17.    The following pages present these five models in table and chart form.

18.    Other potential funding attributes that have not been included in the modelling are:

·    rates paid: there is no relationship with need for services, and support was low for this attribute during the last review, with six boards in favour.

·    current levels of capital expenditure: data on regional activities is unavailable at local level. Levels of expenditure on local assets are not relevant to the purpose of the Capex fund. Gaps in the provision of assets will be met through the relevant network facilities plan.   

·    population growth: growth will be addressed every three years through the proposed allocation formula.

 

 

19.    The charts show the following:

·    Using land area as an allocation factor significantly increases funding to Rodney and Franklin local boards.

·    Great Barrier Island receives less than $7,000 under a population based allocation. This rises to $77,000 under the allocation formula that includes deprivation and land area.

·    Providing Great Barrier Island and Waiheke with fixed allocations under the LDI allocation and Transport models only has a small impact on the other 19 boards.


20.    In determining the appropriate funding levels for Great Barrier Island and Waiheke  consideration should be given both to the total value of the funding over three years, and the typical costs of activities likely to undertaken by these boards. The following table shows the level of funding these boards would receive over three years in comparison to the next smallest board, Papakura:

Allocation formula model

Three year capex funding allocation for

Great Barrier

Waiheke

Papakura

Board Population size

900

8,400

45,000

A: 100% population

$20,000

$180,000

$970,000

B: 95% population + 5% deprivation

$130,000

$260,000

$1,000,000

C: 90% population + 5% deprivation + 5% land area

$230,000

$290,000

$970,000

D: GBI: 2.3% Waiheke 2.7% (Current LDI allocation)

$690,000

$820,000

$940,000

E: GBI: 1% Waiheke 2% of total fund

$300,000

$600,000

$960,000

 

21.    The average cost for SLIPs projects in the last financial year was $31,000 for Great Barrier Island and $27,000 for Waiheke.  Under Model E Waiheke would receive two per cent of the fund, and be able to deliver 20 average cost projects over three years. Great Barrier would receive one per cent of the fund and be able to deliver 10 average cost projects over the same period.  They can of course accumulate funds over the three year period to undertake larger projects.

22.    Staff consider there is a strong case for using the same formula for LDI and the capex fund to maintain consistency in the allocation.  However, there is also a case for excluding land area given its impact on the distribution of funding.

23.    Staff consider that allocating Great Barrier and Waiheke the same proportion of funding as they receive from the LDI opex fund would over fund these boards compared to other board areas. Staff recommend an allocation of one per cent of the total fund to Great Barrier, and two per cent to Waiheke would be appropriate.

Decision making process for capex projects

24.    The chart on the following page provides an overview of decision making pathways for each type of project.

 

25.    Staff will work with boards to develop guidelines for facilities partnerships (including feasibility studies) and community-led projects.

Bringing future capex allocation forward

26.    The governing body has proposed that the fund be managed over a three year period, aligned with the Long-term Plan planning cycle.  Local boards can use their entire three year allocation for one project or spread it over the three years for smaller projects. This provides boards with greater choice in the size and timing of projects they undertake.

27.    As a practical consideration, it is unlikely that all 21 local boards would be in a position to bring forward their three years of funding to 2015/16.  However, in the event that this was to happen, the projects would need to be assessed against the modified “gateway” process to ensure they were able to be delivered.

28.    Budget for the Capex funding is included in the ten year plan. Local boards’ can only bring three years budgets forward however so future decision making is unencumbered.

 

 


Role of LDI funding

29.    The table below sets out how the Capex Fund and LDI Opex Fund could be used for different types of projects.

Funding Type

Project Type

Capex Fund

LDI Opex fund

Capex

Minor Asset based projects (less than $1M)

ü

GB funds consequential opex

?

LBs fund

consequential opex (feedback sought)

Top-up of  regional projects and renewals

ü

?

Major Asset based projects (greater than $1M)

ü

GB approval required. GB funds consequential opex.

û

Must use Capex fund for large projects

Opex

Capital grants to community groups

ü

Debt funded opex. Must be included in annual plan

ü

Standard opex expenditure

Feasibility Studies

ü

ü

 

30.    Local boards are currently able to fund capital projects using their LDI budget by funding the consequential opex. The capex fund largely does away with the need for this and the Mayor’s report proposed the removal of the ability to fund major new facilities with opex funded by their LDI. This raises the question of whether local boards still need the ability to use LDI to fund minor capital projects. The table sets out the key differences between the Capex fund and the LDI opex fund for capital projects.

Capex fund

LDI opex fund

GB funds consequential opex

LB funds consequential opex

Easier for GB to control and plan for debt (set amount available for three years)

Creates variable unknown capex requirements on an annual basis

Simplified reporting processes

Complex financial reporting required to track LB funding vs regional funding

 

31.    Staff recommend that local boards’ do not fund minor (less than $1 million) capital projects with LDI opex from 1 July 2016. This will not impact projects that boards have already committed to funding.

32.    Local boards should provide feedback on whether they see a need to use:

·    LDI to fund minor capital projects

·    Capex funding to bring regionally funded projects forward.

Transferring LDI to Capex

33.    Local boards may transfer their currently approved capex projects paid for by LDI (as outlined in their LB Agreement 2015/16), to the new discretionary fund.  This will free up their LDI opex again and remove the need to fund consequential opex.

Deferral of Capex

34.    Normal deferral conditions apply to the Capex fund. Projects cannot be planned outside of the three years but funds may be deferred if projects are unable to be completed within this period.

Transition for current Capex allocations

35.    There will be no transition mechanism for any existing Capex budgets held by some local boards. The Governing Body has decided that this fund will replace the current Facilities Partnership fund.

36.    Projects that have already been committed to through the Facilities Partnership fund will need to be funded from the relevant boards’ Capex fund allocation.

Local Boards Funding Policy

37.    The current Local Boards Funding Policy must be amended to provide for the allocation of capex funding.  This is an amendment to the Long-term Plan requiring use of the Special Consultative Procedure with a public consultation period of one month. 

38.    Staff propose to amend the LBFP to provide a general formula for allocating any non LDI funding. This will avoid the need to amend the LBFP every time the Governing Body decides to give local boards funding that is not for Locally Driven Initiatives.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

39.    The proposal does not impact the allocation of decision making.

Significance and Engagement

40.    The proposed Capex fund is a minor change in the scale of the Council’s budget and funding for Local Activities. As such it is not a significant change. However, creating a new funding allocation for local boards requires an amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy, and consequently the Long-term Plan.

41.    The Council is required to undertake a special consultative process for any amendment to the Long-term Plan.

Implementation

42.    The proposed amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy is not significant. As such, the amendment to the Long-term Plan will not need to be audited.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Beth Sullivan - Principal Advisor Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - General Manager Financial Plan Policy & Budgeting

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Local and sports park annual work plan - Great Barrier Island

 

File No.: CP2015/15667

 

  

 

Purpose

1.      To seek approval of the Local and Sports Parks annual work programme 2015-2016 for the Great Barrier Local Board area.

Executive Summary

2.      The Local and Sports Parks annual work programme for the 2015-2016 financial year includes park asset renewals, capital works, locally driven initiatives (LDI), and parks maintenance programmes.

3.      The work programme excludes any projects that have not been fully funded.  Additional projects may be prioritised for funding from the discretionary CAPEX budget, which has yet to be agreed and will be discussed with the local boards in the next two months. 

4.      If unforeseen works are needed or work priorities change from the approved annual local and sports parks work programme the parks advisor will discuss this with the local board park portfolio holder.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      approve the 2015-2016 Great Barrier Local and Sports Parks annual work plan;

b)      delegates approval for changes to the work programme to the Great Barrier Local Board parks portfolio holders in discussion with other board members as appropriate.

 

Comments

Background

5.      This report presents the final draft of the Local and Sports Parks annual work programme for the 2015-2016 financial year. The work programme includes park asset renewals, capital works, locally driven initiatives (LDIs) and the parks maintenance programme.

6.      Officers will have ongoing discussions with the board on the priority for other projects that may be eligible for other sources of funding once there is more clarity around how these will be allocated across the region. 

Financial implications

 

7.      The annual work programme is not a budget report and therefore budget figures are indicative only. 

8.      The final draft Local and Sports Parks annual work programme 2015-2016 includes some projects that will be delivered over a number of financial years.  Some flexibility is needed in the delivery of long term complex parks projects to adapt to changing situations.  These include external factors beyond council control such as weather, or issues that may arise during the detailed design, community engagement and consenting stages.  Any of these factors may affect project delivery outcomes singly or in combination.

9.      In particular, staff may need to adjust asset renewal priorities if unforeseen renewals or complexities in delivering planned renewals arise. 

10.    Given the scale of the work programme, the limited amount of time to get the work done, and the dynamic nature of the parks asset base, it is recommended that the board delegates changes to the parks work programme to its parks portfolio holders in discussion with other board members as appropriate.

Alignment with strategies and policies

11.    The draft annual work programme fits with the following Auckland Council guiding documents.

·    Auckland Plan – the world's most liveable city

·    Aotea Great Barrier Local Board Plan

·    Sport & Recreation Strategic Action Plan - Aucklanders: more active more often.

·    Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Plan - quality open spaces that meet community needs

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.    The local board provided feedback on the first draft of the Local and Sports Parks work programme 2015-2016 at workshops on 7 April and 7 July 2015.  Feedback from these workshops has informed this final draft annual work programme for approval.

13.    Completion of the annual work programme 2015-2016 as approved by the Local Board will result in projects that will contribute to the local board objectives for parks.

Māori impact statement

14.    Parks and open spaces contribute to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the work programme are anticipated to have an impact on tangata whenua, appropriate engagement and involvement in decision making will follow.

15.    It is the aspiration of the park officers to share the long term local and sports parks development plans with mana whenua for comment.  Following board approval, officers will engage with iwi to discuss the programme and understand interest in future development.  Further engagement will follow these initial meetings as the projects within the programme progress. 

Implementation

16.    Following approval of the local and sports park annual work programme staff will begin planning the implementation of projects, ensuring the work programme is completed on time and to budget for the 2015/16 financial year.  Monthly updates to the parks portfolio holder will continue and quarterly reports will be sent to the Local Board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment A - Local and sports park annual work plan 2015 -16

17

     

Signatories

Authors

Gary Wilton - Parks Adviser Hauraki Gulf Islands

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Delegation for operational cemeteries on Great Barrier Island

 

File No.: CP2015/15317

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to advise the Great Barrier Local Board that its request for a delegation to manage local cemeteries has been approved and to discuss next steps.

Executive Summary

2.      At its 29 July 2015 meeting, the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved a recommendation from the Manager, Auckland Cemeteries that the Great Barrier Local Board be delegated authority to manage the island’s two cemeteries at Gooseberry Flat, and Whangaparapara. A copy of that report is included at Attachment A.

3.      As well as enabling local cemetery management and decision-making, the approval gives effect to the long-standing request from this and the previous local board for a delegation to assist it to advance its aspirations to create new cemeteries at Claris & Okiwi. Although the delegation does not include acquisition of land for cemeteries, it does include planning and delivery of capital development which will help the board to develop cemeteries on existing local parks for which it has full authority.

4.      The board has allocated $10,000 in its 2015/16 LDI budget for a cemeteries feasibility study which would be a precursor to cemetery development and is being asked to allocate capex budget for cemetery development in 2015/16 and 2016/17 as part of its capex work programme.

5.      The delegation moves operational funding over to the local board with decisions on which part of council will lead and manage liaison with the local board and officers on the ground, still to be determined. Officers are expected to meet in the near future to agree on these matters.

6.      Under the Auckland Council Long-term Plan, regional cemetery fees and charges now apply to Great Barrier from 1 July. It will now cost $1,200 for a single adult interment. The cemeteries delegation now means if the Great Barrier Local Board wishes to reduce fees it can do so by making up the difference (a subsidy) from its LDI budget. The board’s position on this matter is also sought.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Requests that officers report back to the board’s September business meeting on which unit will be responsible for island cemetery and budget management and reporting to the local board and on an indicative work plan for cemetery development on local park land at Claris and/or Okiwi

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Copy of report to 29 July 2015 Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee recommending delegation to Great Barrier Local Board for local cemeteries

23

     

Signatories

Authors

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Report – August 2015 – Great Barrier Island

 

File No.: CP2015/15211

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to respond to local board requests on transport–related matters and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the local board area.

Executive Summary

2.      This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Great Barrier Local Board and its community, matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector, and relevant Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the board and community.

3.      In particular, this report provides an update on;

·      Local Board Transport Capital Fund

·      Consultation documents on proposed safety improvements

·      Previous Resolutions  - Update

·      Okupu Wharf update

·      Footpaths

·      Media

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Report – August 2015

b)      Allocates the full $385,524.00 available to it from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund on determined sections of the Hector Sanderson Road project, as detailed in the attached plan. (Attachments A to C)

 

Comments

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

4.      At the Local Board meeting on the 12 March 2014 the Board were provided with a list of potential Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects.

5.      The below table outlines an up-date as to decisions by the Board and on the progress of the projects. 


Table 1: Great Barrier Local Board project update for Board approval:

Resolution # GBI/2013/234 (2013)

Resolution # GBI/2014/20 (April 2014)

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

211

Hector Sanderson Road

·    Split into sections for funding purposes

·      Resolution GBI/2014/63 (15 May 2014)

“The design element of the project will be led by the Local Parks and SLIP’s project team”

 

·      Resolution GBI/2014/154 (December 2014)

Requests that those parts of projects 221 and 211 currently being progressed by the board be funded from Local Board Transport Capital Fund. Board agreed to fund from the LBTCF April 2015.

AT and AC working with Board on this and Board further supported the use of the LBTCF in the May 2015 Board meeting (GBI/2015/53)

 

ROC attached for discussion/decision 

Attachments A, B, C 

 

Kawa Rd concreting

May 2015 the GBI Board made a resolution, GBI/2015/53;

Requests AT prioritises the following projects;

iii. Kawa Road concreting agreed sections

 

ROC

Section 1 $204K

Section 2 $223K

Section 3 $93K

Attachment D 

222

Fitzroy Wharf parking

·      ROC – Unable to determine at present

Auckland Transport is still looking at options; every option investigated to date suggests huge costs for the benefit of a few cars.

The area is very short of available space.

 

Four parking spaces were identified, however the wall above these spaces slipped, forcing a reconsideration of location

 

This car park extension has been put on hold until the slip has been repaired. There are currently rubbish bins occupying the proposed new car park spaces and these will be relocated once slip work carried out.

Note: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost)

Consultation documents on proposed safety improvements

6.      Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Great Barrier Local Board for its feedback. As the Board’s transport portfolio holders provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the material below is included for general information purposes only.

7.      There was no proposed projects this month.


Resolution Updates

 

August 2014 resolutions;

8.         On the 13 August 2014 the Great Barrier Local Board made the following resolution;

a.    Request a response from Auckland Transport on the following matters at the September 2014 business meeting which are not included in the officers report:

·    An update on the speed limits project.

 

9.         Auckland Transport response;

Auckland Transport’s legislative team is still working on this project and have additional resources allocated in the 2015/16 financial year. Once delivery time frames are confirmed the Board will be updated.

 

Okupu Wharf update  

10.    Auckland Transport has recently carried out a tendering process for the up-grade of this wharf and subsequently has commissioned Hallett Enterprises from Warkworth to carry out the work.

 

11.    Works on the up-grade are expected to begin in early August 2015.

 

12.    This will see nine piles and some 400 linear meters of bearer and bracing timber being replaced.

 

13.    It is hoped this upgrade of the facility will be valued by the residents and the rules around vehicular access will be respected.

 

14.    This is a significant investment by Auckland Transport in a facility that is purely for recreational use by residents, so is at a cost to all ratepayers of greater Auckland.

 

 

GBI Footpaths

15.    As requested by the Great Barrier Local Board, Auckland Transport has recently carried out an audit of the footpaths on Great Barrier Island, as detailed below:

 

16.    Mulberry Grove to Omanawa Lane.  Boardwalks, concrete and grass.  Condition:  some subsidence.  Some areas require replacement. 

· Inspected monthly and waterblasted when required as part of monthly maintenance.

 

17.    Oceanview Rd to Claris Centre.  Mown track with some boxing.  Frequency of mow depends on growth and standards in the contract. 

· Inspected when mown. 

 

18.    Okiwi School for 400m.  Concrete path.  Condition:  some trip hazards (particularly in vehicle crossing areas) require replacement of sections. 

· Inspected monthly.

 

19.    Costs of maintenance of these footpaths are covered in the current maintenance contract between Auckland Transport and Fulton and Hogan and any variation to this would require the contract to be renegotiated.

 

20.    Any new footpaths would need to be funded via the Regional Footpath budget, of which is prioritised regionally based on the attached criteria. Attachment E. 

 

21.    Footpaths can be added to this programme, via requests from the Local Boards, members of the public and other council staff, however all requests are considered on a regional basis and will be assessed under the regional criteria and prioritised on this basis. (Criteria – Attachment E).

 

 

Auckland Transport media release

 Touch Pads help the blind use HOP machines

22.    Auckland Transport has worked with the Blind Foundation to make it easier for people who are blind or have low vision to use Auckland’s public transport system.

 

23.    Bright yellow raised tactile markers have been installed on 74, AT HOP ticket and top-up machines to help people find their way round the screen.

 

24.    Blind Foundation Environmental Awareness Advisor Chris Orr welcomes the move, he says “This means anyone who is blind or has low vision can top-up their HOP card or buy a ticket like anyone else.”

 

25.    The AT HOP ticket and top-up machines already have a voice prompt.  People can also select a mode which makes the font on the machine larger and increases the colour contrast to make it easier to read.

 

26.    It is hoped that this new function will help to make people in the blindness community to be more independent, as they will now be able to do their HOP transactions at their local station, in their own time.

 

27.    Photo Attachment F.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

28.    The board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Māori impact statement

29.       No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

General

30.    The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy. All programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the Council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation

31.    All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Hector Sanderson Rd ROC Summary

29

bView

Hector Sanderson Rd Plan 1

31

cView

Hector Sanderson Rd Plan 2

33

dView

Kawa Rd ROC

35

eView

New Footpath Prioritization-Criteria

37

fView

Hop machine photo

41

     

Signatories

Authors

Ivan Trethowen – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 





Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

For the quarter - 1 April to 30 June 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15221

 

  

 

 

Executive Summary

1.      The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport (AT) in the three months April – June 2015 and planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the next three months.

2.      Attachments include:

A – Auckland Transport activities

B – Travelwise Schools activities

C – Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

D – Report against local board advocacy issues

E – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly update to Local Boards.

 

 

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Strategy and Planning

3.      Corridor Management Plans (CMPs)

Seven new CMP studies and one CMP review were completed this quarter.  These are (1) Gillies Avenue CMP, (2) Henderson Metropolitan Centre Transport Study, (3) Glenfield Road-Birkenhead Avenue CMP, (4) Remuera Road-St Johns Road CMP, (5) Parnell Road-Parnell Rise CMP, (6) Hillsborough Road-Kinross Street CMP, (7) Rosebank Road-Patiki Road CMP and (8) Great South Road Stage 1 (Manukau to Drury) CMP Review.

 

4.      AT Parking Strategy 2015

The Strategy was approved in April and successfully launched at the end of May.

 

5.      RPTP Variation

Public consultations and hearing deliberations on the Regional Public Transport Plan were completed this quarter.

 


Investment and Development

6.      SMART (Southwest Multi-modal Airport Rapid Transit)

Investigation to identify the best public transport mode (heavy or light rail) to support the employment and passenger growth at the Airport.  It also includes the identification of a preferred corridor for protection.  Construction has started on the Kirkbride interchange which includes widening for SMART.

 

PT Development

7.      Otahuhu Bus Rail Interchange

Detailed design is complete and NZTA funding has been approved for construction.  The Signal Box was removed and the overhead live line lowered over Queens Birthday weekend.  Enabling works are on schedule, with the main works tender deferred until all funding is approved (now approved) and planned for July release.  It is expected that main works will begin in October 2015 and be completed in early June 2016.

 

8.      Half Moon Bay New Ferry Facility

This project includes the design and development of a new passenger ferry facility at Half Moon Bay, including integration with Public Transport, and accessibility and passenger amenity improvements.  A site inspection of the pontoon and gangway units was completed in early July prior to placing these units into storage in readiness for the Stage 2 physical works completion.  The wharf design is progressing with the submission of the building consent to Auckland Council expected in July/August 2015.

 

9.      City Rail Link

·   Enabling Works Package: Phase 1 ECI design service contracts 1 and 2 have been awarded.  Construction is to commence November 2015 with services relocation.

·   Main Works: Construction to start in 2018/19, subject to a funding agreement with Government.

 

10.    EMU Procurement

54 units have been provisionally accepted and the final three are in transit and due in Auckland in early August.  Peak period EMU services began on 8 June from Papakura, and on 20 July the network became fully electric with Papakura and Swanson to Britomart service introduction.

 

PT Operations

11.    Public Transport overall

For the 12 months to the end of June, patronage was 79.25 million trips which is up 9.5% on the 2014 result.  This is an increase of almost 7 million trips over the course of a year and, given the strong weekday growth, likely represents around an extra 30,000 trips being taken each working day.  The changes for individual modes were:

·                     Bus (excluding Northern Express) – 57 million trips, up 6.6%

·                     Northern Express – 2.8 million trips, up 17.2%

·                     Rail – 13.9 million trips, up 21.7%

·                     Ferry – 5.5 million trips, up 8.3%

 


12.    Rail Improvements

·   The big performer was rail which reached 13.9 million passenger trips for the year, representing an annual increase of 21.7%.  The growth is put down to the enhanced travel experience and additional capacity provided by the new electric trains and greater service frequency introduced over recent years.

·   The AT network became fully electric on 20 July, except for the link between Papakura and Pukekohe which will continue to use diesel trains. These will be refurbished over time to provide an enhanced experience.  The electric trains will provide improved travel experience and more capacity on all lines.

 

13.    Bus & Ferry Improvements

·   June was also a record-breaking month on the Northern Express, with patronage up 17% on the same month last year.  The 12 month total patronage reached 2.8 million.  It was also a record for other bus services as patronage rose 6.6% to 57 million trips.  Ferry numbers for the year totaled 5.5 million trips, up 8.3% on an annual basis.

·   Growth on bus services is attributed to increased services and frequency, improving travel times from new bus priority lanes and a significant improvement in service punctuality being achieved by bus operators through new timetables.  Further service level increases and punctuality improvements are planned for later this year along with the introduction of double decker buses on a number of routes.  New network routes will also be introduced from later this year.

 

Road Design and Development

14.    Te Atatu Road Improvements

Road Corridor Improvement project on Te Atatu Rd from School Road/Edmonton Road intersection to SH16.  The evaluation of the construction tenders is now completed, with the award of the contract being imminent.  Construction is targeted to start in August 2015 with completion expected around February 2017.  A public open day will be arranged prior to the starting of physical works.

 

15.    Albany Highway

The Albany Highway North Upgrade project involves widening of Albany Highway between Schnapper Rock Road and the Albany Expressway.  Construction is approximately 40% complete.  Disruption to land owners and road users due to construction is being well managed, with any issues being quickly resolved.  The Rosedale Road intersection signalisation has been brought forward to July to assist with traffic management and pedestrian safety.

 

16.    Lincoln Road Improvements

The project involves widening Lincoln Road between Te Pai Place and the motorway interchange to accommodate additional transit/bus lanes on both sides.  Stakeholder feedback has been received for the 2-D layout plan, and the NZTA funding application for the detailed design is progressing.  The designation process is expected to start in late November 2015.

 

17.    Mill Road Improvements

The Redoubt Road - Mill Road corridor project will provide an arterial road connection east of State Highway 1 between Manukau, Papakura and Drury and includes Murphys Road improvements from Redoubt Road to Flatbush School Road.  Submissions to the NOR have closed and AT is now preparing evidence for the formal hearing due at the end of August.

 


Services

18.    Road Safety Highlights

·   Over 4,000 young people and their parents have participated in the Crossroads young driver programme.

·   The Oi! Mind on the road, not on the phone driver distraction campaign in May targeted 20-29yr old drivers.

·   The Love Being a Local road safety campaign enabled rural communities to take a lead role in raising awareness of local speed issues. 

 

19.    Schools Travelwise Programme Highlights

·   The United Nations Global Road Safety Week took place from 4 to 10 May.  146 teachers registered for Road Safety Week information and resources and 27 schools entered the competition. 

·   On 25 June 2015, 400 volunteers attended the Walking School Bus (WSB) megastars event to recognize the efforts of WSB volunteers. 

·   Recently completed research has found that crash rates involving children walking and cycling at schools with Safe School Travel Plans (SSTPs) and Active School Signage were significantly reduced by 37% after the implementation of these measures.

 

20.    Road Safety Education in Schools: (2014/15 Year)

·   79 new Walking School Buses were established, bringing the regional total to 369 and exceeding the target of 347

·   23 schools and 1,683 students received cycle training against a target of 1500

·   4 new schools joined the Travelwise programme, creating a total of 408 schools

·   2 regional ‘Slow Down Around Schools’ campaigns were delivered

·   536 students and 77 teachers attended Travelwise Primary and Secondary school workshops

·   4 high risk schools received rail fare evasion prevention campaigns.

 

21.    Road Safety Promotion and Training: (2014/15 Year)

·   A number of Local campaigns were delivered including: 5,275 drivers through local Drink/Drive operations with NZ Police.

·   The #Drunksense radio advertisement  won the Outstanding Radio Creativity Award and Driver Distractions won the Social and Community Platinum Award.

 

22.    Travel Demand (2014/15 Year)

The ‘Commute’ programme promotes behavioural change to reduce the reliance on and impact of Single Occupancy Vehicle (SOV) trips.  Focused on the morning peak period of congestion, the programme works with businesses to support public transport, carpooling and active modes of getting to work.  Seventeen new organisations joined the ‘Commute’ programme, and 23 organisations progressed or launched their travel plan activities.

 

2014/15 Performance Outcomes

23.    School Travel Trips Avoided

·   The 2015 Community and Road Safety Team target of 16,700 morning car trips avoided through school travel planning activities was exceeded with 17,164 trips avoided.

·   The total number of deaths and serious injuries (DSI) on Auckland Local Roads in the 2014 calendar year was 398, representing a 7.4% reduction from 2013.  For the 2014 calendar year, the Auckland region had the lowest rate of road deaths and serious injuries (DSI) per capita in New Zealand – 31 DSI per 100,000 population. 

 


Road Corridor Delivery

24.    The Asset and Maintenance Group is tasked with the responsibility for a wide range of activities within the Road Corridor.  These include but are not limited to:

·   The delivery of roading and streetlight maintenance and renewal programmes.

·   Managing the access, co-ordination and traffic management impacts of activities taking place within the road corridor

·   Promoting design innovation and efficiency around how work is carried out on the network 

·   The development of long term asset management plans and modelling which support the decision making process around the management of AT’s roading assets.

 

April – June Quarter key highlights

25.    The Road Corridor Delivery Team have a year to date target (YTD) to deliver 581km of resurfacing (asphalt or chipseals), pavement renewals and footpath renewals.  As outlined in figure 1, for 2014/2015 the group delivered 568km, or 98% of the planned  programme.

 

Figure 1:  Actual vs planned lengths (km) for June YTD

 

YTD Planned Targets (KM)

Actuals (KM)

%

Resurfacing

427.4

418.9

Pavement Renewals

37.4

40

Footpath Renewals

116.7

110

Total

581.5

568.9

98%

 

26.    The new Streetlighting contracts have been awarded to Downer (for Central and Southern areas) and Electrix (for North and West areas).  The four new contracts align with the road maintenance contracts and replace the nine legacy contracts which have been in place until now.  The new contracts are for a four year term with an additional 1+1 year right of renewal at AT’s discretion.

 

27.    AT’s second asset management plan (AMP) covering the period 2015-2018 will be published in August 2015.  This document details the strategies and management systems deployed by AT and sets out the future renewals and maintenance investment required to continue building the assets, infrastructure and delivery systems of a world-leading, transformational, sustainable and affordable urban transport service.  The AMP also addresses the shortfalls that will begin to accrue if current budget levels continue over the medium to long term.  Electronic copies will be available for download on the AT website and a hard copy will be sent to each Local Board.


 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Transport activities

49

bView

Travelwise Schools activities

59

cView

Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

61

dView

Report against local board advocacy issues

63

eView

Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 










Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report

 

File No.: CP2015/14910

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      To present the Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report for approval by the Great Barrier Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.      It is a legislative requirement that Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) groups across New Zealand educate the public on their local hazards, and what risks are posed to them as a community. This is to ensure that the community can adequately prepare for an emergency – Get Ready, Get Thru.

3.      The Auckland Hazard Guidelines produced in June 2014 recognised that there is a lack of local hazard knowledge across the Auckland Region. As a result CDEM has commissioned 21 local board hazard reports and will produce seven per financial year. The Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report is the second report to be completed.

4.      These reports address each of the likely hazards (man-made and natural) that have potential to impact the local board area and how the community is likely to be affected in the future, based on current knowledge and historical events.

5.      The Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report discusses the impacts of the hazards identified as well as past events that have occurred. CDEM intends that these reports be available to communities and will work with the local board on the best approach moving forward.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         Receives the Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Great Barrier Local Board Hazard Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

bView

Local Board Hazard Reports; FAQ's (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Brodie Rafferty - Hazards Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Annual Report for Great Barrier Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/15483

 

  

 

Purpose

1.      This report compares the actual activities and actual performance with the intended activities and the intended level of service as set out in the Great Barrier Local Board Agreement for 2014/15.  The information is prepared as part of the Great Barrier Local Board’s accountability to the community for the decisions made throughout the year.

Executive summary

2.      The Local Board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of the Local Board Agreement for 2014/15.  The requirements for monitoring and reporting are set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.  These requirements include providing comment on actual local activities against the intended level of service and for these comments to be included in the Auckland Council Annual Report.

3.      The attached report is proposed for approval from the Great Barrier Local Board.

4.      The Auckland Council Annual Report will be audited and then reported to the Governing Body for adoption on 24 September 2015.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Notes the monitoring and reporting requirements set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the local board information proposed for the Auckland Council Annual Report 2014/15

b)      Approves:

i.     The message from the Chairperson, which provides the Local Board’s comments on local board matters in the 2014/15 annual report

ii.     The list of achievements and the list of capital projects that form part of the local board information for the Auckland Council Annual Report 2014/15

c)         Gives authority to the Chair and Deputy to make typographical changes before             submitting for final publication

 

 


Discussion

5.      The Local Board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its local board agreement for 2014/15. The requirements for monitoring and reporting are set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, as follows:

Section 23 monitoring and reporting

(1)     Each local board must monitor the implementation of the local board agreement for its local board area.

(2)     Each annual report of the Auckland Council must include, in respect of local activities for each local board area, an audited statement that –

i)       Compares the level of service achieved in relation to the activities with the performance target or targets for the activities (as stated in the local board agreement for that year); and

ii)      Specifies whether any intended changes to the level of service have been achieved; and

iii)     Gives reasons for any significant variation between the level of service achieved and the intended level of service.

6.      Each local board must comment on the matters included in the annual report under subsection (2) in respect of its local board area and the council must include those comments in the annual report.

7.      This report focusses on the formal reporting referred to in Section 23 above.  Attachment A provides the draft local board information for inclusion into the Annual Report 2014/15.  The draft report contains the following sections:

·        message from the Chair

·        key achievements

·        financial results

·        performance measures.

8.      Local board comments on local board matters in the annual report will be included in the annual report as part of the message from the Chair.

9.      The next steps for the Annual Report are:

·          audit during August 2014

·          report to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September

·          report to the Governing Body for adoption on 24 September

·          full New Zealand Stock Exchange disclosure on 30 September

·          publication on 23 October

·          copies of the annual report will be provided to the local board office.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

10.    Local Board comments of local board matters are included in the annual report as part of the message from the Chair.

Maori impact statement

11.    The annual report provides information on how the Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the annual plan over a 12 month period.  This includes engagement with Maori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Maori.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Great Barrier Annual Report 2015

71

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Koch - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 














Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Quarterly Performance Report for the year ending June 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/10801

 

  

 

Purpose

1.      To update the Great Barrier Local Board on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 as set out in the local board agreement.

Executive Summary

2.      A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June.

3.      Auckland Council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) also present regular performance reports to the local boards.

4.      To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report, department report and CCO report.

5.      The attached omnibus consolidation contains the following reports this quarter.

·    Local board financial performance report

·    Local Community Development, Arts and Culture (CDAC) activity overview

·    Local Sports Parks and Recreation overview

·    Local Libraries overview

·    Treasury Report

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      receive the Quarterly Performance Report for the Great Barrier Local Board for the period ended 30th June 2015.

Consideration

Local Board Views and Implications

6.      This report informs the Great Barrier Local Board of the performance to date for the period ending June 2015.

Maori Impact Statement

7.      Maori as stakeholders of the council are affected and have an interest in any report on financial results. However this report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

General

8.      This is the financial report for the 9 months year to date for the Great Barrier Local Board for the financial year ending 30 June 2015; the next report will be presented to the board in September 2015.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Quarterly Performance Report for the period ending 30th June 2015

87

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Koch - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

 

 

GREAT BARRIER LOCAL BOARD

QUARTERLY PERFORMANCE REPORT

For the quarter ending June 2015

 

 

 

 

 


Table of contents

 

·          1. Executive Summary

·                  3

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         1.1 Highlights and achievements

·                  3

·          1.2 Watching brief

·                  3

·          1.3 Recommendation

·                  3

·          2. Update on key projects and initiatives

·                  4

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         3. Performance report by department

·                   

·          3.1 Libraries

·                  6

·          3.2 Community development arts and culture (CDAC)

·                  7

·          3.3 Infrastructure and environmental services

·                  8

·          3.4 Parks, sports and leisure

·                  11

·           

·                   

·          4. Financial performance information

·                  13

·                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         5  Appendices

·                   

·          A. Parks, sports and Leisure

·                  22

·          B: CDAC Work Programme

·                  25

·          C: Treasury Report to June 2015

·                  27

 

 

 


 

1. Executive Summary

1.1 Highlights & Achievements

This quarter, Great Barrier Island Community Health Trust and Aotea Family Support Group signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU). The MOU’s are the result of funding from the local board to support key outcomes from the Local Board Plan, and focuses on building working relationships and collaborating.  Aotea Family Support Group and the Great Barrier Island Community Health Trust are delivering a series of seminars as part of their Preparation for Aging Campaign. The first seminar was held on 26 June, focused on legal issues such as wills, living wills and powers of attorney.

1.2 Watching Brief

 

Youth Advisory Panel: The Youth Advisory Panel selection process is currently underway for the election or nomination of a new representative to sit on the Mayor’s Youth Advisory Panel. The incoming YAP member will join the new cohort of YAP members in September.

Financial Performance

The net cost of service is 6% below budget for the year ending 30th June 2015. This reflects underspends in consequential opex (depreciation) and the balance of the Broadband budget which subject to Governing Body approval will be carried forward to next financial year to complete the project. 

Capital expenditure 83% against budget for the year and $116k below budget, the main variances were: $35k Parks renewals, $58k for Okiwi airport sealing and $25k in relation to the Small Local Improvement Project (SLIPS) budget.

1.3 Recommendation

·   To receive  this performance report for the year ending June 2015

 


2. Update on key projects and initiatives (As detailed in Local Board Plan 2014/15)

2.1 Local libraries

 

This group of activities covers the local libraries located within the local board area. We plan to spend $1000 operating expenditure (opex) and $3000 capital expenditure (capex) on these activities in 2014/2015.

 

June 2015 update

 

·      After a very busy summer, the quieter months allow the assessment and refreshing of our collection.

Magazines have been evaluated and new subscriptions taken with the aim of increasing variety and discontinuing less popular titles.

DVDs from the Top Picks collection have been very popular and we hope to increase the number available.

 

 

2.2 Local community services

 

This group of activities covers local community facilities, local community development initiatives and local community safety programmes. Great Barrier is unique in the Auckland Council area, in that it has no council-owned community halls, community centres, or sports fields and facilities and local groups mostly provide community services.

Instead the board’s discretionary budget is a significant contributor to island community group funding needs and this will continue to be our focus.

 

For example in the 2012/2013 year the board allocated over $500,000 to community groups for such things as building repairs, power systems, youth training and development, sporting equipment, and printing of community information.

The key initiatives we have planned for 2014/2015 include identifying gaps and constraints to community service provision and the provision of suitable sites for these services on council land.

 

June 2015 update

 

·   A total of $248k has been allocated to community capital projects by the way of grants.

 

2.3 Local arts, culture and events

 

This group of activities covers local arts and culture facilities, local arts and culture initiatives and local events.  Local events in the Great Barrier Local Board area include local Christmas events, the Wharf-to-Wharf marathon, the New Year Picnic and Mussel Fest. The second Great Barrier walking festival will also be held.  

For the first time the board has established a dedicated fund of $10,000 to support the work of the island’s art gallery and to explore options for more local arts projects. Arts, culture and events are important for the local community, but they also provide an opportunity for visitors to share in the community’s life. These events also provide local community groups with valuable fundraising opportunities.

 

June 2015 Update

 

·   The Art Gallery Grant of $10k has been established.

·   A total of $34k has been allocated from the event funding; a further $25k has been allocated from the discretionary budget for the Great Barrier Walk Fest.

 

 


 

2.4 Local parks

 

This group of activities covers local parks located within the local board area. Our focus will be continuing to develop our open space network, including walkways, view shafts, interpretation and signage and coastal access.

 

The key initiatives we have planned for 2014/2015 include continuing with the Harataonga track upgrade, Station Rock Road walkway development, additional viewshaft development and more interpretive signage and local story telling. Development of Okiwi Park will also continue.

 

June 2015 update

 

·   The third stage of the four-year programme to upgrade the Harataonga Track is now underway.  It includes two more bridges and 3km of track widening and surfacing. 

·   Design and consultation of the Station Rock Road walkway between Medland’s Road and Rosalie Bay Road has started.

·   The new track to the Iona Mine in Okupu has been completed.

 

2.5 Local economic development

 

This group of activities covers initiatives that the local board can progress to grow the economy and the island’s population. Our focus will be on continuing to identify and progress projects and initiatives to improve the island’s economic viability and provide jobs for our local workforce.

 

The key initiatives we have planned for 2014/2015 include further exploring opportunities in these areas with the council’s Economic Development department and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development.

 

June 2015 update

 

· No update at this time

 

2.6 Local built and natural environment

 

This group of activities covers local environment and heritage protection. Our focus will be on continuing to progress existing environmental protection initiatives, commencing a conversation with islanders on their vision for the island’s future ecology, and agreeing next steps on the local Aotea marine protection initiative. We will also investigate opportunities to develop alternative energy technologies and an increased and better coordinated rabbit control programme. These will be progressed through the board’s new environment committee.

 

June 2015 update

·   The board has established an Environment committee to focus on biosecurity, and pest management programmes and environmental enhancement.  The combined budget for specific programs exceeds $102k.  Full details of the programmes can be found in Section 3.3 Infrastructure and environmental services of this report.

·   A number of biosecurity projects and biodiversity projects were delivered in the 2014/2015 financial year. This included community pest control at Mulberry Grove and rabbit control at four locations across the island.

·    The water quality programme will continue in the new financial year focusing on the eight sites in Tryphena. A high level analysis of results to date will be considered at the August Environment Committee meeting.

·   The governing body resolved that there will be no removal of the subsidy for waste services on Great Barrier as part of its decision making on the long-term plan 2015-2025.


 

3. Performance report by department

3.1 Libraries: Great Barrier Library

 

Performance Measures

    

Note: Library visit data was not available in Q1 or Q2 of 2013/14.

 

Regional Update

·    Our new buildings were recognised at this year’s Property Council Awards. Devonport, Te Atatu and Waiheke Libraries were all shortlisted in the Education & Arts category; Devonport Library won an Excellence Award as well as an Award of Merit for sustainability. Waiheke Library was also shortlisted for the recent NZ Institute of Architects Awards.

·    Libraries marked Anzac Day. We have supported local and national efforts to commemorate the World War I Centenary including extensive digitisation of unique resources such as the RSA journals and creation of the  “Our boys, your stories” website, a resource for Auckland’s families and communities to tell their stories and share their WWI memorabilia. The Research Centres have supported a number of related exhibitions and many individual researchers.

·    The build of servers that will host Libraries’ new public computing network has commenced. The public computing network project will move into pilot phase and then rollout in early 2015/16.

·    The Auckland Libraries app has been downloaded by over 19,000 people.

·    Libraries contributed to cyclone relief in Vanuatu by assembling almost half a tonne of deselected books for libraries and schools as they are rebuilt.

·    We Love Feedback, the Net Promoter Score, is being piloted in 10 libraries to capture feedback from customers about their experience in the library. Participating libraries report that there are lots of quick wins where they can make changes immediately in response to the feedback.

·    Libraries added 250 eMagazine titles, including New Zealand content, to our Zinio collection. There are now 534 titles available to customers. A promotional campaign was launched to increase use of Zinio eMagazine platform among our customers and, in the longer term, instil in customers a habit of downloading and eReading.


 

3.2 Community development, arts and culture (CDAC)

 

Regional

 

Matariki Festival

The month-long regional Matariki Festival 2015 started on 20 June marking the rising of the star constellation known as Matariki. It is an important time in the Māori calendar, heralding in the Māori New Year, which is a time to connect with, and give thanks to the land, sea and sky.

 

Creative Communities

 

The Creative Communities Scheme (CCS) is a contestable funding scheme administered by Auckland Council on behalf of Creative New Zealand. The scheme provides funding to local communities to assist them to create and present arts activities, prioritising direct participation in the arts, diversity and young people. In Q4, 61 applications were received for the central area requesting a total of $285,268 from an available pool of $127,505. Thirty-four applications were successful, of which one ($3,468) related to activities in the Great Barrier Local Board area and five (totalling $19,235.30) expect to include participants from the Great Barrier Local Board area.

 

In addition, 17 applications were received for region-wide projects requesting a total of $117,521 from an available pool of $61,834. Thirteen applications were successful, of which three (totalling $16,850) expect to include participants from the Great Barrier Local Board area.

 

ANZAC Day

 

Attendances increased at ceremonies this year, continuing a recent trend.  Of 78 services across the region, council delivered 23, facilitated 41, and supported 14 in other ways. With 2015 being the 100th anniversary of Gallipoli greater numbers were expected and this resulted in associated increases in activity and costs, especially traffic management.  There was also increased involvement by NZ Defence Forces and a larger television broadcast at the Auckland War Memorial Museum / Cenotaph with improved screens and sound systems provided for those attending.

 

https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/v/t1.0-9/11150248_890604557649704_8602431070758452481_n.jpg?oh=986d569dff56f5a7fda32832ef3a1f11&oe=565348A7

Lovebirds (one of the events support by the local board)

3.3 Infrastructure and environmental services

Local Board-funded projects: Infrastructure and Environmental Services was allocated the 2014/2015 Great Barrier Local Board budget lines for biosecurity pest management programmes ($52,936) and environmental enhancement ($49,558) for delivery. 

The table below provides a brief update on the local environment work programme as agreed by the Committee.

Local Board Outcome - The Environment Is At Its Best Here

Environmental Enhancement budget line

Water Quality Monitoring Programme - $12,063

· Monitoring of eight sites in Tryphena is undertaken to provide the board with an understanding of local freshwater stream quality. The Committee agreed interim funding to continue monitoring of the eight sites at its June 2015 meeting while a local person is found to continue the sampling work.

· A high level report providing an assessment of results to date will be presented to the Board at its August 2015 meeting. Depending on the results of that assessment, the board may wish to consider its ongoing funding for the monitoring programme.

Threatened Plants Conservation (Leptinella at Awana) - $10,000

· The construction of the fence to protect the leptinella population at Awana has been completed.

· Regional funding will support the analysis of the monitoring results to help determine which weed control treatment best supports the conservation of this threatened plant. This analysis will be reported to the board when completed. 

Sustainability Stocktake - $10,000

· A workshop was held with the board in June 2015 to discuss three initiatives (information provision; options around financing sustainable technologies; developing a microgrid at Claris) arising from the sustainability stocktake.

· The three initiatives will be discussed by the board in time for consideration by the Committee to fund as part of the board’s 2015/2016 environment work programme.

Kaitoke fire site – weed management and rodent monitoring - $7,775

· Pampas, Tasmanian Blackwood, Gorse and Blackberry have been controlled in key ecological areas around the Grandstand swamp and Kaitoke creek.

Community Pest Coordinator - $10,729

· The Community Pest Coordinator role was established to engage the Mulberry Grove community in undertaking pest control (rats) on private land.

· This role will be continued to be funded as part of its 2015/2016 environment work programme. As such, a stocktake of equipment was undertaken in June 2015 to determine requirements for delivering the programme in the new financial year.

 

Biosecurity / Pest Management budget line

Plague skinks - $15,000

· Surveillance of all 51 sites across Great Barrier (including the 18 funded by the board) found no additional incursions. Therefore, it is highly likely that the skinks are confined to Shoal Bay.

· Recommendations arising from the report on the 2014/2015 surveillance programme will be incorporated into the proposed 2015/2016 environment work programme to be considered at the August 2015 Committee meeting.

 

 

Rabbit Control - $27,020

· The 2014/2015 rabbit control programme concluded in June with the control works undertaken in the area north of the Okiwi airstrip through to Venters to the south. This operation will help create a buffer around the airfield to help minimise rabbit damage to the grass runway and to reduce rabbits burrowing under the tar seal. Relevant abundance accounts indicate that the number of rabbits has reduced.  

Weed Survey - $9,037

· The 2014/2015 weed survey was carried out to proceed as far south as Mangati Bay, Whangaparapara where a number of moth plant seedlings were removed from a previously known site. It is proposed to continue the survey in 2015/2016, subject to confirmation of board funding.

 

Regional Programmes: The table below reports on activities undertaken by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Department as part of regional programmes of interest to the Great Barrier Local Board.

 

The Environment Is At Its Best Here

Thriving Ecosystems

·   Ongoing control of a number of weeds including ginger, moth plant, climbing asparagus and smilax.

·   Continual monitoring of bait traps at wharves, and private jetties and boat ramps.

·   A proposal was supported to establish a National Māori Biosecurity Network to help manage and protect New Zealand from biosecurity incursions. The purpose of the network is to connect Māori organisations with researchers and provide a culturally safe place for Māori to discuss biosecurity issues of importance to them. The partnership and network will increase participation of mana whenua and tangata whenua in the Auckland region to support the development of the Regional Pest Management Plan and other operational biosecurity projects. 

·   A Facebook page for ‘Auckland Biodiversity’ has been established to support connections between council environment experts, individuals, and the community interested in working towards environmental outcomes.

·   A workshop for elected members on implementing the regional weed management policy was held in June 2015. This workshop also provided information on control methods, and provided an opportunity for participants to ask questions of weed control experts. Auckland Council actively manages over 220 weed species.

·   The isolation of a kauri dieback ‘smell’ has enabled training of a detection dog to ‘smell’ kauri dieback.

Pristine Waterways and Harbours

·   The Wai Care programme is a finalist for the Local Government New Zealand Excellence Award for Environmental Impact. This is fantastic recognition effort of the Waicare programme which involves community groups and schools monitoring and restoring their local streams. There are now over 140 Waicare sites across Auckland region.

·   An action plan for addressing pollution of lagoons on Auckland’s west coast has been completed.  The action plan includes recommendations around septic tank management, reducing duck numbers around lagoons, increasing dog control and providing grants to encourage farmers to fence their livestock out of streams. Outcomes from the implementation of this plan will inform similar action elsewhere to address faecal contamination of waterways.


 

Zero Waste

·   As part of its decision making on the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the governing body resolved that there would be no removal of the subsidy for waste services on Waiheke. Any costs of providing such services over and above revenue received from the targeted rate collected from Waiheke properties will be met from the solid waste targeted rate for the Auckland region.

·   The contract for the community waste educator role has been renewed for 2015/2016. In addition, a group of 16 people from Great Barrier undertook a visit to the waste learning centre at the Waitakere Transfer Station. As a result of the visit the group, supported by Envirokiwi, have formed an action group to progress key waste projects.

·   The Compost Collective has been recently launched as a fresh approach to supporting the growth of gardening and composting across the region.  Compost Facilitators are supporting home composting and with community groups through an approach that is flexible and responsive to local needs.  The network reaches urban, rural, Hauraki Gulf Islands as well as communities of interest e.g. Chinese, Pacific Islands, Korean and South Asian Communities. 

 

 

 

Photos of the Tryphena stone wall prior to and after the completed restoration works funded from the SLIPs budget.


 

3.4 Sports, parks and recreation

Local and Sports Park

 

Following consultation with the kids and families of the Motairehe settlement, the playground at Motairehe has been renewed. 

 

cid:image002.jpg@01D0B4CA.35873030

 

 

Recreation Planning and Programming Facility Partnerships:  

 

Great Barrier Island Community Heritage and Arts Village Trust project to complete renovation and refurbishment of the Grey Homestead as a heritage museum has being completed and grant drawdown is complete.

 

Sustainability of Sport Forums: Sustainability of Sport and Recreation Project:

 

The six fora have now been completed with over 140 sport and recreation organisations participating. The analysis report “Community Speak Sport 2015” has been provided to Local Boards and a draft work programme shared with the Local Board, Governing Body representatives at a workshop in May. If Local Board Chairs and portfolio holders would like a further briefing and opportunity to feed into the next steps, Lisa Tocker Manager – Recreation Planning and Programming will make time to visit at a convenient time. The draft work programme will be forwarded to the Chair and Portfolio holders.

 

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) – update

 

ASRSAP sets out the key initiatives and first three years priorities for implementation.  Aktive/ Regional Sports Trusts will receive their investment aligned to the top ASRSAP priorities for 15/16. These are:

a)   Leading work on a Volunteers in Sport and Recreation Action Plan that will focus on development and retention of volunteers,

 

b)   Working with Council and the sector together to support work on the Sport Facilities Network Plan (as the Community Facilities Network Plan does not include sport assets).

c) Providing key services to support capability in sports organisations, and

 

d) Developing local school clusters and working with council to support facility partnerships with the education sector.  A funding agreement will be developed and progress reported through Local Board quarterly reports. The first full ASRSAP annual progress report will be completed and distributed December 2015.

 

Advisory Support:  Sport Code facility Plans – Auckland Regional Tennis Facilities Plan was completed. Key findings include:

 

·   Great Barrier Local Board area has 1 Tennis Club and 2 courts within its catchment. 

·   Access to courts should be considered should sufficient local demand be identified to ensure on-going sustainability.

·   Accessibility and Utilisation – for a sustainable club courts should have a minimum of 45 members / players per court.

 

Auckland Is My Playground:

 

Council has entered into an exciting three year agreement with the YMCA to deliver a social sport programme. The social sport project is an outcome of the ‘Youth Speak Sport’ young people’s sport and recreation summit. As a Youth Summit project it is a priority action within the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan. The first three sites include Mt Albert Community and Recreation Centre, Lynfield Youth and Recreation Centre and Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre (Onehunga). 

 

 

Community Notice Boards funded from SLIPS budget.


 

 4. Financial overview

Net cost of service and Capital expenditure relating to the local board is summarised below and further discussed in the report in respect of each activity. 

 

SVBIPLUS14367557780

 

Net cost of service was $3.2m which is (6%) below budget.

 

Operating expenditure is $226k below budget. The major variances relate to:

·    Parks $58k, Full facility parks contract response maintenance and consequential opex.

·    Local economic development $120k, relating to Broadband and street amenities budget. Governance $53k, relates to overheads for plans and agreements.

Revenue is $2k and on budget.

 

Capital expenditure year to date is $603k and is $116k below budget. This mainly relates to the final payments for Okiwi airport resealing $58k, Parks renewals $35k and Small Local Improvement projects $25k.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


 

4.1 Local community services

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Net cost of service is $324k and is 3% over budget.

Operating expenditure, ($10k) above budget, the variance is due to the apportionment  of corporate overhead  which is offset in other budgets.  

 

4.2 Local arts, culture and events

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Net cost of service was $283k, which is 1% over budget.

Operating expenditure: is $3k above budget, the variance is due to the apportionment  of corporate overhead  which is offset in other budgets.  

 

 

 

 


 

4.3 Local parks services

SVBIPLUS14367558533

Net cost of service was $1,389k, which is below budget by 4%.

 

Operating expenditure is $58k below budget the major variances are as follows:

·    Consequential opex $68k

·    Full parks facility $89k due to response maintenance

 

Offset by

 

·    Storm damage ($44k) repairs due to last year’s storm

·    Small local improvement ($10k) due Kaitoke Dune planting this is offset by budget in Local environmental budget.

·    Contact auditing local parks ($26k).

Capital expenditure is $603k, $109k below budget which relates to the following variances:

·    Park Renewals $35k

·    Local improvement projects $25k

·    Okiwi Airport sealing final payments $58k


 

4.4 Local economic development

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Operating expenditure is $178k, $120k underspent due to the following variances:  Broadband $99k and Street amenities $13k. The Broadband budget is planned to be carried forward in 2015/16 in order to complete the project.

 

4.5 Local built and natural environment

SVBIPLUS14367558885

 

Operating expenditure $131k and is $8k underspent this represents the Kaitoke planting which offsets the expenditure under the Small Local Improvement projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.6 Local governance

SVBIPLUS14367560166

 

Net cost of service is $883k and is 6% below budget.

 

Operating expenditure is underspent by $53k this reflects savings in travel, overheads and the costs associated with the preparing the local board plan and the engagement with the community.

 

Harataonga track

4.7 Discretionary Funding and Grants

The Great Barrier Local Board allocation of discretionary funding and grants is summarised below

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

4.8 Capital Expenditure by Project

 


5.0 Appendices

A: Parks Summary Project Status Report

Project Summary

Project Name

Program

·               Overall Status

·               Finances

·               Key Milestones

Phase

Expected Finish date

Local Board Commentary

 

Great Barrier - Walkways

·                  Walkways and cycleways Development

4.Execution & Delivery

30/06/2023

The Harataonga walkway renewal and bridge construction project is a 4 year programme. Year 1 and 2 with the walkway sections A, B and associated bridges are completed and handed over.

The upgrade of section D and bridge 5 was approved for implementation by the Great Barrier Island Local Board.  Works commenced in February 2015 and practical completion will be issued by July.

Practical Public Access

·                  Walkways and cycleways Development

3.Planning

30/06/2017

Local Board has approved the Tryphena Coastal Walkway Concept Plan. This budget is for the design and consent of two off-road sections of walkways (FY15), consent to be submitted by end of June. Budget for physical works allocated within the FY16 Locally Driven Initiative budgets.

Visitor Orientation And Signage

·                  Furniture and Fixtures Development

1.Concept

30/06/2022

Draft interpretation plan developed and initial batch of signage prepared for review by board. Subjects for individual signs agreed upon. Designs complete and awaiting final review from iwi.

OKIWI Airfield Sealing

·                  Park Development

Benefits Realisation

30/04/2015

Construction contract completed 30 April 2014. Official opening on 2nd of May 2nd 2014. Defects liability certificate obtained and final retentions have been paid out.

Condition 4 & 5 Asset Renewals

·                  Local Park furniture and fixture renewals

4.Execution & Delivery

30/06/2015

Furniture and fixture renewal project sites consists of: Awana Road Reserve: Signage - Design approved.  Installation pending, communications approval for installation in June. Medlands Reserve: Furniture - Complete.  Picnic table installed. Mulberry Grove Reserve & School: Signage – Complete. Old Service Centre Build. Great Barrier; Signage - Signage removed as needed. Works complete.

FY15 Condition 4&5 Renewals

·                  Local Park furniture and fixture renewals

5.Handover & Closure

30/05/2015

Project complete. Replacement/renewal of fixtures and fences: Awana Road Reserve: Renew post & rail fence and Remove farm fence completed. Done Gooseberry Flat Cemetery: Replace picket fence -& Renew wooden sign - completed. Mulberry Grove Reserve & School: Replace picnic table - Installed.
Tryphena Hall: Replace Picnic Table - Installed. Medlands Playground Reserve:  BBQ installed. Okupu Reserve: Remove sign - physical works completed.

Motairehe Playground

·                  Local Park playspace renewals

4.Execution & Delivery

30/07/2015

Design complete and presented to the Local Board.  Public consultation complete and successful.  Design approved.  Play units order and delivered.  Installation underway.  Planned completion by 30 June with final inspection and payment in July 2015.

Harataonga Track

·                  Local Park walkway and cycleway renewals

Benefits Realisation

30/08/2014

Project complete.

Harataonga Track Stage 2

·                  Local Park walkway and cycleway renewals

4.Execution & Delivery

30/06/2015

Four year Project. Stage 3 underway in conjunction with capex development. Contractor appointed, pre -commencement meeting complete.  Physical works commenced in December and planned for completion by June 2015.  Current progress at 25th May - 4,000m have been completed with approximately 1,500m left to complete.  This will be completed by 30th June 2015.

Dolphin Bay Walkway

·                  Local Park walkway and cycleway renewals

4.Execution & Delivery

30/07/2015

Existing consent confirmed as being valid for planned works.  Physical works now bought forward into FY15. Site visit with contractor and arborist completed in April.  Quote received.  Procurement completed and contract issued in May.  Physical works to commence early June, majority of the work will be completed by the end of July taking into account weather conditions.

 


 

B: CDAC Work Programme

Project/Event Name

Description/Key  Activities

Progress update

Building economic prosperity

Christmas Events

Funding for free Christmas events for Gt Barrier. Event Facilitation team to administer this funding for event organisers.

Completed: Funding allocated

Community economic development

Coordinate with Principal Advisor–Social Entrepreneurship to create opportunities for communities to develop social enterprise opportunities in social housing and provision of other services.

Support the development of Ngati Rehua.

Completed: The feasibility studies on Social Housing and setting up a Social Enterprise Abattoir have been completed.

 

Undertake a destination marketing and promotion campaign, to profile Great Barrier Island as a destination. Support opportunities to develop partnerships with ATEED, Events and the Arts.

On Track: Community development staff provide support to Destination Great Barrier who continue to promote local events, and currently manage the ISite at Claris Airport s

Community funding

Funding rounds, processing of applications, consideration of recommendations to local board, approval of allocations and payments made to successful applicants.

Completed: The total community funding budget of $25,459 has been allocated for the 14/15 financial year.

Local Event Fund

Local discretionary events funding.   Intention to itemise specific events for an agreed funding term.  Applicable events to be confirmed for 2014/2015                                                   (budget for 2013/2014 came from the contestable budget).

Completed

Local Event Support Fund

Contestable

Local contestable events funding which is disbursed through two funding rounds per year.

Completed

Signature Event

Provide Events Delivery Team resource to support the delivery of a signature event.

Completed: Event went very well and was a great pilot for 2015.  Due to the limited planning time for the event the numbers were low but this could be rectified in 2015.  All organisations that were involved are happy to be part of the event next year.

Caring for each other

Anzac Day

Deliver or support a meaningful Remembrance Service to honour the ANZACs and those who have served and died in other military operations.

2014/2015:

Develop appropriate initiatives to commemorate WWI Centenary.

Completed: An Anzac Service was held at Tryphena and organised by the Rural Women New Zealand Inc. Tryphena Branch. Great Barrier Local Board granted funding as a contribution towards the cost.


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

 

Project/Event Name

Description/Key  Activities

Progress update

Community art programmes

Administer a funding agreement with GBI Community Heritage and Arts Village Trust for the delivery of community arts programmes.

On Track:  Bringing in new audiences through foot traffic and social media. Use of centre by a range of community groups for arts activities, engagement of young people, implementation of newsletter, visitor surveys carried out.

Community Leasing delivery

Deliver the community lease work list as agreed with the local board to create:

increased currency of portfolio

increased opportunity for potential new occupiers to express interest

increase alignment of Community Outcome Plans to local board priorities

increased utilisation of community lease spaces

On Track: Portfolio meetings progressing work plan priorities.

 

Development of 2015/2016 work programme with local board portfolio holders.

Community Volunteer Awards

Recognise the contribution of local volunteers who help make the community a safer, more caring, more vibrant and more rewarding place to reside.

Completed: Delivered by local group with local board funding

Local Civic functions

Carry out civic/ceremonial events that seek to commemorate, celebrate or acknowledge important occasions or special achievements. Acknowledge milestones of development within local community.

Completed: No local civic functions for Q4

Social Development

Delivery of a range of health, welfare, employment and education services

On Track: The Aotea Family Support Group is providing programmes and services including school holiday programmes, youth training, and education workshops.

Youth Development

Support and empower the YAP representative. Support "Youth Speak" Rangatahi/youth group to develop a plan that reflects their priorities in the Youth Action Plan. Identify areas of training and development that will enhance their skills. The Youth group is to attend Local Board meetings to inform the board of progress and to update regional issues from the YAP representative.

On Track: The Aotea Family Support Group supported by the Youth Advisory Panel representative held a pizza night to enable youth to discuss ideas and potential projects of interest. A recruitment process is underway to select a new Youth Advisory Panel representative for Great Barrier Island.

 

C: Treasury report for the quarter ending 30 June 2015

 

The treasury report provides a summary of how Auckland Council is complying with Treasury Management Policy limits and the performance of treasury activities against benchmarks. 

 

Key highlights for the quarter include:

·    undergoing an internal Treasury Audit with Ernst Young

·    reviewed the liquidity policy resulting in reduced cash facilities saving $940k per annum

·    aligned counterparty credit policy exposure against rates revenue

 

The focus of treasury remains minimising funding costs, managing liquidity and interest rate risk, diversifying the investor base and lengthening the term of debt.

 

Debt

Parent gross debt as at 30 June 2015 was $6.5 billion ($6.4 billion as at 31 March 2015).  After allowing for $297 million of cash investments ($260 million as at 31 March 2015), net debt was $6.2 billion ($6.1 billion as at 31 March 2015). 

 

Borrowing limits

Policy maximum

Annual[1]

Budget

Compliance

Net debt as a percentage of total revenue

275 %

181%

195 %

Yes

Net interest as a percentage of total revenue

15 %

12 %

11%

Yes

Net interest as a percentage of rates income

25 %

21 %

19 %

Yes

 

Debt portfolio performance

June Actual

Average YTD

Budget as per plan

Benchmark 7 year

Cost of funds versus budget

5.15 %

5.36 %

5.69 %

5.62 %

 

The parent June and average year to date cost of funds remains below the group budgeted cost of funds and the 7 year benchmark. The average duration of our debt portfolio lengthened to 8.3 years, and the average duration of our interest rate hedging has increased to 7.5 years.

 

Gross Debt as at   1 Jul 14

Gross Debt Issued

Gross Debt as at 30 June 15

Annual Plan as at 30 June 15

Variance

$ 5,553 m

$ 978 m

$ 6,531 m

$ 6,670 m

$ 139 m

Treasury’s closing gross debt position for the parent at 30 June 2015 was $6,531 million with cash of $297 million.  The parent debt level in the Annual Plan is $6,670 million.  The positive variance of $139 million is due to higher planned cash holdings of $16 million and reduced capital expenditure of $123 million.  


 

 

Debt Maturity Profile

Actual

Actual %

15% to 60% of debt to mature between 0 to 3 years.

$ 1,711 m

26 %

20% to 60% of debt to mature between 3 to 7 years.

$ 2,227 m

35 %

10% to 65% of debt to mature beyond 7 years.

$ 2,543 m

39 %

 

Fixed Interest Rate Repricing [2]

Actual

Actual %

Debt to be between 50 per cent and 95 per cent of total debt.

$ 5,260 m

93 %

 

 

Amount on issue [3]

Change

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

YTD

Commercial paper

$ 280 m

4 %

$ 125 m

2 %

ñ $ 155 m

Retail bonds

$ 1,021 m

16 %

$ 1,121 m

20 %

ò $100 m

Wholesale bonds

$ 1,660 m

25 %

$ 1,469 m

27 %

ñ $ 191 m

Local Government Funding Agency

$ 1,725 m

26 %

$ 1,175 m

21 %

ñ $ 550 m

Offshore funding

$ 1,355 m

21 %

$ 1,355 m

24 %

-

Crown EMU facility

$ 490 m

8 %

$ 308 m

6 %

ñ $ 182 m

Total debt

$ 6,531 m

100 %

$ 5,553 m

100 %

ñ $ 978 m

 

The graph below shows the parent full maturity profile of Auckland Council debt.

Investments

Total cash and liquid investments held at 30 June 2015 was $297 million.

 

Treasury manages the Diversified Financial Asset Portfolio of $328 million held in line with the Statement of Investment Policy and Objectives and the guidelines contained in the council’s treasury policy.

 

 

Diversified Financial Asset Portfolio performance

Actual

Benchmark

Diversified Financial Asset portfolio returns exceed reference portfolio benchmark

Monthly

 - 0.76 %

- 0.59 %

Year to date

13.21 %

13.68 %

 

Treasury also manages the Trust and Reserves portfolio of $28 million held in trust to optimise the return within guidelines contained in the council’s treasury policy.

 

 

Trust and Reserves Portfolio performance

Actual

Benchmark

Investment returns to exceed 20 per cent weighting of NZX 90 day Bank Bill Index and 80 per cent weighting to NZX “A” Grade index

Monthly

 0.73 %

0.79 %

Year to date

6.57 %

8.23 %

 

Credit Exposure to Counterparties

Our counterparty credit exposure is within the policy limit which accesses exposure as a percentage of the budgeted rates collected.  No exposure is permitted to entities that are rated below A- unless they are a local authority. 

Risk measure

Counterparty

Limit

Actual

In policy

Credit exposure

NZ Government

£ 100 %

0 %

Yes

Local Government Funding Agency

£ 100 %

5 %

Yes

Registered banks >AA- / A1+

£ 100 %

89 %

Yes

Registered banks >A- / A1

£ 100 %

4 %

Yes

Rated local authorities >A- / A1

£ 75 %

0 %

Yes

Unrated local authorities

£ 40 %

0 %

Yes

Other corporate issuers and SOEs >AA- / A1+

£ 75 %

0 %

Yes

Other corporate issuers and SOEs >A- / A1

£ 40 %

1 %

Yes

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly Update 1 January to 30 June 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15187

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      To give the Great Barrier Local Board an overview of Auckland Council Property Limited’s (ACPL) activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2015.

Executive Summary

2.      In May 2015 the governing body voted in favour of merging ACPL with Waterfront Auckland to form Development Auckland (DA). The merger responds to feedback from the wider council organisations and seeks to address some key growth, development, housing provision and funding challenges that Auckland will face over the next 20 years. As a council-controlled organisation (CCO) DA will have a commercial orientation, but it will also have explicit public good outcomes to pursue.

3.      Substantive elements of the purpose of DA relate to urban redevelopment, strategic advice on council’s property portfolio and the redevelopment of underutilised council assets to achieve commercial and strategic outcomes.

4.      In August the governing body will receive recommendations from council staff in respect of the proposed locational priorities for DA.

5.      It would be anticipated that DA will specifically engage with local boards post the formal establishment on the 1 September to consider what activities DA can undertake to benefit their local communities.

6.      As this will be our final six-monthly update to you as ACPL, we are including both the full business summary as included in previous versions and additionally providing an outline of some of the strategic and organisational changes we will be making as we transition to DA.

7.      ACPL activity detail is broken down by business unit or work-stream, with a focus on local board specific activities where applicable.

8.      Local board specific supporting detail is included in Attachments A and B.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Accepts the Auckland Council Property Limited Local Board Six-Monthly update 1 January to 30 June 2015.

 

 

Comments

Development Auckland

9.      Council formally approved the establishment of DA, being a merger of Waterfront Auckland and ACPL, in May 2015.


10.    The essential purpose of DA is to contribute to the implementation of the Auckland Plan and encourage economic development by facilitating urban redevelopment that optimises and integrates good public transport outcomes, efficient and sustainable infrastructure and quality public services and amenities. DA will manage council’s non-service property portfolio and provide strategic advice on council’s other property portfolios. It will recycle or redevelop sub-optimal or underutilised council assets and aim to achieve an overall balance of commercial and strategic outcomes.

11.    A number of objectives fall within the purpose including facilitating the redevelopment of urban locations and optimising the council’s property portfolio.

12.    The process to establish the operating structure of DA is well advanced and a combined work stream between DA and council staff is looking at the future priorities for DA that will provide focus in terms of geographic locations and project priorities. In respect of the locational analysis work recommendations will be made to the governing body in August.

13.    It would be anticipated that DA will specifically engage with local boards post the formal establishment on the 1 September to consider what activities DA can undertake to benefit their local communities.

 

Property Portfolio Management

14.    ACPL manages property owned by the council and Auckland Transport (AT) that are not currently required for service or infrastructure purposes. These are properties that are not immediately required for service delivery or infrastructure development but are being held for use in a planned future project such as road construction/widening or the expansion of parks. This work will largely remain unaffected by the transition to DA.

15.    The property portfolio continued to grow during the last six months and now totals 1347 properties containing 1080 leases; an increase of 41 since our July-December 2014 update. The current property portfolio includes industrial sites and buildings, retail tenancies, cafés, restaurants, offices and a substantial portfolio of residential properties.

16.    ACPL’s return on the property portfolio for the year ending 30 June 2015 provides the shareholder a net surplus of $6.8m ahead of budget, with an actual surplus of $29.8m against budget of $23m. The average monthly vacancy rate for the period is 1.6% which is under the SOI targets of 5%.

17.    A properties managed schedule is included as Attachment A of this report. The schedule details:

§ Current ACPL-managed commercial and residential property within the Great Barrier Local Board

§ Each property’s classification or reason for retention

§ The nature of the property, such as a café within a library, or a residential property with a tenancy in place

§ The budget under which operating expenditure and lease revenue for the property is reported eg regional or local board.

18.    A report indicating portfolio movement in the local board area is attached as Attachment B. The report details all new acquisitions including the reason for acquisition, any transfers and the reason for transfer, and any disposals.


Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

19.    ACPL is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. ACPL has a particular focus on achieving housing outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

20.    July 2014 to June 2015 Target

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m disposal recommendations

$69m

These recommendations include $65.9m of sites that are identified for development projects.

 

21.    In setting future disposal targets ACPL is working closely with the council and AT to identify potentially surplus properties.

22.    2014/2015 Targets

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$30m gross value recommended for sale

These targets include disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for place-shaping and housing development projects

Development & Disposals

$30m net value of unconditional sales

 

Process

23.    Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with: the council, CCOs, local board and mana whenua. This is followed by ACPL Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

24.    Properties currently under review for future use opportunities via the Rationalisation Process in the Great Barrier area will be listed here as and when they arise.

Redevelopment/Regeneration and Housing Supply initiatives

Overview

25.    ACPL in its current form is contributing commercial input into approximately 54 region wide council-driven regeneration and housing supply initiatives. Involvement extends from provision of initial feasibility advice through to implementation, with projects ranging in size from $415k to in excess of $100m.

26.    ACPL is also actively contributing to the Housing Action Plan, which is a council initiative focusing on non-regulatory efforts to encourage and increase affordable residential development. ACPL has an SOI target to undertake five housing development projects over three years that will improve housing affordability and the supply of affordable housing encompassing CHO involvement. ACPL is currently actively working on 13 such projects.

27.    In our expanded role as DA we will be extending on this work to play a much stronger role in urban development through greater scale, enhanced capability and the ability to partner with others. We will have a key role in helping deliver the council priority of quality urban living and will have the mandate to deal with the challenge of Auckland’s rapid growth through regeneration and investment.

28.    DA’s roles and responsibilities will be customised to each specific project initiative and location. A few will be of a high custodial nature associated with urban regeneration. Some will be at the other end of the scale with a more facilitative role; and some will be much more able to be delivered in the short term.

29.    ACPL already works closely with the local boards on ACPL-led developments to ensure we give effect to the local boards’ place-shaping role. As DA engagement will in some areas be of a much broader scope, with the potential for involvement in master-planning activities for significant land areas.

Optimisation Update

30.    Optimisation is a programme of work aimed to achieve better use of council’s planned and funded service assets.  The programme targets housing and urban regeneration outcomes along with the delivery of cost-neutral service investment on appropriate sites.  ACPL and ACPD are leading a cross-council project to establish the rules and methodology for service optimisation activity. The programme will be carried across to DA.

31.    Local board engagement and workshops will be provided to demonstrate the scope of optimisation and the benefits of driving optimal asset performance from qualifying service property.  Timeframes for these workshops have been pushed out due to DA transition work.   However ACPL welcomes suggestions of service sites that may have potential for improved service function along with housing or urban regeneration outcomes.

Local Activities

32.    There are currently no regeneration and housing initiative proposal activities in the Great Barrier Local Board area.

Acquisitions

Overview  

33.    ACPL continues to support council and AT programmes and projects by negotiating required property acquisitions. All such acquisitions are funded through approved council or AT budgets. We also provide advice to assist with budgets, business cases and strategy to support an acquisition.

34.    From 1 January 2015 to 31 June 2015, 49 property purchases were completed for the council and AT. All of the property acquisitions met independent valuation thresholds agreed with AT, the council and Public Works Act 1981 requirements.

Council Acquisitions

35.    Of the 49 property acquisitions over the past six months, 12 were purchased to meet council legal, open space and storm water requirements and to contribute to City Transformation projects. There were no council acquisitions in the Great Barrier Local Board area.

 

Auckland Transport Acquisitions

36.    The remaining 37 properties were acquired on behalf of AT. The focus was on acquisitions to support major transport projects including AMETI (five acquisitions) City Rail Link Property Acquisition (seven acquisitions), Redoubt Road Mill Road Corridor Upgrade (six acquisitions) road widening across the region (10 acquisitions) and Northern Strategic Growth Area (one acquisition). Full details of relevant AT projects and associated acquisitions will come to the local board directly from AT.

Business Interests

37.    ACPL also optimises the commercial return from assets it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. A high level update on business interests in the Great Barrier Local Board area is outlined below

38.    Blackwell’s quarry is located on Hector Sanderson Road, Great Barrier Island, and is leased from the Blackwells.

39.    Fulton Hogan operates this quarry on behalf of Auckland Council.

40.    The operating agreement is due to conclude in late 2015. Negotiations with Fulton Hogan for a new operating agreement are proceeding.

41.    ACPL also manages commercial rentals in the Claris airport terminal and collects landing fees. Discussions on future management of the terminal being taken over by AT are underway.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

42.    This report is for the Great Barrier Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

43.    Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. The importance of effective communication and engagement with Māori on the subject of land is understood.  ACPL has accordingly developed robust engagement with the 19 mana whenua groups for our core business activities. We are currently working with Waterfront Auckland on a future strategy for DA.

44.    Key engagement activities currently include: identifying cultural significance concerns regarding disposal properties, flagging commercial interests, development partnering discussions and issues relating to property management such as protection of wāhi tapu or joint management arising from the resolution of Treaty Settlements. ACPL also engages with relevant mana whenua in respect of development outcomes for ACPL lead projects where appropriate. As DA we will work with iwi to consolidate and build on strengths from ACPL and Waterfront Auckland’s approaches along with successful work being done elsewhere in the council family.

45.    ACPL additionally undertook to be part of council’s Māori Responsiveness Plan (MRP) pilot programme. The project’s key output is an operational document outlining ACPL’s contribution to council’s strategic and operational commitments to Māori. The MRP was finalised and approved by the ACPL Board in December 2014 and is in the implantation phase. A copy of this is available on the ACPL website. This work will be carried over and reflected in the new organisation.

46.    As we transition to DA, the local board can expect to be advised or involved as appropriate in any discussions that arise in the local board’s area.

Implementation

47.    There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Properties managed by ACPL in the local board area

135

bView

Property movement in the local board area

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Caitlin Borgfeldt - Senior Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

David Rankin – Auckland Council Property Chief Executive Officer

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act (ARAFA) Funding Model Review - Local Board Input

 

File No.: CP2015/14867

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.           Auckland Council is undertaking a review of the funding model under the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 (ARAFA Funding Model Review). Feedback from the local boards is sought on the level of change proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any).

Executive Summary

2.           The Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 (the Act) established a distinct model for contributing funds to specified regional amenities (regional amenities). This funding model is now under review to consider whether it remains fit for purpose and to identify how it might be improved. The Governing Body adopted Terms of Reference for the review on 26 February 2015.

3.           Working closely with representatives of the regional amenities, seven funding model options were generated along a spectrum, ranging from:

·        retaining the status quo

·        seeking improvements within the existing ARAFA legislative framework

·        modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending legislation, to

·        repealing the existing ARAFA framework and replacing it with an Auckland Council policy framework. (The options are discussed in paragraphs 15 - 32)

4.      The Finance and Performance Committee endorsed the seven options for evaluation on 18 June 2015. The options will be evaluated against criteria previously endorsed by Finance and Performance on 21 May 2015. (The criteria is discussed in paragraph 14)

5.      When viewed across the spectrum, the options shift the role of Auckland Council from influencing decision-making under the Act (by a Funding Board) to becoming the decision-maker itself. The closer Auckland Council becomes to being the decision-maker the more opportunities there are to align the council’s strategic outcomes with those of the regional amenities. The options also incorporate improvements relating to information flows, longer term planning, communications and relationship building.

6.      The options are also associated with a progressively increasing volume of further work that would be required to implement them. The implementation of options requiring legislative change is particularly complex. The necessary trade-offs involved will be teased out and considered through the evaluation of the options.

7.      The evaluation is to be completed and will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015. The evaluation will identify the preferred option/s which may be a refined version, comprising different elements of the options proposed.

8.      Local board feedback is sought on the level of change proposed in the options as set out in this report and the impacts on local boards and local communities(if any).


 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Provides feedback on the level of change proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any) as an input into the evaluation of options under the Auckland Regional Funding Amenities Act Funding Model Review.

 

Comments

The Funding Model under the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008

9.      The Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 (the Act) has two purposes; to provide adequate, sustainable and secure funding for specified regional amenities, and to ensure that local government in Auckland contributes funding.

10.    The Act came into force prior to amalgamation of Auckland’s former councils. It was designed to ensure that all councils in the region contributed fairly to funding the regional amenities given the amenities operated across and benefited the whole of the Auckland region. It also sought to ensure that qualifying regional amenities remained financially viable.

11.    The regional amenities apply each year to a Funding Board for next year’s funding. The Funding Board confers with Auckland Council and prepares and consults on a funding plan, before recommending a levy to Auckland Council for the next financial year. Auckland Council approves the recommended levy and if not, arbitration takes place. The Funding Board subsequently receives the levy and allocates funding to the regional amenities.

12.    Auckland Council appoints six of the Funding Board’s 10 members with four members appointed by an Amenities Board, also created by the Act.

13.    Only the regional amenities specified under the Act may apply for funding and funding is not available for any part of services or facilities provided outside of the Auckland region. Funding is to contribute towards the operational expenditure that regional amenities must incur and is not available for capital expenditure.

14.    The regional amenities must make all reasonable endeavours to maximise funding from other sources. The regional amenities are prohibited from receiving operating funding form Auckland Council, other than via the Funding Board. However, staff are aware that local boards may receive funding requests from groups affiliated with the amenities.

15.    The Funding Board and Auckland Council must have regard to the funding principles prescribed in the Act. The Act makes provision for additional funding principles to be adopted.


Regional Amenities

16.    The purpose of the Act is to ensure the regional amenities are funded to provide services or facilities that contribute to “the well-being of the whole region” and “towards making Auckland an attractive place to live in and visit”. Organisations that wish to become regional amenities must possess these qualities to satisfy criteria for admission. The Act as enacted specified 10 regional amenities in Schedule 1:

·      Auckland Observatory and Planetarium Trust Board        

·      Auckland Philharmonia

·      Auckland Regional Rescue Helicopter Trust 

·      Auckland Theatre Company            

·      Coast Guard Northern Region Incorporated

·      New Zealand National Maritime Museum

·      New Zealand Opera Limited

·      Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated

·      Auckland Festival Trust

·      Watersafe Auckland Incorporated

17.    The following examples illustrate the way the regional amenities serve the Auckland region:

·      The Auckland Philharmonia (APO) was accorded the status of Metropolitan Orchestra as part of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage’s Orchestra Review in 2012. In that year the APO presented 31 performances in the Auckland Town Hall and performed in the Bruce Mason Centre (Takapuna) Telstra Events Centre (Manukau), Massey High Schools and Trusts Stadium (West Auckland) and the Holy Trinity Cathedral (Parnell). It also presented chamber concerts in Takapuna, Remuera and Howick and five free community performances and events in west, central, north and south Auckland. 

·      Coast Guard Northern Region Incorporated has 14 units located across the Auckland region at Waiuku, Papakura, Titirangi, Kaipara, Kawau, Great Barrier, Hibiscus, North Shore, Auckland, Waiheke, Howick and Maraetei, with the Operations Centre and the Auckland Air Patrol operating centrally.

·      Similarly, there are 10 clubs in the Auckland Region under the umbrella of Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated, located at Karioitahi Beach, Karekare, Piha (2), Bethels Beach, Murawai, Omaha, Red Beach, Orewa and Mairangi Bay.

The ARAFA Funding Model Review

18.    Auckland Council’s establishment and issues arising out of the Act’s operation have raised the question of ‘whether the funding model remains fit for purpose’. Auckland Council agreed to review the ARAFA Funding Model through its deliberations on the Mayor’s proposal for the 2014 Annual Plan. The Governing Body endorsed Terms of Reference (Attachment A) for this review on 26 February 2015. It records stakeholder issues and objectives (Schedule 2) and sets the overarching objective to:

“achieve long term sustainable, affordable and predictable funding of the existing amenities while recognising the Council’s purpose and responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002 and other legislation.” (paragraph 12):


19.    The ARAFA funding model and changes to enhance its effectiveness are the focus of the review:

·      The review will not consider whether to add or remove any of the regional amenities from the funding mechanism. That would be a separate piece of work.

·      The review will also not consider how much funding each regional amenity currently receives but rather look at the process that determines the amount of funding provided.

20.    The Terms of Reference set out the basic process for the review with the identification of criteria for the evaluation of options, identification of options and their subsequent evaluation. In undertaking this review we are working closely with representatives of the amenities and engaging with the Funding Board.

Criteria for the Evaluation of Options

21.    The following criteria for evaluating options were endorsed by the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 May 2015:

i.   Financial sustainability and certainty

-      Addresses the ‘sufficiency’ of the contribution provided by the funding model in terms of “adequate, sustainable and secure funding for specified amenities.” It includes the predictability of that funding over the short to medium terms in support of financial planning.

ii.  Affordability

-     Addresses the affordability of the sum of the contributions allocated under the funding model including the impact on rates.

iii. Independence and continuity

-     Considers the extent to which the option provides for objective decision making and the extent it provides for continuity of decision-making over time. These considerations go to the stability of the funding model over time.

iv. Accountability and transparency

-     Considers the information and the processes to support decision-making required by an option to ensure there is a clear chain of accountability from the recipient through to the funder. Transparency supports accountability, providing clarity around decision-making processes. Public sector responsibility requires accountability and transparency generally, and particularly in respect of public funds.

v.  Administrative efficiency

-     Considers the efficiency of the funding model, with regard to the costs associated with the information and processes required by an option. Funding arrangements should have regard to the costs of implementation, and how effective they will be in achieving their objectives.

vi. Alignment of outcomes and goals

-     Considers the extent to which the option allows for alignment between the outcomes and goals sought and achieved by the regional amenities and those of the Auckland Council on behalf of Auckland’s ratepayers.

vii.       Fairness

-     Considers the extent to which the funding model provides for fairness.

viii.      Flexibility

-     Requires consideration of the extent to which the option provides a funding model with sufficient flexibility to take account of changing circumstances.


Options to Enhance Effectiveness

22.    Working closely with representatives of the amenities, seven options along a spectrum have been generated, ranging from:

·      retaining the status quo

·      seeking improvements within the existing ARAFA legislative framework

·      modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending the legislation, to

·      repealing the existing ARAFA legislative framework and replacing it with an Auckland Council policy framework.

23.    The options were endorsed for evaluation by the Finance and Performance Committee on 18 June 2015.

24.    Figure 1 illustrates the options and where they are located on the spectrum. Viewed across the spectrum, the options shift the role of Auckland Council from influencing the Funding Board’s decision-making to becoming the decision-maker itself. Similarly, there are increasing opportunities along the spectrum to align Auckland Council’s strategic outcomes with those of the amenities.

25.    The review to date has identified that processes relating to funding bids and reporting have evolved under the existing arrangements. There appear to be further opportunities to pursue improvements through a focus on, information, communication, developing relationships and longer term planning which are being investigated through the final evaluation.

26.    Implementation of the options will require further work, some of which is significant. The implementation of options requiring legislative change is particularly complex.

27.    Options 1 to 4 are based on current arrangements which provide the pathway for regional amenities to seek operational funding from Auckland Council. Improvements under these options would be available for the 2016/2017 funding year.

28.    Option 5 limits opportunities for Auckland Council to scrutinise the funding sought by the regional amenities, whereas Options 6 and 7 increase Auckland Council’s role in decision-making. The level of funding provided under Option 7 would be dependent on the policy and decisions of the governing body. There may therefore be a greater level of uncertainty for the regional amenities which may hold implications for the level of services and facilities they provide.

29.    Options 5 to 7 require legislative change through the parliamentary process and it is not possible to indicate when they might become available for implementation.

30.    The necessary trade-offs in relation to implementation will be considered through the evaluation of the options.


Figure 1.

 

31.    Option 1 – Status Quo

The existing funding model prescribed by the Act is the benchmark against which the other options will be compared. It is described in paragraphs 1 to 7.

Seeking Improvements from within the existing ARAFA legislative framework

32.    The following three options seek to introduce changes to enhance the legislative framework and the sharing of information between the regional amenities, the Funding Board and Auckland Council.

33.    Option 2 – Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Clear Pathway to Capital Funding’

This option provides a ‘clear pathway for capital funding’ to augment the status quo.

While the amenities can currently apply for capital funding from Auckland Council via the Long Term Plan process, the granting of such funding is considered to be by exception. Under this option, applications for capital could be anticipated from any of the regional amenities. Potential applications would need to be signaled well ahead of time to assist financial planning and to enable the provision of funding.


34.    Option 3 - Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Sustainable Funding’

This option introduces financial planning over a longer time frame with a 3 year rolling funding cycle and supporting information, and establishes how the sustainable level of funding for each regional amenity might be determined:

Introduction of a three year ‘rolling’ funding cycle

This cycle would align with Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan/Annual Plan cycle. Applications for the first year of funding (the year of application) would seek that year’s funding and identify anticipated funding for the next two years. Annual applications made in the second and third year would be considered in the light of all the relevant information then provided.

Information supporting ‘rolling’ applications

The clarity and timeframe of information accompanying applications would be reviewed to ensure it supports the rolling funding cycle.

‘Sustainability’

A definition of the sustainable level of funding would be developed for application in the context of each of the regional amenities. This would also establish appropriate levels of reserves amenities would be able to build-up and maintain to help manage the peaks and troughs of the funding requirements.

35.    Option 4 – Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Alignment/Groupings’

This option similarly proposes the three year rolling review, maximises opportunities to improve strategic alignment between the regional amenities and Auckland Council and addresses the diverse range of regional amenities.

The three year ‘rolling’ funding cycle / Information supporting applications becomes available as set out in the previous option.

Auckland Council and the Funding Board confer

Auckland Council would be more explicit in clarifying its expectations, its funding constraints and its intentions when conferring with the Funding Board on the draft Funding Plan. The purpose would be to ensure transparency about the Auckland Council context and any funding constraints the council might face.

Auckland Council supports public notification

Auckland Council supports public notification of the Draft Funding Plan. The council could support the notification of the Draft Funding Plan on the council’s web site, through the media centre and/or in publications. This would help rate payers provide feedback and make submissions.

More particular consideration relevant to the type of amenity

This could include:

·      Criteria and considerations as relevant to different types of amenities – e.g. safety, arts & culture, and facilities

·      Clarification and guidance around what might be meant by ‘sustainability’ and the sustainable contribution required could be developed with reference to the activities undertaken by the particular regional amenities.

Modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending legislation

36.    The two following options amend the ARAFA legislative framework, proposing specific amendments to the way funding is determined or the roles of institutions and the processes through which they work.


37.    Option 5 – Baseline Plus CPI

Under this option the specified amenities would determine the ‘sustainable’ level of funding required for year 1, which would be CPI adjusted for the next two years. The level of sustainable funding would then be reset for the next (4th) year and CPI adjusted in each of the next two years.

The basis for determining the sustainable level of funding would need to be developed and the implications for the Funding Board explored.

38.    Option 6 - Strong Funder

This option remaps the relationship between the regional amenities and the Auckland Council with Auckland Council providing funds directly. Under this option the ARAFA legislative framework would be amended so that:

·      the regional amenities apply to Auckland Council directly for funding

·      three year rolling funding cycle / supporting information applies

·      Auckland Council sets the funding envelope

·      Auckland Council prepares and adopts the Funding Plan

·      the role of the Funding Board becomes one of providing expert advice to Auckland Council

·      the regional amenities report annually to the Auckland Council.

Auckland Council sets the funding envelope

The funding envelope from which contributions to the regional amenities would be drawn would be set for the 10 year period though the Council’s Long Term Plan process. This longer term approach to funding would likely require a review of the information required in support of setting the envelope.

Auckland Council prepares and adopts the Funding Plan

The Funding Plan mechanism could be similar to the status quo or be modified in terms of the process and matters to be taken into consideration.

The role of the Funding Board

The Funding Board’s role would change to one of providing expert advice to assist Auckland Council. Appointments may still be made by Auckland Council and by the regional amenities.

Repeal of the existing ARAFA framework and replacement with an Auckland Council policy framework

39.    Under this model the existing ARAFA legislative framework would be repealed and replaced with a policy framework established and maintained by Auckland Council.


40.    Option 7 - Auckland Council Dedicated Fund

The repealed ARAFA legislative framework would be replaced by a specific policy of Auckland Council where:

·      Auckland Council sets the funding envelope

·      there is no Funding Board and the regional amenities apply to Auckland Council for funding

·      Auckland Council considers applications and determines the funding allocated following public consultation

·      there is separate policy and consideration for different types of amenity – for example, safety, arts & culture and facilities for example.

·      a three year rolling funding cycle with supporting information would apply

·      the amenities annually report to the Auckland Council.

This option replicates many of the policy intentions of the Strong Funder option within Auckland Council formulated policy, though without the legislation or the Funding Board. As Council policy, the funding model/policy framework would be amenable to any amendment subsequent Councils may require.

Evaluation

41.    The evaluation involves considering the performance of each option against the criteria, relative to the performance of the status quo. Working closely with the amenities representatives, this process is currently underway and the results will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015. The evaluation will identify the preferred option/s which may be a refined version, comprising different elements of the options proposed.

42.    Local board feedback on the level of changes proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any) is sought and will be an input into the evaluation along-side feedback received from the Funding Board and Regional Facilities Auckland.

43.    From the work completed to date it is clear that Option 4- ‘Alignment/Groupings’ is compromised. The idea of grouping amenities by the nature of their operations is unworkable due to the extent of the difference between each of the regional amenities. The other features of this option continue to offer merit however and will be included in the evaluation.

44.    Implementation is a particular consideration in addition to the identified criteria. With the exception of the status quo, each option will require further work to become operational. The amount of work required and the level of complexity is likely to:

·      be less from options seeking improvement within existing frameworks (options 2, 3 and 4)

·      increase where improvements are sought through amendments to the Act (options 5 and 6)

·      further increase with the repeal of the Act and its replacement by an alternative regime (option 7).

45.    Seeking amendments to or the repeal of the Act would require sponsorship by a Member of Parliament to drive it through the Parliamentary processes. These include three readings in Parliament and the Select Committee Hearings process. The Act is a private Act. A private bill seeking changes would be subject to parliamentary processes required and it is not possible to indicate the time it might take for it to be enacted.


Next Steps

46.    Local Board feedback will be collated and incorporated into the final report to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

47.    The ARAFA funding model review considers the funding model established under the ARAFA legislation and will not directly impact on local board funding or decision-making. However, communities across all of Auckland are able to benefit from the services and facilities provided by the amenities funded through the Act.

48.    Local board views on the level of change proposed in the options and their impacts on local boards (if any) are being sought via this report. This report follows a memo circulated to Local Board Chairs in February 2015 and a briefing to Local Board Chairs and members on 22 June 2015. This report follows the structure of that briefing while elaborating on the information provided.

Māori impact statement

49.    The ARAFA funding model review focuses on how Auckland Council’s funding contribution to the specified amenities is determined. Using Whiria Te Muka Tangata: The Māori Responsiveness Framework as a lens there do not appear to be any statutory or treaty obligations, direct Māori or value Te Ao Māori outcomes affected by this review. Enquiries were made of mana whenua in March 2015 to ascertain whether the ARAFA funding model review held any interest. No interests were identified.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act Review

149

     

Signatories

Authors

Alastair Cameron - Principal Advisor CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Wayne Brown - Lead Strategic Advisor Strategic Scanning

Authorisers

Denise O’Shaughnessy - Manager Strategic Advice

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 












Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

 

File No.: CP2015/14868

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      To inform Local Boards about the purpose and content of the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy and seek their feedback.

2.      To outline the Special Consultative Procedure being undertaken and the anticipated role of Local Boards in this consultation process.

3.      To obtain Local Board views on the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy.

Executive Summary

4.      The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan provides for approximately 11,000 hectares of Future Urban zone land.  This land is located within the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB), but outside the 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL).

5.      The Future Urban Land Supply Strategy (the “Strategy”) (Attachment A) provides direction on the next stage in planning for the following Future Urban zone areas:

·        North: Warkworth, Wainui and Silverdale-Dairy Flat

·        North-west: Whenuapai, Redhills, Kumeu-Huapai and Riverhead

·        South: Takanini, Opaheke-Drury, Karaka, Paerata and Pukekohe.

6.      The Strategy sets out Auckland Council’s intention for when the above Future Urban areas are proposed to be development ready.  The Strategy was developed in collaboration with infrastructure providers such as Watercare, Auckland Transport and the New Zealand Transport Agency.

7.      The Strategy has significant implications for Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin Local Boards as they contain areas of Future Urban land which are sequenced for development readiness by the Strategy.

8.      At its July meeting the Auckland Development Committee resolved to approve the draft Strategy for public consultation in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure set out in s83 of the Local Government Act (2002) (Attachment B).  They also appointed a five person hearing panel consisting of four Councillors and a member of the Independent Maori Statutory Board.

9.      The consultation period will run from 17 July to 17 August 2015. Public engagement on the Strategy will include a series of ‘Have your say’ events to be held in Warkworth, Dairy Flat, Drury and Kumeu.

10.    The final Strategy will be submitted to the Auckland Development Committee in October for adoption.

11.    This report seeks views from the Great Barrier Local Board for consideration by the Auckland Development Committee and hearing panel in making a determination on if and how the Strategy will be amended.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Receives this report

 

Comments

Background

12.    The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan provides for approximately 11,000 hectares of Future Urban zone land. This land is located within the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) but outside the 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL). The Future Urban zone indicates that this land is appropriate for future urban development.

13.    A key goal of the Auckland Plan Development Strategy is to achieve a quality compact form.  This requires urban intensification, supplemented by well-managed urban expansion. The Auckland Plan advocates for 70 per cent of growth in the existing urban area and up to 40 per cent of growth in locations outside the 2010 MUL. The Future Urban land is intended to provide a significant portion of the growth outside the 2010 MUL – around 110,000 dwellings. The balance of growth outside the RUB and the satellite towns of Warkworth and Pukekohe, will be accommodated in rural and coastal towns, rural villages, countryside living and general rural areas.

14.    The draft Strategy focuses on the Future Urban land areas located in:

·        North: Warkworth, Wainui and Silverdale-Dairy Flat

·        North-west: Whenuapai, Redhills, Kumeu-Huapai and Riverhead

·        South: Takanini, Opaheke-Drury, Karaka, Paerata and Pukekohe.

15.    Local Board areas which contain Future Urban land directly affected by this Strategy include Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin.

16.    The draft Strategy marks the next step in planning the Future Urban areas that started with the Auckland Plan.  The Auckland Plan identified ‘greenfield areas of investigation’ to provide for future growth outside the MUL. The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan formalised this concept through the location of the RUB and the proposed zoning of this land as Future Urban.

17.    High-level planning was undertaken to provide more detail around possible land use, key infrastructure and potential housing yield and business land location. Based on this, the Strategy sequences the order for when this land is intended to be ready for development over the three decades of the Auckland Plan. It is a proactive approach to long-term planning, infrastructure provision and providing housing and business capacity.

18.    Most of the Future Urban areas are predominantly rural and have not previously been identified for urbanisation.  Bulk infrastructure will therefore have to be provided to these areas. All Future Urban areas require some degree of bulk infrastructure; development will therefore not be able to occur until this infrastructure is in place. In areas where bulk infrastructure projects are large and complex, longer lead-in times (for design, consenting and build) are required. This affects the timing for when land can be development ready.

Purpose of the Strategy

19.    The purpose of the draft Strategy is to provide a robust and logical sequence for when the Future Urban areas are proposed to be ‘development ready’ across the three decades of the Auckland Plan. This will enable coordination of timely structure planning and bulk infrastructure provision to these areas and provide clarity and certainty to all key stakeholders, including infrastructure providers.

Drivers for the Strategy

20.    The key driver for the draft Strategy is the significant current and projected growth in Auckland and the pressure this growth places on housing supply and key infrastructure. The Strategy therefore aims to proactively plan for, coordinate and deliver bulk infrastructure so that this land can be brought on stream for both residential and business development i.e. contributing to development capacity across the region.

21.    Accommodating this growth will come at a significant cost.  Preliminary, high level estimates of bulk infrastructure costs are provided within the draft Strategy; however it does not include costs for any local network infrastructure.  The significant costs are primarily driven by the size of the Future Urban areas (these equate to approximately one and a half times the area of urban Hamilton); the scale of the bulk infrastructure that will be required; and the current lack of such infrastructure in these areas.  For these reasons it would be prohibitively expensive for Council, CCOs and, more broadly, for central government (e.g. the New Zealand Transport Agency and Ministry of Education) to invest in all Future Urban areas at the same time.

The draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

22.    The draft Strategy sets out a logical timed sequence for development readiness. It integrates information on key infrastructure required to get these areas ready for urban development.  The sequencing is based on a suite of principles (attached to the Strategy) that include the consideration of the lead-in times for the bulk infrastructure required. Bulk infrastructure refers to water, wastewater, stormwater and the transport network. This draft Strategy will also assist with the forward planning of community facilities and services critical for creating sustainable communities.

23.    The sequencing set out in the draft Strategy was developed with input from a number of infrastructure providers including Watercare, Veolia, Auckland Transport and the New Zealand Transport Agency.

24.    The analysis done for this draft Strategy is of sufficient scale and specificity to broadly determine bulk infrastructure requirements. There are two subsequent parallel and inter-dependent processes to get land ready for development – more detailed structure planning, and bulk infrastructure planning and build.

25.    Structure planning and plan changes (to urban zones) will be done prior to the areas being ready for development and will be undertaken by the Council (or in partnership with others) in line with the programme set out in the draft Strategy. This is the stage of the process where Local Boards, mana whenua and communities will be involved in the detailed planning of these areas.

26.    The sequencing programme ensures the infrastructure costs are distributed over three decades to smooth spikes in capital expenditure, allow all infrastructure providers to forward plan their asset management and assist with prioritising key enabling projects.

27.    A monitoring programme is an integral part of the Strategy and will be used to monitor trends over time. This is to ensure that the proposed sequencing remains relevant. This monitoring will be part of an overall strategy to provide information on development capacity in brownfield and greenfield locations. Given the 30-year timeframe, a number of factors could change the proposed sequencing and timing as set out in the Strategy. These include funding constraints, possible alternative funding options and changes to population growth and housing demand. Therefore, for the Strategy to remain relevant and effective, it must be a ‘living’ document, able to respond to changes identified through the monitoring programme.


 

The Consultation Process

28.    The public consultation period will run from 17 July – 17 August 2015.  It will follow the Special Consultative Procedure set out in s83 of the Local Government Act (2002).  This procedure requires all interested parties to be given an opportunity to present submissions in a manner which enables spoken interaction.

29.    The Auckland Development Committee has appointed Councillors Cashmore, Darby, Webster and Quax and one member of the IMSB (to be confirmed) to form a hearing panel to receive the spoken submissions.

30.    A series of ‘Have your say’ events will be held to provide an opportunity to all interested parties to provide spoken feedback.  These events will be held at the following dates, times and locations:

·        Monday 3 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Warkworth Masonic Hall

·        Wednesday 5 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Drury Hall

·        Monday 10 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Dairy Flat School Hall

·        Tuesday 11 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Kumeu Community Hall

31.    Invitations will be extended to Ward Councillors and Local Board members to attend these events.

32.    Public notices will be placed in the New Zealand Herald and relevant local newspapers notifying interested parties about the Strategy itself and the ‘Have your say’ events.  The Strategy and a feedback form will be available on the Shape Auckland website and a media release will be distributed at the commencement of the consultation period.  A targeted direct mail out will also be undertaken for key stakeholders.

33.    Local Board participation at the events and feedback and input to the draft Strategy are welcomed.

34.    Feedback received during the period, including that received from Local Boards, will be analysed, summarised and reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel.  The panel will then make a determination about amendment of the Strategy.

35.    The final Strategy will be submitted for adoption at the Auckland Development Committee meeting in October.

Consideration

 

Local Board views and implications

36.    The Strategy has significant implications for Local Boards particularly Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin Local Boards as they contain areas of Future Urban land sequenced by this Strategy.  The consultation period and the ‘Have your say’ events provide an opportunity for Local Boards to become involved in the process, hear the views of their communities and form their own views and response to the Strategy.

37.    Local Boards were informed about the Strategy at a joint workshop held with the Auckland Development Committee on 16 June 2015. A briefing on the Strategy and the consultation process was held for Local Board members on 15 July 2015. This was to ensure Local Boards have a sound understanding of the Strategy and consultation process prior to the commencement of the consultation period.


38.    Preliminary issues raised by attendees included the need to manage community expectation about land purchases in the future urban areas, the need to ensure Council is fully resourced to undertake the structure planning work, a need to forward plan land purchase for community facilities and a proactive engagement approach with central government around provision of education and health facilities and services to deliver the best outcomes for local communities.

39.    This report seeks Local Board views on the Strategy and these issues and any other feedback will be reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel. 

Māori impact statement

40.    This Strategy has significant implications for Maori and has the capacity to contribute to Maori well-being and development of Maori capacity.  It is acknowledged that Maori have a special relationship with Auckland’s physical and cultural environment.  Ongoing liaison has occurred with Te Waka Angamua around the Strategy and the suite of principles which sit behind it.  One of the principles reflects Council’s commitment to Maori social and economic well-being as a transformational shift set out in the Auckland Plan.  Independent Maori Statutory Board staff were briefed at the commencement of the project, provided with background documentation and invited to workshops as the Strategy was developed.  A representative from the IMSB is to be appointed to the hearing panel for this project.  A hui was held with mana whenua chairs on 29 June 2015 and individual meetings will occur with interested Chairs who were unable to attend the hui.

41.    Iwi responses will be sought as part of the public consultation process outlined in this report. Consultation submissions from iwi will be reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

167

bView

The Auckland Development Committee resolution

189

     

Signatories

Authors

Simon  Tattersfield - Principal Growth and Infrastructure Adviser

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 























Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Wild Things conference 12-13 August 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15566

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.      This report is seeking expressions of interest in attending the Wild Things conference being held at the Viaduct Events Centre in Auckland on 12-13 August 2015. 

Executive Summary

2.      Wild Things is a two-day Environmental Defence Society conference that addresses terrestrial, freshwater and marine biodiversity loss.

3.      Wednesday 12 August programme is holding sessions including New Zealand’s Biodiversity Challenge, Bridging the Gap Between Policy and Reality, Labour Political Update, What’s Needed to Scale Up Effort?, and a conference dinner. Thursday 13 August includes sessions on Ahuahu-Great Mercury Island, Addressing Biodiversity in Development, Environmental Political update, Opportunities from Treaty Settlements and How do We Engage New Zealanders?. The full programme follows as Attachment A.

4.      The conference fee is $745 for the full two days. Attendance for one day only is $445. The conference dinner on Tuesday 12 August is $85. Plus travel and accommodation at approximately $415.

5.      The Local Board Services departmental professional development budget will cover the attendance costs for this conference.

6.      It is expected that any attendee will report back via their board member reports during the business meeting held on 9 September 2015.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Nominates board member/s xxx to attend the Wild Things conference on 12-13 August 2015 on the basis that the conference programme is relevant to the Local Board and Environment Committee’s work programmes

b)      Confirms that the conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Wild Things conference programme and costs

193

     

Signatories

Authors

Jacqueline Fyers - Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 






Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2015/11087

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for the chairperson to update the Board on the projects and issues she has been involved with since the last meeting, for information.

 

Recommendation

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)         Receives the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chairperson Izzy Fordham's report

201

    

Signatories

Authors

Jacqueline Fyers - Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 













Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2015/11100

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting, for information.

 

Recommendation/s

a)         That the report of Board Member Susan Daly be received.

b)         That the report of Board Member Jeff Cleave be received.

c)         That the report of Board Member Judy Gilbert be received.

d)         That the report of Board Member Christina Spence be received.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Board Member Susan Daly's report

215

bView

Board Member Jeff Cleave's report

217

cView

Board Member Judy Gilbert's report

219

dView

Board Member Christina Spence's report

221

    

Signatories

Authors

Jacqueline Fyers - Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 



Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 




Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2015/14981

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Attached is the Great Barrier Local Board workshop proceedings taken at the workshops held on the 1st, 7th, 8th of July 2015 and the Environment Committee workshop on the 22nd of July 2015, for information only.

 

Recommendation

That the Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      Receives the workshop proceedings for the workshops held on the 1st, 7th, 8th of July 2015 and the Environment Committee workshop on the 22nd of July 2015.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop proceedings 1 July

227

bView

Workshop proceedings 7 July

229

cView

Workshop proceedings 8 July

231

dView

Environment Committee workshop proceedings 22 July

233

    

Signatories

Authors

Jacqueline Fyers - Democracy/Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

John Nash - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 


Great Barrier Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

    

    



[1]  Annualised results based on the 31 December 2014 audited Auckland Council group results excluding Watercare.

[2] Fixed rate debt refers to all future / forecast debt where the future interest rate / coupon / cashflow is fixed (determined).

[3] Includes $890 million borrowing on behalf of Watercare not included in Fixed Interest Rate Repricing table above.