I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 12 August 2015

9.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Ann Hartley, JP

 

Members

Dr Grant Gillon

 

 

John Gillon

 

 

Danielle Grant

 

 

Richard Hills

 

 

Lorene Pigg

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Blair Doherty

Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

4 August 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 8856

Email: Blair.Doherty@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board area

 

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board Members

 

 

Kay McIntyre QSM

Chairperson

Ph 09 484 8383

DDI 09 484 8987

Mobile 021 287 8844

kay.mcintyre@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Finance – lead

·      Planning, policy and governance – lead

·     Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – alternate

 

Ann Hartley JP

Deputy Chairperson

Mob 027 490 6909

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 483 7572

ann.hartley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Community Development and Facilities – lead

·      Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – lead

·      Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – alternate

·      Planning, policy and governance – alternate

·     Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – alternate

 

 

Danielle Grant

Local Board Member

Mob 021 835 724

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 442 1271

danielle.grant@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Arts, culture and events services – lead

·       Economic development – lead

·       Natural environment – alternate

 

 

Grant Gillon MPP, PhD

Local Board Member

Mob 027 476 4679

Office 09 484 8383

grant.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Natural environment – lead

·      Regulatory, bylaws and compliance – lead

·     Libraries – alternate

 

John Gillon

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 2288

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 443 1683

john.gillon@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Libraries – lead

·       Parks, reserves and playgrounds (passive) – lead

·       Civil defence and emergency management – alternate

 

Lindsay Waugh

Local Board Member

Mob 021 287 1155

Office 09 484 8383

Home 09 418 1620

lindsay.waugh@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·      Built environment, streetscapes and urban design – lead

·      Arts, culture and events services – alternate

·      Transport and infrastructure – alternate

 

 

Lorene Pigg

Local Board Member

Mob 021 839 375

Office 09 484 8383

lorene.pigg@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Civil defence and emergency management – lead

·       Finance – alternate

·       Sport, recreation services and parks (active) – alternate

 

 

Richard Hills

Local Board Member

Mob 021 286 4411

Office 09 484 8383

richard.hills@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Portfolios:

·       Transport and infrastructure – lead

·       Community Development and Facilities – alternate

·       Economic development – alternate

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          9

12        Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipātiki Local Board, Wednesday 8 July 2015                                                                                                                                       11

13        Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Bi-Monthly Report                                       25

14        Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in July 2015 for the Kaipātiki Local Board                                                                                                                                       37

15        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards                                         49

16        Approval of Revised Parks Work Programme 2015/16                                           55

17        Quarterly Performance Report for the period ended 30 June 2015                      63

18        Annual Report 2014/15                                                                                                65

19        Allocation of discretionary capital budget to local boards                                    69

20        Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated Licence to Occupy and Manage                                                                                                                                       77

21        Te Onewa Pa Heritage Site                                                                                         81

22        Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act (ARAFA) Funding Model Review - Local Board Input                                                                                                                   83

23        Future Urban Land Supply Strategy                                                                         93

24        Members' Reports                                                                                                       99

25        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                         109

26        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops - Wednesday, 15 July 2015 and Wednesday,22 July 2015 2015                                                                                  111

27        Record of Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in July 2015              117  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1                                               Welcome

1          Welcome

 

 

2                                               Apologies

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3                                               Declaration of Interest

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

                     i)        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

                    ii)        A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4                                               Confirmation of Minutes

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 8 July 2015, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5                                               Leave of Absence

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6                                               Acknowledgements

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7                                               Petitions


7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8                                               Deputations

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9                                               Public Forum

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10                                              Extraordinary Business

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11                                              Notices of Motion

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

12                                              Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 8 July 2015

Open Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipātiki Local Board, Wednesday 8 July 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15036

 

  

Purpose

The open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipātiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday, 8 July 2015 are attached at item 12 of the Agenda for the information of the board only.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Kaipātiki Local Board meeting held on Wednesday 8 July 2015 are attached at Item 12 of the agenda for the information of the board only, and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipātiki Local Board, Wednesday 8 July 2015

11

      

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Unconfirmed Meeting Minutes Kaipatiki Local Board, Wednesday 8 July 2015

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

13                                              Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust Bi-Monthly Report

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Bi-Monthly Report

 

File No.: CP2015/15081

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to update members on the schedule of work achieved and completed, aligned to Schedule 1 of the Kaipātiki Local Board contract delivery partnership.

Executive Summary

2.       The attached report provides members with an oversight of Kaipātiki Local Board and Auckland Council’s shared community development partnership with the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust for June/July 2015. The Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust leads and supports collaborative responses to improve community wellbeing in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust bi-monthly report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust June/July 2015 report

25

     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust June/July 2015 report

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

14                                              Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in July 2015 for the Kaipatiki Local Board

Auckland Transport Update on Issues Raised in July 2015 for the Kaipātiki Local Board

 

File No.: CP2015/14934

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on transport related issues raised by local board members during July 2015. It also includes general information about matters of interest to the Kaipātiki Local Board and Attachment A the Schedule of Issues raised in July 2015.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      that the Auckland Transport July 2015 Issues Update to the Kaipātiki Local Board be received.

 

 

Auckland Transport News

The Introduction of Double-Deck Buses

2.       Auckland Transport has an urgent requirement to address capacity constraints on several bus routes. The central corridors, Northern Express and services from Botany to the Central Business District (CBD) are experiencing growth rates of 10%, 6.5% and 7% respectively, with peak seated capacity utilisation from 80% to 95%. Strategically, the Auckland Plan looks to double public transport trips to 140 million by 2022.

3.       There is a need to address capacity constraints and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the bus New Network corridors without increasing bus volumes.

4.       The use of double decker buses is the first step in the progressive strategy for increasing capacity on high demand routes and is aligned to delivering improved customer experience, reducing congestion and increasing patronage. Customer growth is expected to be in the region of 20%-30% over the first four years of introduction.

5.       Double decker buses are due to start on the Botany route (city centre to Botany via Newmarket) in October 2015. Mt Eden, Waiheke and Northern Express routes are due to commence in early 2016, with further routes to follow progressively. Over the next ten years, it is planned that up to 13 key routes may be converted to double deck bus operation.

6.       Historically trees have not been proactively managed on sections of these routes. Double-deckers cannot run safely on the route with hazards above the ground. Tree work is required to mitigate this risk and manage the safe carriage of passengers.

7.       Where trees do intrude into the road corridor, Auckland Transport will seek to avoid their removal unless that is a last resort. Minor pruning or maintenance will in some situations be the only requirement, but where major tree surgery, tree removal or mitigation planting is required, there will be consultation. In some cases, the need for removing trees may be able to be avoided by altering kerb lines and other similar measures.

8.       Aside from trees, other obstacles that are being carefully checked are shop verandas, utility service poles and cables. As a result of this process, alterations to verandas, or the relocation of poles and cables may be required.

9.       Local boards that have routes where it is planned to operate double deck bus services will be individually briefed about the specific measures necessary within their local board areas to accommodate them. Depending on the scale and severity of the measures required, a local board may be offered either a workshop or a briefing for the Transport Portfolio leads.

Cycling

10.     Nelson Street – The construction of a segregated two-way cycle lane on the western side of Nelson Street, from Union Street to Victoria Street is expected to start in July. The work will align with a section being constructed by the NZTA that makes use of an old motorway ramp (see image below).

11.     The project will extend connectivity of cycling in the central area of Auckland by creating a dedicated and well-defined route running north and south on the western side of the CBD and will complement the Grafton Gully Cycle Route on the eastern side of the CBD.

12.     The project will change the use of the existing traffic lane on the western side of Nelson Street between Union and Cook Street to a segregated two way cycle facility. Between Cook Street and Victoria Street, the removal of some off-peak bus and car parking will be necessary.

Nelson Street Cycle Bridge

 

13.     Work is under way to investigate the continuation of the route to Quay Street.

14.     Carlton Gore Road – Construction is underway of the Carlton Gore Road cycle lane, including safety improvements at the George Street intersection. The majority of the works will be complete by the end of the month.

New funding a major boost for urban cycling in Auckland

15.     Cycling in Auckland will be safer, easier and more enjoyable following an announcement of the projects to be included in central government’s Urban Cycleways Programme.

16.     The $24.75 million for cycling in Auckland confirmed by the Transport Minister, Hon. Simon Bridges, takes Urban Cycleway Programme (UCP) funding in Auckland to $90 million. The UCP comprises of funding from the government’s Urban Cycle Fund, the National Land Transport Fund and local share funding.

17.     The programme, which will be jointly delivered by Auckland Council, the NZ Transport Agency and Auckland Transport, will be used to accelerate key projects over the next three years and help establish cycling as an integral part of Auckland’s transport network in line with the long-term vision set out in the Auckland Plan.

18.     The announcement takes the total investment in cycling across Auckland for the next three years to approximately $200 million, and is a positive step towards the strategic long-term vision for cycling in Auckland.

19.     Government funding enables Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and the NZ Transport Agency to jointly speed up the delivery of a world-class cycle network for the city.

20.     The funding is part of the Urban Cycleways Programme that will see $296 million invested in 41 projects across the country.

21.     The significant increase in investment will help ease Auckland’s congestion and make cycling a safer and more attractive transport option - a key new priority for the NZ Transport Agency.

22.     With a 20% increase in cycle journeys over the past five years, more Aucklanders are choosing to cycle than ever before. This programme will help grow the number of people cycling in Auckland by creating a city where people can feel safe riding a bike.

23.     The focus for the next three years will be improving cycling facilities in the city and to the city, along east and west corridors. Auckland Transport will also improve cycling access to key public transport hubs in Glen Innes and New Lynn (see below).

24.     The objective is to get as many people as possible cycling for the money available, which is why the emphasis is on these projects. Auckland Transport is also planning on-going education and promotional programmes to support this new infrastructure.

Auckland’s Urban Cycleway Programme

25.     The City Centre Network of separated cycleways and intersection treatments is expected to increase the number of journeys per day to more than 8,500. The total estimated cost is $20.33 million, made up of an estimated $7 million local share, an estimated $7 million National Land Transport Fund share and a $6.33 million share from the Urban Cycleways Fund.

26.     An additional 10.8 km of cycling routes is proposed to provide eastern connections to the city centre. The total estimated project cost is $39.03 million, made up of estimated equal shares of $13.01 million from local sources, the National Land Transport Fund and the Urban Cycleways Fund.

27.     A safer and more direct route to the city centre will be provided for residents from the western suburbs, including improved links to the North Western cycleway and connections with the Waterview shared path. The total estimated cost is $11.37 million, made up of around $4.57 million each from local sources and the National Land Transport Fund, as well as $2.23 million from the Urban Cycleways Fund.

28.     Improved cycling links will be made to the New Lynn and Glen Innes public transport interchanges. The total cost is $18 million, made up of an estimated $7.41 million each of local and National Land Transport Fund shares and $3.18 million from the Urban Cycleways Fund.

Wider Investment in Cycling for the Auckland Region

29.     In addition to the Urban Cycleways Programme there are a number of other cycling projects funded through various funding channels that takes the overall investment in cycling across Auckland for the next three years to an estimated $200 million.

30.     The Urban Cycleways Programme is designed to take full advantage of all available funding sources, including the National Land Transport Fund and local government, to enable high-quality projects to get underway much sooner than may otherwise have been the case.

31.       The NZ Transport Agency anticipates the total investment in cycling in New Zealand over the next three years will be around $380 million to $400 million, delivering more than 250 km of new urban cycleways and greater network connectivity.

Auckland’s trains going all-electric

32.     Auckland’s rail network became all-electric on Monday 20 July. With new trains operating all services on the electrified network from Papakura in the south to Swanson in the west.

33.     With the increased number of services now operating on the network, schedules are very tight and work is continuing to make sure trains meet their spot into the busy Newmarket and Britomart stations. Customers will see an improvement in punctuality as drivers become more familiar with the new trains.

34.     From 20 July buses will shuttle passengers between Swanson and the former Waitakere station.

35.     On the Southern Line the electric trains end at Papakura and there will be a shuttle service using diesel trains to and from Pukekohe.

36.     The last of Auckland’s 57 electric trains are currently being shipped from Spain and the full fleet will be in service by the end of the year.

37.     The new trains have been very popular. By the time the new timetable comes into effect, Aucklanders will have taken more than 14 million trips across the Auckland rail network in the past year which represents a 21% increase.

38.     The modern new trains mean extra capacity as well as improved comfort.  At peak times 6 car trains provide even more room.

39.     The trains have wider doors making it easier for passengers. See AT’s video showing the features of the new trains at www.at.govt.nz/electrictrains

40.     Auckland’s new electric trains are much quieter than the old diesel trains and they accelerate faster, which means vehicles be extra cautious when using railway crossings.

Update from the New Network Consultation Team

41.     Consultation has officially closed on the North Shore New Network, with submissions received from the Kaipātiki, Devonport-Takapuna, and Hibiscus and Bays Local Boards.

42.     Activities during the consultation included:

·        Public events at Sunnynook and Smales Farm busway stations, Upper Harbour Local Board office/library and Albany busway station, Milford shops, Greenhithe Village Hall, Sunnynook Community centre, shops and busway station, and Torbay Shops.  In total AT engaged with over 700 people.

·        Engagement with the following groups: Shanshan Multicultural group in Sunnynook, Birkenhead College, North Shore and Auckland City hospitals, Mayfair, Highgrove, and Knightsbridge retirement villages, and residents from Sunrise Ave, Mairangi Bay. (Over 260 people)

·        Ambassadors handing out brochures at various locations across the city and North Shore. (1641 brochures handed out)

·        Adshel posters in bus shelters plus posters at 300 key bus stops across the North Shore

·        Adverts in the following papers: NZ Herald, North Shore Times, Auckland City Harbour News, Rodney Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, NZ Times Korean and Goodday NZ.

·        Online advertising – You Tube, TV On Demand, Google etc. (To date approx. 238,202 views of the two promotional videos, 748 views of 3 FAQ videos)

43.     Feedback received:

·        Estimated 2662 pieces of feedback (not including late feedback forms through the post). Auckland Transport is pleased with the number of submissions received, as it is more than double the number of submissions received from any of the previous consultations.

44.     Auckland Transport’s new Network Team will now begin analysis of the feedback and investigate changes to the proposed network to respond to the issues identified.

Mokoia Road Maintenance

45.     Major maintenance work is due to commence on the next section of Mokoia Road between Willow Ave and Roseberry Ave. Subject to weather conditions, the work will be carried out from 27 July 2015 through to 30 October 2015.

46.     Some work will also be required to be done at night. This is expected to be limited to one week towards the end of the project.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

47.     This report is for the Kaipātiki Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

48.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

General

49.     The activities detailed in this report do not trigger the Significance Policy, all programmes and activities are within budget/in line with the council’s Annual Plan and LTP documents and there are no legal or legislative implications arising from the activities detailed in this report.

Implementation

50.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Kaipātiki issues raised by members during July 2015

41

     

Signatories

Authors

Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Kaipatiki issues raised by members during July 2015

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

15                                              Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

 

File No.: CP2015/15083

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport (AT) in the three months April – June 2015 and planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the next three months.

Executive Summary

2.       This report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport (AT) in the three months April – June 2015 and planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the next three months, the detail of which is contained within Attachments A to E in this report.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Quarterly update.

 

 

Comments

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Strategy and Planning

Corridor Management Plans (CMPs)

3.       Seven new CMP studies and one CMP review were completed this quarter. These are (1) Gillies Avenue CMP, (2) Henderson Metropolitan Centre Transport Study, (3) Glenfield Road-Birkenhead Avenue CMP, (4) Remuera Road-St Johns Road CMP, (5) Parnell Road-Parnell Rise CMP, (6) Hillsborough Road-Kinross Street CMP, (7) Rosebank Road-Patiki Road CMP and (8) Great South Road Stage 1 (Manukau to Drury) CMP Review.

AT Parking Strategy 2015

4.       The Strategy was approved in April and successfully launched at the end of May.

RPTP Variation

5.       Public consultation and hearing deliberations on the Regional Public Transport Plan(RPTP) were completed this quarter.

Investment and Development

SMART (Southwest Multi-modal Airport Rapid Transit)

6.       Investigation to identify the best public transport mode (heavy or light rail) to support the employment and passenger growth at the Airport.  It also includes the identification of a preferred corridor for protection.  Construction has started on the Kirkbride interchange which includes widening for SMART.

 


PT Development

Otahuhu Bus Rail Interchange

7.       Detailed design is complete and NZTA funding has been approved for construction.  The Signal Box was removed and the overhead live line lowered over Queens Birthday weekend.  Enabling works are on schedule, with the main works tender deferred until all funding is approved (now approved) and planned for July release. It is expected that main works will begin in October 2015 and be completed in early June 2016.

Half Moon Bay New Ferry Facility

8.       This project includes the design and development of a new passenger ferry facility at Half Moon Bay, including integration with Public Transport, and accessibility and passenger amenity improvements. A site inspection of the pontoon and gangway units was completed in early July prior to placing these units into storage in readiness for the Stage 2 physical works completion.  The wharf design is progressing with the submission of the building consent to Auckland Council expected in July/August 2015.

City Rail Link

9.       Enabling Works Package: Phase 1 ECI design service contracts 1 and 2 have been awarded.  Construction is to commence November 2015 with services relocation.

10.     Main Works: Construction to start in 2018/19, subject to a funding agreement with Government.

EMU Procurement

11.     54 units have been provisionally accepted and the final three are in transit and due in Auckland in early August.  Peak period EMU services began on 8 June from Papakura, and on 20 July the network became fully electric with Papakura and Swanson to Britomart service introduction.

PT Operations

Public Transport overall

12.     For the 12 months to the end of June, patronage was 79.25 million trips which is up 9.5% on the 2014 result.  This is an increase of almost 7 million trips over the course of a year and, given the strong weekday growth, likely represents around an extra 30,000 trips being taken each working day.  The changes for individual modes were:

·        Bus (excluding Northern Express) – 57 million trips, up 6.6%;

·        Northern Express – 2.8 million trips, up 17.2%;

·        Rail – 13.9 million trips, up 21.7%; and

·        Ferry – 5.5 million trips, up 8.3%.

Rail Improvements

13.     The big performer was rail which reached 13.9 million passenger trips for the year, representing an annual increase of 21.7%. The growth is put down to the enhanced travel experience and additional capacity provided by the new electric trains and greater service frequency introduced over recent years.

14.     The AT network became fully electric on 20 July, except for the link between Papakura and Pukekohe which will continue to use diesel trains. These will be refurbished over time to provide an enhanced experience.  The electric trains will provide improved travel experience and more capacity on all lines.

Bus and Ferry Improvements

15.     June was also a record-breaking month on the Northern Express, with patronage up 17% on the same month last year. The 12 month total patronage reached 2.8 million.  It was also a record for other bus services as patronage rose 6.6% to 57 million trips.  Ferry numbers for the year totalled 5.5 million trips, up 8.3% on the previous year.

16.     Growth on bus services is attributed to increased services and frequency, improving travel times from new bus priority lanes and a significant improvement in service punctuality being achieved by bus operators through new timetables. Further service level increases and punctuality improvements are planned for later this year along with the introduction of double decker buses on a number of routes.  New network routes will also be introduced from later this year.

Road Design and Development

Te Atatu Road Improvements

17.     Road Corridor Improvement project on Te Atatu Rd from School Road/Edmonton Road intersection to SH16.  The evaluation of the construction tenders is now completed, with the award of the contract being imminent.  Construction is targeted to start in August 2015 with completion expected around February 2017. A public open day will be arranged prior to the starting of physical works.

Albany Highway

18.     The Albany Highway North Upgrade project involves widening of Albany Highway between Schnapper Rock Road and the Albany Expressway.  Construction is approximately 40% complete.  Disruption to land owners and road users due to construction is being well managed, with any issues being quickly resolved. The Rosedale Road intersection signalisation has been brought forward to July to assist with traffic management and pedestrian safety.

Lincoln Road Improvements

19.     The project involves widening Lincoln Road between Te Pai Place and the motorway interchange to accommodate additional transit/bus lanes on both sides.  Stakeholder feedback has been received for the 2-D layout plan, and the NZTA funding application for the detailed design is progressing. The designation process is expected to start in late November 2015.

Mill Road Improvements

20.     The Redoubt Road - Mill Road corridor project will provide an arterial road connection east of State Highway 1 between Manukau, Papakura and Drury and includes Murphys Road improvements from Redoubt Road to Flatbush School Road.  Submissions to the notice of requirement (NOR) have closed and AT is now preparing evidence for the formal hearing due at the end of August.

Services

Road Safety Highlights

21.     Over 4,000 young people and their parents have participated in the Crossroads young driver programme.

22.     The Oi! Mind on the road, not on the phone driver distraction campaign in May targeted 20-29yr old drivers.

23.     The Love Being a Local road safety campaign enabled rural communities to take a lead role in raising awareness of local speed issues. 

Schools Travelwise Programme Highlights

24.     The United Nations Global Road Safety Week took place from 4 to 10 May.  146 teachers registered for Road Safety Week information and resources and 27 schools entered the competition. 

25.     On 25 June 2015, 400 volunteers attended the Walking School Bus (WSB) megastars event to recognize the efforts of WSB volunteers. 

26.     Recently completed research has found that crash rates involving children walking and cycling at schools with Safe School Travel Plans (SSTPs) and Active School Signage were significantly reduced by 37% after the implementation of these measures.

Road Safety Education in Schools: (2014/15 Year)

·        79 new Walking School Buses were established, bringing the regional total to 369 and exceeding the target of 347.

·        23 schools and 1,683 students received cycle training against a target of 1500.

·        4 new schools joined the Travelwise programme, creating a total of 408 schools.

·        2 regional ‘Slow Down Around Schools’ campaigns were delivered.

·        536 students and 77 teachers attended Travelwise Primary and Secondary school workshops.

·        4 high risk schools received rail fare evasion prevention campaigns.

Road Safety Promotion and Training: (2014/15 Year)

27.     A number of local campaigns were delivered including: 5,275 drivers through local Drink/Drive operations with NZ Police.

28.     The #Drunksense radio advertisement  won the Outstanding Radio Creativity Award and Driver Distractions won the Social and Community Platinum Award.

Travel Demand (2014/15 Year)

29.     The ‘Commute’ programme promotes behavioural change to reduce the reliance on and impact of Single Occupancy Vehicle (SOV) trips. Focused on the morning peak period of congestion, the programme works with businesses to support public transport, carpooling and active modes of getting to work. Seventeen new organisations joined the ‘Commute’ programme, and 23 organisations progressed or launched their travel plan activities.

2014/15 Performance Outcomes

School Travel Trips Avoided

30.     The 2015 Community and Road Safety Team target of 16,700 morning car trips avoided through school travel planning activities was exceeded with 17,164 trips avoided.

31.     The total number of deaths and serious injuries (DSI) on Auckland local roads in the 2014 calendar year was 398, representing a 7.4% reduction from 2013. For the 2014 calendar year, the Auckland region had the lowest rate of road deaths and serious injuries (DSI) per capita in New Zealand – 31 DSI per 100,000 population. 

Road Corridor Delivery

32.     The Asset and Maintenance Group is tasked with the responsibility for a wide range of activities within the road corridor. These include but are not limited to:

·        the delivery of roading and streetlight maintenance and renewal programmes;

·        managing the access, co-ordination and traffic management impacts of activities taking place within the road corridor;

·        promoting design innovation and efficiency around how work is carried out on the network; and

·        the development of long term asset management plans and modelling which support the decision making process around the management of AT’s roading assets.

April – June quarter key highlights

33.     The Road Corridor Delivery Team have a year to date target (YTD) to deliver 581km of resurfacing (asphalt or chipseals), pavement renewals and footpath renewals. As outlined in figure 1, for 2014/2015 the group delivered 568km, or 98% of the planned programme.

 


Figure 1:  Actual vs planned lengths (km) for June YTD

 

YTD Planned Targets (KM)

Actuals (KM)

%

Resurfacing

427.4

418.9

Pavement Renewals

37.4

40

Footpath Renewals

116.7

110

Total

581.5

568.9

98%

 

34.     The new streetlighting contracts have been awarded to Downer (for central and southern areas) and Electrix (for north and west areas).  The four new contracts align with the road maintenance contracts and replace the nine legacy contracts which have been in place until now.  The new contracts are for a four year term with an additional 1+1 year right of renewal at AT’s discretion.

35.     AT’s second asset management plan (AMP) covering the period 2015-2018 will be published in August 2015.  This document details the strategies and management systems deployed by AT and sets out the future renewals and maintenance investment required to continue building the assets, infrastructure and delivery systems of a world-leading, transformational, sustainable and affordable urban transport service.  The AMP also addresses the shortfalls that will begin to accrue if current budget levels continue over the medium to long term.  Electronic copies will be available for download on the AT website and a hard copy will be sent to each local board.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

36.     This report is for the Kaipātiki Local Board’s information.

Māori impact statement

37.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

Implementation

38.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Schedule of activities undertaken for the fourth quarter (2014/15) ending 30 June 2015  (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Travelwise Schools activities broken down by local board (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Traffic Control Committee Decisions broken down by local board (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Local Board Advocacy Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

16                                              Approval of Revised Parks Work Programme 2015/16

Approval of Revised Parks Work Programme 2015/16

 

File No.: CP2015/14054

 

  

Purpose

1.       To obtain approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board for the 2015/16 revised Parks work programme.   

Executive Summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board deferred the approval of the Parks work programme as presented on 8 July 2015, pending discussions of the programme at a workshop.

3.       This report presents the revised work programme for the 2015/16 financial year (Attachment A) following discussions at the workshop on 22 July 2015.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the revised 2015/16 Parks work programme outlined in Attachment A.

 

Comments

4.       On 8 July 2015 the Kaipātiki Local Board deferred the approval of the Parks work programme pending further discussions of the programme at a workshop.

5.       This report presents the revised work programme for the 2015/16 financial year following discussions at a workshop on 22 July 2015 (Attachment A). Any amendments to the programme are highlighted in orange.

6.       The programme is split into three budget areas:

·    Parks development programme;

·    Parks renewal programme; and

·    Locally driven initiative (LDI) funding – Parks, sport and recreation.

7.       For each of the budget areas it outlines anticipated costs for identified projects and available budget from the 2015/16 to the 2017/18 financial years, excluding the 5 % contribution to the newly established Central Risk Fund.

8.       Cost estimates are broad and will be refined as projects progress in the project life cycle from business case to physical work.

9.       The revised programme is currently anticipated to be delivered under budget. However, it should be noted that cost estimates for four of the renewals projects are yet to be included in the programme.

Parks Development Programme

10.     The Parks work programme includes development projects for the ongoing implementation of on the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan, and projects which qualify for Foundation Infrastructure funding.

11.     This section of the work programme has been revised following the confirmation from council’s stormwater unit that no further funding is required from the Parks department for the de-silting of the Onepoto Domain ponds.

12.     The foundation infrastructure budget now includes the development of new car parks at 136 Birkdale Road and work previously proposed to upgrade Tamahere Reserve and its extension.

13.     An update on the progress of the Kaipātiki Connections Plan and proposed works for the coming financial years will be presented to the local board at a workshop in late August.

Parks Asset Renewals

14.     The renewals work programme as outlined in Attachment A is based on the following principles:

·    assets in poor and very poor condition, and short remaining life, are given priority;

·    assets with higher associated risk e.g bridges, are given priority; and

·    consideration of use.

15.     It has to be acknowledged that the condition of park assets is dynamic and subject to factors beyond control (weather events, vandalism, theft etc). Flexibility is needed to address unforeseen and urgent renewals, in particular where they pose a health and safety risk.

16.     Should renewal priorities change from those identified and approved by the local board, updates will be brought to the local board throughout the year via the parks portfolio holders.

Locally Driven Initiative Funding

17.     A major component of the LDI funding is the ongoing support for the work of the parks volunteer groups.

18.     A series of workshops was held with the local board in May and June 2015 to discuss options for LDI funding and the impact of the proposed services level changes to parks maintenance.

19.     As a result of this the local board agreed to fund the retention of the current level of service for mechanical edging of passive turf areas from its LDI funding and the establishment of a parks response fund.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

20.     This report seeks approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board for the proposed Parks work programme for 2015/16.

Māori impact statement

21.     Parks and open spaces contribute to Maori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the work programme are anticipated to have an impact on tangata whenua or mataawaka appropriate engagement and involvement in decision making will be undertaken.

Implementation

22.     There are no known implementation issues for the parks work programme 2015/16.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local and Sports Park North revised work programme 2015/16

57

     

Signatories

Authors

Nicki Malone - Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Bowater - Manager Local and Sports Parks

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Local and Sports Park North revised work programme 2015/16

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

17                                              Quarterly Performance Report for the period ended 30 June 2015

Quarterly Performance Report for the period ended 30 June 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/14209

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update Kaipātiki Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015, as set out in the local board agreement.

Executive Summary

2.       A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June. 

3.       Auckland Council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) also present regular performance reports to the local boards

4.       To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report, department report and CCO report

5.       The attached omnibus consolidation contains the following reports this quarter

·             Local Community Development, Arts and Culture (CDAC) activity overview;

·             Local Libraries overview;

·             Local Sports Parks and Recreation overview;

·             Local Infrastructure and Environmental Services (IES) overview;

·             Local board financial performance report;

·             Treasury update; and

·             ATEED update.

6.       The full report is attached.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      notes the Performance Report for the period ended 30 June 2015.

b)      notes the attached co developed Local Board Engagement Activity Plan appended to this report, which provides a framework to guide engagement between Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

 

 

Comments

7.       The performance report is for information only. No actions are required.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

8.       This report informs the Kaipātiki Local Board of the performance to date for the period ending 30 June 2015.

Māori impact statement

9.       Māori as stakeholders in the council are affected and have an interest in any report on financial results. However, this report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Māori.

Implementation

10.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quarterly Performance Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

ATEED Six Monthly Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

ATEED Local Board Engagement Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Pramod Nair - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

18                                              Annual Report 2014/15

Annual Report 2014/15

 

File No.: CP2015/15006

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report compares the actual activities and performance with the intended activities and level of service as set out in the Kaipātiki Local Board Agreement for 2014/15. The information is prepared as part of the Kaipātiki Local Board’s accountability to the community for decisions made throughout the year.

Executive Summary

2.       Local boards are required to monitor and report on the implementation of their local board agreements for 2014/15. The requirements for monitoring and reporting are set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. These requirements include providing comment on actual local activities against the intended level of service and for these comments to be included in the Auckland Council Annual Report.

3.       The attached report is proposed for approval by the Kaipātiki Local Board.

4.       The Auckland Council Annual Report will be audited and then reported to the Governing Body for adoption on 24 September 2015.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      notes the monitoring and reporting requirements as set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the local board information proposed for the Auckland Council Annual Report 2014/15.

b)      approves:

i.      the message from the Chairperson, which provides comment from the Kaipātiki Local Board on local board matters in the 2014/15 annual report.

ii.     the list of achievements and capital projects that form part of the local board information for the Auckland Council Annual Report 2014/15.

c)      delegates authority to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson to make typographical changes before submitting for final publication.

 

 

Comments

1.       Local board are required to monitor and report on the implementation of their local board agreements for 2014/15. The requirements for monitoring and reporting are set out in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, as follows:

Section 23 Monitoring and reporting

(1)     Each local board must monitor the implementation of the local board agreement for its local board area.


 

(2)     Each annual report of the Auckland Council must include, in respect of local activities for each local board area, an audited statement that –

i)       compares the level of service achieved in relation to the activities with the performance target or targets for the activities (as stated in the local board agreement for that year); and

ii)      specifies whether any intended changes to the level of service have been achieved; and

iii)     gives reasons for any significant variation between the level of service achieved and the intended level of service.

2.       Each local board must comment on the matters included in the Annual Report under subsection (2) in respect of its local board area and the council must include those comments in the annual report.

3.       This report focusses on the formal reporting referred to in Section 23 above. Attachment A provides the draft local board information for inclusion into the Annual Report 2014/15. The draft report contains the following sections:

·        message from the Chairperson;

·        key achievements;

·        financial results; and

·        performance measures.

4.       Local board comments on local board matters in the Annual Report will be included as part of the message from the Chairperson.

5.       The next steps for the Annual Report are:

·          audit during August 2015;

·          report to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17th September;

·          report to the Governing Body for adoption on 24th September;

·          full New Zealand Stock Exchange disclosure on 30th September; and

·          publication on 23 October.

5.       Copies of the Annual Report will be made available for public inspection at all local board offices.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

6.       Local board comments on local board matters are included in the Annual Report as part of the message from the Chairperson.

Māori impact statement

7.       The Annual Report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Annual Plan over a 12 month period. This includes engagement with Maori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Maori.

Implementation

8.       There are no implementation issues identified in this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Annual Report 2014/15 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Pramod Nair - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

19                                              Allocation of discretionary capital budget to local boards

Allocation of discretionary capital budget to local boards

 

File No.: CP2015/15029

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks direction from local boards on the proposed discretionary fund for local board capital expenditure (capex fund) regarding the:

·    model for allocating the fund; and

·    criteria for the fund.

Executive Summary

2.       The governing body has created a discretionary fund for capital expenditure for local boards. Local boards have been requested to work with staff to develop a formula for allocation and criteria for qualifying projects.

3.       The capex fund enables local boards to deliver small local asset based projects, either directly, in partnership with the community, or through joint agreements between boards.

4.       The capex fund will be managed over three years. Local boards can use their entire three year allocation for one project or spread it over the three years for smaller projects.

5.       Local boards provided views on how funding should be allocated generally during the review of the Local Boards Funding Policy (LBFP) in 2014. The resulting funding formula for locally driven initiatives (LDI) allocates 90 per cent based on population, 5 per cent on deprivation and 5 per cent on land area. The same allocation formula can be used for the capex fund to maintain consistency in the policy. Staff note, however, that the link between costs and land area is weak and leads to major shifts in the allocation of funding.

6.       A formula based approach provides limited funding for the Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards. Local boards should consider what level of funding over three years is appropriate for these boards. Staff recommend setting funding at one per cent of the fund for Great Barrier and two per cent for Waiheke.

7.       Using the capex fund is preferable to LDI funding as the governing body funds the consequential opex associated with capital develoment. Boards should consider whether they need to continue to use LDI funding for minor (less than $1 million) capital projects.  Boards should also consider whether they need to be able to bring forward regionally funded projects using the capex fund.

8.                                              The proposal to allocate a capex fund to local boards will require an amendment to the LBFP. This will amend the Long-term Plan (LTP) and requires the use of the special Recommendation

consultative procedure.

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the allocation of capital expenditure (capex) funding to local boards.

 

 

Comments

Background

9.       The governing body has created a discretionary fund for capital expenditure for local boards. On May 7 the Budget Committee passed the following resolution:

That the Budget Committee:

a)      provide a new local board discretionary capex fund of $10 million per annum noting that this will incorporate the existing Facilities Partnership Fund.

b)      approve the following parameters for this fund:

i.   The fund may be managed as a three year amount

ii.  local boards may use the fund to build council owned assets, add to an existing council funded renewal or new capital project, work in partnership with an external provider or seed fund a community project.

10.     The Budget Committee requested that staff and local boards develop a formula for allocation and criteria for qualifying projects to report to the Finance and Performance Committee.

Purpose of the capex fund

11.     The purpose of the fund is to ensure locally important projects are given appropriate priority. It is envisaged that the fund will be used for projects similar to those historically funded by local improvement projects (LIPs) or small local improvement projects (SLIPs) budgets.

Funding Allocation Model

 

Principles for funding allocations

12.     The core principles for allocating funding to local boards are an:

·        equitable capacity for each local board to enhance well-being;

·        administrative effectiveness; and

·        transparency.

Attributes for funding allocation

13.     The Local Boards Funding Policy (LBFP) makes allocations on the following basis:

·        90 per cent based on local board population size;

·        5 per cent based on the relative level of deprivation of the board;

·        5 per cent based on the land area of the board; and

·        Waiheke and Great Barrier are funded for a fixed amount set by the governing body.

14.     The following table shows the level of local board support for the use of the above factors for allocating LDI recorded during the review of the LBFP.

Local Board Attribute

Local Boards that supported use during last review of LBFP

Relationship to need for funding

Staff Comments

Population

21

Strong

Strongly relates to demand for services

Deprivation

17

Weak

Little objective evidence for relationship to demand for services 

Geography

16

Weak

High distortion effect on allocation that does not relate to need for services

 

15.     A key decision for the allocation of the capex fund will be to determine the appropriate level of capital funding for Great Barrier and Waiheke. The discussion document considers the two current allocation models used to fund these boards:

·        LDI allocation: Great Barrier and Waiheke receive the same proportion of the capex fund as they currently receive of the total funding pool for locally driven initiatives (this is 2.3% of the total pool for  Great Barrier and 2.7% for Waiheke); and

·        Transport model: Great Barrier receives 1 per cent and Waiheke 2 per cent of the total funding pool.

16.     Five models have been considered for allocating the capex fund between all boards based on the population, deprivation and land area attributes of the boards:

·        Model A: All boards funded based on 100% population;

·        Model B: All boards funded based on 95% population and 5% deprivation;

·        Model C: All boards funded based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area;

·        Model D: Great Barrier receives 2.3% and Waiheke receives 2.7% of total funds, remaining funds allocated to all other boards based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area; and

·        Model E:  Great Barrier receives 1% and Waiheke receives 2% of total funds, remaining funds allocated to all other boards based on 90% population, 5% deprivation and 5% land area.

17.     The following pages present these five models in table and chart form.

18.     Other potential funding attributes that have not been included in the modelling are:

·        rates paid: there is no relationship with need for services, and support was low for this attribute during the last review, with six boards in favour;

·        current levels of capital expenditure: data on regional activities is unavailable at local level. Levels of expenditure on local assets are not relevant to the purpose of the capex fund. Gaps in the provision of assets will be met through the relevant network facilities plan; and

·        population growth: growth will be addressed every three years through the proposed allocation formula.

 

 

 

 

 

19.     The charts show the following:

·        using land area as an allocation factor significantly increases funding to Rodney and Franklin Local Boards;

·        Great Barrier receives less than $7,000 under a population based allocation. This rises to $77,000 under the allocation formula that includes deprivation and land area; and

·        providing Great Barrier and Waiheke with fixed allocations under the LDI allocation and Transport models only has a small impact on the other 19 boards.

20.     In determining the appropriate funding levels for Great Barrier and Waiheke  consideration should be given both to the total value of the funding over three years, and the typical costs of activities likely to undertaken by these boards. The following table shows the level of funding these boards would receive over three years in comparison to the next smallest board, Papakura:

Allocation formula model

Three year capex funding allocation for

Great Barrier

Waiheke

Papakura

Board Population size

900

8,400

45,000

A: 100% population

$20,000

$180,000

$970,000

B: 95% population + 5% deprivation

$130,000

$260,000

$1,000,000

C: 90% population + 5% deprivation + 5% land area

$230,000

$290,000

$970,000

D: GBI: 2.3% Waiheke 2.7% (Current LDI allocation)

$690,000

$820,000

$940,000

E: GBI: 1% Waiheke 2% of total fund

$300,000

$600,000

$960,000

 

21.     The average cost for SLIPs projects in the last financial year was $31,000 for Great Barrier and $27,000 for Waiheke.  Under Model E, Waiheke would receive two per cent of the fund, and be able to deliver 20 average cost projects over three years. Great Barrier would receive one per cent of the fund and be able to deliver 10 average cost projects over the same period.  Those boards can, of course, accumulate funds over the three year period to undertake larger projects.

22.     Staff consider there is a strong case for using the same formula for LDI and the capex fund to maintain consistency in the allocation.  However, there is also a case for excluding land area given its impact on the distribution of funding.

23.     Staff consider that allocating Great Barrier and Waiheke the same proportion of funding as they receive from the LDI opex fund would over fund these boards compared to other board areas. Staff recommend an allocation of one per cent of the total fund to Great Barrier, and two per cent to Waiheke would be appropriate.

Decision making process for capex projects

24.     The chart on the following page provides an overview of decision making pathways for each type of project.

25.     Staff will work with local boards to develop guidelines for facilities partnerships (including feasibility studies) and community-led projects.

Bringing future capex allocation forward

26.     The governing body has proposed that the fund be managed over a three year period, aligned with the Long-term Plan (LTP) planning cycle.  Local boards can use their entire three year allocation for one project or spread it over the three years for smaller projects. This provides boards with greater choice in the size and timing of projects they undertake.

 

 

 

27.     As a practical consideration, it is unlikely that all 21 local boards would be in a position to bring forward their three years of funding to 2015/16.  However, in the event that this was to happen, the projects would need to be assessed against the modified “gateway” process to ensure they were able to be delivered.

28.     Budget for the local board capex fund is included in the Long-term Plan. Local boards’ can only bring three years budgets forward, however, so future decision making is unencumbered.

Role of LDI funding

29.     The table below sets out how the capex fund and LDI funding could be used for different types of projects.

Funding Type

Project Type

Capex Fund

LDI Opex fund

Capex

Minor Asset based projects (less than $1M)

ü

GB funds consequential opex

?

LBs fund

consequential opex (feedback sought)

Top-up of  regional projects and renewals

ü

?

Major Asset based projects (greater than $1M)

ü

GB approval required. GB funds consequential opex.

û

Must use Capex fund for large projects

Opex

Capital grants to community groups

ü

Debt funded opex. Must be included in annual plan

ü

Standard opex expenditure

Feasibility Studies

ü

ü

 

30.     Local boards are currently able to fund capital projects using their LDI budget by funding the consequential opex. The capex fund largely does away with the need for this, and the Mayor’s report proposed the removal of the ability to fund major new facilities with opex funded by their LDI funding. This raises the question of whether local boards still need the ability to use LDI funding to fund minor capital projects. The table sets out the key differences between the capex fund and LDI funding for capital projects.

Capex fund

LDI opex fund

GB funds consequential opex

LB funds consequential opex

Easier for GB to control and plan for debt (set amount available for three years)

Creates variable unknown capex requirements on an annual basis

Simplified reporting processes

Complex financial reporting required to track LB funding vs regional funding

 

31.     Staff recommend that local boards’ do not fund minor (less than $1 million) capital projects with LDI funding from 1 July 2016. This will not impact projects that boards have already committed to funding.

32.     Local boards should provide feedback on whether they see a need to use:

·        LDI budget to fund minor capital projects; and

·        Capex funding to bring regionally funded projects forward.

Transferring LDI to Capex

33.     Local boards may transfer their currently approved capex projects paid for by LDI funding (as outlined in their Local Board Agreements 2015/16), to the new discretionary fund.  This will free up their LDI opex again and remove the need to fund consequential opex.


Deferral of Capex

34.     Normal deferral conditions apply to the capex fund. Projects cannot be planned outside of the three years but funds may be deferred if projects are unable to be completed within this period.

Transition for current capex allocations

35.     There will be no transition mechanism for any existing capex budgets held by some local boards. The governing body has decided that this fund will replace the current Facilities Partnership Fund.

36.     Projects that have already been committed to through the Facilities Partnership Fund will need to be funded from the relevant boards’ capex fund allocation.

Local Boards Funding Policy

37.     The current Local Boards Funding Policy (LBFP) must be amended to provide for the allocation of capex funding.  This is an amendment to the Long-term Plan which requires use of the special consultative procedure (SCP), with a public consultation period of one month. 

38.     Staff propose to amend the LBFP to provide a general formula for allocating any non LDI funding. This will avoid the need to amend the LBFP every time the governing body decides to allocate local boards funding that is not for locally driven initiatives.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

39.     The proposal does not impact the allocation of decision making.

Significance and Engagement

40.     The proposed capex fund is a minor change in the scale of council’s budget and funding for local activities. As such it is not a significant change. However, creating a new funding allocation for local boards requires an amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy, and consequently the Long-term Plan.

41.     Council is required to undertake a special consultative process for any amendment to the Long-term Plan.

Implementation

42.     The proposed amendment to the Local Board Funding Policy is not significant. As such, the amendment to the Long-term Plan will not need to be audited.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Beth Sullivan - Principal Advisor Policy

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - General Manager Financial Plan Policy & Budgeting

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

20                                              Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated Licence to Occupy and Manage

Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated Licence to Occupy and Manage

 

File No.: CP2015/15631

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks Kaipātiki Local Board approval to grant a Licence to Occupy and Manage (LTOM) to the Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated (BBCP) for the Birkdale Community House, 134 Birkdale Road, Birkdale and the Beach Haven Community House, 31-35 Cresta Avenue (130 Beach Haven Rd), Beach Haven.

Executive Summary

2.       As a result of amalgamation, community centres and houses that were operated by community committees had their legacy funding agreements extended, most for several years. Since then, council staff have developed a more appropriate funding agreement, with an attached LTOM (where applicable) that provides more coherency and consistency as well as aligning to delivery of local board outcomes.  Currently these funding agreements and licences are granted on an annual basis. Previously, BBCP was on a month by month tenancy arrangement after its lease expired.  With local board approval, staff negotiated to transfer BBCP to a LTOM that aligns the occupancy term to the funding.

3.       This report is seeking local board approval to grant a LTOM to BBCP for the Birkdale Community House, 134 Birkdale Road and the Beach Haven Community House, 31-35 Cresta Avenue (130 Beach Haven Rd), Beach Haven.

4.       In the future the local board could consider offering a range of options for the term of the funding agreement and/or licence which would be dependent on a number of factors. For example, new organisations or those still developing their governance structure could remain on a one year term. More experienced organisations could transition to a two or three-year term and major organisations with proven performance, especially those requiring long-term tenure for external funding, could be granted five or more years.  Staff will commence discussions with local board portfolio holders within the next few months.

 

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the granting of a Licence to Occupy and Manage to the Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated for the Birkdale Community House, 134 Birkdale Road, Birkdale and the Beach Haven Community House, 31-35 Cresta Avenue (130 Beach Haven Rd), Beach Haven subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term –1 year commencing on 1 July 2015;

ii)       Rent -  $1.00 plus Goods and Services Tax per annum if requested

 

 

Comments

5.       The BBCP has occupied the council owned Birkdale Community House at 134 Birkdale Road since 1987. Beach Haven Community House was relocated to its current site in 1990 and has been occupied by the BBCP since then. The BBCP has approximately 23,840 visitors through these two community houses per annum with activities catering to all ages and community groups. There are two part time Project Coordinators who work 50 hours per week (combined). The BBCP committee is made up of a Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer and 6 additional committee members.

6.       Both community houses deliver community programmes and activities to meet local needs and local board outcomes. Their 2015/2016 work programme is outlined in schedule one of their funding agreement. Schedule two of the funding agreement outlines the reporting requirements. The LTOM is schedule three of the funding agreement. The funding agreement is attached to this report as Attachment A.

7.       The financial accounts provided by the BBCP indicates that the funds held are sufficient to meet their liabilities and are being managed appropriately.

8.       The BBCP has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

9.       This report is seeking approval to grant a LTOM to the BBCP for the Birkdale Community House, 134 Birkdale Road, Birkdale Lot 1 DP 43563, and the Beach Haven Community House, 31-35 Cresta Avenue (130 Beach Haven Rd), Beach Haven Lots 156-162 & 167 DP 20048, Pt Lot 1-2 DP 99986 for a term of 1 year commencing on 1 July 2015 at a rental of $1.00 plus GST. The licence outlines both Auckland Council and BBCP’s building maintenance responsibilities.

10.     In the future the local board could consider offering a range of options for the term of the funding agreement and/or licence and this would be dependent on a number of factors. For example, new organisations or those still developing their governance structure should remain on a one year term. More experienced organisations could transition to a two or three-year term and major organisations with proven performance, especially those requiring long-term tenure for external funding, could be granted five or more years. 

11.     Multi-year agreements would not change any of the other conditions in the existing funding agreements or licences. Adjustments for inflation could be included in each agreement and licence that has a term of two or more years. Staff will commence these discussions with local board portfolio holders within the next few months.

12.     Council staff have sought input from relevant council departments

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.     Council staff have discussed BBCP’s work programmes with local board portfolio holders. This report is seeking local board approval to grant the LTOM to enable the delivery of the work programme. The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

14.     The BBCP endeavours to improve the well-being for Māori within the work programmes they deliver.  Council staff continue to work with the houses to ensure development of programmes and activities that support Māori and align with council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

Implementation

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Funding Agreement (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Lois Hannah – Programmess and Partnerships Advisor Facilities

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - Manager - Community Development, Arts and Culture

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

21                                              Te Onewa Pa Heritage Site

Te Onewa Pa Heritage Site

 

File No.: CP2015/15570

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report is to give the Kaipātiki Local Board the opportunity to consider endorsement of the New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA) current proposal for Te Onewa Reserve, Northcote Point.

Executive Summary

2.       The NZTA has worked with Auckland Council (AC), Kaipātiki Local Board, and other stakeholders and partners, including iwi, Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (HNZPT) and the Northcote Residents Association (NRA) over the past two years on a plan to:

·          improve access, safety and amenity to the Te Onewa Reserve; and

·          protect the Te Onewa Reserve archaeological and heritage values.

3.       NZTA have now progressed planning to a stage where it would like to seek board endorsement of the concept plan, before undertaking further detailed engineering and landscaping planning and seeking Heritage NZ Authority to undertake physical works.

4.       The NZTA proposal and concept plan are attached to this report for the board’s consideration.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      consider endorsing the New Zealand Transport Agency concept plan for Te Onewa Pa, Northcote Point.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

NZTA Te Onewa Pa report (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Te Onewa Pa preferred concept design (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Andy Roche - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

22                                              Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act (ARAFA) Funding Model Review - Local Board Input

Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act (ARAFA) Funding Model Review - Local Board Input

 

File No.: CP2015/14933

 

  

Purpose

1.       Auckland Council is undertaking a review of the funding model under the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 (ARAFA). Feedback from local boards is sought on the level of change proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any).

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 established a distinct model for contributing funds to specified regional amenities. This funding model is now under review to consider whether it remains fit for purpose and to identify how it might be improved. The Governing Body adopted terms of reference for the review on 26 February 2015.

3.       Working closely with representatives of the regional amenities, seven funding model options were generated along a spectrum, ranging from:

·        retaining the status quo;

·        seeking improvements within the existing ARAFA legislative framework; or

·        modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending legislation; to

·        repealing the existing ARAFA framework and replacing it with an Auckland Council policy framework. The options are discussed in paragraphs 15 - 32.

4.       The Finance and Performance Committee endorsed the seven options for evaluation on 18 June 2015. The options will be evaluated against criteria previously endorsed by Finance and Performance on 21 May 2015. The criteria are discussed in paragraph 14.

5.       When viewed across the spectrum, the options shift the role of Auckland Council from influencing decision-making under the Act (by a funding board) to becoming the decision-maker itself. The closer Auckland Council becomes to being the decision-maker the more opportunities there are to align the council’s strategic outcomes with those of the regional amenities. The options also incorporate improvements relating to information flows, longer term planning, communications and relationship building.

6.       The options are also associated with a progressively increasing volume of further work that would be required to implement them. The implementation of options requiring legislative change is particularly complex. The necessary trade-offs involved will be teased out and considered through the evaluation of the options.

7.       The evaluation is to be completed and will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015. The evaluation will identify the preferred option/s which may be a refined version, comprising different elements of the options proposed.

8.       Local board feedback is sought on the level of change proposed in the options as set out in this report and the impacts on local boards and local communities(if any).

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provides feedback on the level of change proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any) as an input into the evaluation of options under the Auckland Regional Funding Amenities Act Funding Model Review.

 

Comments

The Funding Model under the Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008

9.       The Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act 2008 has two purposes; to provide adequate, sustainable and secure funding for specified regional amenities, and to ensure that local government in Auckland contributes funding.

10.     The Act came into force prior to amalgamation of Auckland’s former councils. It was designed to ensure that all councils in the region contributed fairly to funding the regional amenities given the amenities operated across and benefited the whole of the Auckland region. It also sought to ensure that qualifying regional amenities remained financially viable.

11.     The regional amenities apply each year to a Funding Board for next year’s funding. The Funding Board confers with Auckland Council and prepares and consults on a funding plan, before recommending a levy to Auckland Council for the next financial year. Auckland Council approves the recommended levy and if not, arbitration takes place. The Funding Board subsequently receives the levy and allocates funding to the regional amenities.

12.     Auckland Council appoints six of the Funding Board’s 10 members with four members appointed by an Amenities Board, also created by the Act.

13.     Only the regional amenities specified under the Act may apply for funding and funding is not available for any part of services or facilities provided outside of the Auckland region. Funding is to contribute towards the operational expenditure that regional amenities must incur and is not available for capital expenditure.

14.     The regional amenities must make all reasonable endeavours to maximise funding from other sources. The regional amenities are prohibited from receiving operating funding from Auckland Council, other than via the Funding Board. However, staff are aware that local boards may receive funding requests from groups affiliated with the amenities.

15.     The Funding Board and Auckland Council must have regard to the funding principles prescribed in the Act. The Act makes provision for additional funding principles to be adopted.

Regional Amenities

16.     The purpose of the Act is to ensure the regional amenities are funded to provide services or facilities that contribute to “the well-being of the whole region” and “towards making Auckland an attractive place to live in and visit”. Organisations that wish to become regional amenities must possess these qualities to satisfy criteria for admission. The Act as enacted specified 10 regional amenities in Schedule 1:

·        Auckland Observatory and Planetarium Trust Board;

·        Auckland Philharmonia;

·        Auckland Regional Rescue Helicopter Trust;

·        Auckland Theatre Company;

·        Coast Guard Northern Region Incorporated;

·        New Zealand National Maritime Museum;

·        New Zealand Opera Limited;

·        Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated;

·        Auckland Festival Trust; and

·        Watersafe Auckland Incorporated.

17.     The following examples illustrate the way the regional amenities serve the Auckland region:

·        The Auckland Philharmonia (APO) was accorded the status of Metropolitan Orchestra as part of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage’s Orchestra Review in 2012. In that year the APO presented 31 performances in the Auckland Town Hall and performed in the Bruce Mason Centre (Takapuna) Telstra Events Centre (Manukau), Massey High School and Trusts Stadium (West Auckland) and the Holy Trinity Cathedral (Parnell). It also presented chamber concerts in Takapuna, Remuera and Howick and five free community performances and events in west, central, north and south Auckland. 

·        Coast Guard Northern Region Incorporated has 14 units located across the Auckland region at Waiuku, Papakura, Titirangi, Kaipara, Kawau, Great Barrier, Hibiscus, North Shore, Auckland, Waiheke, Howick and Maraetei, with the Operations Centre and the Auckland Air Patrol operating centrally.

·        Similarly, there are 10 clubs in the Auckland region under the umbrella of Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated, located at Karioitahi Beach, Karekare, Piha (2), Bethels Beach, Murawai, Omaha, Red Beach, Orewa and Mairangi Bay.

The ARAFA Funding Model Review

18.     Auckland Council’s establishment and issues arising out of the Act’s operation have raised the question of ‘whether the funding model remains fit for purpose’. Auckland Council agreed to review the ARAFA Funding Model through its deliberations on the Mayor’s proposal for the 2014 Annual Plan. The Governing Body endorsed terms of reference ( refer Attachment A) for this review on 26 February 2015. It records stakeholder issues and objectives (Schedule 2) and sets the overarching objective to:

“achieve long term sustainable, affordable and predictable funding of the existing amenities while recognising the Council’s purpose and responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002 and other legislation.” (paragraph 12):

19.     The ARAFA funding model and changes to enhance its effectiveness are the focus of the review:

·        The review will not consider whether to add or remove any of the regional amenities from the funding mechanism. That would be a separate piece of work.

·        The review will also not consider how much funding each regional amenity currently receives but rather look at the process that determines the amount of funding provided.

20.     The terms of reference set out the basic process for the review with the identification of criteria for the evaluation and identification of options and their subsequent evaluation. In undertaking this review council is working closely with representatives of the amenities and engaging with the Funding Board.

Criteria for the Evaluation of Options

21.     The following criteria for evaluating options were endorsed by the Finance and Performance Committee on 21 May 2015:

i.   Financial sustainability and certainty

-      Addresses the ‘sufficiency’ of the contribution provided by the Funding Model in terms of “adequate, sustainable and secure funding for specified amenities.” It includes the predictability of that funding over the short to medium terms in support of financial planning.

ii.  Affordability

-     Addresses the affordability of the sum of the contributions allocated under the funding model including the impact on rates.

iii. Independence and continuity

-     Considers the extent to which the option provides for objective decision making and the extent it provides for continuity of decision-making over time. These considerations go to the stability of the Funding Model over time.


iv. Accountability and transparency

-     Considers the information and the processes to support decision-making required by an option to ensure there is a clear chain of accountability from the recipient through to the funder. Transparency supports accountability, providing clarity around decision-making processes. Public sector responsibility requires accountability and transparency generally, and particularly in respect of public funds.

v.  Administrative efficiency

-     Considers the efficiency of the Funding Model, with regard to the costs associated with the information and processes required by an option. Funding arrangements should have regard to the costs of implementation, and how effective they will be in achieving their objectives.

vi. Alignment of outcomes and goals

-     Considers the extent to which the option allows for alignment between the outcomes and goals sought and achieved by the regional amenities and those of the Auckland Council on behalf of Auckland’s ratepayers.

vii.       Fairness

-     Considers the extent to which the Funding Model provides for fairness.

viii.      Flexibility

-     Requires consideration of the extent to which the option provides a Funding Model with sufficient flexibility to take account of changing circumstances.

Options to Enhance Effectiveness

22.     Working closely with representatives of the amenities, seven options along a spectrum have been generated, ranging from:

·        retaining the status quo;

·        seeking improvements within the existing ARAFA legislative framework; or

·        modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending the legislation; to

·        repealing the existing ARAFA legislative framework and replacing it with an Auckland Council policy framework.

23.     The options were endorsed for evaluation by the Finance and Performance Committee on 18 June 2015.

24.     Figure 1 below illustrates the options and where they are located on the spectrum. Viewed across the spectrum, the options shift the role of Auckland Council from influencing the Funding Board’s decision-making to becoming the decision-maker itself. Similarly, there are increasing opportunities along the spectrum to align Auckland Council’s strategic outcomes with those of the amenities.

25.     The review to date has identified that processes relating to funding bids and reporting have evolved under the existing arrangements. There appear to be further opportunities to pursue improvements through a focus on, information, communication, developing relationships and longer term planning which are being investigated through the final evaluation.

26.     Implementation of the options will require further work, some of which is significant. The implementation of options requiring legislative change is particularly complex.

27.     Options 1 to 4 are based on current arrangements which provide the pathway for regional amenities to seek operational funding from Auckland Council. Improvements under these options would be available for the 2016/2017 funding year.

28.     Option 5 limits opportunities for Auckland Council to scrutinise the funding sought by the regional amenities, whereas Options 6 and 7 increase Auckland Council’s role in decision-making. The level of funding provided under Option 7 would be dependent on the policy and decisions of the governing body. There may therefore be a greater level of uncertainty for the regional amenities which may hold implications for the level of services and facilities they provide.

29.     Options 5 to 7 require legislative change through the parliamentary process and it is not possible to indicate when they might become available for implementation.

30.     The necessary trade-offs in relation to implementation will be considered through the evaluation of the options.

Figure 1.

 

Seeking Improvements from within the existing ARAFA legislative framework

Option 1 – Status Quo

31.     The existing funding model prescribed by the Act is the benchmark against which the other options will be compared. It is described in paragraphs 1 to 7.

32.     The following three options seek to introduce changes to enhance the legislative framework and the sharing of information between the regional amenities, the Funding Board and Auckland Council.

Option 2 – Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Clear Pathway to Capital Funding’

33.     This option provides a ‘clear pathway for capital funding’ to augment the status quo.

34.     While the amenities can currently apply for capital funding from Auckland Council via the Long Term Plan process, the granting of such funding is considered to be by exception. Under this option, applications for capital could be anticipated from any of the regional amenities. Potential applications would need to be signaled well ahead of time to assist financial planning and to enable the provision of funding.

Option 3 - Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Sustainable Funding’

35.     This option introduces financial planning over a longer time frame with a 3 year rolling funding cycle and supporting information, and establishes how the sustainable level of funding for each regional amenity might be determined:


Introduction of a three year ‘rolling’ funding cycle

36.     This cycle would align with Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan/Annual Plan cycle. Applications for the first year of funding (the year of application) would seek that year’s funding and identify anticipated funding for the next two years. Annual applications made in the second and third year would be considered in the light of all the relevant information then provided.

Information supporting ‘rolling’ applications

37.     The clarity and timeframe of information accompanying applications would be reviewed to ensure it supports the rolling funding cycle.

‘Sustainability’

38.     A definition of the sustainable level of funding would be developed for application in the context of each of the regional amenities. This would also establish appropriate levels of reserves amenities would be able to build-up and maintain to help manage the peaks and troughs of the funding requirements.

Option 4 – Enhanced Status Quo – ‘Alignment/Groupings’

39.     This option similarly proposes the three year rolling review, maximises opportunities to improve strategic alignment between the regional amenities and Auckland Council and addresses the diverse range of regional amenities.

40.     The three year ‘rolling’ funding cycle / information supporting applications becomes available as set out in the previous option.

Auckland Council and the Funding Board confer

41.     Auckland Council would be more explicit in clarifying its expectations, its funding constraints and its intentions when conferring with the Funding Board on the draft Funding Plan. The purpose would be to ensure transparency about the Auckland Council context and any funding constraints the council might face.

Auckland Council supports public notification

42.     Auckland Council supports public notification of the Draft Funding Plan. The council could support the notification of the Draft Funding Plan on the council’s web site, through the media centre and/or in publications. This would help rate payers provide feedback and make submissions.

More particular consideration relevant to the type of amenity

43.     This could include:

·        Criteria and considerations as relevant to different types of amenities – e.g. safety, arts & culture, and facilities

·        Clarification and guidance around what might be meant by ‘sustainability’ and the sustainable contribution required could be developed with reference to the activities undertaken by the particular regional amenities.

Modifying the existing ARAFA framework by amending legislation

44.     The two following options amend the ARAFA legislative framework, proposing specific amendments to the way funding is determined or the roles of institutions and the processes through which they work.

Option 5 – Baseline Plus CPI

45.     Under this option the specified amenities would determine the ‘sustainable’ level of funding required for year 1, which would be CPI adjusted for the next two years. The level of sustainable funding would then be reset for the next (4th) year and CPI adjusted in each of the next two years.

46.     The basis for determining the sustainable level of funding would need to be developed and the implications for the Funding Board explored.

Option 6 - Strong Funder

47.     This option remaps the relationship between the regional amenities and the Auckland Council with Auckland Council providing funds directly. Under this option the ARAFA legislative framework would be amended so that:

·        the regional amenities apply to Auckland Council directly for funding;

·        three year rolling funding cycle / supporting information applies;

·        Auckland Council sets the funding envelope;

·        Auckland Council prepares and adopts the Funding Plan;

·        the role of the Funding Board becomes one of providing expert advice to Auckland Council; and

·        the regional amenities report annually to the Auckland Council.

Auckland Council sets the funding envelope

The funding envelope from which contributions to the regional amenities would be drawn would be set for the 10 year period though the council’s Long Term Plan process. This longer term approach to funding would likely require a review of the information required in support of setting the envelope.

Auckland Council prepares and adopts the Funding Plan

The Funding Plan mechanism could be similar to the status quo or be modified in terms of the process and matters to be taken into consideration.

The role of the Funding Board

The Funding Board’s role would change to one of providing expert advice to assist Auckland Council. Appointments may still be made by Auckland Council and by the regional amenities.

Repeal of the existing ARAFA framework and replacement with an Auckland Council policy framework

48.     Under this model the existing ARAFA legislative framework would be repealed and replaced with a policy framework established and maintained by Auckland Council.

Option 7 - Auckland Council Dedicated Fund

49.     The repealed ARAFA legislative framework would be replaced by a specific policy of Auckland Council where:

·        Auckland Council sets the funding envelope;

·        there is no Funding Board and the regional amenities apply to Auckland Council for funding;

·        Auckland Council considers applications and determines the funding allocated following public consultation;

·        there is separate policy and consideration for different types of amenity – for example, safety, arts and culture, and facilities;

·        a three year rolling funding cycle with supporting information would apply; and

·        the amenities annually report to the Auckland Council.

50.     This option replicates many of the policy intentions of the Strong Funder option within Auckland Council formulated policy, though without the legislation or the Funding Board. As council policy, the funding model/policy framework would be amenable to any amendment subsequent councils may require.


Evaluation

51.     The evaluation involves considering the performance of each option against the criteria, relative to the performance of the status quo. Working closely with the amenities representatives, this process is currently underway and the results will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015. The evaluation will identify the preferred option/s which may be a refined version, comprising different elements of the options proposed.

52.     Local board feedback on the level of changes proposed in the options and the impacts on local boards and local communities (if any) is sought and will be an input into the evaluation along-side feedback received from the Funding Board and Regional Facilities Auckland.

53.     From the work completed to date it is clear that Option 4- ‘Alignment/Groupings’ is compromised. The idea of grouping amenities by the nature of their operations is unworkable due to the extent of the difference between each of the regional amenities. The other features of this option continue to offer merit however and will be included in the evaluation.

54.     Implementation is a particular consideration in addition to the identified criteria. With the exception of the status quo, each option will require further work to become operational. The amount of work required and the level of complexity is likely to:

·        be less from options seeking improvement within existing frameworks (options 2, 3 and 4);

·        increase where improvements are sought through amendments to the Act (options 5 and 6); and

·        further increase with the repeal of the Act and its replacement by an alternative regime (option 7).

55.     Seeking amendments to or the repeal of the Act would require sponsorship by a Member of Parliament to drive it through the Parliamentary processes. These include three readings in Parliament and the Select Committee Hearings process. The Act is a private Act. A private bill seeking changes would be subject to parliamentary processes required and it is not possible to indicate the time it might take for it to be enacted.

Next Steps

56.     Local board feedback will be collated and incorporated into the final report to the Finance and Performance Committee on 17 September 2015.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

57.     The ARAFA funding model review considers the funding model established under the ARAFA legislation and will not directly impact on local board funding or decision-making. However, communities across all of Auckland are able to benefit from the services and facilities provided by the amenities funded through the Act.

58.     Local board views on the level of change proposed in the options and their impacts on local boards (if any) are being sought via this report. This report follows a memo circulated to local board chairs in February 2015 and a briefing to local board chairs and members on 22 June 2015. This report follows the structure of that briefing while elaborating on the information provided.

Māori impact statement

59.     The ARAFA funding model review focuses on how Auckland Council’s funding contribution to the specified amenities is determined. Using Whiria Te Muka Tangata: The Māori Responsiveness Framework as a lens there do not appear to be any statutory or treaty obligations, direct Māori or value Te Ao Māori outcomes affected by this review. Enquiries were made of mana whenua in March 2015 to ascertain whether the ARAFA funding model review held any interest. No interests were identified.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Regional Amenities Funding Act Review (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Alastair Cameron - Principal Advisor CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Wayne Brown - Lead Strategic Advisor Strategic Scanning

Authorisers

John Bishop - Treasurer  and Manager CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Jacques  Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

23                                              Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

 

File No.: CP2015/14932

 

  

Purpose

1.       To inform local boards about the purpose and content of the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy and seek their feedback.

2.       To outline the special consultative procedure (SCP) being undertaken and the anticipated role of Local Boards in this consultation process.

3.       To obtain local board views on the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy.

Executive Summary

4.       The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP) provides for approximately 11,000 hectares of Future Urban zone land.  This land is located within the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB), but outside the 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL).

5.       The Future Urban Land Supply Strategy (the “Strategy”) presented at Attachment A provides direction on the next stage in planning for the following Future Urban zone areas:

·        North: Warkworth, Wainui and Silverdale-Dairy Flat;

·        North-west: Whenuapai, Redhills, Kumeu-Huapai and Riverhead; and

·        South: Takanini, Opaheke-Drury, Karaka, Paerata and Pukekohe.

6.       The Strategy sets out Auckland Council’s intention for when the above Future Urban areas are proposed to be development ready.  The Strategy was developed in collaboration with infrastructure providers such as Watercare, Auckland Transport and the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA).

7.       The Strategy has significant implications for Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin Local Boards as they contain areas of Future Urban land which are sequenced for development readiness by the Strategy.

8.       At its July meeting the Auckland Development Committee resolved to approve the draft Strategy for public consultation in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure set out in s83 of the Local Government Act (2002) (refer Attachment B).  The Committee also appointed a five person hearing panel consisting of four councillors and a member of the Independent Maori Statutory Board.

9.       The consultation period will run from 17 July to 17 August 2015. Public engagement on the Strategy will include a series of ‘Have Your Say’ events to be held in Warkworth, Dairy Flat, Drury and Kumeu.

10.     The final Strategy will be submitted to the Auckland Development Committee in October for adoption.

11.     This report seeks views from the Kaipātiki Local Board for consideration by the Auckland Development Committee and hearing panel in making a determination on if and how the Strategy will be amended.


Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the report.

b)      provides feedback to the Auckland Development Committee and hearing panel on the Strategy, in particular on:

i)        whether the local board agrees with the sequencing proposed within the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy and, if so, the reasons why; and

ii)       aspects of the sequencing in the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy the local board disagrees with and the reasons as to why

c)      any further issues on the draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy.

 

Comments

Background

12.     The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (PAUP) provides for approximately 11,000 hectares of Future Urban Zone land. This land is located within the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) but outside the 2010 Metropolitan Urban Limit (MUL). The Future Urban Zone indicates that this land is appropriate for future urban development.

13.     A key goal of the Auckland Plan Development Strategy is to achieve a quality compact form.  This requires urban intensification, supplemented by well-managed urban expansion. The Auckland Plan advocates for 70 per cent of growth in the existing urban area and up to 40 per cent of growth in locations outside the 2010 MUL. The Future Urban land is intended to provide a significant portion of the growth outside the 2010 MUL – around 110,000 dwellings. The balance of growth outside the RUB and the satellite towns of Warkworth and Pukekohe, will be accommodated in rural and coastal towns, rural villages, countryside living and general rural areas.

14.     The draft Strategy focuses on the Future Urban land areas located in:

·        North: Warkworth, Wainui and Silverdale-Dairy Flat.

·        North-west: Whenuapai, Redhills, Kumeu-Huapai and Riverhead.

·        South: Takanini, Opaheke-Drury, Karaka, Paerata and Pukekohe.

15.     Local board areas which contain Future Urban land directly affected by this Strategy include Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin.

16.     The draft Strategy marks the next step in planning the Future Urban areas that started with the Auckland Plan.  The Auckland Plan identified ‘greenfield areas of investigation’ to provide for future growth outside the MUL. The Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan formalised this concept through the location of the RUB and the proposed zoning of this land as Future Urban.

17.     High-level planning was undertaken to provide more detail around possible land use, key infrastructure and potential housing yield and business land location. Based on this, the Strategy sequences the order for when this land is intended to be ready for development over the three decades of the Auckland Plan. It is a proactive approach to long-term planning, infrastructure provision and providing housing and business capacity.

18.     Most of the Future Urban areas are predominantly rural and have not previously been identified for urbanisation.  Bulk infrastructure will therefore have to be provided to these areas. All Future Urban areas require some degree of bulk infrastructure; development will therefore not be able to occur until this infrastructure is in place. In areas where bulk infrastructure projects are large and complex, longer lead-in times (for design, consenting and build) are required. This affects the timing for when land can be development ready.

Purpose of the Strategy

19.     The purpose of the draft Strategy is to provide a robust and logical sequence for when the Future Urban areas are proposed to be ‘development ready’ across the three decades of the Auckland Plan. This will enable coordination of timely structure planning and bulk infrastructure provision to these areas and provide clarity and certainty to all key stakeholders, including infrastructure providers.

Drivers for the Strategy

20.     The key driver for the draft Strategy is the significant current and projected growth in Auckland and the pressure this growth places on housing supply and key infrastructure. The Strategy therefore aims to proactively plan for, coordinate and deliver bulk infrastructure so that this land can be brought on stream for both residential and business development i.e. contributing to development capacity across the region.

21.     Accommodating this growth will come at a significant cost.  Preliminary, high level estimates of bulk infrastructure costs are provided within the draft Strategy; however it does not include costs for any local network infrastructure.  The significant costs are primarily driven by the size of the Future Urban areas (these equate to approximately one and a half times the area of urban Hamilton); the scale of the bulk infrastructure that will be required; and the current lack of such infrastructure in these areas.  For these reasons it would be prohibitively expensive for Auckland Council, CCOs and, more broadly, central government (e.g. NZTA and the Ministry of Education) to invest in all Future Urban areas at the same time.

The draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy

22.     The draft Strategy sets out a logical timed sequence for development readiness. It integrates information on key infrastructure required to get these areas ready for urban development.  The sequencing is based on a suite of principles (attached to the Strategy) that include the consideration of the lead-in times for the bulk infrastructure required. Bulk infrastructure refers to water, wastewater, stormwater and the transport network. This draft Strategy will also assist with the forward planning of community facilities and services critical for creating sustainable communities.

23.     The sequencing set out in the draft Strategy was developed with input from a number of infrastructure providers including Watercare, Veolia, Auckland Transport and NZTA.

24.     The analysis done for this draft Strategy is of sufficient scale and specificity to broadly determine bulk infrastructure requirements. There are two subsequent parallel and inter-dependent processes to get land ready for development – more detailed structure planning, and bulk infrastructure planning and build.

25.     Structure planning and plan changes (to urban zones) will be done prior to the areas being ready for development and will be undertaken by the council (or in partnership with others) in line with the programme set out in the draft Strategy. This is the stage of the process where local boards, mana whenua and communities will be involved in the detailed planning of these areas.

26.     The sequencing programme ensures the infrastructure costs are distributed over three decades to smooth spikes in capital expenditure, allow all infrastructure providers to forward plan their asset management and assist with prioritising key enabling projects.

27.     A monitoring programme is an integral part of the Strategy and will be used to monitor trends over time. This is to ensure that the proposed sequencing remains relevant. This monitoring will be part of an overall strategy to provide information on development capacity in brownfield and greenfield locations. Given the 30-year timeframe, a number of factors could change the proposed sequencing and timing as set out in the Strategy. These include funding constraints, possible alternative funding options and changes to population growth and housing demand. Therefore, for the Strategy to remain relevant and effective, it must be a ‘living’ document, able to respond to changes identified through the monitoring programme.

The consultation process

28.     The public consultation period will run from 17 July – 17 August 2015.  It will follow the special consultative procedure set out in s83 of the Local Government Act (2002).  This procedure requires all interested parties to be given an opportunity to present submissions in a manner which enables spoken interaction.

29.     The Auckland Development Committee has appointed Councillors Cashmore, Darby, Webster and Quax and one member of the IMSB (to be confirmed) to form a hearing panel to receive the spoken submissions.

30.     A series of ‘Have Your Say’ events will be held to provide an opportunity to all interested parties to provide spoken feedback.  These events will be held at the following dates, times and locations:

·        Monday 3 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Warkworth Masonic Hall.

·        Wednesday 5 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Drury Hall.

·        Monday 10 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Dairy Flat School Hall.

·        Tuesday 11 August (7pm-8.30pm) – Kumeu Community Hall.

31.     Invitations will be extended to ward councillors and local board members to attend these events.

32.     Public notices will be placed in the New Zealand Herald and relevant local newspapers notifying interested parties about the Strategy itself and the ‘Have Your Say’ events.  The Strategy and a feedback form will be available on the Shape Auckland website and a media release will be distributed at the commencement of the consultation period.  A targeted direct mail out will also be undertaken for key stakeholders.

33.     Local board participation at the events and feedback and input to the draft Strategy are welcomed.

34.     Feedback received during the period, including that received from local boards, will be analysed, summarised and reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel. The panel will then make a determination about amendment of the Strategy.

35.     The final Strategy will be submitted for adoption at the Auckland Development Committee meeting in October.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

36.     The Strategy has significant implications for local boards particularly Rodney, Upper Harbour, Henderson-Massey, Papakura and Franklin Local Boards as they contain areas of Future Urban land sequenced by this Strategy.  The consultation period and the ‘Have Your Say’ events provide an opportunity for local boards to become involved in the process, hear the views of their communities and form their own views and response to the Strategy.

37.     Local boards were informed about the Strategy at a joint workshop held with the Auckland Development Committee on 16 June 2015. A briefing on the Strategy and the consultation process was held for local board members on 15 July 2015. This was to ensure local boards have a sound understanding of the Strategy and consultation process prior to the commencement of the consultation period.

38.     Preliminary issues raised by attendees included the need to manage community expectation about land purchases in the future urban areas, the need to ensure council is fully resourced to undertake the structure planning work, a need to forward plan land purchase for community facilities and a proactive engagement approach with central government around provision of education and health facilities and services to deliver the best outcomes for local communities.

39.     This report seeks local board views on the Strategy and these issues and any other feedback will be reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel. 

Māori impact statement

40.     This Strategy has significant implications for Maori and has the capacity to contribute to Maori well-being and development of Maori capacity.  It is acknowledged that Maori have a special relationship with Auckland’s physical and cultural environment.  Ongoing liaison has occurred with Te Waka Angamua around the Strategy and the suite of principles which sit behind it.  One of the principles reflects council’s commitment to Maori social and economic well-being as a transformational shift set out in the Auckland Plan. 

41.     Independent Maori Statutory Board staff were briefed at the commencement of the project, provided with background documentation and invited to workshops as the Strategy was developed.  A representative from the IMSB is to be appointed to the hearing panel for this project.  A hui was held with mana whenua chairs on 29 June 2015 and individual meetings will occur with interested chairs who were unable to attend the hui.

42.     Iwi responses will be sought as part of the public consultation process outlined in this report. Consultation submissions from iwi will be reported to the Auckland Development Committee and the hearing panel.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Future Urban Land Supply Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

The Auckland Development Committee resolution (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Simon  Tattersfield - Principal Growth and Infrastructure Adviser

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

24                                              Members' Reports

Members' Reports

 

File No.: CP2015/15038

 

  

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         receive the report from Member Richard Hills.

b)         receive any verbal reports of members.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Richard Hills Members Report - August

99

bView

Beach Haven Rangatira Roundabout Upgrade Proposed Submission

103

cView

Coronation Intersection Roundabout Proposed Submission

105

     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Richard Hills Members Report - August

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Beach Haven Rangatira Roundabout Upgrade Proposed Submission

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Coronation Intersection Roundabout Proposed Submission

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

25                                              Governing Body Members' Update

Governing Body Members' Update

 

File No.: CP2015/15039

 

  

 

Executive summary

An opportunity is provided for Governing Body Members to update the board on Governing Body issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Members’ verbal updates.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

26                                              Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops - Wednesday, 15 July 2015 and Wednesday,22 July 2015 2015

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops - Wednesday, 15 July 2015 and Wednesday,22 July 2015 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15040

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday, 15 July 2015 and Wednesday, 22 July 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 15 July 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board had a briefing on:

· Local Event (Contestable) Support Fund; and

· Local Board Capital Fund.

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday, 22 July 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board had a briefing on:

· Environmental Services Work Programme; and

· Parks Work Programme.

4.       Workshops records are attached to this report.

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the records for the Kaipātiki Local Board Workshops held on Wednesday 15 July 2015 and Wednesday, 22 July 2015 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Record of Workshop - 15 July 2015

111

bView

Record of Workshop - 22 July 2015

113

    

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Record of Workshop - 15 July 2015

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

Record of Workshop - 22 July 2015

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Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

27                                              Record of Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in July 2015

Record of Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in July 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/15041

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in July 2015.

Executive summary

2.       In July 2015, the Kaipātiki Local Board held the following Portfolio Briefings:

·        Arts and Culture – Tuesday 7 July 2015.

·        Built Environment – Thursday 2 July 2015.

·        Community Development & Facilities – Wednesday 8 July 2015.

·        Events - Tuesday 7 July 2015.

·        Finance – Monday 13 July 2015.

·        Leisure – Thursday 16 July 2015.

·        Parks – Wednesday 8 July 2015.

·        Transport – Wednesday 1 July 2015.

 

Recommendation

 

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the record of Kaipātiki Local Board Portfolio Briefings held in July 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

KLB Briefing Records July 2015

117

     

Signatories

Authors

Blair Doherty - Kaipātiki Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

12 August 2015

 

 

KLB Briefing Records July 2015

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