I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                  

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 November 2015

10.00am

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street, Auckland CBD

 

Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Bill Cashmore

 

Members

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

 

Cr Denise Krum

 

 

Cr Calum Penrose

 

 

Member David Taipari

 

 

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

 

Member Karen Wilson

 

 

Cr George Wood, CNZM

 

Ex-Officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Elaine Stephenson

Democracy Advisor

 

11 November 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8117

Email: elaine.stephenson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will be responsible for:

 

·        Being Auckland’s strategic forum for civil defence and emergency management planning and policy;

·        Establishing an emergency management structure for the Auckland region;

·        Develop, approve, implement and monitor the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan;

·        Performing the statutory functions of a civil defence emergency management group;

·        Representing Auckland in the development of national emergency management policy;

·        Developing policy for, and monitoring, the Auckland Council’s civil defence, emergency management and natural hazards functions; and

·        Engaging with Local Boards on civil defence and emergency management issues.

 

The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee will exercise the statutory powers outlined in the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002 and the Auckland Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Plan.

 

The Civil Defence Emergency Management Group Committee is authorised to approve use of the established emergency funding facility provided for emergency management.

 

Relevant legislation includes but is not limited to:

 

Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002; and
Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996.

 


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·        Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·        Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·        Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·        In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·        The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·        However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·        All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·        Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·        Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·        All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·        Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·        Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·        Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                      7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                              7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                              7

4          Petitions                                                                                                     7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                      7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                            7

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                      8

9          Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan Update                                                                                                        9

10        Chile Tsunami Research Deployment and Auckland Tsunami Work Programme                                                                                              13

11        Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) Work Programme Update                                                                                 21

12        Items for Information                                                                              27  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

An apology from Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse has been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 25 August 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan Update

 

File No.: CP2015/21626

 

  

 

ü Reduction

ü Readiness

ü Response

ü Recovery

Purpose

1.      To provide the Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group committee (committee) with an update on the development of the Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) Group Plan (Group Plan).

Executive Summary

2.      Since the last Group Plan update the project team has conducted a wide range of engagement activities across CDEM group members and key stakeholders, local boards and advisory panels and a diverse cross-section of Auckland’s communities.

3.      The informal engagement phase has been completed which has resulted in rich information and knowledge gathering and sharing.

4.      The next phase has commenced with the project team identifying a content structure, narrative and framework for action from the feedback received for development of the draft Group Plan to align with key milestones.      

5.      On 16 December 2015, the committee will meet to endorse the draft Group Plan for the statutory consultation process and agree the approach for the formal hearings process. 

 

Recommendation

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee:

a)      receive the Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Plan Update report.

 

 

Comments

6.      Since the last Group Plan update in August 2015, the project team has conducted a wide range of engagement activities and completed the first phase of information and knowledge gathering and sharing through:

·        One-on-one interviews with CEG members (completed end August 2015).

·        ‘Shaping a Resilient Auckland’ symposium held Thursday 3 September 2015 with 86 stakeholders’ participating. 

·        Local Board workshops (workshops scheduled with 20 out of 21 Local Boards between September and November 2015).

·        Reports and discussions with council Advisory Panels (Youth, Senior, Disability, Ethnic and Pacific Peoples).

·        Workshops with Youth, Senior, Ethnic and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels.

·        Community group workshops with four community groups based in Papakura, Manurewa, Papatoetoe and Onehunga. 

·        Updates at community Inner City Business District network meetings.

·        Distribution of information via updates through local community group e-newsletters and websites (ten).

·        Manned displays at community events such as Otahuhu Community Safety event, NZ Police Open Day (North/West), Probus Botany and NZ ShakeOut initiatives.

·        Interactions with customers at Service Centres and Libraries.

·        Joint partnerships between council departments to deliver key messages.

·        A questionnaire on Shape Auckland asking Aucklanders what they think is important when planning how we will manage the next big emergency (submissions closed 23 October 2015).

·        Information disseminated through council channels, e.g. community newsletters, social and traditional media, online, publications (Our Auckland). 

 

7.      Some of the engagement activities asked Aucklanders to answer a series of questions either in questionnaire form or during workshop sessions.  Below is a high-level synopsis of what these Aucklanders told us were priorities and our areas for us to focus on.

·    Improved and accessible hazard and risk communication and public education, specifically in schools.

·    Incentivise preparedness action for communities.

·    Work with and or empower Local Boards to champion action.

·    Ensure communities are aware and understand what actions to take in a disaster, for example, where to go (erect tsunami evacuation signage).

·    Consistent and timely public alerting and warning systems.

·    Effective and established recovery planning.

·    Increase trust and confidence through neighbourhood initiatives.

·    Encourage people to take responsibility through advertising, sharing information, practice and knowledge within communities.

·    Ensure people have realistic expectations about the help they can expect to receive during and after a disaster.

·    Identify and work with key leaders and local established community-based organisations, for example, churches, workplaces, Marae, Neighbourhood Support.

·    Continue to develop and maintain strong working relationships between council and the community.

·    Connect with your neighbours, for example, Connect4

·    Regular community exercises and drills, for example, community evacuation exercises.

·    Use technology, for example social media, apps.

·    Work closer with Business Improvement District associations.

·    Understand Auckland’s communities, especially their needs.

·    More visible and resourced staff to support community development.

·    On-going community forums, network meetings, workshops.

 

8.      These recommendations and themes will be incorporated into the draft Group Plan document for committee members’ consideration in December 2015.  A total of 30 submissions were received via the Shape Auckland website.

9.      In addition, the Group Plan project team has worked with the University of Auckland and the Auckland University of Technology, to explore a series of high-level challenges to build Auckland’s resilience to disasters.  These initiatives will be included in the framework for action in the draft Group Plan.  

10.    A workshop with staff from the Wellington and Auckland offices of the Ministry of CDEM was also conducted to ensure Auckland’s Group Plan is aligned with national CDEM thinking and new strategy development.

11.    After completing these informal engagement activities the project team are able to move into the next phase of the project, being developing the draft Group Plan in preparation for the statutory consultation process.  The team are currently developing a content structure, narrative and framework for action to develop the draft Group Plan.

12.    On 16 December 2015, the committee will meet briefly to consider this draft Group Plan, for the statutory consultation process (18 January - 18 April 2016) and the formal hearings process approach (currently scheduled from 16 May – 20 May 2016).

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.    For the purposes of preparing this report, no specific local board views or implications were sought. local board views on the Group Plan review are being sought in workshops between September and November 2015.  Early feedback from local boards suggests local board members; in particular CDEM portfolio holders, want to better understand and agree their roles and responsibilities before, during and after an emergency.

Māori impact statement

14.    The development of the Group Plan requires engagement with Māori. During the informal engagement phase our intention to engage with Māori was not realised. A review of this process is currently underway to ensure that targeted engagement with both mana whenua and mataa waka occurs.

Implementation

15.    There are no implementation issues at this stage of the project.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Author

Kiri Maxwell, Senior Advisor Readiness, Civil Defence and Emergency Management

Authoriser

John Dragicevich - Director Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

Chile Tsunami Research Deployment and Auckland Tsunami Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2015/22805

 

  

ü Reduction

ü Readiness

ü Response

ü Recovery

 

Purpose

1.      To update the committee on findings from the New Zealand research deployment to Chile to study the impacts of the 16 September 2015 tsunami and to propose an Auckland tsunami work programme for the committee’s consideration.

Executive Summary

2.      At 10.54am (NZT) on 17 September 2015, a magnitude 8.3 earthquake struck the west coast of Chile near the province of Coquimbo.  The earthquake generated a tsunami which caused significant damage locally with strong currents and small waves recorded around the Pacific.  On 26 September 2015, a New Zealand research contingent travelled to Chile to undertake research on the lifeline impacts and subsequent emergency response to the tsunami. 

3.      The evacuation conducted following the earthquake was successful with one million people evacuated and only 15 deaths.  For some communities tsunami waves arrived within 20 minutes of earthquake onset.  The main factors contributing to this success included:

§  Public education through evacuation signage and clearly marked roads identifying evacuation routes

§  Public knowledge of what action to undertake when a warning, natural and official , is received through annual physical evacuation drills

§  Effective, reliable cell broadcasting messaging system supported by 24 hour central government operations centres

4.      A tsunami work programme, with an emphasis on public education and physical evacuation drills, is recommended to ensure that Aucklanders and visitors to Auckland are adequately informed of their tsunami risk and will take the necessary actions on receipt of either a natural of official warning.

5.      This report will be accompanied by a presentation from Richard Woods, Head of Emergency Management Planning, on his deployment to Chile and key lessons.

 

Recommendation

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee:

a)      approve the Auckland Tsunami work programme.

 

 

Comments

6.      On 26 September 2015, a New Zealand research contingent travelled to Chile to undertake research on the lifeline impacts and subsequent emergency response to the 16 September tsunami event.  The delegation included representatives from GNS Science, NIWA, the University of Canterbury, Wellington Lifelines Group and Auckland Council.  The deployment was co-funded by these agencies with additional funding provided by the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering and the Earthquake Commission. 


 

7.      A recent review of tsunami impacts to lifelines for the Wellington and Auckland Lifelines Groups highlighted large gaps in our understanding of impacts to lifelines and a lack of data on one to five metre tsunami flow depths. This event, particularly impacts in the Coquimbo province, presented an excellent opportunity to capture such data.  The lifelines assessment undertook a census style data collection using handheld tablets, where all lifelines assets within the inundation zone were surveyed. The survey focused on the energy, transport and water sectors for which a large number of assets were affected. In addition to the survey, meetings with local lifelines utility companies provided situational context on the operability of lifeline networks during the event.  The results of this research are now being collated and will be presented to the Auckland Lifelines Group in due course.

8.      Meetings with central and local government agencies, members of the public and emergency managers provided insight into the emergency response.  Since the February 2010 tsunami, Chile has made improvements to public alerting infrastructure and substantially enhanced public education activities.  As a result only 15 deaths were directly related to the September 2015 tsunami and evacuation compared to 150 deaths in 2010.  In total, one million people were evacuated from coastal communities.  The effectiveness of the evacuation was due to a combination of factors including:

§  Clearly marked evacuation routes with standard signage and demarcation of routes on roads.

§  Annual physical evacuation drills are conducted.  Some drills were undertaken prior to the 2010 tsunami however over 300,000 people now practice annually.

§  A very high level of public awareness to evacuate on the receipt of either a natural or official warning.

§  Central government investment in cell broadcasting technology allowed a message to be received with six minutes of earthquake onset.

9.      At present New Zealand mobile phones do not support cell broadcasting technology rather, Auckland relies on suite of public alerting options.  It is therefore, crucial that members of the public are informed of their risk and act on the receipt of the necessary warning, be that natural or official.

 

Auckland Tsunami Work Programme

10.    While Chile has had a succession of recent tsunamis due to an earthquake cluster, prior to 2010, the last major tsunami had occurred in 1960.  This time gap led to public awareness and knowledge of the hazard being diminished.  Historically, New Zealand has also been subject to similar earthquake clusters, for example the 1929-42 earthquake sequence included seven earthquakes greater than magnitude 7.  New Zealand has experienced a relatively quiescent state of earthquake and related tsunami activity in the last 60 to 70 years which has also led to a diminished level of public awareness.

11.    To ensure readiness for future tsunamis, it is proposed to implement an Auckland tsunami work programme to be completed by June 2017.  Given New Zealand does not have a 24 hour central government alerting facility, public education and increasing the awareness of necessary actions is priority.   The work programme would comprise:

§  Public education through:

§  The installation of nationally consistent signage (Appendix 1 and 2). 

§  Where appropriate, demarcation of evacuation routes and safe zones on roads.

§  Annual physical evacuation drills in collaboration with community networks.  In conjunction with Rotary, the first drill will be held in Orewa in early 2016 followed by a region wide drill during the national tsunami exercise being held in late 2016.

§  Distribution of hard copy, neighbourhood specific evacuation maps to households and businesses.

§  Ensure the development and maintenance of robust public alerting systems (presently under review).

 

§  Development of a tsunami contingency plans and robust standard operating procedures to inform regional to near shore warnings such as a tsunami generated from the Tonga-Kermadec trench.

§  Consideration to be given to designation of structures, primarily buildings, for vertical evacuation.

12.    The proposed tsunami work programme was approved by the Coordinating Executive Group on Tuesday 27 October 2015 and if approved by this committee will be implemented as part of the CDEM departmental work programme.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.    Local Boards will be encouraged to champion physical evacuation drills and support public education initiatives in their respective communities.

Māori impact statement

14.    The proposed tsunami work programme will increase readiness for all Aucklanders and visitors to the city.  As such, there are no particular impacts on Māori which are different to other residents or visitors to Auckland.

Implementation

15.    There are no implementation issues of note and the work programme can be expended from within existing budgets.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

New Zealand Tsunami Signage Options

17

bView

Tsunami Information Board Template

19

     

Signatories

Authors

Richard Woods - Head of Emergency Management Planning

Authorisers

John Dragicevich - Director Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 



Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) Work Programme Update

 

File No.: CP2015/22881

 

  

 

ü Reduction

ü Readiness

ü Response

ü Recovery

Purpose

1.      To update members of the Civil Defence and Emergency Management (CDEM) Committee on the progress of the Auckland CDEM team’s work programme.

Executive Summary

2.      This is a regular report to keep the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee up to date on the CDEM department’s work programme.

3.      At the time of writing this report all service delivery measures and key performance indicators were on track with further detail on activity described in the body of this report. Key highlights for the period included:

§  Completed decommission of two legacy civil defence public alerting options: OPTN text alerting system and North Shore fixed telephone warning systems.

§  439,937 Aucklanders were registered to participate in Exercise Shakeout on 15 October at 9.15 a.m. A debrief process has commenced to review the communications approach and improvements will be documented for consideration at the next ShakeOut event.

§  Tsunami Sirens and Public Alerting Systems were tested for daylight saving in September with some sirens requiring remedial repairs.

§  Radio communication systems were tested with the help of Amateur Radio Emergency Communications (AREC) at Exercise Drifting Kite in Manurewa in September.

§  The Emergency Coordination Centre was activated to a monitoring mode for the Chilean tsunami threat in September 2015.

 

Recommendation

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee:

a)      receive Auckland Civil Defence and Emergency Management team’s work programme update report.

 

 

Comments

4.      At the time of writing this report all service delivery measures and key performance indicators were on track with further detail on specific CDEM work streams described below.

 

Queensland Fruit Fly

5.      The Auckland Council response to the Queensland Fruit Fly incident in Grey Lynn and surrounding areas is continuing. The Ministry has resumed more frequent checking of the surveillance traps in the A Zone of the controlled area, closer to where the original flies were found. It is hoped to declare eradication and end the movement controls on fruit and vegetables in early December.

6.      Auckland CDEM continues to provide a staff member for one day a week to provide a single point of contact for affected residents and businesses.

 

Auckland CDEM Top Service Delivery Objectives

Understand and communicate, and where practical reduce the risks of hazards to Auckland

 

7.      The local board hazard reports produced in 2014/15 have been well received with positive feedback.  The Kaipatiki local board report is currently being prepared.  A design for summary leaflets has been drafted by the Auckland Council communications team.  These are intended to be distributed at local events, service centres and libraries. 

8.      The draft Operational Evacuation Plan was scenario tested by the Auckland Transport Response Group (ATRG) in August 2015.  Gaps in the draft plan were identified and subsequently rectified with the version now with ATRG members for comment. 

9.      The annual University of Auckland disaster management volcanic simulation was held in the Bledisloe ECC on 31 August 2015.  This is the fourth your Auckland CDEM have hosted the approximate 35 students.

10.    A tour of Auckland’s hazardscape and some infrastructure facilities is being arranged for CDEM Group Committee and Waste Advisory Group members for early 2016.  This will be an opportunity for members to discuss integrated hazard related issues facing the region.

11.    Work on Council’s Natural Hazards Risk Management Plan is on track to be reported to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in the New Year. 

 

Auckland CDEM Group Plan Review

12.    The “Shaping a Resilient Auckland” symposium was held on 3 September 2015 to frame the first stage of content for the third generation Auckland CDEM Group plan.  The symposium was structured using the four Sendai disaster risk reduction priorities.

13.    The first round of draft text content has been completed.  Staff are now working this text into a narrative in collaboration with the University of Auckland.

 

Build individual, community and business resilience against the disruption caused by the impact of a hazard

14.    Work has continued on producing new Community Response Plans and reviewing older plans. Otara- Papatoetoe, Bethells, Massey-Henderson and Albert-Eden are new plans and are progressing with greater Orewa and Waiheke plans under review.

15.    Community resilience  staff held an exercise with the newly formed Manurewa Community Response Group. The exercise was developed around opening an Evacuation Centre and participants include Māori Wardens, a Māori Warden Response Team, the 4X4 Club, members of the Amateur Radio club and community members.  Initial training has also been held with the Howick Botany Community Response Group.

16.    CDEM will be taking part in a total of seven Christmas parades across the Auckland Region with the main focus being on the Farmers Santa Parade on 30 November 2015.

17.    CDEM have attended two large exercises as invited observers, the first being at the Royal New Zealand Airforce fuel farm exercise at Whenuapai and secondly, Exercise Susi, a table top exercise based on the evacuation of Wynyard Quarter in an emergency


 

Public Education

18.    A trial community ambassador programme has been initiated. This initiative ‘piggy-backs’ on the established NZ Police ambassador programme.  Shanti Niwas Charitable Trust is our partner in delivery and is expected to be underway in the new year.

19.    The University of Auckland survey of inner-city apartment buildings to understand levels of CBD resident’s preparedness has been completed and a report is being formulated.

20.    The Community Resilience team attended the NZ Police Open day on 18 October 2015 along with RT3 Auckland Local Emergency Response Team.  This was used as an opportunity to build and maintain connections with the emergency services and the community.

21.    CDEM are currently working with the Cornwall Park Trust to establish a Civil Defence component of their education outside the classroom programme.

 

Emergency Coordination Centre (ECC)

22.    Hamish Keith has been appointed as acting ECC Manager following the resignation of Paul Clement.

23.    The work programme for the ECC has been reviewed and updated to include the corrective actions from recent storm events and exercises.

24.    A review of the duty officer or backup duty officer system and activation process is currently underway. Duty Officers may be given greater responsibilities in regard to managing operational stakeholder relationships. This review incorporates how stakeholders including Auckland Council departments are included as part of the ECC activation process.

25.    How information is received and monitored within the ECC is under review. There is an opportunity to better utilise and access Auckland Council and stakeholder resources through CDEM relationships that will enhance our response capability.

26.    Contact lists and how we communicate with stakeholders is being reviewed including the development of a VHF radio strategy.

27.    IT Systems within Bledisloe ECC are being reviewed to be more resilient and have stronger alignment with the rest of council. This includes an upgrade of IT security and potentially the email system.

28.    A comprehensive review of WebEOC and EMIS systems is currently underway to determine what system is preferred for future use. The review will encompass technical capability, usability, compatibility, costs, security and governance.

 

Public Alerting Review

29.    The review of the public alerting systems is on-going. The review will identify a range of alerting platforms, input from internal audit, strategic partnerships and other council departments and stakeholders will be held to identify further initiatives. The estimated completion date for this review and options development is early 2016. The review will consider the costs and benefits of all public alerting options together including the fixed tsunami siren, helicopter siren, public alerting platform and other public alerting options.   Following consideration of the review, the findings will be reported to this committee as the CDEM Public Alerting Strategy for consideration.


 

30.    In September, Red Cross NZ launched a free smartphone application which has some functionality for alerting subscribers of imminent hazards and which can provide information during an emergency.  The launch of this application has been undertaken in conjunction with the Wellington Region Emergency Management Office (WREMO).  Staff will meet with Red Cross and WREMO representatives in mid-November to understand the implications for Auckland and the noted public alerting review.

Welfare

31.    Following an open contestable process, Catherine Gilhooly has been appointed to the role of Welfare Manager. Catherine held the Welfare Manager position for 12 months in an acting role.  This acting timeframe allowed for confirmation and alignment of the role within the existing structure.

32.    The new arrangements for welfare are being progressed with key staff from the lead agencies of the nine identified welfare sub-functions. Welfare staff from Auckland, Northland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty have established a closer working framework to support the new arrangements throughout the regions.

33.    The Welfare Manager is working further with marae and other stakeholders to develop a framework to engage marae communities in the welfare space.

34.    Recent discussions as to the benefits and disadvantages of pre-publicising Civil Defence Centres to the general public has prompted a timely to review existing process and decisions.  A report on this topic will be prepared for the next CDEM committee meeting.

 

Logistics

35.    The CDEM Logistics manager is involved in a working group to develop advanced logistics training for the National Integrated Training Framework. A successful run through of the draft training framework was completed in September with selected participants.  Feedback has been received allowing for final adjustments to be made before its release in November 2015. Logistics is the first of the advanced courses and will provide the foundation for the other disciplines.

 

Training and Development

36.    The Integrated Training Framework intermediate course is in its final stage of development, with a pilot course to be held in Taranaki during May 2016. Auckland CDEM have provided technical expertise for the development of this framework and sit on the Steering Committee.

37.    The Logistics and Welfare managers are providing subject matter expert input to the Integrated Training Framework proposals for advanced welfare and logistics training.

38.    A two day induction led by MCDEM and Auckland CDEM staff has been held for newly appointed alternate controllers. The joint Training Committee has met and minor changes have been made in line with new CIMS model were made to the CIMS presentations. Three CIMS Courses have been run throughout the year with the fourth due to be held on 12 and 13 November 2015.

39.    Up to four graduates are to be appointed to the CDEM department from Auckland Council’s graduate employment programme.  These positions have been derived from existing vacancies.  Graduates will rotate within department teams to gain knowledge on all facets CDEM and Rural Fire.


 

Recovery

40.    The four recovery workstream chairs (for Built, Economic, Social and Infrastructure) have been appointed and met on 29 October to discuss roles and interdependencies. They will be responsible for developing the membership of their task groups and areas of influence in their respective sectors as per the following descriptions:

§  Built Environment Task Group Chair: Reports to CDEM Recovery Manager, establishes priorities for reconstruction/recovery of infrastructure, engineering lifelines, services, buildings and the rural sector considering mitigation opportunities.  Advises the Group Recovery Manager on priorities and options and their likely effects on the community

§  Natural Environment Task Group Chair: Reports to CDEM Recovery Manager, to minimise the impact on the natural environment, which may have consequences on the social, built and economic environments

§  Economic Environment Task Group Chair: Reports to CDEM Recovery Manager, coordinates the efforts of agencies involved in the restoration of economic recovery.

§  Social Environment Task Group: Reports to CDEM Recovery Manager, coordinates the efforts of agencies that have significant recovery roles in the social environment, whether legislative or voluntary, to care for the social recovery of the community.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

41.    Local Boards are being consulted in through community resilience planning initiatives and on the development of local board hazard reports.  As required, CDEM continue to attend Local Board meetings.  

Māori impact statement

42.    Both mana whenua and mataa waka will be involved with the welfare marae initiatives to be reported at the next CDEM Group committee meeting.

Implementation

43.    No implementation issues identified.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Richard Woods - Head of Emergency Management Planning

Authoriser

John Dragicevich - Director Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

Items for Information

 

File No.: CP2015/24111

 

  

 

ü Reduction

ü Readiness

ü Response

ü Recovery

Purpose

1.      To receive information items and reports from Rural Fire and the Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management.

Executive Summary

2.      This is a regular information-only report which allows for information sharing and greater visibility of information, where no decisions are required.

3.      The following information only reports are attached:

·      Rural Fire Update

·      Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management (MCDEM)  Work Programme Update

·      Ministry of Civil Defence & Emergency Management Calendar

 

 

Recommendation

That the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee:

a)      receive the items for information report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Rural Fire Update

29

bView

MCDEM Work Programme Update

33

cView

MCDEM Rolling Calendar

39

     

Signatories

Author

Mara Bebich - Stakeholder Liasion Manager

Authoriser

John Dragicevich - Director Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 

Rural Fire Update

 

  

 


 

ü   Reduction

ü   Readiness

ü   Response

ü   Recovery

Purpose

1.      To update all members of the Civil Defence Emergency Management Group (CDEMG) on current Rural Fire activities.


Comments

 

2.      Review of Fire Services update

3.      At the previous meeting of this committee the Principal Rural Fire Officer provided a report on the Review of Fire Services along with the proposed consultation timelines.

4.      In a public statement in September, Minister Peter Dunne spoke about the common themes coming strongly through consultation including a shared desire for change, the importance of local engagement and community links, and the need to strongly support our volunteers.

5.      The Minister intends to take a paper to Cabinet on 9th November proposing a new organisational and financial structure for the proposed Fire Services organisation. Once the paper has been adopted by Cabinet, will give direction to transitional arrangements and associated legislation to give effect to the new organisation. The legislation should be introduced early next year with the intention that the new Fire Services be operative by the mid-2017.

Auckland Rural Fire aids United States Wildfires

6.      A 15 person team of vegetation fire specialists including Scott Marchant from Auckland Rural Fire were deployed to Idaho and Washington State after a request from the US government. The US has experienced one of the most severe fire seasons in history. Over 9 million acres been burnt by over 50,000 wildfires. This is the seventh time New Zealand has supported North America in the past 15 years including the Canadian deployment earlier this year.

7.      The team travelled to Boise, Idaho where the National Interagency Fire Centre is located, they were all given a safety briefing and equipment to undertake there specific tasks. They were also given “fire shelter’ training which is compulsory in the US, a concept new to many from the southern hemisphere. The team was quickly able to integrate with all the resources from USA including crews from Mexico, Australia and Canada as these countries all use the very similar incident management structures and processes as New Zealand.

8.      The New Zealand team specialised in aircraft management and leadership of firefighting crews, while working in rugged mountainous terrain.

9.      The deployment provided much needed support for the US. Deployments of this nature are not only good for international relations, but an excellent opportunity to gain experience and share skills with fire managers from around the world.

10.    The US and Canadian Embassy have invited members of the deployments to attend de-briefs in Wellington in November where specific learnings will be finalised.  A summary of the learnings from this deployment will advance Auckland Rural Fire and the wider NZ fire sector and will be integrated into policy, the fire plan and work programs. 


 

11.    The key learnings included, improved safety considerations, pre-deployment skills alignment, rehabilitation of fire grounds post fires and alignment to international training standards. The experienced gained by these deployments will lead to greater operational confidence, enabling more efficient and effective resource utilisation on the fire ground.

12.    Providing such assistance to our international partners builds relationships, development opportunities and capacity that will assist and support the New Zealand fire sector should that be needed?

13.    Two key Auckland Rural Fire team members Thomas Harre and Rory Renwick also attended an internationally recognized Advanced Wildland Fire Behaviour specialist training course in Ontario Canada.  This course attracted a significant training grant from the National Rural Fire Authority.

14.    Rural Fire Fleet replacement

15.    The Auckland Rural Fire fleet as previously reported is somewhat ageing and incurs significant maintenance costs annually, currently Auckland Rural Fire have a joint project with the New Zealand Fire Service to enter a selective tender process looking at building 2 to 3 appliances per year, this build program is aligned to the fleet replacement strategy. The New Zealand Fire Service is assisting in the tender and procurement process.

16.    Volunteer Recognition Awards

17.    The Auckland Rural Fire Authority hosted its annual recognition awards evening at Alexandra Park Raceway on the 17th October with 320 attendees.

18.    Auckland Rural Fire would like to acknowledge and thank the ongoing support from the CDEM committee and appreciate the participation of the chair and deputy chair at the recent Rural Fire and Civil Defence Response Team’s Honours evening.

19.    There were 63 National Certificates were awarded to the volunteers totalling 2213 credits which equates to approximately 22,130 hours of training.

20.    A significant number of years of service were also achieved by the Auckland Rural Fire Volunteers with over 287 years of service and 220 years of service for the Auckland Local Emergency Response Teams. This is a significant achievement and Service Honours were presented to recognise these achievements.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.    Local Board views, have not been sought.

 

Maori impact statement

22.    The positions adopted in this report do not give rise to any issues for Maori.

 

Implementation

23.    There are no implementation issues at this stage of the project.

 



Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Thomas Harre, Principal Rural Fire Officer, Rural Fire

Authoriser

 John Dragicevich, Director Civil Defence & Emergency Management


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 







Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015

 


Civil Defence and Emergency Management Group Committee

17 November 2015