I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Economic Development Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 4 November 2015

9.30am

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street

Auckland

 

Economic Development Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Anae Arthur Anae

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Ross Clow

 

Members

Cr Cameron Brewer

 

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

 

 

Ms Precious Clark

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

 

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

 

Cr Denise Krum

 

 

Mr Kris MacDonald

 

 

Cr Dick Quax

 

 

Cr Penny Webster

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

 

 

 

Ex-officio

(without voting rights)

All other Councillors

 

 

(Quorum 6 members)

 

 

 

Louis Dalzell

Democracy Advisor

 

27 October 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8135

Email: louis.dalzell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 



TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Responsibilities and key projects

 

The Committee is responsible for regional economic development by:

·         Developing (and monitoring) strategy, policy and action plans, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee, as set out in the Schedule of Key Projects for Reporting Committees, attached to these Terms of Reference* 

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

 

Powers

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

(i)      the power to establish sub-committees

 

 

*Schedule of key projects for the Economic Development Committee

Economic development strategy implementation

Global partnerships strategy – implementation and monitoring

Business relationships

 


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Economic Development Committee

04 November 2015

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          8

9          Post briefing - Visit to Singapore and China, September 2015                                9

10        Update on Tripartite Summit 2016                                                                             17

11        Regional Economic Activity Report 2015                                                                 19  

12        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies for absence have been received from Mayor Len Brown and Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Economic Development Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 August 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Economic Development Committee

04 November 2015

 

Post briefing - Visit to Singapore and China, September 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/22064

 

  

Purpose

1.       To inform the Economic Development Committee about the outcomes from the participation of the Mayor and council staff on their visit to Singapore and China in September 2015 and outline next steps following these visits.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council sent a delegation of four to Singapore comprising Mayor Len Brown, the CEO of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) and representatives from the Mayor’s Office and Global Partnerships and Strategy. 

3.       In Singapore the Mayor delivered a lecture as part of the Centre for Liveable Cities’ lecture series (similar to our Auckland Conversations). He spoke on the topic of ‘Auckland on the world stage’, and discussed the initiatives we are taking to globalise Auckland within an increasingly competitive international environment.

4.       The delegation also focused on engagement with Singapore-based investors to promote Auckland as a business friendly city and to encourage investment interest across a broad spectrum of sectors.  The delegation identified further opportunities to increase international investment in Auckland and for Auckland businesses looking to expand in to Singapore. 

5.       The six-person China delegation included Mayor Len Brown, the CEO of ATEED, and representatives from the Mayor’s Office, ATEED, Global Partnerships and Strategy and a mayoral interpreter.  The delegation was supported by the New Zealand Consulate and New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) Trade Commissioner in Guangzhou.

6.       In Xiamen the delegation attended the inaugural New Zealand-China Mayoral Forum.  The Forum, led by Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) President Lawrence Yule and hosted by Madame Li Xiaolin, President of The Chinese People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries, strengthened engagement between mayors from both countries and focused on development opportunities within New Zealand’s education, primary industries and tourism sectors.  As a result of the forum, Auckland will lead on exploring a 72 hour transit visa exemption for tourists from China.   The second New Zealand-China Mayoral Forum will take place in Wellington in 2017.

7.       Following Xiamen, Mayor Brown visited Guangzhou to progress initiatives under the Tripartite Economic Alliance signed in 2014 with Guangzhou and Los Angeles, and to discuss the upcoming summit in Auckland, in May 2016.

8.       Whilst in China, the delegation met with businesses to discuss their participation at the 2016 Tripartite Summit and investment opportunities in Auckland.  These included:

·   Guangzhou-based innovation incubator ‘Innohub’ will establish a NZD$20 million fund to invest in Auckland businesses

·   Drone manufacturer, Ehang, will visit Auckland to trial their technology

·   Auckland-based intellectual property firms will assist Chinese companies with patent protection

·   Collaboration with China’s largest animation company, Alpha Animation, on the possibility of a theme park in Auckland, liaising with one of China’s largest fashion manufacturers about establishing a presence in Auckland, and working with investors around the establishment of an international school in Auckland 

·   The potential introduction of Qingdao-Auckland direct flights

·   Further collaboration in the education, marine science, transport, ports and cultural sectors.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Economic Development Committee:

a)      note the programme of meetings and the outcomes from the attendance of the Mayor and staff in Singapore and China in September 2015.

b)      note Auckland Council is likely to engage in future activity with the China-New Zealand Mayoral Forum (Wellington will host the second forum in 2017).

c)      note Auckland Council will host the 2016 Tripartite Economic Alliance Summit in Auckland.

 

Comments

Outcomes

Lecture at the Centre for Liveable Cities in Singapore

9.       The Mayor delivered a lecture as part of the Centre for Liveable Cities’ (CLC) lecture series (similar to our Auckland Conversations). He spoke on the topic of ‘Auckland on the world stage’, and discussed the initiatives the city is taking to globalise Auckland within an increasingly competitive international environment. The lecture was an opportunity to share the Auckland story and raise the profile of Auckland in Singapore and globally through the wide audience CLC attracts (approximately 100 in attendance at the lecture, and 30,000 on the global online distribution list). This was a particularly important opportunity against Auckland’s interest in Singapore as an investment source and destination, and our ongoing participation in the Singapore-led World Cities Summit.

Profile Auckland in Singapore to investors

10.     The delegation met with Singapore-based investors, including the head of Asia-Pacific for the $266 billion Singapore investment company, Temasek. These meetings provided an important opportunity to establish an initial relationship with serious investors, a number of who are set to or have plans to visit Auckland on investment scoping missions in the immediate to medium term.

11.     Meetings were also held with NZTE, International Enterprise (Singapore’s investment promotion agency), business incubators, and Singapore-based New Zealanders.  Attendees gained a much better understanding of the Singaporean investment environment, both for Auckland accessing capital from Singapore, and for Auckland businesses looking to expand in to Singapore.

Participate in a waste management meeting and site visit in Singapore

12.     The delegation visited two private enterprise environmental projects: a waste-to-energy plant run by Keppel Seghers’ Tuas; and a food waste to re-usable water system at the Swissotel Hotel, both of which provided an insight in to some of the more progressive ways in which Singapore is dealing with waste management issues. The site visits also provided the opportunity to meet with officials from Singapore’s National Environment Agency and engage in broader dialogue around shared sustainability challenges and issues.

The inaugural China-New Zealand Mayoral Forum in Xiamen

13.     The Forum was attended by 12 New Zealand mayors and 13 Chinese mayors. Mayor Brown led the New Zealand side of the forum on New Zealand-China tourism relations, and spoke on the opportunity for greater tourism flows between Auckland and China.

14.     Auckland was identified as potentially being well-placed for Chinese air carriers looking to expand in to the Latin America market, and this would be likely to deliver significant benefits to the Auckland tourism economy.

15.     The mayors from Auckland, Christchurch, Dunedin, Gisborne, Hastings, Matamata Piako District, Palmerston North, Taupo, Tauranga, Timaru, Wanganui Region and Wellington, together with the Chinese mayors, signed the Xiamen Declaration outlining the forum’s intent to deepen the friendship between New Zealand and China, and work towards the advancement of joint economic development outcomes.

16.     Participating mayors agreed to identify the specific outcomes wanted from the next forum in Wellington in 2017, with a city from New Zealand to lead on each sector.

17.     Very productive meetings were had in Xiamen with the Mayors of Auckland’s international partner cities Qingdao and Ningbo.

Bilateral meeting with the Mayor of Guangzhou

18.     The Mayor of Guangzhou, CHEN Jianhua, acknowledged Auckland’s strong support for the Tripartite Economic Alliance, and committed to sending a significant delegation of Guangzhou businesses to the Auckland Summit in May 2016.

Specific investment meetings in China

19.     In Xiamen, the delegation met with investors, particularly in the development and marine industry, and witnessed the signing of several Memoranda of Understanding between Auckland and Fujian Province marine sectors.

20.     A meeting was also held with the Chairman of Septwolves, one of China’s largest fashion manufacturers, regarding their presence in Auckland.

21.     In Guangzhou, the delegation met with a number of parties, including:

·      Guangzhou-based Aucklander and head of ISA international School Guangzhou Elaine Whelan, who wants to establish an international school in Auckland

·      Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, who have successfully expanded into Guangzhou and are keen to share their story with other Auckland firms. As a result of this discussion, opportunities were identified for Auckland-based IP protection firms to assist Guangzhou-based companies having difficulties with patent protection

·      Alpha Animation, the largest animation company in China, who are keen to leverage the NZ-China co-production agreement to develop more IP in Auckland.

·      Ehang, a large drone manufacturer and innovator looking to test their technology in Auckland

·      NZTE and MFAT representatives in Guangzhou.

22.     A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between ATEED and InnoHub, an innovation incubator in Guangzhou. This will pave the way for increased Chinese investment in Auckland companies and greater exposure for Auckland businesses to the Asia-Pacific rim market. As part of this MOU, InnoHub is establishing a NZD$20 million fund to invest in Auckland businesses, intends to establish a new Auckland office, and has signalled interest in being part of the ATEED-run GridAKL innovation precinct.

23.     ATEED and China Southern hosted an Auckland WeChat ID promotional lunch attended by Vice Mayor WANG, and influential tourism operators.  (WeChat is a Chinese mobile messaging platform with over 500 million active users and will be a significant tool to promote Auckland to a large number of people inside and outside of China.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next steps

24.     Next steps include:

·        Host at least three delegations of potential investors from Singapore, who otherwise would not have come here, to explore investment opportunities in Auckland businesses, infrastructure and development. ATEED will manage these visits.

·        Pursue discussions with International Enterprise, Singapore, regarding the value of positioning Auckland as a logistics and tech hub for Asia-NZ-Latin America trade.

·        Connect Auckland’s IP/expertise in the marine industry with relevant Chinese companies.

·        Follow up with Septwolves Industry Co Ltd, Xiamen, regarding their presence in Auckland.

·        Explore a 72 hour transit visa exemption for tourists from China visiting New Zealand on their way home from Australia, but particularly focussing on Chinese carriers using Auckland as a transit hub for Latin America.

·        Work with Alpha Animation on the possibility of a theme park in Auckland.

·        Liaise with investors regarding the establishment of an international school in Auckland - potential interest in developing mixed-use residential property alongside a community-focussed international school.

·        Facilitate investment opportunities for Chinese innovators Ehang and InnoHub who will participate in Auckland’s Tripartite Summit in May 2016.

·        Finalise registration and verification of Auckland’s own WeChat account.

·        Further progress the Tripartite Economic Alliance involving Auckland, Los Angeles and Guangzhou and potential benefits to be gained for Auckland across a range of shared economic sectors including ICT, film, ports, education and tourism.

·        In addition, officers will follow up on action points from meetings with the Mayor of Qingdao (including education and research in marine science, establishment of a hi-tech hub, greater tourism links including direct flights between Qingdao and Auckland, and film and screen collaboration), and with the Mayor Ningbo (sharing of information and expertise on rail and metro developments, increasing links in the arts and culture sectors including student music exchanges, sharing information on ports development and investigate the exportation of more agricultural products). 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

25.     The governing body is responsible for international partnerships under the council’s economic development activity (reflecting the national and regional significance of these initiatives to Auckland). Local Boards can assist in supporting Auckland’s partnerships with existing partner cities. Benefits from this visit may accrue across various industry sectors within the Auckland region.

 

 

 

 

 

Māori impact statement

26.     There is active and ongoing commitment to engage with Māori business, cultural and iwi representatives in order to identify ways to enhance and deepen Auckland’s international connectivity and engagement as it relates to broader Māori economic development objectives.

27.     This visit is aligned with the shared economic agenda for Auckland.  Māori participation and outcomes are integral to a number of the nine priorities of the shared agenda, in particular relating to brand, visibility, skills, investment and business.  The visit increased Auckland’s visibility and brand and through this our Māori identity, which is Auckland’s point of difference in the world (Auckland Plan outcome). We will be working with Māori business, cultural and iwi representatives on various aspects of our engagement in these two markets and, in particular, as it relates to Tripartite activity and Auckland’s Māori identity.

28.     The synergies between Chinese and Māori culture provide an important platform for further progressing business connectivity and cultural linkages with this important market.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Summary of key meetings

15

      

Signatories

Authors

Sanchia Jacobs - Manager Global Partnerships

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

 


Economic Development Committee

04 November 2015

 



Economic Development Committee

04 November 2015

 

Update on Tripartite Summit 2016

 

File No.: CP2015/22166

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Economic Development Committee on the planning for the Auckland hosted Tripartite Economic Alliance Summit in May 2016.

Executive Summary

2.       This presentation, which will be given by Koro Dickinson, Global Partnership and Strategy Advisor, follows resolution number ECO/2015/18 (18 August 2015) which noted officials would provide regular Tripartite Economic Alliance updates to the Economic Development Committee - in particular on the planning for the Auckland hosted Tripartite Summit that will be attended by Auckland, Guangzhou and LA city representatives and business leaders.

 

Recommendation

That the Economic Development Committee:

a)      receive the Update on Tripartite Summit 2016 presentation.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Louis Dalzell - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

 


Economic Development Committee

04 November 2015

 

Regional Economic Activity Report 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/22164

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an overview of the Regional Economic Activity Report 2015, highlighting the key points and changes from the equivalent 2014 Report.

Executive Summary

2.       The Regional Economic Activity Report 2015 (2015 Report) is the third annual report in the series which commenced in 2013.

3.       Overall, the Auckland economy performed well as indicated by an increase in regional GDP and improvements in other indicators, although increases in house prices and rent are noted as a risk to the regional economy.

4.       The 2015 Report includes a highlighted section on South Auckland, noting growth in educational attainment, the contribution that improving the socio-economic conditions can make to Auckland’s short and long term performance and the opportunities represented by its youth, diversity and capacity for growth. The 2015 Report notes that Auckland Council and Government are focusing on improving the effectiveness of assistance and interventions in South Auckland.

5.       The 2015 Report is associated with an updated and more detailed web tool on the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s web site. The web tool enables comparison across time, regions and territorial authority area across a range of indicators and themes.

 

Recommendation

That the Economic Development Committee:

a)      receive the summary of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s recently released Regional Economic Activity Report 2015 (a full copy of which is provided as Attachment A).

 

 

Comments

Regional Economic Activity Report 2015

6.       The first Regional Economic Activity Report was published in 2013 and the 2015 Report is the third in the annual series. Each iteration has incorporated modifications, improvements and been tailored to ensure currency.

7.       The intention is that Regional Economic Activity Reports makes information more accessible about each region’s economy. The annual report provides an overview of New Zealand’s 16 regional economies to help support discussion on how best to build the future.

Key Points

8.       In the Regional Economic Outcomes section, the 2015 Report looks across the 16 regions. Key points include:

·    Auckland is in the top six regions by employment rate/employment growth

·    Auckland is one of the top two regions by household income/skilled occupation

·    Auckland is one of the three least affected regions by the population aging indicated by household income/proportion working age

·    However, Auckland pays the highest proportion of household income on rent (24% compared to 12% for Southland).

9.       Economic growth over 2000-2014 was stronger in predominantly rural regions. Even so, Auckland’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita remained above the New Zealand average, joining Taranaki and Wellington. Southland has exceeded the average in recent years, while the West Coast did exceed the average in some years.

10.     In the Auckland section the 2015 Report notes the shift that has occurred in Auckland’s economy over the past decade as it has increasingly focused on knowledge intensive services. Key points include:

·    High levels of income are consistent with high levels of education and a skilled workforce although there are significant disparities across the region

·    The report states “There are opportunities for Auckland to lift its innovation performance and continue to grow the knowledge-intensive sectors of its economy, focusing on high-value goods and services for a global market”

·    Educational disparities and barriers to young people entering the workforce represent unrealised potential

·    Auckland’s population, location and proximate time zone with Asia provide an opportunity to better connect with Asia and its growth

·    Auckland has the second highest average household income ($96,000) and the highest house prices and weekly rents

·    Strong increases in Auckland’s house prices pose a key risk to the economy and threaten to reduce Auckland’s attractiveness as a place for people and business to locate.

What’s changed for Auckland?

11.     Changes in the calculation, coverage and presentation of information means there are some limitations of direct comparisons between years, which are summarised as follows:

Auckland region

2015

2014

Regional GDP ($m)

81,186

74,746

Regional GDP per capital ($)

53,759

49,217

Mean house price

625,000

565,000

Total employment

846,950

775,313

Employment rate

64.7

63.7

Unemployment rate

6.3

6.8

Labour force participation rate

69

68.3

NEET rate

10.4

9.7

% of 18 year olds obtaining minimum NCEA level 2

82.3

81.1

% of 25-34 year olds with level 4 qualifications or higher

60.1

57

Skilled and highly skilled jobs as a share of total employment

60.7

76

12.     Improvements can be seen across Regional GDP, GDP per capita, total employment, the employment rate, unemployment rate, labour force participation[1] and the measures on NCEA attainment. However, the increase in the NEET rate (a young person not in education, employment or training) could indicate a competing trend. The decline in the share of skilled/highly skilled share of total employment is likely due to the reduced unemployment rate and increased labour force participation rate.

South Auckland

13.     The 2015 Report’s Auckland section also includes a highlighted section on South Auckland detailing differences in income and educational attainment, the main industries and its connecting infrastructure. They key points include:

·    While people in South Auckland are more likely to have no qualifications and less likely to have higher level qualifications, educational attainment is growing faster in South Auckland than the rest of the region

·    Improving the community’s socio-economic position is one of the keys to lifting Auckland’s short and long term performance

·    South Auckland’s opportunities include its youth, diversity and capacity for growth with over one-third of Auckland’s employment growth to 2040 projected to be located in South Auckland

·    The 2015 Report notes that Auckland Council and Government are focusing on improving the effectiveness of assistance and interventions in South Auckland.

Web tool

14.     The 2015 Report is associated with an updated and more detailed web tool on the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment web site, and a new phone app. (http://www.mbie.govt.nz/info-services/business/business-growth-agenda/regions/web-tool )

15.     The web tool is informative and simple to use. It holds data on 34 indicators over 8 themes – Social & income, Workforce, Housing, Education, Population, Economic, Agriculture and Tourism. Indicators are shown by interactive graphs which enable comparison across time, regions and territorial authority area.  

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

16.     Local board views have not been sought as this report merely summarises the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Regional Economic Activity Report 2015. Local boards may have particular interest in the highlight feature on South Auckland. The 2015 Report notes that Auckland Council’s efforts are focused on improving the effectiveness of assistance and interventions in South Auckland.

Māori impact statement

17.     The Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment’s 2015 Report does not clarify the impacts or implications for Māori. There is however specific reference to:

·    Māori and Pacific trades training and unlocking the productivity of Māori owned land as Auckland relevant Business Growth Agenda actions

·    Māori educational attainment in a new series of graphics included in the 2015 Report, illustrating that the level of attainment meets or is close to national goals. The figures the graphics are based on are new to the 2015 Report and only cover one year. They do not show if the level of attainment is improving.

18.     It is relevant to note that Auckland Council’s involvement in Māori economic development is being progressed under the Whai Rawa, Māori Economic Well-being work programme under Te Toa Takitini, Māori Responsive High Performance Council.   

19.     The IMSB’s view has not been sought as this report merely summarises the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Regional Economic Activity Report 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Economic Activity Report 2015  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Authors

Wayne Brown - Lead Strategic Advisor Strategic Scanning

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

     

    



[1] NB The extent to which changes in Government policy on the work requirements of beneficiaries may or may not have attributed to changes in labour force participation, employment rates and unemployment rate is not clear.