I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 16 November 2015

6.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

David Collings

 

Deputy Chairperson

Adele White

 

Members

Garry Boles

 

 

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Jim Donald

 

 

Lucy Schwaner

 

 

John Spiller

 

 

Steve Udy

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Lynda Pearson

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

9 November 2015

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 572 0151

Email: lynda.pearson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Roundabout at Pah Road and Shelley Beach Parade, Cockle Bay                5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Chair's Report                                                                                                                7

13        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       9

14        Auckland Transport Update – November 2015                                                        11

15        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards                                         25

16        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Equinox Capital Ltd at 109 Adamson Road, Flat Bush.                                                                                         53

17        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Arwen Place Projects Ltd at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark                                                                                   57

18        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Ivan Frisken Estates Ltd at 221 – 227 Murphys Road, Flat Bush                                                                          61

19        New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by City Life Developments Ltd at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights                                                                  65

20        Howick Local Board Local Grants, Round One and Quick Response, Round Two, 2015/2016                                                                                                                      69

21        2015/2016 Lease Workplan - Expedited Renewal Process and Review of Ongoing Lease Management                                                                                                               131

22        Adoption of Howick 2015/16 Economic Development Programme                     139

23        Performance Report for the Howick Local Board for the quarter ending September 2015                                                                                                                                     143

24        Libraries Work Programme 2015 -2016                                                                   191

25        Flat Bush Aquatic/Leisure Centre Location                                                           195

26        Landowner approval for culvert removal and sediment pond within Salford Park     205

27        Annual Plan 2016/2017                                                                                              213

28        Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016                                                265

29        Workshop Notes                                                                                                        269  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items  

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

31        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               275

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Flat Bush                                                     275

C2       Acquisition of open space land - Flat Bush                                                           275  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirms the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 12 October 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Roundabout at Pah Road and Shelley Beach Parade, Cockle Bay

Purpose

1.       To inform the Board a Petition will be tabled at the Business Meeting on 16th November 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       A Petition on behalf of the residents of Cockle Bay will be presented to the Board by Ian Wallis regarding a roundabout on Pah Road and Shelley Beach Road.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Petition presented on behalf of Cockle Bay Residents.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/23098

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Chair to update the meeting on projects and issues which the Board has been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       An opportunity for the Chair to verbally update the meeting on projects, issues, events, and progress the board has made since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Chair’s verbal report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Councillor's Update

 

File No.: CP2015/23097

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       An opportunity for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters of interest.

Executive Summary

2.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Ward Councillors to update the Board on regional matters.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the verbal report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – November 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/23194

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on transport matters for the information of the Howick Local Board and a register of transport issues in the Howick Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

Executive Summary

2.   This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Howick Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.   In particular, this report provides information on:

·    the Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund

·    New Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

·    Eastern New Network consultation update

·    Double-decker buses update

·    AT HOP card price change

·    Let’s Carpool Campaign.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receives the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – November 2015’ and the attached issues register from Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South);

b)      approves an increased allocation towards the #009 Half Moon Bay walkway and amenity improvements project from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, to a total of $455,000;

c)      approves an increased allocation towards the #155 Burswood Business Area enhancement project from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to allow completion of the project, to a total of $307,770.

 

 

 

Discussion

Howick Items

 

A1. Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

4.       The Howick Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is $871,903 per annum.

5.       The Board’s active projects are included in Table 1 below (NB: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost):

 

Table 1:

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

009

Walkway and amenity improvements at Half Moon Bay (HMB) Marina

·      $27,000 already received from 2011/12 Local Board Discretionary budget

·      Updated FEC now $482,000

·      Further approval sought for an increased budget of $455,000 from the LBTCF

·      On 8-Jun-15, the Board approved the project for construction based on a FEC estimate of $422,000, of which $395,000 would come from the LBTCF.

·      TCC approval and the consent for earthworks and trees are currently being progressed.  Development of the contract for physical works is being done in parallel with these processes. 

·      The resource consent application was lodged on 1-Sep-15.

·      Updated estimates and design clarifications with cost implications for the project were presented and discussed with the Board’s transport portfolio holders in Oct and Nov-15.

·      As a result, the updated FEC for the project is now $482,000 meaning a further $60,000 (on top of the $395,000 already approved) is required from the LBTCF.

·      A draft resolution seeking an increased allocation of $455,000 from the LBTCF is provided for the Board’s consideration.

155

Burswood Business Area enhancements

·      Updated firm estimate of $411,770

·      $104,000 received from Council’s Business Area Planning Unit

·      $307,770 balance required from LBTCF

·      On 10-Nov-14, the Board approved the project for construction.

·    Tenders closed on 25-Sep-15.  The lowest conforming tender was higher than the approved budget, meaning increased funding is required to complete the project.  The updated project and contingency costs were presented and discussed with the Board’s transport portfolio holders on 13-Oct-15 and confirmed in writing thereafter.

·      A draft resolution seeking an increased allocation of $307,770 from the LBTCF is provided for the Board’s consideration.

217

Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals

·      FEC estimate of $418,000

·      On 20-Apr-15, the Board resolved that AT should proceed to complete detailed design and costing.

·      Detailed designs were presented to the transport portfolio meeting on 15-Sep-15.  The firm estimate for the project is $418,000.

·      The Board approved construction of the project on 12-Oct-15.

·      The design is being finalised and approval will be sought from the TCC in Nov-15.

272

Bucklands Beach walkway improvements

·      ROCs for various sections (as per concept plans)

A-B = $134,000

B-C = $496,000

C-D = $57,000

D-E = $104,000

E-F = $803,000 or $97,000*

F-G = $324,000 or $115,000*

G-H = $97,000

H-I = $224,000

I-J = $152,000

J-K = $93,000

·      Total ROC = either $2,484,000 or $1,569,000 with *alternate options

·      On 14-Jul-14, the Board approved a Little Bucklands Beach walkway (either side of Grainger Point) project to progress to detailed design and costing stage.

·      On 8-Jun-15, the Board resolved to expand the scope of the earlier project to include pedestrian improvements along the entire length of The Parade.

·      On 13-Jul-15, concept plans showing the length of The Parade, itemising proposed pedestrian improvements in various sections and ROCs for each section were presented to the Board.  AT awaits further direction from the Board in respect of the proposals.

·      The Board resolved to consult with the public and key stakeholders on the strategic vision for the proposed walkway improvements.  Further planning is underway regarding the next steps.

279

Chapel Road pedestrian signals

·      FEC estimate of $261,282

·      On 11-May-15, the Board approved this project for construction based on the FEC estimate of $261,282.

·      TCC approval for the project was given on 3-Jul-15.

·      Tender documents are being finalised and the project will be tendered in Nov-15.

396

Half Moon Bay (HMB) new ferry facility

·      Up to $2.5m originally allocated

·      $1.25m confirmed as required from LBTCF following NZTA subsidy approval

·      Further funding and NZTA subsidy application required for Stage 2 landside works

·      On 13-Oct-14, the Board allocated up to $2.5m towards a new $4.3m ferry facility at HMB, subject to AT allocating at least $1m towards the project.

·      NZTA subsidy approval for approximately 50% of the initial $4.3m project is confirmed.

·      AT agrees that the Board’s proportion of funding for the initial $4.3m project will be abated by an equal proportion of the NZTA subsidy, meaning that $1.25m of the Board’s original allocation will be required.  However, if the project runs over budget the Board will need to contribute to any shortfall on the same basis.

·      A further NZTA funding application will be made for the proposed Stage 2 landside works once estimates are finalised.

·      A progress update is included at item A2 below.

 

6.       The Howick Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below:

Howick Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total funding available ($871,903 p.a. across 5 FYs – 2012/13 to 2016/17)

$4,359,515

Actual costs reported for completed projects (3x driver feedback signs; Ti Rakau & Cockle Bay bus shelters; Pedestrian improvements at Meadowlands/Whitford/Millhouse; Crooks Road streetscape improvements; The Parade footpath; Highland Park Adshel double bus shelter; Point View Drive footpath; East Tamaki streetlighting upgrade)

-867,294

Firm estimates for projects given construction approval (Chapel Road pedestrian signals; Pigeon Mountain Road metering signals)

-679,282

Projects given construction approval now requiring increased LBTCF allocations (HMB walkway/amenity improvements; Burswood Business Area enhancements)

-762,770

Confirmed LBTCF funding requirement towards initial Half Moon Bay ferry facility project (though further discussions required regarding funding of Stage 2 landside works)

-1,250,000

Funding available to allocate (assuming construction approval given to all projects excluding Bucklands Beach)

$800,169

Rough estimates on project requiring further direction (Bucklands Beach/The Parade walkway improvements - two alternate costings provided)

$2,848,000

or $1,569,000

 

 

A2. New Half Moon Bay ferry facility update

7.       The Stage 1 pontoon and gangway fabrication works have been completed and placed in storage and will not be required until the latter half of 2016.

8.       The fabricated Half Moon Bay pontoon units, whalers and fenders are to be used to replace the existing pontoon structure at Down Town Ferry Terminal Pier 2.

9.       All items utilised for Down Town Ferry Terminal Pier 2 will be replaced with no cost or time implications for the Half Moon Bay project.

10.     The wharf design fire reports along with the structural peer review are on-going and will be provided shortly.

11.     The Quantity Surveyor is working through the marine and landside proposals and will provide costs estimate for the wharf construction and the proposed landside design works towards the end of October.

12.     Once the estimate for the landside works is finalised, the Howick Local Board will be briefed on the additional scope for landside including a request for approval for additional funding to support a further funding application to the NZTA.

13.     The marine resource consent submission period has closed and the project is currently aware of four submissions from interested parties.

14.     The hearing is planned for early November, where duty commissioners will assess the project.  It is anticipated that this will be favourable and that the consent will be granted before December.

15.     The project is continuing on-going engagement with Mana Whenua to confirm Te Aranga Design Principles in line with Council engagement policies.

16.     The overall project is progressing as planned with completion scheduled for October 2016.

17.     The high level programme for Half Moon Bay is:

·    Marine resource consent period – June to December 2015

·    Wharf structure building consent period – October to December 2015

·    Landside resource consent – November to January 2016

·    Tender package release to market – January to February  2016

·    Physical works contractor established on site – April 2016

·    Physical works – wharf and landside – April to September 2016

·    Relocation of ferry service – October 2016.

 

A3. Eastern ‘New Network’ consultation update

18.     Public consultation began on 1 October and is currently underway on proposed ‘New Network’ changes to the bus services for Central and East Auckland.  Almost 53,000 brochures were delivered to properties in East Auckland.  The consultation period runs until 10 December.

19.     Ambassadors have handed out flyers regarding the New Network consultation at various locations, and there has been advertising on Chinese radio, regional and local newspapers, Adshel bus shelters, You Tube, TV On Demand and Google.

20.     The consultation brochure, individual route maps, FAQs, videos and all other information relating to the proposed changes are available on the consultation webpage at AT.govt.nz/NewNetwork.

21.     As at 23 October, with consultation having been underway for 3 weeks, an estimated 595 pieces of feedback had been received comprising:

·    Hardcopy forms                      300 approx.

·    Online submissions                 408

·    Discussion forum                    125 Visitors, 28 comments, 26 votes

·    ‘Map a comment’                    33 Visitors, 6 pins

·    Q and A                                   42 Visitors and 22 questions asked.

 

22.     A public event has already been held at the Pakuranga Night Market (on 10 October) and further planned events are listed below.  Engagement has also been held with the Howick Youth Council.

 

A4. Double-decker buses update

23.     Auckland Transport is introducing larger capacity, high-spec double decker buses on east Auckland commuter routes between Botany and downtown Auckland to provide extra capacity, particularly at peak commuter congestion times along the main arterials of Pakuranga Road and Ti Rakau Drive.  These buses will have 90 seats, which is nearly double the capacity of a regular Howick & Eastern commuter bus.

24.     Double-deckers will be progressively introduced on the 500, 501 and 550 bus routes, with the first bus introduced on the 500 route on 4 November 2015.

25.     Prior to introducing double-decker buses, Auckland Transport undertook an extensive assessment of all planned routes to determine where work needed to be completed in advance in order to allow the double decker buses to operate safely without impacting on hazards above the ground, including trees, service poles, or other obstacles.

26.     In the Howick Local Board area, over 450 potential conflicts were identified between trees and the new double-decker buses.  Most conflicts (almost 370) were able to be resolved through minor pruning.  Wherever possible, engineering solutions (such as adjusting traffic lanes through line re-marking or kerb build outs) were used to reduce the number of major conflicts and eventually only 20 trees were required to be removed in total along all three routes.

27.     As at 23 October, all tree pruning and removal works had been completed, as had required power pole and streetlight relocations.  However, some engineering solutions were still being completed.

 

A5. Progress report on Howick Local Board June 2015 resolution

28.     At its June meeting, under the item “Auckland Transport Update – June 2015”, the Howick Local Board passed the following resolution:

Resolution number HW/2015/82

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Requests Auckland Transport to scope potential park and ride sites for the Half Moon Bay ferry terminal in the Howick Local Board area and provide feedback to the Board by December 2015.

 

29.     As previously reported, Auckland Transport has been investigating potential park and ride options for Half Moon Bay as requested and in October reported back to the Board’s transport portfolio team on its initial findings.  As a result of the discussions, Auckland Transport is further developing a preferred option and will be consulting with impacted stakeholders prior to Christmas, with a view to implementing a trial beginning in the first quarter of 2016.

 

General Information Items

 

B1. AT HOP Card Price Change

30.     Auckland Transport reviews costs, such as the price of public transport fares against a cost/benefit matrix, on a regular basis.  The AT HOP card originally cost customers $10, including GST, when it was first launched in 2012 but for much of the time since it has been discounted to $5 to assist in encouraging uptake.  This approach has been very successful with over 80% of public transport trips on a weekday now made with a HOP card.

31.     The approximately 20,000 cards now sold each month are usually for lost cards.

32.     The HOP card itself costs Auckland Transport $9.82 (including GST) which, with 600,000 cards sold, means Auckland’s ratepayers and taxpayers have been heavily subsidising the card.  Card provisioning costs include setting the card up in the system, the support costs of having a retail agent network (86), customer service centres (13) and 5 ticket offices.  The cost of a HOP card remains less than the supply of a standard bank card, which is $15.

33.     Auckland Transport is offering a final opportunity for a $5 HOP card before the card goes up to its true cost on Thursday 17 December 2015.  This will give customers an opportunity to be ready with their HOP card when they return from their holiday break.

34.     Customers should register their HOP card to protect their balance.  To register, visit at.govt.nz/bus-train-ferry/at-hop-card/register-at-hop-card/

 

B2. Let’s Carpool campaign

35.     Let’s Carpool is a national carpool match service designed to help commuters connect with people who share similar journeys.  Carpooling will help save you money, meet new people and do your bit for the environment while helping to reduce road congestion.

36.     Let’s Carpool also offers a comprehensive service for employers and tertiary institutions interested in setting up workplace carpool schemes.  It provides businesses with the promotional tools and support to successfully introduce carpooling to their staff, including posters, employee guides and web banners.  Workplaces can join the scheme for free to receive access to the software, a dedicated branded page on the Let’s Carpool system, and reporting and administration assistance from Auckland Transport’s Commute team.

37.     For the month of November, Auckland Transport is offering commuters the chance to win a $350 restaurant voucher and a $50 taxi voucher (competition terms and conditions apply) by signing up to the Let’s Carpool programme at Letscarpool.govt.nz or Facebook.com/letscarpoolnz.

38.     The campaign seeks to reduce the amount of single vehicle occupancy trips into central Auckland by encouraging people to give carpooling a go.

39.     The Downtown car park also offers 15 discounted carpool priority car parking spaces on Level 8.  These spaces are available with a 10% discounted rate.  For more information on pricing and on how to lease one of these dedicated spaces, visit

www.AT.govt.nz/carpoolspaces

 

B3. Road Safety Young Driver Marketing Campaign

40.     Young driver crashes are a high strategic priority identified in “Safer Journeys” and locally this issue is of high concern due to the number of deaths and serious injuries resulting from these crashes. From 2010 to 2014, there were 664 death and serious injury crashes involving young drivers and these crashes resulted in 74 deaths and 749 serious injuries.  Targeting 18-24 year old male and female drivers, the main campaign objectives are:

·    To contribute towards a reduction in serious injury crashes involving young drivers across the Auckland region

·    To increase young driver’s safety awareness and understanding of the consequences of dangerous driving

·    To continue to grow the Snapchat and Facebook database of young drivers. This follows on from the success of the May 2015 young driver campaign, whereby AT generated 2,193 new likes on the “Youredriving” Facebook page and 5,185 new Snapchat followers.

 

41.     Based on the tagline of “You wouldn’t do that”, the three road safety themes are Distraction, Speeding and Drink Driving.  Three different scenarios will be developed into short 10 second videos and released on Snapchat and Facebook:

·    You wouldn’t text while in a job interview.  Don’t Text.  You’re Driving.

·    You wouldn’t drink before hitting the gym.  Don’t drink.  You’re Driving.

·    You wouldn’t rush through a hot date.  Don’t speed.  You’re Driving.

 

42.     To help incentivise people, Auckland Transport will run a competition challenging Snapchat users to send in a snap of their own 10 second video (or static photo) showing a scenario where they “Wouldn’t do that”.  The best entries will be posted on Snapchat for the public to vote on and the favourite choice each week, over a three week period, will receive a prize of an iPhone 6.

 

B4. Operating Conditions for Unmanned Aircraft (UAV) Drones, Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPAS) and others

43.     In response to the recent update of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) Rules, Auckland Transport has developed a set of conditions for Unmanned Aircraft/Drones (UAV) operators to meet before flights in Auckland Transport airspace over roads and other public places under the control of Auckland Transport. Unlicensed UAV operators flying under rule 101 now require property owner permission before taking flight.  This rule includes the regulation of model aircraft, kites, drones, balloons and other unmanned remote controlled piloted aircraft.

44.     Auckland Transport has taken a risk-based approach in line with the intention of the CAA, due to the high risk of drone malfunction and road safety to only allow those with public liability insurance to operate over roads.  The purpose of the conditions is to minimise public nuisance, risk to all road users and to remind operators of their obligations prior to flights.  UAVs/drones are not permitted in, on or above Auckland Transport public transport vehicles, stations, terminals and wharves, near traffic lights and intersections, in Auckland Transport-controlled parking buildings, or on roads adjacent to the zoo.  UAV operators must avoid flying over the road, and if necessary, at a height of 20m or more to minimise distraction to drivers.  If using the road, UAVs may only take off from the grass berm avoiding all overhead lines.

45.     These conditions for unlicensed operators will be available soon on the Auckland Transport public website for operators to seek approval prior to flights.  This will be granted automatically should operators meet the conditions of flight.  Enforcement is by way of the CAA, NZ Police and the Auckland Transport and Council Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaws.  Complaints will not be responded to by Auckland Council, but monitored and recorded for future education.

46.     These conditions were created in collaboration with Auckland Council and other CCOs to ensure regional consistency.

 

B5. Public Transport Patronage

47.     The summary patronage performance for September 2015 is presented below:

 

48.     For the 12-months to Sept-15, Auckland public transport patronage totalled 80.4 million passengers, an increase of +8.8% on the previous year.  September monthly patronage was 7.0 million, an increase of +5.6% on Sept-14 and -1.7% below SOI target (YTD -1.2%).  Accounting for special event patronage, September normalised to ~ +5.6%.

49.     Bus services totalled 60.2 million passenger trips for the 12-months to Sept-15, an increase of +5.7% on the previous year.  Patronage for Sept-15 was 5.2 million, an increase of +1.9% on Sept-14, however -2.9% below SOI target (YTD -2.3%).

50.     Rail services totalled 14.6 million passengers for the 12-months to Sept-15, an increase of +22.8% on the previous year.  Patronage for Sept-15 was 1.4 million, an increase of +21.7% on Sept-14 and +1.1% above SOI target (YTD +1.5%).  September normalised to ~ +21.8%.

51.     Ferry services totalled 5.6 million passenger trips for the 12-months to Sept-15, an increase of +10.2% on the previous year.  Patronage for Sept-15 was 40,509 – an increase of +8.9% on Sept-14 and 4.3% above SOI target (YTD +3.5%).

52.     Rapid and Frequent services totalled 31.3 million passenger trips for the 12-months to Sept-15.  Patronage for Sept-15 was 2.8 million, an increase of +12.1% on Sept-14 and +0.5% below SOI target (YTD +1.3%).

 

Media Items

 

C1. New bus lanes and bus stop changes in central Auckland

53.     On 18 October Auckland Transport added more than 1.2km of new 24 hours/day, seven days/week, bus lanes to the city centre to minimise effects on bus timetables when construction starts on the City Rail Link (CRL).

54.     In November, a new stormwater main being tunnelled under the eastern side of Albert Street between Swanson and Wellesley Streets for the City Rail Link will affect traffic lanes at these and the Victoria Street intersections.

55.     Some bus routes and stops are being moved to new locations away from these construction works.

56.     The new bus lanes are on:

·    Fanshawe Street between Daldy and Halsey Streets

·    Halsey Street between Fanshawe and Victoria Street West

·    Victoria Street West between Graham and Queen Streets

·    Wellesley Street West between Sale and Queen Streets

·    Mayoral Drive between Cook and Wellesley Streets

·    Hobson Street between Wellesley and Victoria Streets.

 

57.     The bus lanes separate buses from other traffic, enabling them to bypass traffic congestion so they have shorter journey times and can keep to their timetables.  This will help encourage more people to use buses, which will mean fewer cars on the road.

58.     The new bus lanes operate 24 hours a day, and motorists who wish to turn left can only enter a bus lane 50 metres before the relevant intersection.

59.     There also changes to bus stops in Queen Street, Quay Street, Lower Albert Street, Albert Street, Victoria Street, Mayoral Drive, Vincent Street, Fanshawe Street and Sturdee Street.

60.     Further, the InnerLink bus will no longer travel along Albert Street but will use Queen Street instead.

61.     To find out how the changes affect city routes and stops, visit: www.AT.govt.nz/citycentre

 

C2. Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Cycle Path

62.     Construction has started on one of Auckland’s biggest walking and cycling projects, connecting Auckland’s eastern suburbs to the Waitemata Harbour.  A dawn blessing and sod turning ceremony marked the start of the construction phase on 21 October.  The sod turning ceremony was attended by representatives of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board, Orakei Local Board, Auckland Council, NZTA, Auckland Transport and the Hon. Simon Bridges, Minister of Transport.

63.     The shared path starts at Merton Road in Glen Innes and follows the rail line all the way to Tamaki Drive and will connect communities and provide a route into the city for people on bikes and is another step on the way towards easing traffic congestion.

64.     The path will be around four metres wide and constructed mostly in concrete.  Timber boardwalks will cross the water at Orakei Basin and concrete will be used for longer structures such as the proposed Hobson Bay crossing.  LED lighting will extend the hours of access, particularly during the winter months.  Although the geography along the route is hilly in places, the pathway is designed to keep gradients as low as possible.

65.     The first stage of the shared path from Merton Road to St Johns Road is due to be finished in late 2016.

 

C3. Cycling Numbers Increasing

66.     The number of people cycling in Auckland is up 7% according to research released recently by Auckland Transport.  An independent survey conducted earlier in the year, looked at the walking and cycling habits of more than 1600 people living in Auckland and compared the findings with last year.

67.     It found that the number of people who said that they did any cycling at all went from 20% to 27%.  The number of people cycling at least once a week was also up to 11% from 6% just 12 months ago.

68.     While the main reasons for cycling are still exercise or fitness (68%) or recreation (48%), there was a steady growth in those saying cycling to work was the reason they get on a bike (up to 16% from 12%).  The survey also gathered information about where people lived and found that those living directly east and west of the city have the highest proportion of people cycling.

69.     This research is a source of real data in order for Auckland Transport to plan ahead for the future cycle improvements.  Putting in protected cycle facilities in the right parts of the city will make people feel and be safer when riding around the city.  To maximise the investment which has come from local and central government, Auckland Transport plans to improve the network for cycling into and around the city centre as well connections to public transport interchanges.

70.     People living in the inner city and the corridor running north-south from the city have the highest potential for growth in cycling.  To get more people cycling, overcoming perception of safety seems to be the greatest barrier.

 

C4. New Manukau Bus Station

71.     The proposed new Manukau Bus Station is a key part of the roll out of a new public transport network across south Auckland.  It will provide Aucklanders with a new network of buses and trains that will get them to their destination faster and more efficiently.

72.     The Manukau train station sees an average of 1037 daily week day passenger trips and is currently the 13th busiest station in Auckland.

73.     Auckland Transport has now developed concept design plans for the proposed new high quality bus station, aimed at making it easy to transfer between trains and buses, as well as between bus services.  It will be designed to have sufficient capacity for long distance coach services.  The facility will also feature a large enclosed waiting area similar to an airport lounge.

74.     Auckland Transport seeks feedback on the concept design to help make an informed decision to provide a high quality bus station and customer experience.

75.     Located right next to Manukau train station, the Auckland Council’s Manukau civic offices car park on Putney Way (between Davies Avenue and Osterley Way) will be transformed to a 23-bay bus station.  The train and bus stations will be linked by a covered walkway.

76.     The Auckland Transport project, in partnership with the NZTA, is expected to cost approximately $26 million.

77.     The entire structure will be designed to provide a high quality public transport experience which will be safe and accessible for everyone.  Temporary bus stops will be installed on Davies Avenue to allow the new network to operate smoothly until the station is constructed and opens in the second half of 2017.

78.     To support the rollout of the new network in south Auckland, Auckland Transport is also is building new bus and rail interchanges at key locations like Pukekohe and Otahuhu.

79.     The new bus station is likely to feature the following:

·    Convenience kiosks

·    A ticket office

·    AT Metro customer service

·    Drop off and pick up facilities

·    Cycle parking facilities

·    Taxi parking

·    Customer waiting areas

·    Bus staff office facilities

·    24 hour security, help points and CCTV

·    Toilets

·    Designed to allow for regional coach services (for example, services currently using Leyton Way at Westfield Manukau will be moved to the bus interchange).

 

Issues Register

80.     The regular monthly issues register is Attachment A to this report.

Consideration

Local Board Views

81.     The Howick Local Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation Issues

82.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Issues Register - November 2015

23

     

Signatories

Author

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager; Auckland Transport

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

 

File No.: CP2015/23205

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.   The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport (AT) in the three months from 1 July to 30 September 2015 and planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the next three months.

 

Executive Summary

2.   Attachments (as relevant to each individual local board area) include:

A – Auckland Transport activities

B – Travelwise Schools activities

C – Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

D – Report against local board advocacy issues

E – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards

 

Significant activities during the period under review

 

Strategy and Planning

3.       Penlink

·        The Notice of Requirement for the alteration to the designation and consents has been completed.

·        AT and its witnesses have completed their evidence and submitted these to the independent hearings panel.

·        The evidence was presented at the hearing held during the week 22 – 25 September 2015.

·        A set of designation conditions was agreed to between Auckland Council and AT and these were presented to the commissioners.

·        Recommendations from the commissioners are expected later this year.

 

4.       Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) Variation

The AT Board adopted the Hearings Panel recommendations on changes to the RPTP with minor alterations on 27 July 2015.  A revised RPTP will be published over the next quarter.

 

Investment and Development

5.   SMART (Southwest Multi-modal Airport Rapid Transit)

· Feasibility level alignments for both a heavy rail and light rail corridor have now been identified.

· The benefits and risks of the two-mode options were documented in an Interim Business Case.

· Independent peer review has been concluded on the costs of each option.

· Risk assessment was completed on the route protection for each option.

 

PT Development

6.   Double Decker Network Mitigation works

Of the total eight double decker bus routes identified to be delivered in the long term plan, three routes (Botany, Mt Eden and Northern Busway 2) will be implemented this financial year (FY).  The remainder (Great North Road, Manukau, Remuera, New North Road and Onewa) will be delivered in the next two FYs.

 

7.   Bus Infrastructure Programme

There are 200 bus stop improvement sites planned to be delivered this year across the region.  At the end of September, 30 sites are now complete.

 

8.   City Rail Link

The project continues with reference design, enabling works detailed design, property purchase and consenting process.  The Environment Court reached a decision and the Notice of Requirement (NoR) was confirmed.  Pipe Jack resource consent was granted.  The Britomart to Wyndham Street resource consent hearing was concluded and a decision was reached (which is currently in the appeals period).  Enabling Works and detailed design scope continue to make progress (Contract 2 substantially complete).

 

9.   EMU Procurement

All 57 electric trains are now in Auckland, and provisional acceptance has been issued for all but the last, which is due to be completed early in October.

 

PT Operations

10.  Highlights for the quarter

· AT Metro’s 12 month rolling patronage record passed the 80 million mark in August with rail services exceeding 14 million.

· Train services had record performance on the network.  September 7th recorded the best performance ever for a single business weekday, with 97.6% punctuality and 99.2% reliability and only four cancellations out of a total of 500.  Statistics also showed 100% service delivery and no cancellations on the Pukekohe diesel shuttle.

· Swanson Station’s new park and ride carpark with eco-rain gardens opened on 6th July providing an additional 136 parking spaces.

· A total of 53 new double decker buses have been ordered by Howick & Eastern Buses, Ritchies and NZ Bus, under contract to AT.  The first buses arrive in the next few weeks for testing with the new fleet targeted for full operation by mid-2016.  A second double-decker vehicle was introduced to the Northern Express service in July by Ritchies.

· First tenders for Auckland’s New Network bus services (the first under the fully contracted PTOM procurement model) were released on 17 August, with responses received on 28 September.

· Central and East Auckland New Network: Public consultation commenced on 1 October and runs through to 10 December 2015.

 

Road Design and Development

11.  Te Atatu Road Improvements

Underground services relocation works continue within the road berm of Edmonton Road and Flanshaw Road. Removal of trees, hedges and the like is underway, in accordance with the resource consent; this is site clearance in preparation for both the road widening and the agreed property works.

 

12.  Jennys Road Construction – Great Barrier Island

This road was established as an outcome of an Environment Court decision.  The road has been designed as a single lane road with passing bays. Stage 1 was completed in May 2014, and Stage 2 commenced in October 2014.  Physical works and the final walkover with the contractor have been completed.

 

13.  Redoubt Road-Mill Road Corridor Improvements

The project on Redoubt Road provides for four lanes from SH1 to Murphys Road, and includes bus priority lane, cycle lanes and a 60km/h speed limit, and signals and bus priority lane at the Hollyford Drive/Redoubt Road intersection.  The hearing has now been completed and the commissioners’ decision is expected within one to two months.

 

Services

14.  Driver Licensing Challenge

Young Driver safety is a high priority in the national Safer Journeys strategy, and Auckland Young Driver death and serious injury (DSI) rates make up 30% of the regions DSI crashes.  This issue is exacerbated by the high proportion of unlicensed young drivers in the region.  An inter-agency Co-Design Lab was founded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment that explores ways to improve access to driver licensing.  AT is part of the team along with ACC, Ministry of Education, Auckland Council, Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) and Otara youth based at the Otara's Crosspower youth centre.  The Co-Design team will engage with Maori and Pasifika youth at Crosspower where over 250 youth attend each week.  The initial stage of this four month project will end in November with recommendations to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

 

15.  Primary Schools Lead Teacher Workshop

Over the past five years there has been an increase in deaths and serious injuries (DSI) for 5-10 year old pedestrians during weekdays in peak traffic hours.  The Travelwise team looked to address this issue at a recent primary schools lead teacher workshop in the CBD.  Seventy teachers attended the workshop by rail to explore ‘Transporting our Students into the Future’ and develop curriculum programmes that would support safer travel for students and increased use of active transport (Public Transport PT, Walking and Cycling) options to help reduce congestion.

 

16.  Travel Demand (2014/15 Year)

The Commute travel planning programme has a focus on engagement with commuters and businesses this year.  This quarter has seen the development of a campaign to promote travel choice which will be launched in October.  A focus has been the development of travel demand plans for the Devonport Peninsula, Albany Highway and City Rail Link, and implementation of these plans is underway.

 

17.  Route Optimisation

The regional Route Optimisation is underway, which forms part of the programme for Network Optimisation, including traffic signal improvements, minor changes to the road network and the inclusion of transit lanes, freight lanes and trial of Dynamic lanes.

 

Road Corridor Delivery

18.  Key Highlights

In the 2015/2016 financial year, AT is planning to deliver 37.7 km of pavement rehabilitation, 480.1 km of resurfacing (which includes 88.9 km of hotmix and 391.2 km of chip-sealing), 75.7 km of footpath renewals and 82.7 km of kerb and channel replacement.  This represents a total of 676 km or around 9% of work on AT’s 7,300km network.  Table 1 below outlines this work in more detail.

 

Table 1: Progress against Asset Renewal Targets

 

19.  The new Streetlight maintenance and renewal contracts commenced on 1 August 2015.  There are now four contracts across the region with one dedicated contract for the Hauraki Gulf Islands.  The new contractors are Downer (Central and South), Electrix (North and West) and NorthPower (HGI).  Tenders have also been called for the supply of 8,000 LED luminaires to replace existing 70W HPS lamps on the network in the 2015/2016 financial year.

20.  AT’s second Asset Management Plan (AMP) covering the period 2015-2018 has been published and is available to download from the AT website.

21.  Monitoring of Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) at work sites is continuing to ensure compliance with the approved traffic management plans and to identify opportunities for improvement.  The average percentage of low risk sites for Quarter 1 is 96%*[1] (The target is 90%)

 

Fig 1:  Compliance with approved traffic management plans

 

22.  The Corridor Access Request (CAR) team continues to process around 1,300 applications per month.  These requests are for network operators from the water and telecommunication industry to access and maintain their assets sitting within the road corridor.  Access is also sought by private operators and individuals who need to access the road network to undertake activities such as private water connections etc.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the first quarter (2015/16) ending 30 September 2015

31

bView

Travelwise Schools activities broken down by local board

45

cView

Traffic Control Committee Decisions broken down by local board

47

dView

Local Board Advocacy Report

49

eView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

51

     

Signatories

 

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 















Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Equinox Capital Ltd at 109 Adamson Road, Flat Bush.

 

File No.: CP2015/21509

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 109 Adamson Road, Flat Bush.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       The applicant has requested that as Roads 3, 5 and 6 are extensions of existing roads (Road naming completed as part of stage 1); the existing names are to be extended. Therefore, Road 3 is an extension of Joseph Street and should be named Joseph Street. Road 5 is an extension of Fernly Rise and should be named Fernly Rise. Road 6 is an extension of Manawatere Way and should be called Manawatere Way.

4.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Panakenake Way’, ‘Lomandra Way’, and ‘Te Tuhi Way’ were determined to meet the road naming policy criteria for the new road (Road 7).

5.       Local iwi groups were consulted and only one local iwi group responded advising in regards to the application that there is no input required from them. All other local iwi groups did not respond to request for consultation made by the applicant.  

6.       The name ‘Panakenake Way’ preferred by the Applicant and the names “Lomandra Way” and “Te Tuhi Way” are considered for approval by the Local Board.   

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval;

a)   The road names for extensions to roads 3, 5 and 6, being road 3 is an extensions of Joseph Street and should be named “Joseph Street”, road 5 is an extension of Fernly Rise and should be named “Fernly Rise” and road 6 is an extension of Manawatere Way and should be named “Manawatere Way”; and

b)  The road name “ Panakenake Way”, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 109 Adamson Road, Flat Bush  while noting that “Lomandra Way” and “Te Tuhi Way”, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for Council’s approval.

8.       The residential subdivision (Stage 2) will be serviced by newly extended part of Joseph Street, Fernly Rise and Manawatere Way (Roads 3, 5 and 6). The development will require the new road (Road 7) to be vested in Council. In this case, approval is being sought for road name (Road 7) and the continuation of the three existing legal roads (Joseph Street, Fernly Rise and Manawatere Way) within the subdivision.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 109 Adamson Road, Flat Bush.  

 Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Panakenake Way

Plant included in the subdivision landscaping

First Alternative

Lomandra Way

Plant included in the subdivision landscaping

Second Alternative

Te Tuhi Way

Tuhi pays tribute to the local Te Tuhi Art gallery and also refers to the legend of the ancestor Manawatere who made his ‘tuhi or mark on a Pohutukawa tree on the foreshore. This was his sign to those who would follow that this was the place he had chosen, ‘Te Tuhi a Manawatere’.

 

9.       ‘Te Tuhi’ is a name that was part of the road naming alternatives submitted to local iwi groups during stage 1 of the subdivision. Local iwi groups did not oppose the name ‘Te Tuhi’. The applicant has again included the name ‘Te Tuhi Way’ as one of the alternative names for the new road.   

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road and Road extensions

 

 

Decision Making

10.     The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

11.     The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

12.     The continuation of the existing legal roads (Joseph Street, Fernly Rise and Manawatere Way) are considered appropriate as the numbering of the sites is from the northern end towards the east for Arrowsmith Drive and similarly, from the northern end towards the south for Joseph Street and Manawatere Way. Therefore, there will be no requirement for the roads to be re-numbered as a result of the proposed subdivision.

13.     The proposed suffix “Way” is appropriate in this circumstance, as the road to be vested is a short enclosed roadway. 

14.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (‘Panakenake Way’) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the other names proposed by the applicant   (‘Lomandra Way’ and ‘Te Tuhi Way’) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

 

15.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Maori impact statement

16.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

 

Consultation

17.     The applicant has emailed all the relevant iwi groups. Ngati te Ata responded advising the applicant that there is no engagement required from them. All other local Iwi groups did not respond.   

18.     Initially, the applicant had ‘Puka Way’ and ‘Houpara Way’ as preferred names for the new road. But after consultation with the New Zealand Post, the applicant was advised that these names already existed within the Auckland region. Thereby, these names were withdrawn and ‘Panakenake Way’, Lomandra Way’ and ‘Te Tuhi Way’ were resubmitted and all these names were acceptable.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

19.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

20.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

 

 

Implementation

21.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Arwen Place Projects Ltd at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark

 

File No.: CP2015/22084

 

  

 

 

Purpose

 

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark.

Executive Summary

 

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Romona Close’ (applicant’s preferred road name) and ‘Amory Close’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria.

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki opposed the names originally proposed by the applicant, recommending four alternative names, of which ‘Awakirihi Close’ was adopted by the applicant as an alternative. It is identified to the Howick Local Board that the guidelines encourage the use of Maori names but it could be considered that the name is too long for proposed privateway.

5.       The name ‘Romona Close’, proposed by the Applicant and the names ‘Amory Close’ and ‘Awakirihi Close’ are considered for approval by the Local Board.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name ‘Romona Close’, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark while noting that ‘Amory Close’ and ‘Awakirihi Close’, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

 

Comments

 

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The road to be named is a privateway, servicing ten (10) residential properties at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark. The privateway is a cul-de-sac, ending in a “Y” turning head. Resource Consent for this subdivision was applied for and granted under proposal number 47852 SP11921.

 

 

 

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 208 Whitford Road, Northpark. 

 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Romona Close

‘Romona’ is a word derived by the applicant from the word ‘Roma’. The applicant has a personal liking of Roman culture and considers the proposed name to represent power and wealth which evokes prosperity and wellbeing, associating Roman culture with high-end residential development.

There are no alternative meanings for this word in the English dictionary or under the Maori dictionary. The name ‘Romona’ can be associated with the commonly used name ‘Romona’ however, in this instance, there are persons it is in specific reference to.

First Alternative

Amory Close

A composition various letters from the applicant’s family members. Specifically, ‘Amy’, ‘Ryan’, ‘Frank’ and ‘Tong’.

There are no alternative meanings for this word in the English dictionary or under the Maori dictionary. The name ‘Amory’ can be associated with a city in Mississippi and is also an uncommonly used personal name.

Second Alternative

Awakirihi Close

‘Awakirihi’ is related to the Awakirihi Pa, a Pa site within the local area. This name was proposed by Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust and adopted by the applicant.

There are no alternative meanings for this word in the Maori dictionary.

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

 

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     These road names were submitted as part of this development. The preferred name ‘Romona’ and ‘Amory’ are consistent with the Auckland Council Road Name Guidelines. However, ‘Awakirihi’ could be considered too long for the length of the proposed access lot and may to result in cartographic problems.

11.     The proposed suffix ‘Close’ is appropriate as it reflects the physical layout of the privateway.

12.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (Romona Close) and alternative name (Amory Close) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines. While noting that the name proposed by the iwi (Awakirihi Close) may be too long for the proposed privateway but is still recommended for approval by the Howick Local Board as the guidelines encourage the use of Maori names. 

Consideration

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Consultation

15.     The applicant has emailed all the relevant iwi groups, and they were given a 15 working day period to respond. Of the eleven iwi groups that were contacted, only Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust, Ngati Tamaoho and Ngati Te Ata Waiohua provided responses. Ngati Te Ata Waiohua indicated that no engagement was required while Ngati Tamaoho deferred their response to Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki.

16.     Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust opposed the names proposed and recommended the inclusion of four alternatives names (Turanga Awa, Mangemangeroa Pa, Moananui Pa and Awakirihi Pa) being names associated with Pa sites or significant streams in the local area. It is noted that of these four names, only Awakirihi Pa was adopted by the applicant as the remaining three were already used elsewhere in the Auckland Region.

17.     New Zealand Post was consulted and indicated that all the names provided are acceptable from their perspective.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

18.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

19.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

20.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by Ivan Frisken Estates Ltd at 221 – 227 Murphys Road, Flat Bush

 

File No.: CP2015/22595

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for two new road names and one road extension (Timmer Road) created by way of subdivision at 221 – 227 Murphys Road, Flat Bush.

Executive Summary

 

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Horsefields Drive’ (Road 2) and ‘Frisken Road’ (Roads 6 and 10),  the applicant’s preferred road names, ‘Riding School Road’ and ‘Pony Club Road’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria. 

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust did not oppose the road names however did indicate a preference for Maori names.    

5.       The names ‘Horsefields Drive’ (Road 2) and ‘Frisken Road’ (Roads 6 and 10), proposed by the Applicant and the names ‘Riding School Road’ and ‘Pony Club Road’, are considered for approval by the Local Board.    

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road names ‘Timmer Road’ (Roads 7 and 11), ‘Horsefields Drive’ (Road 2) and ‘Frisken Road’ (Roads 6 and 10), proposed by the Applicant, for the new roads created by way of subdivision at 221 – 227 Murphys Road, Flat Bush  while noting that ‘Riding School Road’ and ‘Pony Club Road’, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

 

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The staged residential subdivision will be serviced by new roads that come off Murphys Road, Flat Bush. The Applicant seeks to name two of the new roads and extend of the existing road name (Timmer Road) into the proposed development.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 221 – 227 Murphys Road, Flat Bush. 

 

Road 2

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Horsefields Drive

Relating to the past use of the property as a horse riding school for local children for more than 30 years.

 

 

Roads 6 and 10

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Frisken Road

‘Frisken’ is associated with Ivan Frisken, who has been a local resident on the property for over 40 years and has had a long association with the area through the local pony and bowling clubs.

Roads 7 and 11 (extension)

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Timmer Road

Associated with Susan Timmer, being one of the three daughters of Ivan Frisken.

It is noted that this name has already been approved by Howick Local Board in December 2014.

Alternatives

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

First Alternative

Riding School Road

Relating to the past use of the property as a horse riding school for local children for more than 30 years.

Second Alternative

Karren Road

Karren Bartley being one of the three daughters of Ivan Frisken.

Third Alternative

Susan Road

Susan Timmer being one of the three daughters of Ivan Frisken.

Fourth Alternative

Pony Club Road

Relating to the past use of the property as a horse riding school for local children for more than 30 years.

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     Of the seven road names proposed by the Applicant, ‘Susan Road’ is too similar to ‘Susanne Place’ in Pakuranga. Furthermore, ‘Karren’ (named after Karren Bartley) and ‘Susan’ (named after Susan Timmer) are persons still living. The remaining road names are considered to be consistent with the road naming guidelines.

11.     The proposed suffixes ‘Road’ and ‘Drive’ are appropriate as they reflect the physical characteristics of the proposed roads.

12.     As the Applicant’s preferred names (Horsefield Drive and Frisken Road) meet the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the alternative names proposed by the Applicant (Riding School Road and Pony Club Road) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

 

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

 

Consultation

15.     The applicant has emailed all the relevant iwi groups. Of the eleven iwi groups that were contacted, Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust stated that they did not oppose the proposed road names however did indicate a preference for Maori names. Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust have not provided any recommended alternatives.

16.     New Zealand Post was consulted and indicated that all the names provided are acceptable from their perspective.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

New Road Name Approval for the residential subdivision by City Life Developments Ltd at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights

 

File No.: CP2015/22822

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek approval from the Howick Local Board, for a new road name for a road created by way of subdivision at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names.  These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming for the Auckland Council.

3.       Following assessment against the road naming criteria, the road names ‘Ruhanui Lane’ (applicant’s preferred road name), ‘Takaro Lane’ and ‘Edgepark Lane’ were determined to meet the road naming guideline criteria. 

4.       Local iwi groups were consulted and no opposition to the recommended road names was received.    

5.       The name ‘Ruhanui Lane’, proposed by the Applicant and the names ‘Takaro Lane’ and ‘Edgepark Lane’, are considered for approval by the Local Board.    

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, considers for approval, the road name ‘Ruhanui Lane’, proposed by the Applicant, for the new road created by way of subdivision at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights while noting that ‘Takaro Lane’ and ‘Edgepark Lane, also meet the road naming criteria.

 

Comments

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allowed that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name for the Local Board’s approval.

7.       The road to be named is a privateway, servicing seven (7) residential properties at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights. The privateway is a cul-de-sac. Resource Consent for this subdivision was applied for and granted under proposal number 45239 SP11510.

The Applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the road created as part of the development at 4 Cascades Road, Pakuranga Heights. 

Preference

Proposed New Road Name

Meaning

Preferred Name

Ruhanui Lane

‘Ruhanui’ means the personification of leisure activities.

First Alternative

Takaro Lane

‘Takaro’ means to play/wrestle. Alternatively it can mean sport, game or recreational activities.

Second Alternative

Edgepark Lane

Chosen to represent the location of the road on the edge of Lloyd Elsmore Park.

 

Figure One: Location and Layout of new Road

Decision Making

8.       The Auckland Council, by way of the Auckland Council Long Term Plan (2012 - 2022), allocated the responsibility for the naming of new roads, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974, to Local Boards.

Assessment

9.       The Applicant’s proposed road names have been assessed against the criteria set out in the Auckland Council road naming guidelines;

10.     The Applicant’s preferred and two alternative names are all consistent with the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

11.     The proposed suffix ‘Lane’ is appropriate as it reflects on the physical characteristics of the privateway. 

12.     As the Applicant’s preferred name (Ruhanui Lane) meets the criteria, it is recommended for consideration for approval while noting that the names proposed by the iwi (Takaro Lane and Edgepark Lane) are also appropriate as they comply with all the criteria of the road naming guidelines.

Consideration

Significance of Decision

13.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Māori impact statement

14.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

 

Consultation

15.     The Applicant has emailed all the relevant iwi groups. Based on the information supplied by the Applicant, of the eleven iwi groups contacted, only Ngati Te Ata Waiohua provided a response stating that no further engagement was required.

16.     New Zealand Post was consulted and indicated that all the names provided are acceptable from their perspective.

Financial and Resourcing Implications

17.     The cost of processing the approval of the proposed new road name and any installation of road name signage is recoverable in accordance with Council’s Administrative Charges.

Legal and Legislative Implications

18.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board for this report is not considered to have any legal or legislative implications.

Implementation

19.     The Resource Consenting Team is involved in ensuring that appropriate road name signage will be installed accordingly once an approval is obtained for the new road name.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Debby Blackburn - Resource Consent Administrator

Authorisers

Ian Smallburn - General Manager Resource Consents

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Howick Local Board Local Grants, Round One and Quick Response, Round Two, 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/22703

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for round one of the Howick Local Board Local Grants 2015/2016 and round two of the Howick Local Board Quick Response Grants.  The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.       The Howick Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $220,000 and a local events budget of $271,000 for the 2015/2016 financial year.

3.       A total of $17,657 was allocated under round one of the quick response grants leaving a balance of $210,343. A total of $116,030 has been allocated for local events leaving a total of $154,970.

4.       Thirty two applications were received in the first round of local grants, with a total requested of $416,608.78. Five applications were received in the second round of quick response, with a total requested of $5,735.00.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      consider the applications listed in Table One and agree to fund, part-fund or decline 3each application in this round.

Table One: Howick Local Board Round One Local Grant Applications

Organisation Name

Focus

Project

Total Requested

Eligible/

ineligible

Communicare CMA (AK) Inc

 

Community

 

Towards rental for Communicare prorgammes

$3,198.00

Eligible

Riverina School

 

Sport and recreation

 

Towards swimming pool costs

$3, 515.00

 

Eligible

LifeKidz Trust

 

Community

 

Towards costs for summer holidays programme

$10,000.00

Eligible

Lions Club of Howick

 

Events

 

Howick in the Park

$21,123.20

 

Eligible

Howick Pakuranga Chess Club

 

Community

Annual Latvian Chess Tournament

$2, 655.00

 

Eligible

Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club

 

Sport and recreation

 

Maraetai Forest Trail Restoration project

$15,000.00

Eligible

LifeGrowth Community Trust

 

Community

 

Christmas in Burswood

$2,567.00

 

Eligible

British & European Car Show Committee

 

Events

 

British and European Car Show

$6,546.00

 

Eligible

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

 

Arts and culture

 

Towards Little Kungfu Master programme

$8,000.00

 

Eligible

Howick Gymnastic Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards rental costs for the Howick Gymnastics Club

$5,000.00

Eligible

Life Education Trust South East Auckland trading as Life Education Counties Manukau

 

Community

 

Towards Life Education programme

$12,500.00

Eligible

Ormiston Community Vision

 

Community

 

Christmas in the courtyard

$6,000.00

 

Eligible

Royal New Zealand Coastguard Boating Education Limited

 

Sport and recreation

 

Towards Safe Boating programme

$1,841.40

 

Eligible

Lions Club of Howick Charitable Trust

 

Events

 

Howick Lions Water Safety programme

$2,500.00

 

Eligible

Howick Schools Waterwise Society Incorporated

 

Sport and recreation

 

Howick schools Waterwise programme

$4,732.25

 

Eligible

Citizens Advice Bureau Pakuranga Eastern Manukau

 

Community

 

Towards office equipment

$4,000.00

Eligible

Rotary Club of Pakuranga Inc

 

Community

 

Community Carnival Day

$7,500.00

Eligible

Wairoa River Landcare Group

 

Environment

 

Equipment costs for nursery to deliver school programmes

$16, 250.00

 

Eligible

Macleans Primary School

 

Sport and recreation

 

Towards costs for school swimming pool

$2,400.00

 

Eligible

Cockle Bay Tennis Club

 

Sport and recreation

 

Towards resurfacing of tennis courts

$20,000.00

 

Eligible

The Howick and Districts Historical Society Inc.

 

Historic Heritage

 

Puhinui Homestead foundation repair

$8,000.00

 

Eligible

Stedfast Advisory Services Limited

 

Community

 

Towards costs for production of a financial planning guide.

$2,682.72

 

Ineligible due to

the start date of the

project being before

the decision

 date.

Dance Therapy NZ

 

Community

 

Towards costs for the STARS Pakuranga Dance Movement Therapy workshops

$4,973.00

 

Eligible

St Marks Catholic Church and St Marks Catholic Primary School

Events

 

Towards the building of a multi-purpose space

$240,000.00

 

Ineligible due to incomplete application.

Sporting Edge Trust

 

Community

 

Towards the community care and protection project programme

$10,150.00

Ineligible due to incomplete application form.

People First New Zealand Inc.

Community

Towards the costs of the People First group expenses.

$1,589.50

Ineligible due to incomplete application

SeniorNet Eastern Bays Inc.

Community

Towards rental costs for the SeniorNet programmes

$147.00

Eligible

Autism New Zealand Incorporated – Auckland Branch

Community

Towards operating costs for Autism New Zealand.

$2,000.00

Eligible

Urban EcoLiving Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards Tread Lightly Caravan programme costs

$3858.50

Eligible

Counselling Services Centre

Community

Supply and installation of a heat pump

$2,206.66

Eligible

Mind over Manner Limited

Community

Towards the programme costs for workshops

$5,864.40

Eligible

Children’s Autism Foundation

Community

Towards programme costs for the Children’s Autism Foundation

$2,229.15

Eligible

 

Total Requested

 

$416,608.78

 

 

That the Howick Local Board:

b)      consider the applications listed in Table Two and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table Two: Howick Local Board Quick Response Round Two Grant Applications

Organisation Name

Focus

Project

Total Requested

Eligible/ineligible

 

Youth Advance Trust Board

Events

Carols in the Park

$750.00

Eligible

The Howick Tennis Club Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards the coaching programme

$1,221.00

Eligible

Botany Downs School

Community

Towards the school swimming pool costs

$1,400.00

Eligible

Howick Village Business Assn.

Events

Midnight Madness

$2,000.00

Eligible

Howick Village Christmas Lights Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Howick Village Christmas Lights

$364.00

Eligible

 

Total Requested

 

$5,735.00

 

 

 

 

Comments

5.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2015/2016 and the Howick Local Board adopted its grants programme on 20 April 2015 (see Attachment A).

6.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

7.       The Howick Local Board will operate five quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year.

8.       The new community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the new council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas, which have been attended by approximately 1000 people across the Auckland region.

9.       For the 2015/2016 financial year, the Howick Local Board set a total local community grant of $220,000 and events grants budget of $271,000.00, as below:

2015/2016 Annual Budget

Fund Type

Grants paid

Balance

$220,000.00

Local Community Grants

$17,657.00

$210,343.00

$271,000.00

Local Events Fund

$116,030.00

$154,970.00

 

10.     Thirty two applications were received for the first local grant round, requesting a total of $416,608.78. Five applications were received for the second round of quick response, requesting a total of $5,735.00.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

12.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

13.     A one-page summary of each application has been supplied to members under separate cover.

Māori impact statement

14.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

16.     Following the Howick Local Board allocating funding for round one of local grant and round two quick response, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Howick Local Board Grants Programme 2015/2016

75

bView

Howick Local Board Local Grant and Quick Response summaries.

77

     

Signatories

Authors

Tamarisk Sutherland - Environmetnal Funding coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 






















































Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

2015/2016 Lease Workplan - Expedited Renewal Process and Review of Ongoing Lease Management

 

File No.: CP2015/22832

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is two-fold.  Firstly, to introduce the operational approach to the delivery of this year’s community lease work programme. Secondly, to seek Howick Local Board approval of the community lease renewals being advanced via this approach.

Executive Summary

2.       Community leases are one of the ways in which Council provides support to local community organisations, assisting them to sustain the activities and experiences they provide in alignment with recognised local priorities.

3.       Council has a substantial programme of community leasing work to complete this year.  The scale of the programme includes a number of existing leases that have rolled over beyond their anticipated expiry date and require attention. There are also a number of leases reaching their renewal or expiry date this year. Staff provided an update to a meeting of the Local Board Chairs on 28 September 2015, which identified the scale of the programme at a network level and introduced a programme approach to help deliver the extra volume of work this year.

4.       The programme approach aims to simplify procedures to enable a large number of more routine leases to be fast tracked, whilst focusing necessary attention on those community leases that are more complex.  Extra staff resources have been made available to support this peak of work.

5.       The main categories of work that are being advanced are:

·        The renewal of existing leases

·        The award of new land related leases

·        The award of new building related leases

·        Progressing more complex or involved cases

6.       This report includes details of the first batch of fast tracked lease renewals.  In every case the group has an existing right of renewal.  Staff recommend that these leases be renewed.

7.       To maintain productive delivery of this year’s programme, staff will be working closely with the portfolio holder and will operate to any delegations that are in place.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Approves the renewal of leases to the community organisations shown on Attachment A on the existing terms and conditions.  Those community organisations being:

·    Howick Range Trust Incorporated, Howick Domain ,90R Wellington Street, Howick

·    Southside Streeters Incorporated, 563R Pakuranga Road, Howick

·    Tamaki Playcentres Association Incorporated (Bucklands Beach), 50 The Parade, Bucklands Beach

·    Tamaki Playcentres Association Incorporated (Pakuranga Rahihi), 6R Glenside Avenue, Pakuranga

b)      Notes that community outcome plans are not required or provided with these lease renewals.

 

 

Comments

8.       There is a substantial programme of community leasing work to complete this year, with leases due for renewal and/or expired leases to be re-established in all 21 of Auckland’s local board areas.  In total there are about 500 work items to complete.  Attachment B shows the distribution of this activity by local board.

9.       Given the scale of the programme, staff have adopted a new approach to operational delivery this year, aimed at increasing productivity whilst supporting good governance.  The approach will simplify procedures to enable a large number of more routine leases to be fast tracked, whilst focusing necessary attention on those community leases that are more complex.  Extra staff resources have been made available to support this work.

10.     There are three routine categories of work are being advanced.

·        The renewal of existing leases

·        The award of new land related leases

·        The award of new building related leases

Staff will work closely with the appointed local board portfolio holder and progress this work in batches.

11.     The following table shows the initial assessment of work in the Howick Local Board area.

 

Type of leases

Fast track

Complex

Renewals

4

0

New Leases

21

7

12.     Progressing renewals is the priority first phase of this year’s programme.  Alongside the fast track renewals, new leases and more complex renewals that require further input will be progressed.

13.     Some of the leases requiring consideration are more complex or involved.  These typically relate to situations where there are multiple stakeholder interests, external dependencies or issues related to the classification of reserves.  Again, staff will work closely with the local board portfolio holder to prioritise and progress these cases once the more routine renewals are able to be progressed.

14.     Attachment A includes the details of the lease renewals that are of a routine nature and it is recommended that these renewals be approved.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

15.     Staff provided an update to a meeting of the Local Board Chairs on 28 September 2015, which identified the scale of the community lease workload at a network level and introduced a programme approach to help deliver the work this year.

16.     The content of this report has been discussed with the local board portfolio holder, including the rationale applied to the assessment of routine and more complex leases.

17.     To maintain productive delivery of this year’s programme, staff will continue to work closely with the portfolio holder and will operate to the delegations that are in place.

Māori impact statement

18.     Community leases generally supporting a wide range of activities and groups and are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interest and priorities.  As such, they are designed to create local benefits to many communities, including Maori.

Implementation

19.     Staff will execute the decisions sought within this report promptly to ensure the occupying groups have clarification/confirmation of their tenancy.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Community Lease Renewals Schedule Howick

135

bView

Distribution of Leases by Local Board

137

     

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager - Arts, Community and Events

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Adoption of Howick 2015/16 Economic Development Programme

 

File No.: CP2015/23185

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval the 2015/2016 Howick economic development programme.

Executive Summary

2.       The report outlines the economic development projects agreed in the local board workshop on 12 August 2015.   In response, staff have developed an economic development programme for 2015/2016.

3.       The 2015/2016 Howick economic development programme is drawn from recommended actions in 2014 Howick Local Board Plan. Some of the projects can proceed if the board allocates funding.

4.       The board is now being asked to approve 2015/16 Howick economic development programme.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approves 2015/2016 Howick  economic development programme as in Attachment A to the report.

 

 

Comments

Background

5.       The 2015/2016 Howick economic development programme references Howick Local Board’s strategy in local economic development. The 2014 Howick Local Board Plan stated that the board would:

·     develop a tourism plan that promotes the Howick ward’s identity and key attractions.

·     work with ATEED to  undertake an audit of economic and business precinct plans and provide a coordinated approach to economic development in Howick area

6.       There are two areas of focus outlined in the economic development programme including

·     Preparation a Howick Tourism Plan

·     Reviewing current East Tamaki Business Precinct Plan and Integrated Industrial Business Plan.

Howick Tourism Plan

7.       ATEED staff have spoken to the key members of Howick Tourism Group and other tourism operators including Howick Historical Village, Howick Village, Uxbridge Gallery, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Temple and Pakuranga Golf club for initial engagement on developing a Howick Tourism Plan.

8.       ATEED staff will be developing Howick Tourism Plan in house and in consultation with Howick tourism operators.

9.       The tourism plan will provide a framework for the tourism industry to deliver initiatives in an integrated approach in Howick for next three to five years.  It provides a mechanism for the local board to support local tourism operators in support of the industry by overcoming key constraints

Business Precinct Plans Audit

10.     ATEED staff will audit relevant proposed actions and their implementation status of East Tamaki Business Precinct Plan, Integrated Industrial Business Plan and 2014 Howick Local Board plan to identify the cross-overs projects.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     Workshops will be arranged to present the finding of the audit and the draft of Howick Tourism Plan once the work is completed.

12.     The results of the audit will be available in late 2015 and a draft of Howick Tourism Plan will be presented to the board in first quarter of 2016

13.     The board will be formally asked to adopt the Howick Tourism Plan once the draft has been consulted upon and feedback agreed.

14.     Howick Tourism Group and other tourism operators are key partners in implementing the plan.  However, the board may need to consider re-purposing the LDI funding to enable the implementation of the projects and actions identified in the tourism plan.

 

Māori impact statement

15.     Staff are not aware of any Māori owned tourism operators and Māori cultural tourism opportunities in the local board area.

 

Implementation

16.     Staff will report back to the board by the second the quarter of 2016 to seek approval of project scopes and budget of the implementation of Howick Tourism Plan.

17.     Local iwi will be invited to the event on 11th November 2015 as part of the development of the Tourism plan.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Economic Development Business Programme 2015/16

141

     

Signatories

Authors

Luo Lei, Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman, Strategic Planner Local Economic Development

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Economic Development Programme 2015/16

             The purpose of this document is to provide a range of options for Howick Local Board to consider in the delivery of economic development.  The document outlines a number of projects ATEED for delivery in 2015/16.

2015/2016 Economic Development Programmes

LED #

Details

Description

Outcome

Lead

LDI Implication

1

Review East Tamaki Business Precinct Plan, Integrated Business Precinct Plan and 2014 Local Board Plan

 

To identify cross-overs in the existing strategy documents

Provide recommendations on projects the local board is able to pursue and influence.

Luo Lei

Minimum  -the project does not require significant funding

2

Prepare a Howick Tourism Plan to  propose a set of programmes  to improve Howick tourism offering and to enhance the visitor

 

The Howick Tourism Plan provides an integrated approach for further developing the tourism sector in Howick

 

Enhance visitor experience and strengthen economic viability and attractiveness

Luo Lei

10k

2

Facilitate and support the Howick tourism group to implement Howick Tourism Plan to improve Howick tourism offering and to enhance the visitor experience

ATEED tourism is going to work with Howick tourism operators to implement the Howick Tourism Plan.

Increasing collaboration among tourism operators and creating a channel to highlight progress and opportunities.

Lynne Butler

 Further funding required

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Performance Report for the Howick Local Board for the quarter ending September 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/22139

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Howick Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive summary

2.       A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June. 

3.       Auckland Council departments also present quarterly performance reports to the local boards

4.       To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report and department report

5.       The attached report contains the following reports this quarter

·    Local Community Services including Libraries

·    Local Environmental Management

·    Local Sports Parks and Recreation

·    Local Board Financial Performance

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receive sthe Performance Report for the Howick Local Board for the financial quarter ended September 2015

 

 

Comments

6.       In consultation with local boards this report provides the elected members with an overview of local activities from council departments for discussion.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       The report is presented to the Howick Local Board members at a workshop prior to the business meeting.

Maori impact statement

8.       Maori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report of the local board financials.  However, this financial performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Howick Local Board Performance Report to Sep 2015

145

     

Signatories

Authors

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

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Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Libraries Work Programme 2015 -2016

 

File No.: CP2015/21588

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents the Libraries 2015/2016 Howick Local Board work programme for approval

Executive Summary

2.       This report provides information to support local boards to make decisions required to approve the Libraries 2015/2016 work programme.

3.       The Libraries work programme for the Howick Local Board has been aligned to the following 2014-2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·        An involved and connected community.

·        Howick’s future growth is managed effectively

·        Valuing our cultural diversity

·        We all treasure and enjoy our environment

·        Our community is active and healthy

·        A prosperous local economy

4.         Local boards are being requested to approve the Libraries work programme for FY 2015/2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Approves the 2015/2016 Libraries work programme (Attachment A).

 

 

Comments

5.       The Libraries work programme for 2015/2016 aligns to the Howick Local Board plan 2014 – 2017 and Te Kauroa – Auckland Libraries Future Directions 2013-2023.

6.       The Libraries work programmes align to the following 2014 – 2017 Howick Local Board Plan priorities:

·        An involved and connected community.

·        Howick’s future growth is managed effectively

·        Valuing our cultural diversity

·        We all treasure and enjoy our environment

·        Our community is active and healthy

·        A prosperous local economy

7.       A workshop was held on 9 April 2015 with the local board and Libraries staff to ensure activities align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Howick community.

8.       Local Boards are requested to approve the Libraries work programme for 2015/2016. Library staff will continue to work with the local board to ensure actions are delivered and evaluated.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

9.       The draft 2015/2016 work programme was considered by the local board at a workshop held on 9 April 2015. The views expressed by local board members are reflected in Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

10.     Improving Maori outcomes is core to library services and is defined in Te kauhanganui. The Libraries work programme supports Maori initiatives in both programme and service delivery at local libraries.

Implementation

11.     Libraries staff will continue to meet with the local board to provide updates on the work programme and ensure it is progressed. The Libraries work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2015/2016 budget and reported on through the quarterly reporting process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Libraries Work Programme FY2015/2016 Howick Local Board

193

     

Signatories

Authors

Cheryl Fowler - Libraries Service Delivery Manager

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Flat Bush Aquatic/Leisure Centre Location

 

File No.: CP2015/22162

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval of the Ormiston Town Centre site as the preferred location for the future Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre.

Executive summary

2.       Flat Bush is an area of significant residential growth. Development of the town centre is progressing, including planning for civic amenities that include an aquatic/leisure facility to complement the growth of the new township.

3.       In 2011, three potential locations for an aquatic/leisure facility were assessed. The preferred site was identified as Ormiston Road in Ormiston Town Centre, although there was no formal approval of that site as the preferred location.

4.       Formal approval is now sought for the Ormiston Town Centre site in order to provide certainty for ongoing planning work for the delivery of the aquatic/leisure facility.

5.       The Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2015-2025 provides a budget of $27,650,000 in the 2020/2021 financial year for the delivery of the future aquatic/leisure centre. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Approves the location of the Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre site as Ormiston Road between Pencaitland Drive and Park Edge Road in Ormiston Town Centre.

 

        Comments

Background

6.       Flat Bush is an area of significant residential growth, which will accommodate a population that is expected to double over the next ten years to 36,000 people.

7.       In 2007, the former Manukau City Council identified the need for recreation facilities in the proposed new Flat Bush Township. An initial concept was to develop a combined aquatic and indoor recreation facility, in Barry Curtis Park.

8.       In 2011, Auckland Council reviewed the suitability of Barry Curtis Park site for a future aquatic/leisure centre, alongside two other council owned sites, one being Ormiston Road on the southern side of the town centre, the other a ‘residential finger’ near the  town centre. Attachment A shows the three potential locations for the proposed facility.

Assessment process

9.       Assessment of the three potential locations was based on a weighted scoring for each site against the following criteria:

·    site area, suitability for development

·    lost opportunity cost for land use

·    north facing, bus route, accessibility to users

·    pedestrian access, parking, geotechnical elements

·    access to in-ground services

·    security, safety for users

·    proximity to schools, access to other facilities

·    hours of operation/exposure

·    compatibility with surrounding use

·    benefits/synergy as a destination

·    site for future recreation facility (sports hall).

10.     The completed assessment is provided in Attachment B. Table 1 below provides a summary of the identified advantages and disadvantages of each of the three sites.

11.     Table 1 – Summary of advantages and disadvantages of potential locations for Flat Bush leisure/aquatic facility:

Ormiston Town Centre

Advantages

Disadvantages

·      Opportunities for cross-patronage, increased community awareness of town centre facilities

·      Potential higher user numbers, buses arrive in town centre

·      Adequate site for aquatic and future sports hall

·      Car parking less (also use town centre and local streets)

·      Site within easy walking distance (locals and schools)

·      In-ground street services already available

·      Higher levels of security at night for users

·      Extends activity levels in the town centre outside of traditional 9am to 5pm retail

·      Civic facility in premium destination within town centre.

 

·      Reduced commercial return to Panuku Development  Auckland using town centre land for public facility.

 

Barry Curtis Park

Advantages

Disadvantages

·      Large site and for future sports pavilion

·      Suitable geotechnical site information

·      Access to sports fields and skate park

·      Anchor for swimming and sports.

·      Need to provide for direct vehicle access from the town centre, with significant cost associated with crossing the stream

 

·      Isolated at night, distant from town centre and bus routes

·      Visitors to park will arrive mainly by private vehicles

·      Pedestrian access from town centre not formed

·      Higher costs for in ground services and parking

·      Visual impact of a large building in the park

·      Need to provide for direct vehicle access from the town centre, with significant cost associated with crossing the stream.


 

Residential finger

Advantages

Disadvantages

·      Adequate site for aquatic and future sports hall

·      Car parking less (also use local streets)

·      Less isolated at night, but still some security issues

·      Geotechnical site information available.

 

 

·      Narrow neck of housing land, requiring pedestrian connection across waterway

·      Road connection from town centre yet to be formed and not funded

·      Ground services for power, water gas, sewer yet to be installed

·      Reduced commercial return to Panuku Development  Auckland using land for public.

 

 

12.     The assessment identified the Ormiston Town Centre site as the preferred location for the Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre.

13.     While the assessment findings have been generally accepted and have formed the basis for a range of subsequent site investigation, design and consultation work, there has been no formal approval of that site as the preferred location.

14.     In order to provide certainty for future planning and delivery of the project, formal approval of the Ormiston Town Centre site as the preferred location for the leisure/aquatic facility is now being sought.

Work undertaken following site assessment

15.     Following the site assessment undertaken in 2011, a range of further planning, site investigation, design and consultation work has been undertaken for both the proposed facility and the wider Ormiston area. This work has consistently assumed that the Ormiston Town Centre site is the preferred location for the proposed leisure/aquatic facility. Table 2 below summaries this work.

16.     Table 2 – summary of work undertaken subsequent to the 2011 site assessment.

 

Ormiston town centre revised Master Plan 2012

Oct 2012

Geotechnical assessment and report

May 2013

Bulk & location study

June 2013

Draft concept plans

July 2013

Howick Local Board scoping workshop

Aug 2013

Howick Local Board facility component workshop

Feb 2014

Ormiston public information evening

May 2014

Ormiston town centre & aquatic centre hui

May 2014

Needs assessment/feasibility study

Aug 2014

Howick Local Board workshop –

Howick Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2015-2025

Feb 2015

Needs 2015 assessment/feasibility study updated

Jul 2015

Howick Local Board workshop on design options

Aug 2015

Howick Local Board workshop site assessment

Sep 2015

 

Next steps

 

17.     Budget for the delivery of the proposed leisure/aquatic facility is allocated in the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan in the 2020/2021 financial year.

18.     Planning and design work would need to be undertaken in advance to enable commencement of construction in 2020/2021.

19.     Budget for the planning and design work could be provided by bringing some of the budget allocated forward through the annual plan process.

20.     It has been suggested by consultants who have been involved with this project that $750,000 be budgeted for the preliminary design stage, including project & cost management input, together with commencement of preparation of resource consent application.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

21.     A workshop was held on 13th August 2015 with the Howick Local Board on the Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre, this included the project programme and three facility design options with cost estimates.  

22.     A further workshop was held on 3rd September 2015 to review the site assessment process undertaken in 2011. At the workshop board members indicated their support for the town centre site.

Maori impact statement

 

23.     Maori make up approximately seven per cent of the Howick Local Board area. The Local Board Plan 2014 describes ways of working together with local iwi that will support kaitiakitanga and guardianship of the environment and special places

24.     There have been a number of hui with mana whenua on the development of Flat Bush and the town centre. A further hui is planned to be held later in 2015 where discussions will include combined services relating to planning for the future aquatic/leisure centre.

25.     Staff are engaged with the following mana whenua regarding the Flat Bush kaupapa:

·    Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust

·    Ngati Maru Runanga

·    Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngati Tamaoho Trust

·    Ngati Whanaunga Environment Unit

·    Te Aakitai Waiohua Iwi Authority

·    Te Ara Rangatu o Te Iwi o Ngati Te Ata Waiohua

26.     Improved facilities and services in the wider Flat Bush area are likely to have a positive impact on Maori users.

Implementation Issues

27.     The Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2015-2025 provides a budget of $27,650,000 in the 2020/2021 financial year for the delivery of the future aquatic/leisure centre.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Site locations for Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre

201

bView

Site assessment Flat Bush aquatic/leisure centre

203

     

Signatories

Authors

Paul Clark - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Landowner approval for culvert removal and sediment pond within Salford Park

 

File No.: CP2015/23907

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek landowner approval for works in Salford Park, Flat Bush, to remove an existing temporary culvert and establish a temporary sediment pond.

Executive Summary

2.       The developer of the property at 248 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, has applied for landowner approval to remove an existing temporary culvert and construct a temporary sediment pond in Salford Park at 248R Ormiston Road (refer Attachment A). 

3.       The temporary culvert was constructed as part of the developmental requirements for the subdivision by this developer to the north of Salford Park and is no longer required. Its removal will enable the stream to become more naturalised and includes replanting.

4.       The proposal to construct a temporary sediment retention pond (SRP) in the park relates to development to the south of the park. Its construction will require the removal of surplus soil and pipes currently located on the park and reinstatement by May 2017 (refer Attachment B for photos). While the SRP could be located on the applicants land, this proposal will save the council having to do these works (estimated cost $40,000).

5.       Overall it is considered that these proposals will be beneficial to the park environment and its users. It is recommended that the local board grant landowner approval subject to conditions provided by the Manager of Local and Sports Parks South to manage construction and reinstatement of the park.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Grants landowner approval for the removal of a temporary culvert and the construction of a temporary sediment retention pond (as shown on the Woods Drawing No. 60244-03-EW-121 Rev 2 – Parks Edit, titled Rowan Block-Stage 3 Overall Erosion and Sediment Control Plan: Southern Works, dated August 2015) subject to conditions to be provided by the Manager Local and Sports Parks – South to manage the construction effects and reinstatement of the park.

 

 

Comments

6.       The developer of the property at 248 Ormiston Road, Flat Bush, has applied for landowner approval to remove an existing temporary culvert and construct a temporary sediment pond in Salford Park at 248R Ormiston Road (refer Attachment A). 

7.       Council purchased Salford Park for stormwater purposes prior to 2010 and has since constructed a permanent stormwater pond on the land. The park is bisected by a stream. The area to the north of the stream is grassed with a walkway, playground and riparian planting.  The area to the south of the stream is currently undeveloped.  Attachment B contains photos of the site.

Removal of an existing temporary culvert

8.       The existing concrete culvert was constructed as a temporary measure to enable the earthworks (now completed) to the north.  The works have been granted resource consent and the removal of the existing culvert is required under as a consent condition (Permit: 38051). 

9.       The methodology of the removal of this culvert has been approved by Resource Consent staff. The removal works will occur over approximately five days. No machinery will enter the watercourse to carry out the works.

10.     The removal of the culvert is considered beneficial to the park and its users as it will enable the stream bed to slowly revert back to a more natural state. The banks either side of the culvert will be contoured to match the existing, and additional planting (to be finalised with Parks staff) will be undertaken as part of the reinstatement works within the stream area thereby improving the overall stream environment.

11.     Appropriate sediment control measures to approved standards will be in place to ensure that there are no adverse effects on the water quality of the stream. It is understood by the applicant that should any removal of vegetation be required, it will need to be replanted and maintained for a minimum of 2 years at their cost.

12.     The applicant would like to re-use the culvert further downstream in their own property.   

Construction of a new temporary sediment retention pond

13.     The SRP is proposed to be located in an area of Salford Park which is overgrown and contains noxious weeds. The works will require removal of the vegetation and excavation.

14.     A 1.8m high fence will be installed around the SRP to prevent public access. No other access restrictions will be placed on the park.

15.     The SRP is anticipated to be removed by May 2016 at the earliest or May 2017 at the latest after which it will be appropriately backfilled and grassed, to a level and useable condition for park users.

16.     Development of this area of the park is not anticipated to occur until the adjacent residential sites are developed.  Parks staff will continue to work with the developer when they lodge for subdivision consent to achieve a good interface between the site and the park.

17.     The location of the pond means the developer would need to remove an existing large pile of surplus soil and weeds from the site. The developer has also offered to remove another adjacent pile of soil and some large stormwater manholes/pipes (refer Attachment 2). 

18.     If landowner approval is not provided, there is potential to locate the SRP within the applicant’s property.  It is considered however that there is benefit to the council in having the surplus soil and pipelines removed and the area reinstated in grass once the SRP is removed by the applicant. A rough estimate for council to undertake this work is $40,000. 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     The proposal is to be workshopped with the local board on 12 November 2015, prior to the meeting. 

20.     The applicant has requested that the matter be considered as an urgent decision as they are ready to implement these proposals now. 

Māori impact statement

21.     There are no sites of significance or value to mana whenua shown on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan at this site. 

22.     As the works are largely operational and the removal of the culvert is a requirement of resource consent, as are appropriate sediment controls, it is considered that consultation with iwi is not necessary.

Implementation

23.     The applicant has obtained all relevant regulatory consents for the proposal. They have advised that they will seek a variation to their resource consents to extend the time period.  A condition of that variation can be that reinstatement of the area is required.  This would also be a condition of landowner approval.

24.     It is recommended that approval be subject to the Manager of Local and Sports Parks – South providing conditions to manage the construction works and reinstatement.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Site plan

209

bView

Photos of site

211

     

Signatories

Authors

Jayesh Parekh - Parks and Open Space Specialist

Authorisers

Sophie Bell - Parks & Open Space Specialists Manager

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Annual Plan 2016/2017

 

File No.: CP2015/23953

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       This report requests that the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)   provides formal feedback on regional issues:

i.          the Uniform Annual General Charge (UAGC)

ii.          the Interim Transport Levy (ITL)

iii.         Māori land rates

iv.        a review of rural rates

b)   agrees key advocacy issues

c)   recommends any local targeted rate proposals

d)   recommends any Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates.

Executive Summary

2.       Legislation governing the Annual Plan process has changed, and there is no longer the requirement to produce a draft Annual Plan.  Instead,  the council will be producing a consultation document which will cover:

a)   any significant or material changes proposed to the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP)

b)   content relating to local board agreements.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Plan 2016/2017 will take place in February and March of 2016.

4.       This report seeks input from local boards on a range of annual plan related matters including feedback on regional financial policy issues and advocacy issues, and recommendations as to any local targeted rate or BID targeted rate proposals.  These will be considered by the Governing Body prior to finalising consultation topics.

5.       Local board views on these matters will also be considered in discussions between the local boards and the Governing Body on 27 and 30 November, prior to the Mayoral Proposal.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      provides any views it may have on regional issues (that is, the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates) for the Governing Body to consider.

b)      agrees key advocacy issues.

c)      recommends local targeted rate proposals (if any) for consultation.

d)      recommends BID targeted rates (if any) for consultation.

 

 

 

Comments

Regional issues

6.       At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee considered information and analysis on potentially changing the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates.  It resolved to recommend that the council should consult on all of these issues, as part of the process for developing the Annual Plan 2016/2017. 

7.       A summary of these issues and the Finance and Performance Committee recommendations is provided in Attachment A. The detailed reports, setting out the information and analysis provided to the Finance and Performance Committee, can be found here:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/10/FIN_20151028_AGN_6098_AT.PDF

8.       Briefing sessions were held for local board members at the beginning of November.  At these briefings local board members were provided with the detailed reports, and information on the implications of changing the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates.

Advocacy issues

9.       The Local Board may also wish to agree any advocacy priorities for discussion with the Governing Body.

Local targeted rate and BID targeted rate proposals

10.     Any new local targeted rates and/or BIDs must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are required to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     Local Board feedback is being sought in this report. 

12.     Local Boards will also have further opportunities to provide information and views as council continues through the annual plan process.

Māori impact statement

13.     The detailed reports provided to the Finance and Performance Committee have information and analysis on the impacts on Māori regarding proposed financial policies.

14.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual plan are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were developed in 2014 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities.There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

15.     Feedback from the local boards will be summarised and provided in full to:

·    inform the Mayoral Proposal process,

·    the Governing Body for consideration at its meeting on 17 December on consultation topics for the Annual Plan 2016/2017.

16.     The Governing Body will adopt Annual Plan consultation material in early February 2016.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Summary of Regional Issues

217

bView

Finance and Performance Committee Report

223

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh, Financial Planning Manager – Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker, GM Financial Strategy and Planning

Karen Lyons, Manager Local Board Services

 

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 






Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 











































Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 -2016

 

File No.: CP2015/23100

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing a list of reports requested and issues pending for the Howick Local Board.

Executive Summary

2.       A list of reports requested and issues pending is updated monthly and presented at the Board meeting to keep members informed of progress on outstanding reports and issues.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the Reports Requested and Issues Raised 2013 – 2016 schedule.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Reports Requested Issues Raised

267

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 



Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/23102

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report attaches the workshop notes taken for the period stated below.

Executive Summary

2.       Under Standing Order 1.4.2 and 2.15 workshops convened by the Board shall be closed to the public, however, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed or decisions reached, but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.  This report attaches the workshop notes for the period stated below.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      Receives the workshop notes for workshops held on 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th October 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Notes

271

     

Signatories

Authors

Lynda Pearson - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Karen Lyons - Manager Local Board Services

Angeline Barlow - Relationship Manager

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 




     

 


Howick Local Board

16 November 2015

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      excludes the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Acquisition of land for open space - Flat Bush

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report refers to the acqusition of land for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report refers to the acqusition of land for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       Acquisition of open space land - Flat Bush

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] Note this represents 96% in July, 96% in August and 97% in September.