I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 November 2015

9.30am

Room 1, Level 26
135 Albert Street
Auckland

 

Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Mike Lee

Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Dick Quax

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board (alternate)

Member David Taipari

 

Ex-officio

(without voting rights)

All other Councillors

 

 

(Quorum 8 members)

 

 

 

Suad Allie

Democracy Advisor

13 November 2015

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 2769

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Areas of Activity

 

·         Provision of regional facilities and open space

·         Regional frameworks for local facility and open space provision

·         Encouraging healthy lifestyles through participation in sport and recreation sectors

·         Facilitating partnerships and collaborative funding models across the sport and recreation sectors

·         Performing the delegation made by the Governing Body to the former Parks, Recreation and Heritage Forum,  under resolution GB/2012/157 in relation to the Dog Policy

 

Responsibilities

 

Within the specified area of activity the Committee is responsible for:

 

·         In accordance with the work programme agreed with the parent committee, developing strategy and policy, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

·         Making decisions within delegated powers

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million other than for land purchases which shall have a limit of $5 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

 

 

 

 

 

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC – WHO NEEDS TO LEAVE THE MEETING

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Only staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

IMSB

 

·         Members of the IMSB who are appointed members of the meeting remain.

·         Other IMSB members and IMSB staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

CCOs

 

Representatives of a CCO can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the CCO.

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

5.1     Open Land Space - Flat Bush, Pat Gavaghan                                                  7

5.2     Cornwallis Park - Robert Chisholm                                                                   8

5.3     Park Ranger Walks – Judy Donovan                                                                 8

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          8

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          9

9          Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2015 Annual Report       11

10        Parks, Sports and Recreation - Acting General Manager's Report                      39

11        Requirement to formalise access over regional parkland  at Cornwallis             45

12        Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee forward work programme to October 2016                                                                                                                                       53

13        Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines and future allocation of residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund                                59

14        Community Leases located on Omaha Reserve and the limitations of the current land status under the Reserves Act 1977                                                                          73

15        Te Muri Regional Park variation                                                                                81

16        David Nathan Park Reserve Classification                                                             121

17        Assistance with conservation programmes on Regional Parks                          127

18        Aquatic Safety Programmes Update                                                                       129

19        Regional Sport and Recreation Grant Allocation: 2015/2016                               133

20        Regional and Specialist Parks Strategic Achievements for 2013 to 2015          143  

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

22        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               159


 

C1       Acquisition of Land for Open Space- Silverdale North                                        159

C2       Acquisition of land for open space - Flat Bush                                                     159

C3       Acquisition of open space land - Flat Bush - Stage 3                                           160

C4       Acquisition of open space land - Takanini                                                             160

C5       Acquisition of open space land - Orewa                                                                 161

C6       Acquisition of open space land - Glenbrook                                                          161

C7       Acquisition of open space land - Massey                                                               162

C8       Acquisition of open space land - Hingaia                                                               162

C9       Future governance and management of Browns Island (Motukorea)

The report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be circulated prior to the meeting.

  

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 16 September 2015, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

 

5.1       Open Land Space - Flat Bush, Pat Gavaghan

Purpose

1.       Pat Gavaghan will be in attendance to address the Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee regarding the Open Land Space in Flatbush, the report will be discussed in the confidential section of the agenda.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      thank Pat Gavaghan for his attendance.

 

 

 

5.2       Cornwallis Park - Robert Chisholm

Purpose

1.       To address the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee regarding parkland at Cornwallis Wharf area.

Executive Summary

2.       Robert Chisholm, will be in attendance.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      thank Robert Chisholm for his attendance.

 

 

 

5.3       Park Ranger Walks – Judy Donovan

Purpose

1.       To address the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee regarding extending the Park Ranger walks to all Auckland Regional Parks.

Executive Summary

2.       Judy Donovan, will be in attendance.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      thank Judy Donovan for her attendance.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2015 Annual Report

 

File No.: CP2015/24153

 

Purpose

1.       This report summarises the implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan across the sector during 2014 and 2015. The report highlights key achievements so far and priorities planned for the upcoming year.

Executive Summary

2.       The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) was launched in early 2014 as the sector plan to guide planning and delivery of recreation and sport opportunities in Auckland.

3.       ASRSAP is co-sponsored by Auckland Council and OneVoice – Sport and Recreation Auckland. Gary Troup – Independent Chair of OneVoice and members of the OneVoice will be present for this item.

4.       The plan identifies 18 action areas within the four priority areas of participation, infrastructure, excellence in recreation and sport and sector development.

5.       Over 18 months significant progress and milestones have been achieved for sport and recreation in Auckland.

6.       The establishment and contribution of Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation has provided Auckland wide leadership, advocacy and influence in strategy, programming and funding.

7.       Auckland has worked closely with central government on the implementation of the ASRSAP. The launch of Sport NZ’s and Ministry of Health’s key strategy and initiative portfolios has provided a national foundation with ASRSAP providing an Auckland overlay of regional priorities and issues of importance to Aucklanders.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2015 Annual Report from OneVoice – Auckland Sport and Recreation and acknowledge the progress made to date.

b)      support staff to work with OneVoice and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan leadership group to progress a communications and engagement approach that increases awareness and further collaboration to support implementation.

Comments

8.       The Annual report is attached as Attachment A.

9.       The Initiative Update is attached as Attachment B.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     Local Boards were consulted during the development of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) which sets out how the priorities and strategic directions of the Auckland Plan will be put into action.

11.     Local Boards receive regular updates on delivery of local initiatives through the Parks, Sport and Recreation quarterly local board reports.

12.     Discussions on local priorities for sport and recreation take place during the local board annual plan development.

Māori impact statement

13.     The ASRSAP includes actions focusing on improving the health and well-being of Māori. Initiative 3.7 – Partner with regional Māori sports organisations to identify opportunities to increase participation by Maori in recreation and sport activities, including programmes in Te Reo, Māori settings and cultural activities. The report includes progress on this Initiative.

14.     ASRSAP key initiative 15.2 sets out the development of a sport and recreation plan for Māori. A draft plan Te Whai Oranga – the Māori Sport and Recreation Plan has been developed and reported to the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee. Te Whai Oranga and ASRSAP will guide delivery of specific programmes that will benefit Māori and improve delivery of against outcomes.

Implementation

15.     ASRSAP identified Year 1 to 3 priorities and these and other inputs have been considered when setting the priority initiatives for 2015/16 and beyond. The priorities for implementation have been agreed by the Senior Leadership Group. The priorities assume that to achieve our strategic outcome of increasing participation through system building we will also target participant groups.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

20151118, Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee, Annual Report

15

bView

20151118, Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee, Initiative Update

29

      

Signatories

Author

Sharon Rimmer - Manager Recreation Partnerships Programmes and Funding

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


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Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Parks, Sports and Recreation - Acting General Manager's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/23719

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Committee on activities undertaken by the Department of Parks, Sports and Recreation to support implementation of plans and policies of Auckland Council.

Executive Summary

2.       This report has been written to update the Committee across a range of issues and progress with respect to approved work programmes.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the update report from the Acting General Manager – Parks, Sports and Recreation.

Comments

3.       Leisure has seen a number of staff celebrating major anniversaries recently.  Michael Groom (Aquatics and Recreation Facilities Manager) and Craig Rouse (Centre Manager – Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre) have achieved 25 years of service with Council and Lynda Luiten (Operations Manager – Stanmore Bay Pool and Leisure Centre) celebrated 20 years.

4.       Leisure celebrated the 25th birthday of its Stanmore Bay Pool and Leisure Centre on the 18th October with an open day and small ceremony to mark the occasion. It was a good turn out and enjoyable day by all.

5.       On the 7th October Moana-Nui-a-kiwa Pool and Leisure Centre hosted this year’s Super 7’s competition which brings together all holiday programmes from seven different Leisure centres to compete in various events throughout the day.   Over 100 children took part in activities including hockey, basketball, aqua run and finishing up with a performance segment where each centre put together a dance routine and performed it in front of the other participants.  After a long day the overall winners were Allan Brewster Leisure Centre. It was great to see centres working collaboratively together to provide such a fantastic event which was enjoyed by all.

6.       At Hui 13 the Maunga Authority approved the planting of a grove of trees on the summit of Maungakiekie. The grove will consist of Pohutukawa and Totara, and the Maunga Authority have signaled for a planting to take place during Mataraki 2016.

7.       An operator for the Maungawhau kiosk has been selected. The operator will look at establishing a café and function centre within the building. The operation is likely to open after Christmas 2015.

8.       Highest visitor count based on vehicle arrivals for October yet seen at Botanic Gardens with more than 55,000 visitors (based on car park count only, excluding pedestrians).  During school holidays there were approximately 7000 more visitors than over the same period in 2014. This was partially due to the spectacular spring blossom displays this year.

9.       The new Auckland Botanic Gardens website has been launched and is receiving high levels of use.

10.     The Botanic Gardens nursery achieved certification in nursery biosecurity. This ensures the risk of transferring new pests and diseases to parks is minimised.

11.     New Aloe collection (290 species) was planted and opened formally with the extended family of the donor the late Geoff Etherington.

12.     Ambury Farm Day was held on Sunday 4, October and was again a success with 32,000 people attending and enjoying this event.

13.     The second stage of the Hunua Ranges 1080 pest control program was completed in September.  This program has been extremely well managed with staff from all over council supporting.  There has been support and engagement with Mana Whenua and stakeholders including DoC, Watercare and many neighbours.  Pest indices are being monitored to determine the success of the operation.  The fledging success of threatened species such as Kokako will also be monitored.

14.     Regional Parks with support from Biosecurity and Biodiversity have initiated and developed a six month Kaitiaki Park Ranger Trainee programme to support park management.  Four young people from Mana Whenua across Auckland have been selected and have started training.  They will be working alongside park rangers throughout the southern regional parks.  This will help build their skills in recreation, conservation and land management and hopefully provide future career opportunities.  The training component of the programme has been jointly developed working in partnership with the Department of Conservation who are running a similar programme.

15.     On September 18 representatives from Haranui Marae and Nga Maunga Whakahii O Kaipara were hosted at the recently acquired extension to Te Rau Puriri Regional Park.  The purpose of the meeting was familiarization and to commence an early conversation about future management and development of the parkland.

16.     Botanic Gardens hosted the staff of Hamilton Gardens and Hamilton City Parks to showcase the sustainable garden practices including spray-free roses, water sensitive design devices (rain-garden, swale, living roofs and mowing regime, including meadow trials.

Projects

17.     Leisure has 10 Early Childhood Education centres as part of the in house Leisure network and over the last few months they have implemented a number of specific actions to better integrate with the broader Leisure offering. This has led to immediate improvements in occupancy rates.  Over the coming months Leisure intends to develop an integration strategy to further align these services so they complement each other and provide a meaningful point of difference to others in this competitive market.

18.     The West Wave Pool and Leisure Centre is the largest facility in Council’s network with almost 1 million visits annually and over the last 12 months has been undergoing a progressive upgrade to re-establish it as the premier Pool and Leisure Centre.  Work has included a major upgrade to the family changing rooms, a refurbishment of the upstairs fitness area and the development of a new functional training area and sales office.  There is also a comprehensive two year renewal programme underway which will ensure all plant and equipment is capable of meeting the demands of this extremely popular centre.

19.     The team have also undergone some significant changes with the addition of a new Business Manager and Operations Manager to provide the centre with some more focus and support. We are already seeing the benefits of these additions with staff engagement scores improving significantly over the last 12 months along with the centres net position.

20.     On Saturday 12 August an open day was held to celebrate the re-opening of the Mt Albert Centre after a major upgrade. In attendance was Peter Hayes (Albert-Eden Local Board chair), Glenda Fryer (Aquatics Trust chair and Albert Eden local board deputy chair), David Shearer (local Labour MP), Dale Burden (Mt Albert School Principal) as well as various school officers, Local board representatives and Council officials.  The project was on time and budget which is a great achievement and since opening feedback from members of the public has been very positive with attendance above what we anticipated.

21.     Belgravia Leisure have also employed double Olympic gold medalist Danyon Loader to head up their aquatics programs for NZ and as an assistant manager to the centre.  Since the reopening Swim school numbers have grown very quickly with term 4 already having 650 enrolments which is exciting to see.

 

22.     Wairau Stream Bridge project (Devonport /Takapuna Local Board Area)

Significant progress has been made in the construction of this long awaited footbridge.  We have completed the foundations, piles and the static beams.  Only the lifting section remains to be installed, followed by the detailing (handrail).  We have an agreement from Auckland Transport Operations Centre to operate the bridge on Councils behalf once commissioning is complete.  It is anticipated to be complete before Christmas.

 

23.     Windrush Park

A highly productive workshop was held at Ngaiwi Primary School to glean what the students would like to see in the Windrush Park in Mangere. This is an example of the increasing quality of community consultation held by parks

24.     Sportsfields

There is an ongoing major problem with unauthorised/unbooked use of sportsfields which is causing problems for domiciled clubs and causing damage to playing surfaces. Without resources on the ground it is a very difficult issue to resolve, however, clubs, staff and the community remain vigilant and with an increase in reporting there has been some success in catching the culprits.

25.     Education programme

The Parks Education Programme introduced a new site to the guided walks programme at Adah Platts-Mills Reserve in Maraetai.

26.     Volunteer hours recorded on Waiheke have more than doubled and in September were approximately 1200 hours.

 

27.     Auckland Domain

Compliment on Auckland Domain from Gulf News & Waiheke Weekend reporter:

‘Yesterday I had the most stunning walk through the Auckland Domain bush tracks (Lover's Walk) and park area. The flowers were blooming, the grass was green and lush, the place was spotlessly clean and everything looked fresh, beautiful and so well kept and cared for. Whoever manages city parks, and the team who make it so beautiful there in particular, deserve an enormous bouquet! I'd be happy to pass this on to the NZ Herald for their rants and raves section as a 'rave'.’

28.     Symonds Street

Positive feedback for Symonds Street Cemetery from staff member at Central Auckland Research Centre   ‘I took people down to Bishop Selwyn’s Path and was really pleased to see the additional gravel and the steps (with handrails) – and the steps down to the Waiparuru Nature Trail!   No more potential for slipping over. These will certainly make the Anglican/Methodist parts of the Cemetery much more accessible in Spring and Autumn, as well as Summer of course. I also noted that 2 out of the 3 signboards have now been upgraded.’

29.     Essex Reserve

This was a key project for the Albert-Eden Local Board and it has given the precinct on Newnham Lane a new lease of life. This included renewal of the playground, new paths, landscape planting, seats and lawn areas

30.     Sainsbury reserve improvements

An upgrade of the northern part of Sainsbury Reserve with a new play area, paths, trees and landscape planting has converted what had been essentially a paddock on the outskirts of St Luke’s shopping centre into a useful community asset. Note: educational/fun pavement markings.

31.     Waikowhai Walkways Guided Walk 3 October

Around 100 people took part in a ten kilometre guided walk from Onehunga to Lynfield Cove to promote the Waikowhai walkway.  New way-finding and interpretation signs are in place and a map and brochure are available, both in hard copy and on line at:

http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/parksfacilities/walkingtracks/Pages/manukaucoastalwalks.aspx

32.     Regional Parks staff are currently working with a number of agencies including, (Police, Ministry of Primary Industry (Fisheries), Defence and representatives from Nga Maunga Whakahii O Kaipara) at Muriwai Regional Park to run a joint operation on 26 September focused on raising awareness around responsible and safe driver behavior on Muriwai beach.

33.     Track renewal work on the Peripatus Track in the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park was completed in September.  The outcome includes improved track safety, reduced environmental impact and will result in sustainable maintenance.  Photos taken prior to and after the work are included below.

   

Issues/Challenges

34.     Point England Beach access burnt down earlier this month – Parks staff are working with police and Risk & Assurance – an engineer’s report has been completed and plans are underway to restore the structure.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

35.     There has been no specific engagement with local boards in relation to this update report. Programmes and initiatives associated with Local and Sports Parks, together with Pools and Leisure are led by Local Boards.  Local Boards are consulted with respect to specific operational aspects of Regional Parks and Cemeteries within their District.

Māori impact statement

36.     There has been no specific engagement with Māori in relation to this update report.  The report briefly summarises the status of initiatives and projects which are however, on an individual basis, the subject of engagement with Māori.

Implementation

37.     No issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

Dean Kimpton - Chief Operating Officer

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Requirement to formalise access over regional parkland  at Cornwallis

 

File No.: CP2015/22393

 

Purpose

1.       To seek approval to enter into an interim licence with the owner of 124 Cornwallis Road for access across regional parkland while they complete preparation for an easement.

Executive Summary

2.       The owner of a residential property at 124 Cornwallis Road, that is fronted by the Manakau Harbour and surrounded by part of the Waitakere Regional Park known as Cornwallis Reserve, currently access their property via an informal gravel road that bisects a well-used area of the park. (refer Attachment A)

3.       Council has been working with the current owner since 2007 and previous owner since 2004 in an attempt to relocate and formalise access to the property via a more appropriate location that has a lower impact on the park.

4.       In June 2014 the current owner submitted an easement application along a more appropriate alignment. The Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved public notification of the intention to grant an easement along this alignment in September 2014.

5.       The application was withdrawn when council provided the easement conditions and sought agreement for payment of all costs associated with creation of the easement.

6.       Now that a feasible alternative access has been identified open-ended informal use of the existing access over parkland is no longer considered appropriate.

7.       To ensure the issue is resolved within a reasonable timeframe it is recommended that the current owner enter into an interim licence agreement and be required to formalise the access within five years. The interim licence would outline conditions of access and provide a maximum five year time frame to complete the easement.

8.       At the end of the five year period they have not secured an easement it is recommended that the common boundary between the 124 Cornwallis Road and Regional Parkland is fenced such that the existing access is permanently terminated.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the Manager Regional Parks requiring the current owner of 124 Cornwallis Road to enter into an interim licence agreement, by 18 May 2016, for continued private access over the existing formed track to their property for a maximum of 5 years, in order to provide a reasonable timeframe to enable them to complete a proposed easement on an alignment agreed by council including the following conditions:

i)        licence is non-renewable and not able to be assigned to another party on  sale or disposal of the property

ii)       access use restricted to the current property owner, his immediate family members and his tenants

iii)      allow for use by passenger cars and service vehicles only

iv)      an annual licence fee to be paid

b)      approve the Manager Regional Parks terminating access over parkland to the property at 124 Cornwallis Road on 18 November 2020.

Comments

9.       Vehicle access to the residential property at 124 Cornwallis Road is currently obtained by use of 140m of the lower of two gravel roads that runs through Cornwallis Reserve as marked as Access A in Attachment A. Informal use of this road has been allowed to continue for many years although there is no easement or other formed access agreement and council has no legal obligation to provide access across the parkland.

10.     The property owner at 124 Cornwallis road and the neighbouring property owners at 126 Cornwallis Road wrote to council seeking to formalise access to their properties in 2007. Since this time owners of 126 Cornwallis Road have secured an easement along the upper road (Access A) and council has endeavoured to formalise access for the owner of 124 Cornwallis Road along the same alignment so that it does not unduly impact on park use. A range of other options have also been discussed and offered to the property owner including a temporary vehicle licence and pedestrian easement.

11.     Since 2007 council has maintained that continued long term use of the lower road is not desirable however, the property owner of 124 Cornwallis Road’s preference remains an easement or continued informal access via the lower road (Access B) and declined to consider other alternatives.

12.     In June 2014 they eventually submitted an application for an easement along upper road (Access A) that followed the same alignment as the easement granted to the owners of 126 Cornwallis Road in 2009. This option was considered acceptable and the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved at its meeting on 9 September 2014, public notification of the application.

13.     The owner of 124 Cornwallis Road recently withdrew their easement application when presented with easement conditions on clarification that all related costs would need to be met by the property owner.

Issues of unresolved access

14.     The owner of 124 Cornwallis Road has confirmed through their application that alternative access to the property from the upper road is feasible. Their delay in formalising an easement hinders council’s effort to resolve the issue of continued informal private access over parkland at Cornwallis and more appropriately use popular areas of the parkland for regional park purposes.

15.     Consideration and negotiation of various access options has required substantial staff time and resource since the owners of 124 and 126 Cornwallis Road first requested formalising access in 2007. If council continues to allow open ended informal access without a commitment to formalise access there is potential that the same ground will need to be covered in the future should the property be sold before legal access is formalised.

Time frames and recommended conditions of continued access

16.     To ensure access over parkland is formalised within a reasonable timeframe it is proposed to give the current owner of 124 Cornwallis Road a five year time frame to secure and physically create legal access to their property. This time frame will ensure that they have has adequate time to fulfil council, legal and physical construction requirements of the new access.

17.     In order to regularise the current access arrangement on an interim basis, it is recommended that council enter a temporary vehicle licence with the current owner of 124 Cornwallis Road. This will ensure conditions of use can be applied and that the access will only available within the five year time period the current owner has to secure an easement.


18.     At the end of the five year period if the current owner of 124 Cornwallis Road have not secured an easement along the upper road (Access A) it is recommended that access is terminated across the regional park and the common boundary between the 124 Cornwallis Road and the park will be fenced. ‘Securing an easement’ being defined as all parties signed up to a binding agreement which relates to the only alignment on offer and full compensation settled and council’s reasonable costs [including all the work done to date].

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     The Waitakere Ranges Local Board were consulted and supportive of an easement proposal prior to reporting to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee in September 2015. Nothing with regard to the proposed easement has changed except the timeframe for completion.

20.     The local Board delegation protocols (22 January 2013) sets out the local board will be consulted on occupancy agreements within parks where decision-making is allocated to the Governing Body that require public notification. If the committee approves the recommendation to enter into a temporary licence the local board will be consulted as part of regional parks standard licence approval process even though the licence will not require public notification.

Māori impact statement

21.     Mana whenua were consulted and supportive an easement proposal prior to reporting the easement request to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee in September 2015. However, as part of the regional parks licence approval process prior to a council and the current owner entering into a temporary access agreement further consultation with mana whenua will be required.

22.     Temporarily formalising the current access arrangement with a licence enables conditions of use and encourages the relocation of vehicle access to a more appropriate location on the park. This does not present any particular impacts on mana whenua any differently to general users of the park. 

Implementation

23.     The current owner of 124 Cornwallis Road will be informed of this resolution, invited to continue to progress their easement application and requested to enter into an access licence agreement.

24.     If they refuse to enter into a licence agreement by 18 may 2016 (six months) and should an access easement not be secured by 18 November 2020 (5 years), access across the regional park will be terminated and the common boundary between 124 Cornwallis Road and the park will be fenced.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Access Map

53

bView

Cornwallis Warf Concept Plan 2005

55

     

Signatories

Author

Dafydd  Pettigrew - Parks and Open Space Specialist - Region Wide

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee forward work programme to October 2016

 

File No.: CP2015/24382

 

Purpose

1.       To present the forward work programme to October 2016 for approval.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the forward work programme to October 2016.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

20151118, Parks Sports Recreation Committee, Parks Sports Recreation Sports Work Programme

59

     

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 





Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines and future allocation of residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund

 

File No.: CP2015/24069

 

Purpose

1.  To seek approval of the draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines for local board and sector engagement and the future allocation of the residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund.

Executive Summary

2.    At the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee workshop on 14 October 2015 the key principles of the draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme and options for the use of the residual $2.5m Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund were considered.

3.    The Committee provided feedback on the proposed draft Community Access Scheme for local board and sector engagement and the use of the residual Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund.

4.    This report provides formal oversight of information covered at the workshop and timeframes associated with the Community Access Scheme (see Attachment A).

5.    This report requests approval of the draft Community Access Scheme guidelines for local board and sector engagement and the use of the residual Hillary Commission funding toward the implementation of this scheme. A decision on the Hillary Commission residual funding will allow consultation on the draft Community Access Scheme to include all funding sources.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the allocation of the residual $2.5m Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund toward the implementation of the Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme with a priority given to identified need in the legacy Waitakere and Auckland City Council areas.

b)      approve the draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines for local board and sector engagement.

Comments

Draft Community Access Scheme

6.      Council’s region wide investment programme in sport and recreation supports the implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) and organisations delivering region-wide to inspire and encourage Aucklanders to be more active more often. The investment programme consists of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme, Region Wide Strategic Partnership Grants and the Community Access Scheme. Local Boards also have discretion through the Local Board Grants Programme to support sport and recreation providers (see Attachment B).

7.      The 29 July 2015 Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved a regional sport and recreation work programme that included the development of strategic region wide guidelines for the allocation of sport and recreation grants outside the scope of the Council Grants Policy including community access/operating grants and the residual Hillary Commission fund.

8.      The Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee held a workshop on 14 October 2015 to consider the draft Community Access Scheme guidelines and options for the use of the residual Hillary Commission Community Sport fund. The workshop was well attended.

9.      The purpose of the proposed Community Access Scheme is to leverage access to non-council facilities to support increased levels of sport and recreation participation and improve equity of access to opportunities. The scheme will support implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) and the Sport Facility Network Plan, under development.  The aim is to open up access to facilities where there are identified gaps in the existing network provided both by council and the sports sector, encourage greater use of existing assets and support multisport/shared use facilities.

10.    The Community Access Scheme will enable council to move investment across Auckland in response to highest need/demand and invest on a three yearly cycle aligned to the Long Term Plan (first cycle proposed as two years to align with development 2018/28 LTP). Like the Sports Field Capacity Development programme this is a region wide scheme allocated locally.

11.    As per Attachment A the six principles for this scheme proposed at the workshop and receiving general support are:

·      A focus on outcomes

·      Sustainable facilities

·      Fairness and equity of opportunity

·      Make the best use of resources

·      Be inclusive

·      Enabling Māori outcomes and valuing Te Ao Māori

 

Strategic alignment

12.     The Auckland Plan sets out a single vision to make Auckland the world’s most livable city over the next 30 years, to 2040. The particular priorities in the Auckland Plan that the draft Community Access Scheme impacts the delivery of are:

·    Provide quality opportunities for all Aucklanders to participate in sport and recreation

·    Optimise sport and recreation facilities use

·    Provide social and community infrastructure for present and future generations

13.     The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) sets out how the priorities and strategic directions of the Auckland Plan will be put into action.  The draft Community Access Scheme is part of a suite of investment tools that deliver on three (Participation, Infrastructure, Sector Capability) of the four priority areas and key actions of this plan. Specific to the Community Access Scheme is the key priority area of:

Infrastructure: Access to open spaces, harbors, coastlines, waterways and a fit for purpose network of facilities that enable physical activity, recreation and sport at all levels. The draft Community Access Scheme will support the key actions to:

·    Improve access to existing school sport and recreation assets

·    Promote and prioritise investment into partnership facilities

·    Deliver access to a recreation centre and swimming pool network across Auckland

·    Implement the sport code facility plans

·    Address equity of access to facilities


 

14.     The Te Whai Oranga - Māori Sport & Recreation Plan, developed as an action of the Auckland Sport & Recreation Strategic Action Plan will guide prioritisation of activities to increase Māori participation in sport and recreation and improve Māori health and well-being. This plan will form part of the strategic context to inform decision making for the Community Access Scheme.

15.     I am Auckland – the Children and Young Peoples Strategic Action Plan outlines Auckland Council’s region-wide commitments to children and young people in Auckland. Specific to the Community Access Scheme is the key goal of ‘Auckland is my playground’ meaning we provide a range of opportunities for sport, recreation, arts and culture, which are easy for children and young people to participate in. This action plan will form part of the strategic context to inform decision making for the Community Access Scheme.

Existing Community Access Grants

16.     Existing Community Access Grants are currently being reviewed to ensure those that are either no longer eligible or do not align with the principles of the proposed scheme,  are supported through another mechanism or provided with sufficient support to maintain current levels of community access.

17.     The following table illustrates current investment

Table 1.

 

 

Investment Area

Who

Amount

Asset based term grant – community access

Sovereign Stadium Mairangi Bay

School/community/council partnership

$58k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Hato Petera School

School/community/council partnership

$28k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Avondale College

School/community/council partnership

$17k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Tamaki Recreation Centre

School/community/council partnership

$100k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

ASB Stadium

School/community/council partnership

$80k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Waiheke Recreation Centre School/community/council partnership

$75k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust

Operational support

$340k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Papatoetoe Sports Community & Charitable Trust (Kolmar)

Operational support

$100k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Dacre Park

Cost-equity – contribution to field maintenance

$17k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Auckland Netball

Sport-equity – contribution to facility maintenance

$150k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Manukau Tennis Centre

Sport-equity – contribution to facility maintenance

$41k p.a.

Total

 

$1.006m

 

 


Future use of Hillary Commission Funding

18.     In June 2002, Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC, now Sport NZ) ceased the annual funding through the Community Sport Fund. The fund was administered through territorial local authorities and supported sport and recreation projects and initiatives.

19.     The fund was allocated to councils on a population based approach and was distributed to the community through a combination of contestable grants and loans.

20.     Following the end of the Community Sport Fund, SPARC advised councils that any remaining Community Sport funding held or returned via loan repayments could be allocated in a manner consistent with the desired outcomes of the fund.

21.     Prior to Auckland Council, councils took a varied approach with most using remaining funds for capital projects or allocated in grants to sport and recreation groups.

22.     At amalgamation Waitakere ($1.1 million) and Auckland City Council ($1.39 million) had remaining Community Sport Funds due in the most part to their approach of funding low interest loans to sport groups clubs which have since been repaid.

23.     Four options were discussed at the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee workshops on 17 June 2015 and 14 October 2015 for the future use of the residual Hillary Commission fund. Further analysis of these four options is outlined in Attachment C.

·    Develop a separate region wide contestable grants programme. A new contestable grants programme could be established. It could provide a wider criteria for achieving sport and recreation outcomes including facility or capital, and operational and programme related funding. It would need to be considered how this would fit with the regional and local grants programme including the new local discretionary capital fund.

 

·    Allocate as part of the new Community Grants Policy (CGP) Regional Sport & Recreation Grants Programme. The new regional sport and recreation grants programme that has been established as part of the Community Grants Policy (CGP) has a budget of $508K per annum. This funding could be split across the first three years and added to the current budget, for distribution against the criteria in the CGP.

 

·    Allocate towards the implementation of Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) priority initiatives. The funding could be used to deliver on some of the focus areas of ASRSAP, for example, addressing inequity in sport and recreation support, sustainability of sport work programme, and the Sport Facility Network Plan implementation. Progress and outcomes would be reported via ASRSAP annual reporting.

 

·    Allocate as part of a proposed Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme to address inequities across sport and recreation in Auckland. This would increase the budget available to support community access to non-council facilities in areas of demand and provide operational support to new or existing sport and recreation facilities, including multisport hubs, for example, supporting netball hubs, and incentivising new multisport/co-location. This is a big gap area for sport and recreation funding support and would support and increase the sustainability of sport and recreation facility provision.

 

24.     An option to use the Hillary Commission funding to repay some or all of the legacy sport and recreation community loans was raised at the July workshop. Of the 45 community loans held with council, thirteen loans totaling $1.2 million are to sport and recreation community organisations ($123,000 Waitakere, $746,000 Auckland, $338,000 Papakura and Franklin). Based on feedback from the workshop these options were not developed further.

25.     Allocating the funds to the Community Access Scheme is identified as the preferred option. It will add to existing funding over say a five year period, and provide support for community access to non-council facilities in areas of high demand, establishment of operational support to new sport and recreation facilities, including multisport hubs and support code specific sports hubs. This is a gap in sport and recreation funding support and will support the sustainability of sport and recreation provision. The existing need to incrementally address some of the inequity across codes was supported at the workshop.

26.     Including the residual Hillary Commission fund in the Community Access Grants Scheme would provide further funding to leverage access to non-council facilities to support increased levels of sport and recreation participation and reduce inequities of access to opportunities. It is proposed that the Hillary Commission funding be allocated over a five year period and priority be given to identified need in the legacy Waitakere and Auckland City Council areas.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

27.     Local Boards were consulted during the development of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP) which sets out how the priorities and strategic directions of the Auckland Plan will be put into action. This scheme implements these plans.

28.     The three West Local boards have expressed a view that the residual Hillary Commission funds from legacy Waitakere City Council should be retained and distributed for the benefit of the West community.

29.     The draft Community Access Scheme guidelines and use of residual Hillary Commission funds will be presented to a workshop of Local Board chairs 23 November with the opportunity to provide feedback.

30.     Targeted engagement of local boards will continue to occur. Local boards and organisations with existing community access agreements have been engaged in on-going dialogue with Auckland Council staff about potential future change in agreements since amalgamation. Responses to the consultation will be reported back to Committee early 2016.

Māori impact statement

31.     The ASRSAP includes actions focusing on improving the health and well-being of Māori. Initiative 3.7 – Partner with regional Māori sports organisations to identify opportunities to increase participation by Maori in recreation and sport activities, including programmes in Te Reo, Māori settings and cultural activities.

32.     ASRSAP key initiative 15.2 sets out the task for Te Waka Angamua and partners to lead the development of Te Whai Oranga – the Māori Sport and Recreation Plan; this will be reported to the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee in due course. Te Whai Oranga and the ASRSAP will guide delivery of specific programmes that will benefit Māori and improve delivery of against outcomes.

33.     Staff from the Parks Sport and Recreation department and Te Waka Angamua will work with the Independent Māori Statutory Board regarding the draft Community Access Scheme guidelines during the November to March period. The IMSB views will inform the final report.

34.     The Community Access Scheme will support Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori and support positive outcomes for Māori participation in sport and recreation through investing in eligible organisations that help achieve this objective.  Matauranga Māori / Māori knowledge and world views will be respected. We will ensure that we:

·    Engage effectively with Māori to identify investment opportunities to increase access

·    Provide appropriate capacity building support to those invested in to support increased Maori participation in sport and recreation

Implementation

35.     Engagement with key stakeholders will take place between November and March 2016. Officers will report back to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee in May 2016 seeking approval of the Community Access Scheme guidelines and consideration of recommendations for legacy agreements. This will enable revised agreements with existing entities that are aligned,  to be in place by 1 July 2016.

36.     Funding decisions on future partnerships created through this scheme for 2016/2017 and beyond will be made by Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee Resolution following the completion of the Sports Facility Network Plan. This includes any future decisions in relation to the residual Hillary Commission funds.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines

69

bView

Sport and Recreation Investment diagram

73

cView

Options Analysis for residual Hillary Commission fund

75

     

Signatories

Author

Joanne Macmillan - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 





Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Community Leases located on Omaha Reserve and the limitations of the current land status under the Reserves Act 1977

 

File No.: CP2015/24189

 

Purpose

1.       This report seeks the approval of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee to approve the revocation of the reserve status over the land at Omaha Reserve in line with the processes prescribed by the Reserves Act 1977 and the Local Government Act 2002.

Executive Summary

2.       Omaha Reserve located at the corner of Omaha Drive and North West Anchorage currently accommodates 4 community ground leases comprising 3 recreational activities (bowling, golf and tennis clubs) and 1 local purpose activity (community centre).

3.       Due to legacy actions Parcels A, B and C in the image provided (Attachment A) were set apart as an unclassified local purpose reserve under the Reserves Act 1977, requiring that only activities of a local purpose nature are permitted on the reserve.

4.       The risks associated with permitting non-compliant activities under the Reserves Act affect the community groups operating them as well as the Local Board and Council and include:  potential breaches of health and safety legislation and costs resulting from challenges raised as to the legalities of the actions undertaken by the Council, the Local Board and tenants.

5.       On 2 November 2015, Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee carried resolution RODPC/2015/75 in support of revocation of the Reserves Act 1977 over the land at Omaha Reserve in order to rectify the current compliance issues and enable possible future community activities on the site.

6.       This report seeks the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to revoke the reserve status of the land at Omaha Reserve in line with the processes prescribed by the Reserves Act 1977 and to be held the Local Government Act 2002.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the revocation of the reserve status of the land at Omaha Reserve subject to public notification and iwi consultation and in line with the processes prescribed by the Reserves Act 1977 and the Local Government Act 2002.

 

Comments

7.       Omaha Reserve located at the corner of Omaha Drive and North West Anchorage currently accommodates 4 community ground leases comprising 3 recreational activities (bowling, golf and tennis clubs) and 1 local purpose activity (community centre).

8.       Due to legacy actions Parcels A, B and C in the image provided (Attachment A) were set apart as an unclassified local purpose reserve under the Reserves Act 1977, requiring that only activities of a local purpose nature are permitted on the reserve.

9.       The local purpose activities carried out within the community centre (excluding the activities of the commercial café and golf pro-shop) are therefore permitted under the current local purpose reserve status of Parcel B.

10.     The recreational activities of the tennis and bowling clubs occupying Parcels A, B and C, however, are not permitted on a local purpose reserve and any leases granted to accommodate these activities do not comply with the Reserves Act. 

11.     The remaining recreational lease to the golf club is permitted on Parcel D because the land is not subject to the Reserves Act and is held by the council under the Local Government Act.

12.     The risks associated with permitting non-compliant activities under the Reserves Act affect the community groups operating them as well as the Local Board and Council and include:  potential breaches of health and safety legislation and costs resulting from challenges raised as to the legalities of the actions undertaken by the Council, the Local Board and tenants.

13.     Revocation of the Reserves Act over the affected portions of Omaha Reserve as described in Attachment A would address the entire area at once, affecting all leases (excepting the already compliant golf club’s lease on Parcel D) and mitigate the overall cost required by the alternative option to classify and any future requirements to re-classify. A minimum overall time estimate to complete the revocation process is one year at a minimum cost of $2,800.

14.     Revocation would also promote a transparent and consistent process to enable compliance with the law. The land would remain as held by Auckland Council and leased under the Local Government Act 2002, effectively providing the flexibility to accommodate all activities as required by local communities and streamlining future leasing arrangements.

Consideration

Committee views and implications

15.     Council staff tabled the impediments to progressing community leases at Omaha Reserve posed by the Reserves Act status of the land at the Rodney Local Board Workshop on 12 October 2015. Following a formal report on 2 November 2015, Rodney Local Board carried resolution RODPC/2015/75 in support of revocation of the reserve status on the land at Omaha Reserve.

16.     This report was written based on input from the Legal, Local and Sports Parks, Property and Community Development Arts and Culture (CDAC) departments of Auckland Council and in consideration of the current and possible future community tenants occupying and utilising Omaha Reserve.

Māori impact statement

17.     Revocation of the current Reserves Act status of the land at Omaha Reserve would require iwi consultation as outlined in Attachment B.

Implementation

18.     Subject to Parks, Recreation and Sport Com0073mittee approval, Council staff will action the recommendation as outlined in the table in Attachment B.

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

20151118, Parks Recreation and Sports, Aerial image of Omaha Reserve

81

bView

20151118, Parks Recreation and Sports, Minimum Process, Timeframes and Costs

83

     

Signatories

Author

Toto Vu-Duc - Manager Community Leases

Authorisers

John O’Brien - Manager Regional Operations

Kim O’Neill - Manager Leasing and Land Advisory Services

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Te Muri Regional Park variation

 

File No.: CP2015/21725

 

Purpose

1.    To endorse the draft variation to the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 (RPMP) to incorporate Te Muri Regional Park and to seek approval to publically notify this.

Executive Summary

2.       The Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved public notification of the intention to vary the RPMP to incorporate Te Muri Regional Park at the committee’s meeting on 9 June 2015. Council publically notified the intention to vary the RPMP in mid-July.

3.    This initial notification sought comment on issues and matters to be considered in the preparation of the draft plan.  Feedback to the proposal was received from a number of key stakeholders including recreation groups, neighbours, previous owners and individual members of the public.

4.    Key themes from the initial consultation include pedestrian and vehicle access into the park, development of recreational activities such as horse riding walking, cycling, camping, retention of the remote feeling of the park and access over the Te Muri Stream and Puhoi River.

5.    Hui have been held with iwi and a cultural impact assessment has been prepared by Ngati Manuhiri. This assessment has been utilised to inform the draft variation.

6.    Rodney Local Board members at their Rodney Local Board meeting held on 2 November 2015 formally recorded their views for consideration in the development of the draft variation to the RPMP.

7.    If the public notification of the draft variation is approved consultation will run from mid-December 2015 and close early March 2016. Submissions will be heard by independent commissioners in April/May and the commissioners’ recommendations reported back to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee for a final decision in June 2016.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      endorse the draft variation to the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 to incorporate Te Muri Regional Park and minor variations to the Mahurangi section of the plan, as shown in Attachments A and B, and requests this be publically notified to seek the community’s feedback.

Comments

8.      Te Muri Regional Park comprising 382.46ha was purchased by council in 2010.  A variation to the RPMP is being undertaken prior to Te Muri Regional Park being formally opened to the public. 

9.      At the Parks, Recreation and Sport committee’s 9 June meeting the committee resolved to

a)      approve the initiation of a variation of the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 to incorporate Te Muri Regional Park, and

b)      approve the appointment of an independent hearings commissioner to hear submissions on a draft variation and to recommend to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee a draft variation to the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 to incorporate Te Muri Regional Park.

10.    The intention to undertake this variation was publicly notified in mid July 2015.  This included information on the Shape Auckland website, public notices in the NZ Herald, the Rodney and North Shore Times and Mahurangi Matters.  Key stakeholders and local residents within a 1km to 1.5km radius of the park were notified.  The closing date for this phase of the consultation was 19 August 2015.

11.    Comments were received from 140 people via email, of which 88 of these were on a pro-forma submission.  Submissions on behalf of groups were received from:

·    Department of Conservation

·    NZ Horse Network

·    Horse Connections NZ

·    Auckland Tramping Club

·    Puhoi Canoes

·    NZ Walking Access Commission

·    Mahurangi Action Inc

·    West Auckland District Tramping Club

·    Friends of Regional Parks

·    New Zealand Motor Caravan Association

12.    Three members of the Schischka family (previous landowner) provided comments on the future of the park.

13.    In addition a petition on Change.Org was organised by Horse Connections NZ and had 1,046 signatories supporting the provision of horse riding on the park.

14.    The main themes evident in the initial feedback have been:

·    Retention of the remote visitor experience

·    Provision for horse-riding and mountain biking

·    Development of a coastal trail connecting Te Muri with Wenderholm and Mahurangi West Regional Parks

·    Utilising the park for the Te Araroa trail as an alternative to going down the Puhoi River

·    Vehicle access into the park

·    Retention and expansion of camping opportunities

15.    The feedback received from this first round of consultation has been has been used to inform the draft variation, refer to Attachment C for a summary of this feedback.

16.    The draft variation covers the addition of Te Muri Regional Park to Section 17 Parks Specific Management, refer to Attachment A.  This includes a park vision, park values, management focus, management policies and recreation use and activities.  

17.    The vision for the park is:

                 Together with Wenderholm and Mahurangi Regional Parks, Te Muri forms a strategic coastal park network on the north eastern coast of the region. Te Muri is a farmed park that offers a wide range of individual and group-orientated active outdoor recreation pursuits in a picturesque setting with panoramic views over the Hauraki Gulf and islands. The park contains a kiwi bach escape and a camping area close to a sandy beach offering safe swimming, kayaking and other beach related activities.  The park is rich in cultural heritage and natural values and is an outstanding example of best practice land management which provides a context for environmental education and demonstrates effective conservation strategies.


 

18.    The plan provides for a staged development of the park to provide for recreational use.  This will initially hinge on improvements being made to Hungry Creek Road and the intersection with State Highway 1.  It is proposed an arrival area be developed at the entrance to the park and that as resources permit the central road would be upgraded and a primary arrival area would be developed, set back from the beach.

19.    While there was support in the feedback not to provide vehicle access into the park, this is required to fully utilise the council’s significant investment in this park and make it as available as possible to all sectors of the community. 

20.    Over time a track network will be developed that caters for walkers, horse riders and mountain bike riders.  The plan also gives consideration to linking Te Muri with the adjacent regional parks, as suggested in the feedback.   

21.    The park’s significant cultural and historic values have been recognised in policies that aim to protect, enhance and interpret these.  In addition, while the park will continue to be farmed, revegetation will continue to be undertaken in riparian areas and erosion prone slopes. The significant view shafts in the park have been identified and will be protected.

22.    The map of Te Muri Regional Park is currently under development and will be tabled at the meeting.  This reflects the park vision and management and development policies considered for the park and will be included in the RPMP Volume 2: Maps. 

23.    A minor variation to the RPMP related to adjoining Mahurangi (West) Regional Park is proposed to update this to remove or amend reference to Te Muri where appropriate, refer to Attachment B which includes tracked changes.  There will also be an addendum added to the RPMP of consequential changes relating to the addition of Te Muri to the regional park network.  No changes are proposed to the generic policy sections.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

24.    At the Rodney Local Board Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee workshop on the 21st September 2015 the members discussed the main themes from the feedback received from the initial round of public consultation and provided staff with their views.

25.    At the workshop the committee requested their views be formally recorded by way of resolutions at their Parks, Culture and Community Development Committee meeting on 2 November 2015.  The local board resolved at this meeting that their views to be considered in the preparation of the variation were:

a)      Greater consultation with the community is required on the coastal trail proposal, particularly the bridge across the Puhoi River and the associated visual impact, health and safety issues and the significant cost required to develop and maintain the structure.

b)      Support pedestrian and operational access being provided across the Te Muri Stream.

c)  Acknowledge and retain the remote feeling of the park.

d)  Provision of practicable vehicle access to the park for families, the elderly or infirm.

e)         Support developing the park for use by walkers, cyclists and horse-riders.

f)          Support houses on the park being added to the council’s bach escapes.

g)         Support linking existing and proposed walkway connections through Te Muri Regional Park to add to the national walkway network.

26.     These matters have been considered in the development of the draft variation.

Māori impact statement

27.     Te Muri Regional Park is a place of significance for Iwi and contains a number of important historic sites including pa, urupa and other archaeological sites.

28.     Iwi consultation was initiated in June and hui have been held with Ngati Manuhiri, Ngati Whatua o Kaipara and Ngati Maru. 

29.     Ngati Manuhiri has prepared a cultural values assessment to cover Te Muri, Wenderholm and Mahurangi West Regional Parks. This has been considered in the development of the draft variation and will assist future management and planning at Te Muri, Wenderholm and Mahurangi Regional Parks.

30.     Further engagement with these mana whenua will now be undertaken over the draft plan.

Implementation

31.     Due to the consultation period running over the Christmas break the consultation period is proposed to run from mid-December 2015 to early March 2016. This will allow a park open day and further hui to be held in February and sufficient time for feedback to be submitted before the consultation period closes in early March.

32.     Consultation will include advertising in the NZ Herald and three local papers, posters or temporary signage located on adjoining regional parks and notice boards in the local area, a park open day.  Key stakeholders and local residents within a 1km to 1.5km radius of the park will be notified.  There will be information on Shape Auckland Shape Auckland website Council’s Facebook page and will include a link to an online survey. 

33.     It is anticipated that any hearing of submissions and deliberations will be held in April/May 2016 and that the final plan will be adopted by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee by June/July 2016.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft variation covering Te Muri Regional Park

89

bView

Draft minor variation to Mahurangi

103

cView

Summary of feedback to the initial round of consultation

117

     

Signatories

Authors

Annette Campion - Project coordinator

Dafydd Pettigrew - Parks and Open Space Specialist - Region Wide

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager  Parks, Sport and Recreation

Ian Maxwell – Director Community Services

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 















Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 














Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 








Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

David Nathan Park Reserve Classification

 

File No.: CP2015/22605

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present reserve classification options for David Nathan Park and to gain approval from the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee to initiate the classification process.

Executive Summary

2.       During the process of updating commercial lease arrangements at Nathan Homestead it was identified that David Nathan Park is an ‘Unclassified’ public reserve. The ‘Unclassified’ reserve status means that the current commercial activities on site are non-compliant under the Reserves Act. These activities include the café, childcare, room-hire and hireage of the grounds for weddings and events.

3.       Staff from Community Facilities (Leasing Team), Legal, Parks, Sport and Recreation (Local Parks and Leisure Teams), and Arts and Culture have reviewed the reserve classification options available to council to ensure provision for current and potential future on-site activities.

4.       Three classification options have been identified:

1) to revoke the reserve classification for David Nathan Park

2) to classify the reserve under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act as a Historic Reserve

3) to survey the park and classify areas of the park based on their primary value and main  

    use.

5.       Option two is endorsed by the Manurewa Local Board as it meets the needs of the current activities at David Nathan Park and Nathan Homestead, and also allows flexibility for future use. This option would provide a level of comfort for the community that the reserve is protected, will take the least time and incur the least cost.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the proposed classification of David Nathan Park as a Historic Reserve (Option two) and direct staff to initiate the classification process.

Comments

6.       David Nathan Park remains held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as an ‘Unclassified’ public reserve. In terms of Section 16 (6) of the Reserves Act, David Nathan Park must be administered by the council as a public reserve until the property has been classified for a reserve purpose by the council by way of a resolution in terms of its powers held under Section 16 (2A) of the same Act.

7.       During the process of updating commercial lease arrangements at Nathan Homestead it was identified that David Nathan Park is an ‘Unclassified’ public reserve. This status defaults the reserve to the highest protection under the Reserves Act and limits permitted activities on the site.

8.       The ‘Unclassified’ reserve status means that the current commercial activities on site are non-compliant under the Reserves Act. These activities include the café, childcare, room-hire and hireage of the grounds for weddings and events.

9.       Staff from Legal and Community Facilities (Leasing Team) have researched all available information on David Nathan Park, including the Deed of Trust dated 14 December 1962 made between the Manurewa Borough Council and the Nathan family. Staff representatives from Community Facilities (Leasing Team), Legal, Parks, Sport and Recreation (Local Parks and Leisure Teams), and Arts and Culture have reviewed the reserve classification options available to council to ensure provision for current and potential future on site activities.

10.     There are three reserve classification options available.

11.     OPTION 1: to revoke reserve classification to enable varied leasing and licensing. This option would allow the greatest degree of flexibility for park usage and on-site building and asset functions.

12.     The revoking of reserve classification could be interpreted by the public as a reduction in open space protection, with increased potential for council to sell the land or use it for other activities, such as housing development. However, this is not the case. The land would retain a reserve zoning under the Unitary Plan, and council would be required to go through a public consultation process to re-zone or sell the land.

13.     The process to revoke classification would take six to twelve months, include iwi engagement and full public consultation, and cost approximately $10,000. The Nathan Homestead operational budget can fund $5,000 of this cost.  An additional funding source for the remaining $5,000 would need to be found.

14.     OPTION 2: to classify the reserve under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act as a historic reserve. Section 58A (1) of the Act allows commercial leases or licences to be granted by the council on historic reserves: this option would legitimise current and potential future commercial activities. Community activities would also be provided for, together with outside activities such as wedding receptions, events and photo shoots.

15.     The classification process would take three to six months, include iwi engagement and public notification, and cost approximately $5,000. The Nathan Homestead operational budget can fund the $5,000 cost.

16.     OPTION 3: to complete a full survey of the park and classify specific areas to reflect the primary value and main use. As shown in Attachment A, the section of bush would be classified as a scenic reserve, the main area of the park would be classified as recreation reserve, and the Homestead area and associated buildings would be classified as local purpose. This option is considered to be best practice under the Reserves Act.

17.     The classification process would take six to twelve months, include iwi engagement and full public consultation, and cost approximately $15,000 to $20,000 due to additional survey plan and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) approval fees. The Nathan Homestead operational budget can fund $5,000 of this cost.  An additional funding source for the remaining $10-15,000 would need to be found.

18.     Option 2 has been endorsed by the Manurewa Local Board (via an urgent resolution on 3 November 2015) as it meets the needs of the current activities at David Nathan Park and Nathan Homestead and will also allow flexibility for future use. This option would provide a level of comfort for the community that the reserve is protected, take the least time and incur the least cost.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

19.     Maunurewa Local Board has identified Nathan Homestead and David Nathan Park as highly valued community assets in Manurewa. The board has also endorsed the Nathan Homestead Strategic Business Planning project that is currently underway with the following proposed long term aspirations:

 

·    to restore the heritage building and features

·    to protect the natural and passive recreation values of the site

·    to focus the facility on arts and culture, venue hire and community events

·    to connect the site to the town centre and the Botanic Gardens.

20.     In order to legitimise current activities and enable the local board’s long term aspirations, the reserve needs to be appropriately classified.  At their meeting on 22 October, the local board endorsed Option 2: classifying David Nathan Park as a Historic Reserve. An urgent resolution was then passed on 3 November to support this endorsement.

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)         Support the recommendation to the Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee to classify David Nathan Park as a Historic Reserve under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act.

Māori impact statement

21.     Iwi consultation will be undertaken as required under the Reserves Act for all options.

22.     Ten mana whenua contacts for the Manurewa Local Board area were invited to participate in the wider strategic business planning project that will set the future direction of David Nathan Park and Nathan Homestead. One of the priority actions identified by this business planning process includes appropriately classifying the reserve to legitimise current activities.

23.     One response was received from Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua. They indicated that they will not actively participate in the business planning work, but asked to be kept up to date as plans are confirmed.

Mana Whenua

Response Received

Follow-Up Council Action

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Email response received – requesting email updates as plans are confirmed.

Project Manager to provide updates via email at key project milestones. The next milestone is 27 November 2015 – update on local board workshop.

Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

No response

Project Manager will provide a copy of the final David Nathan Park and Nathan Homestead Strategy Business Plan once adopted by the Local Board in January / February 2016.

Te Kawerau a Maki

No response

Ngāti Tamaoho

No response

Te Akitai Waiohua

No response

Ngāti Paoa

No response

Ngāti Maru

No response

Ngāti Whanaunga

No response

Ngāti Tamaterā

No response

Waikato-Tainui

No response

Implementation

24.     Upon final approval from the Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee, the classification process will commence. The process will take three to twelve months depending on the option approved.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

20151118, Parks Sports Recreation, David Nathan Park Option C: Potential Reserve Classification Areas

129

     

Signatories

Author

Naomi Singer – Arts & Culture Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager - Arts, Community and Events

Mark Bowater - Acting GM Parks, Sport and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Assistance with conservation programmes on Regional Parks

 

File No.: CP2015/24046

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee’s endorsement to forming a partnership with ‘Greenfleet’ to accelerate the ecological restoration programme on regional parks.

Executive Summary

2.       Council has been approached by ‘Greenfleet’ for access to 50 hectares of parkland to fund, carryout and maintain conservation programmes in order to restore natural ecosystems and off-set carbon emissions.

3.       The revegetation programme on regional parks is currently operating at full capacity. While meeting set levels of service the programme will not extend to all areas identified for planting within the parks management plan so additional land is available for consideration.   Equally the existing regional parks revegetation programme could be extended to diversify planting within established revegetation areas.

4.       The acceleration of the revegetation programme would see the ecological benefits realised earlier than planned.

5.       That any partnership with ‘Greenfleet” be subject to conditions that ensure the council benefits from the programme and that the community continue to be actively engaged.

Recommendation

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      authorise the Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks to negotiate a partnership with ‘Greenfleet’ on regional parkland subject to the conditions outlined in this report.

Comments

6.       Council has been approached by ‘Greenfleet’ for access to approx. 50 hectares of land to carry out conservation programmes. ‘Greenfleet’ are a not-for-profit organisation operating in Australia since 1997 and is looking to extend its activities into New Zealand. They fund, carryout and maintain planting programmes on public and private land in order to restore natural ecosystems and off-set carbon emissions.

7.       A prerequisite of entering into a partnership with “Greenfleet” will be to not account for the carbon on the areas covered by the programme.  As the proposal of 50 hectares represents a very small proportion of the land managed by council (43,000 hectares in the case of regional parks).  The proposal is aligned to the council’s objectives in the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 and the benefits of accelerating the programme resulting in the ecological restoration occurring earlier than possible within the existing resources. Parks, Sport and Recreation has a number of active on-going re-vegetation programmes. This is largely resourced using staff and the community. The programme on regional parks aims at achieving approximately eight hectares of land per annum (60,000 to 80,000 plants). There is over 500 hectares of land identified in the Regional Parks Management Plan for future revegetation on regional parks that is not resourced for planting within the current programme.  

8.       This programme includes all aspects of revegetation including seed collection, growing-on, site preparation, fencing, planting and post planting management. The recent acquisition and vesting of new parkland, for example on South Head peninsula, Te Arai and Te Muri Regional Park, have not been provided for in the current revegetation programme.

9.       This partnership approach could also provide particular benefit for progressing revegetation in areas of Regional Parks that have a smaller population base and where volunteer attraction is more challenging. 

10.     It is recommended that a pilot programme covering up to 50 hectares be trialled on regional parkland, and if successful, other lands could also be considered as part of a partnership with ‘Greenfleet’. These include;

·   Local Parks

·   Stormwater Management areas

·   Catchment Management areas

·   Covenant Management areas

·   Trees for Survival

11.     It is recommended that any partnership with ‘Greenfleet’ should be subject to the following conditions:

·   Be carried out at no net cost to the council and recognising the assignment of carbon credits on the areas to be re-vegetated.

·   Be fully consistent with council priorities and the objectives and policies relating to council conservation programmes, reserve management plans and land management practices, such as eco-sourcing plant material.

·   Cover all aspects of revegetation requirements (for example fencing and weed control) for areas planted under this agreement.

·   No property rights beyond assuring the maintenance of the planting for 50 years are assigned.

·   Be consistent with the particular land management objectives for each locality and meet any planning requirements, at no cost to the council.

·   The agreement is non-exclusive to other partnerships for re-vegetation.

·   Seeks to actively engage communities and volunteers.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

12.     Local Boards have not been consulted on this programme but would be consulted if any local parkland was considered as part of the programme.

Māori impact statement

13.     Iwi have not been consulted on this programme. Any specific proposal will be subject to consultation with the relevant mana whenua for the location.

Implementation

14.     As this programme will be fully funded and managed by ‘Greenfleet” there are no operational or budget implications for council apart from the forgoing of carbon credits on the areas covered by the programme. The benefits of advancing the councils conservation programmes will outweigh these costs.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Author

Neil Olsen - Parks and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Aquatic Safety Programmes Update

 

File No.: CP2015/23698

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee on aquatic safety programmes facilitated by the Parks Sports and Recreation Department including those run by the Leisure Unit and the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme run collaboratively by Regional Parks, Surf Lifesaving New Zealand (SLSNZ) and Watersafe Auckland Inc. (WAI).

Executive Summary

2.       The West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme is in it’s tenth year of operation and is a partnership between Auckland Council, SLSNZ and WAI with assistance from Te Kawerau ā Maki and some land owners along Auckland’s west coast.

3.       Monitoring of rock fisher behaviour by multilingual rock fishing advisors and SLSNZ lifeguards together with the installation of angel rings has lead to a reduction in fishing-related fatalities and improvements in safety behaviours by rock fishers.

4.       The results of summer surveys from 2014/15 and the learnings over the 10 year period that the programme has been operating show that there is a greater understanding of the behaviours of individuals involved in rock fishing incidents. There is an opportunity to use that information along with information on boating incidents to better tailor and coordinate the wide range of water safety programmes and messages that are delivered by both Council and our key partners. This could greatly assist with drowning prevention and ensure key messaging is getting to the right communities. Council is keen to work closely with our partners to develop a more coordinated approach continues improvements of the programme.

5.       In addition there is an opportunity to develop a shore based fishing safety programme to improve the understanding and safety of net fishers, shell fish gatherer’s and other shore based fishing groups.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      support the ongoing delivery of aquatic safety programmes by the Leisure Unit and the continued delivery of the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme for the 2015/16 summer season.

b)      note the support of Te Kawerau ā Maki, the Lusk family, the Woodward family, Watersafe Auckland Inc and Surf Life Saving New Zealand for their ongoing commitment to achieving safer fishing practices on Auckland’s west coast.

c)      note the coordination of council’s aquatic safety programmes to a more targeted and tailored approach to drowning prevention that would further enhance the work already provided by the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme.

Comments

6.       The West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme is run as a partnership between Auckland Council, SLSNZ and WAI. The programme now in its tenth year is seeking to encourage better attitudes toward personal safety and responsibility amongst rockfishers, particularly those who fish on Auckland’s rugged west coast. It is hoped that these improved attitudes will lead to an ongoing and sustained reduction in the incidence of drowning among rock fishers.

7.       The use of a rock fishing lifeguard is a recent addition to the programme and has proven to be successful. The lifeguard is able to target remote fishing spots which have previously been inaccessible to the multilingual rock fishing safety advisor.

8.       The lifeguard has also able to assess potential additional sites for improved safety measures, which has lead to the installation of additional angel rings at several remote locations.

9.       Angel rings are now installed at 16 locations based on the recommendation of SLSNZ and their assessment of the data provided by the rock fishing lifeguard. Angel rings have been installed on private land such as Kauwahia Island which was supported by the Woodward family.

10.     There are several groups, landowners and companies that need to be acknowledged and thanked for their ongoing and continued support of the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme these are Te Kawerau ā Maki, the Lusk family, the Woodward family for allowing angel rings to be installed on their land, local surf clubs, who routinely check the rings over the summer and provide assistance with their maintenance. Additionally the high level of ongoing support from the lifejacket suppliers, Hutchwilco Ltd and RFD NZ Ltd, whose continued support to the programme has been invaluable is acknowledged.

11.     It has been recognised that there is a growing group of rock fishers who are catching fish to feed their families, as opposed to recreational fishing. The partners are looking to explore and understand this more in order to determine any implications it has in terms of risk behavior that could be addressed this coming summer.

12.     Dr Kevin Moran will present a summary of the programme results over its ten year life, including analysis of the surveys conducted over the 2014/2015 summer period.

13.     There are a number of current initiatives and campaigns by the Auckland Council, Watersafe Auckland (WAI) and Surf Lifesaving New Zealand (SLSNZ) promoting land based fishing and aquatic safety. However there is limited accurate information about which organisations or groups are doing what or where they are undertaking that work. As a result some of the current campaigns may not be as effective as they could be.

14.     One of the strengths that have underpinned the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety campaign is that it is based on the results from ongoing annual survey’s of West Coast Rock Fishers which include observational data. This has allowed an understanding of the demographics and habits of the fishers to be compiled and enabled a safety campaign to be developed that targets at risk groups and behaviours. It has also meant that the programme can be adjusted to accurately and quickly respond to changes.

15.     It is recommended that a shore based fishing safety programme now be developed based on the best practice model developed through the successful Rock Fishing Safety campaign.

16.     The first phase would be to complete a stocktake of which groups are engaged in which shore based fishing practices / activities and where they are fishing. The purpose of this approach is to coordinate and focus current initiatives to ensure they are effectively targeted.

17.     This information would be gathered through a range of methods including from discussions with local surf clubs and surveys of land based fishers. This will provide a more thorough understanding of land based fishing across the region and provide the basis for future coordinated initiatives.

18.     In addition development of risk profiles of diferent types of fishing by location and number of participants would be developed. This would identify potential hotspots and enable development of programmes that help address and assess requirements for on site safety information and targeted community campaigns. They would be supported by a range of education tools and would also help inform education campaigns through churches, community groups and fishing clubs.

 

19.     In addition to the Rock Fishing Programme, council is also heavily involved in teaching and supporting other water safety initiatives with key messages and skills built into council’s Learn to Swim Programme which sees over 22,000 children participate each year. Council also supports and partners with key agencies such as WAI who deliver the Whanau Nui programme and the Coastguard who deliver their Safe Boating Programme in most council owned pools along with the Sir John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Community Swim programme and GAAP who provide low or no cost learn to swim programmes to schools across Auckland.

20.     Overall there is significant investment in promoting and teaching water safety and the basic skills required to be confident and safe in the water. With greater insight as to which community groups are most at risk from water related incidents and being able to tailor key messages and skills in a coordinated way through the programmes that are already in place could greatly assist in reducing drowning.

21.     Council will initiate a discussion about improved coordination with the key stakeholders such as WAI, the Coastguard and Surf Lifesaving to see what opportunity exists to work more closely together and deliver this more targeted and coordinated approach to water safety.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

22.     The Waitakere Ranges Local Board and the Rodney Local Board have not specifically been consulted in the preparation of this report. They are aware of and supportive of the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme.

Māori impact statement

23.     Iwi were not specifically consulted in the preparation of this report.  Te Kawerau ā Maki is one of the partner agencies who provide ongoing support for the West Coast Rock Fishing Safety Programme.

Implementation

24.     Over the past four years, the installation and maintenance of angel rings, the engagement of a multilingual rock fishing safety adviser and a surf lifeguard have been funded by council.

25.     Coordinating and delivering an increased programme across the Auckland region as described in this report is not possible from within current resources and would require additional funding.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Stephen Bell - Principal Ranger

Rob McGee - Manager Leisure – Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Grant Allocation: 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/20069

 

Purpose

1.       To allocate the $508,000 2015/2016 Regional Sport and Recreation Grant Programme budget.

Executive Summary

2.       The Community Grants Policy (CGP), adopted 4 December 2014, established a new Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme providing ‘one-off’ project grants and multi-year strategic relationship grants.

3.       The purpose of the programme is outlined in Schedule Six of the CGP (Attachment A) and supports the implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASRSAP).

4.       An annual budget of $508,000 is available in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.

5.       The Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme supports eligible organisations to encourage Aucklanders to be more active, more often, by supporting projects and programmes whose outcomes will increase community participation.

6.       The Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme opened on 3 August 2015 and closed on 14 September 2015. 33 applications were received, requesting a total of $1,830,800.21 (Attachment B). Seven applications are ineligible for funding under the CGP.

7.       All eligible applications were assessed by a cross council team and ranked with funding recommendations based on these assessments.

8.       Three of the seven highest ranked applications are recommended for multi-year agreements.  Multi-year agreements encourage opportunities to leverage funding from other investors and build on annual outcomes. This will reduce the available funding in 2016/2017 to $175,000.

9.       With a reduced amount of funding, it would be prudent to narrow the focus for the 2016/2017 funding round to projects that:

·    will deliver priorities from the Sustainability of Sport work programme,

·    support innovation in recreation sector programming.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve the following allocation of funding for the amounts and terms outlined below:

Organisation

Funding Allocation

Term

Sport Waitakere / He Oranga Poutama ki Tamaki

$60,000

2 years

Bikes in Schools Auckland (T/A Bike On NZ Charitable Trust)

$85,000

1 year

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association (T/A Parafed Auckland)

$30,000

1 year

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

$208,000

2 years

Hockey New Zealand

$40,000

1 year

Getin2life Youth Development Trust

$65,000

2 years

North West Orienteering Club

$20,000

1 year

TOTAL

$508,000

 

 

b)      approve the priority areas for the 2016/2017 Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme as meeting identified priorities from the Sustainability of Sport work programme and supporting innovation in recreation sector programming

 

Comments

10.     The Community Grants Policy (CGP) was adopted at the 4 December 2014 meeting of the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REF/2014/134). The CGP established six new regional grants programmes, including the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme.

11.     To be eligible for a regional grant, applicants must show that their service, project or activity primarily addresses regionally determined priorities and is regional in terms of scale and/or significance, and/or is regional in terms of impact and/or reach.

12.     The purpose of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme is to support implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, contributing to Aucklanders becoming more active, more often.

13.     The outcomes sought through the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme are:

Participation

·   There are affordable and accessible options for participation in informal physical activity, recreation and sport.

·   Our communities enjoy healthy and active lifestyles.

·   Māori participation in sport and recreation activities has increased.

 

Infrastructure

·   Participants in a wide range of physical activities, recreational activities and sports are equally able to access suitable facilities and outdoor environments

14.     Applications were invited from eligible organisations, including Iwi and other Māori organisations active in the sport and recreation sector.

15.     Of the 33 applications received, a total of $1,830,800.21 has been requested towards total overall project costs of $4,049,139.53. The round was oversubscribed by $1,322,800.21.

16.     Grouped into themes, many of the applications are predominantly sport-focussed, others are recreation, and others are sport and recreation projects that are predominantly targeting Māori or people with disabilities.

Table 1: Regional Sport and Recreation Grant Application themes

17.     The Parks Recreation and Sport Committee were briefed on applications received at the 14 October 2015 workshop.

Assessment

18.     Seven applications did not meet the funding eligibility criteria because they were capital expenditure requests and/or not of regional impact.

19.     Eligible applications were assessed against the CGP assessment matrix (Attachment C) and for delivery of Māori outcomes.  Assessment was by a panel of staff from Community and Social Policy, Arts, Community and Events and Parks Sports and Recreation. The recommendations presented in this report are the outcome of the assessment process.  Applications were grouped into those that were aligned, partially aligned or not aligned. Further detail on the applications and the assessment is provided in Attachment B.

20.     Seven applications recommended for funding are those that most strategically aligned to the Community Grants Policy Schedule Six, and have evidence of alignment to other council strategic documents.  These applications demonstrate a good ability to target a regionally identified population and/or priority and are organisations with a known history of quality delivery.  The group represents a good spread, geographically and across multiple target groups. 

21.     Five of the seven recommended applications deliver Māori outcomes, and/or exhibit high participation of Māori, and/or are delivered in areas with high Māori populations. 

22.     All seven recommended applications have a strong youth element.

23.     The total funding requested from these aligned applications exceeds the available budget, so not all applications can be supported in full. It is recommended that investment is therefore targeted to the components of the projects that are most strongly and strategically aligned.

24.     The policy provides for multi-year and ‘one-off’ project grants. Three applications have been recommended for multi-year funding. This will encourage long-term relationships, build on outcomes year upon year, enable groups to plan more comprehensively, and assist in leveraging funding from other investors.

25.     The partially aligned did not demonstrate as strong alignment to the CGP outcomes. Many were requests for business-as-usual activities, equipment or ‘have-a-go’ days, and did not demonstrate strong evidence that the projects would increase participation. Many were also localised projects with limited evidence that they would sufficiently meet region-wide needs and/or deliver high regional impact.

26.     Staff will work with all declined applicants to advise of other more relevant funding opportunities, opportunities to partner to achieve results, or referral to other council funding rounds.

Funding round priorities for 2016/2017 round

27.     If the Committee accepts the report’s recommendations for multi-year strategic partnerships, the total pool of funding for ‘one-off’ project grants in 2016/2017 is $175,000. With a reduced amount of funding, it would be prudent to narrow the focus for the 2016/2017 to projects that:

·     will deliver priorities from the Sustainability of Sport work programme

·       support innovation in recreation sector programming

28.     In July the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee resolved that the 2016/2017 funding round should open for applications in late November with it closing in January and reporting in March.  To allow suitable time to include learnings from the current funding round, advertise the next round and to avoid the Christmas period for applicants, staff suggest the next round should open in late January for period of 6 weeks with decision making timed for July 2016.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

29.     Local boards were consulted through the development of the Community Grants Policy. Local boards have noted that there are organisations and projects that do not qualify for local board funding and are therefore in need of a regional funding option.

30.     Local boards have not been consulted on applications received through the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme.  However, local board chairs were invited to participate in the 14 November Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee workshop.

Māori impact statement

31.     Five of the seven recommended applications offer opportunities to deliver on Te Whai Oranga, the Māori Sport and Recreation Plan for Auckland.  Examples are:

·     the provision of  administration support to Māori sports clubs, increasing their capability and capacity

·     teaching traditional Māori sports and games

·     promoting and enabling rangatahi leadership

·     providing increased opportunities for Māori to participate in recreation in supportive settings

Implementation

32.     Following funding decisions by this Committee, all applicants will be notified of the outcome. Staff will support those that were partially aligned to seek other funding mechanisms. To encourage high quality, innovative projects and applications in future, staff will work with key sector support agencies such as Aktive and local Regional Sports Trusts.

33.     Funding agreements will be prepared for all successful applications. All grants will be monitored and evaluated and reported to Committee in line with the CGP and Monitoring and Evaluation matrix. Māori outcomes will also specifically be reported.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule 6: Regional Sports and Recreation Grants Programme

145

bView

Regional Sport and Recreation Grant Applications 2015-2016

147

cView

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme Matrix

149

     

Signatories

Authors

Emma Morgan - Sport and Recreation Project Leader

Authorisers

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lisa Tocker - Manager, Recreation Facilities & Service Delivery Central

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Regional and Specialist Parks Strategic Achievements for 2013 to 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/23133

 

Purpose

1.       This report is to update committee members on the strategic achievements of Regional and Specialist Parks over the last two years as well as to highlight the challenges and opportunities faced by the individual business units for the future.

Executive Summary

2.       The Regional and Specialist Parks area is made up of four business units: Cemeteries, Regional Parks, Botanic Gardens and Tūpuna Maunga/ Volcanic Cones.

3.       This report is for information only and is to provide an update to the members of the committee on the strategic achievements of the above business units over the last 2 years. It also outlines the challenges and opportunities that these units will face in the short to medium term.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive this report for information purposes.

Comments

4.       There are no further comments to be made in relation to this report.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

5.       There are no implications for Local Boards in relation to this report. However a copy of the report can be made available to Local Boards on request.

Māori impact statement

6.       There are no impacts for Māori in relation to this report as it is provided to the committee for information purposes only. A copy of this report can be made available on request.

Implementation

7.       No further implementation required.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

20151118, Parks Sports Recreation, Strategic Performance Summary Regional and Specialist Parks

153

 

Signatories

Author

Clare Thorne - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Mace Ward - Group Manager Regional and Specialist Parks

Mark Bowater - Acting General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 














     

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

18 November 2015

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Acquisition of Land for Open Space- Silverdale North

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains confidential information which may affect the purchase negotiations.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       Acquisition of land for open space - Flat Bush

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land for proposed open space purpose..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land for proposed open space purpose.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


 

C3       Acquisition of open space land - Flat Bush - Stage 3

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C4       Acquisition of open space land - Takanini

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


 

C5       Acquisition of open space land - Orewa

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C6       Acquisition of open space land - Glenbrook

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


 

C7       Acquisition of open space land - Massey

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C8       Acquisition of open space land - Hingaia

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space purposes..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


 

C9       Future governance and management of Browns Island (Motukorea)

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would disclose a trade secret.

In particular, the report contains a discussion of options that have not yet been disucssed with the Department of Conservation or mana whenua..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains a discussion of options that have not yet been disucssed with the Department of Conservation or mana whenua..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.