I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 26 November 2015

6.00pm

Lynfield Meeting Room
Fickling Convention Centre
546 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Harry Doig

 

Members

David Holm

 

 

Ella Kumar

 

 

Nigel Turnbull

 

 

Michael Wood

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor

 

16 November 2015

 

Contact Telephone: 021 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members Update                                           7

13        Chairperson's Report, November 2015                                                                       9

14        Board Member Reports, November 2015                                                                 25

15        Puketapapa Local Board Performance Report for the three months ending September 2015                                                                                                                               37

16        Annual Plan 2016/2017                                                                                                81

17        Auckland Transport Report for November 2015                                                   133

18        Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards
For the quarter 1 July to 30 September 2015.                                                       
155

19        Puketāpapa Local Board Local Grants: Round One 2015/2016                           181

20        Puketāpapa Local Board Quick Response Grants: Round Two 2015/2016       213

21        Libraries Work Programme 2015/2016                                                                    221

22        Scope for local dog access rule review                                                                  227

23        Adoption of Local Fees and Charges 2015/2016                                                    249

24        Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2015-16 for period ended 30 September 2015                                                                                                                             253

25        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          275

26        Resolutions Pending Action Schedule, November 2015                                      281  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 29 October 2015, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members Update

 

File No.: CP2015/24099

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is for the Albert-Eden-Roskill Governing Body Members to provide a verbal update to the Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketapapa Local Board thanks Governing Body Members for their update.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Chairperson's Report, November 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/24101

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform the Puketāpapa Local Board on the Chairperson’s portfolio activities.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Chair’s Report for November 2015.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Julie Fairey report, 19 October to 15 November 2015

11

bView

Memo to the Chair, Auckland Development Committee dated 11/11/15 outlining the Board’s position and concerns on the Hearings Panel Decision Report on Three Kings Reserve land proposed exchange

19

    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 









Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 






Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Board Member Reports, November 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/24104

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide Board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       Board Member reports are attached for the month of November 2015, providing an update their portfolio work.

It is anticipated that Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Member reports for November 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

David Holm Report, 17 October to 15 November 2015

27

bView

D Holm Report on Petition for investigation of undergrounding of high voltage transmission lines.

29

    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 








Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Puketapapa Local Board Performance Report for the three months ending September 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/23724

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Puketapapa Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive summary

2.       A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June. 

3.       Auckland Council departments also present quarterly performance reports to the local boards

4.       To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report and department report

5.       The attached report contains the following reports this quarter

·    Local Community Services including Libraries

·    Local Environmental Management

·    Local Sports Parks and Recreation

·    Local Board Financial Performance

·    Local Board Services Department update

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receive the Performance Report for the Puketapapa Local Board for the financial quarter ended September 2015.

 

Comments

6.       In consultation with local boards this report provides the elected members with an overview of local activities from council departments for discussion.

Maori impact statement

7.       Maori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report of the local board financials.  However, this financial performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Puketapapa Local Board Performance Report for the three months ending September 2015

39

     

Signatories

Authors

Sugenthy  Thomson - Lead FInancial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 










































Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Annual Plan 2016/2017

 

File No.: CP2015/23916

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report requests that the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)   provides formal feedback on regional issues:

i.        the Uniform Annual General Charge (UAGC)

ii.       the Interim Transport Levy (ITL)

iii.      Māori land rates

iv.      a review of rural rates

b)   agrees key advocacy issues

c)   recommends any local targeted rate proposals

d)   recommends any Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates.

Executive Summary

2.       Legislation governing the Annual Plan process has changed, and there is no longer the requirement to produce a draft Annual Plan.  Instead,  the council will be producing a consultation document which will cover:

a)   any significant or material changes proposed to the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP)

b)   content relating to local board agreements.

3.       Consultation on the Annual Plan 2016/2017 will take place in February and March of 2016.

4.       This report seeks input from local boards on a range of annual plan related matters including feedback on regional financial policy issues and advocacy issues, and recommendations as to any local targeted rate or BID targeted rate proposals.  These will be considered by the Governing Body prior to finalising consultation topics.

5.       Local board views on these matters will also be considered in discussions between the local boards and the Governing Body on 27 and 30 November, prior to the Mayoral Proposal.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provides any views it may have on regional issues (that is, the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates) for the Governing Body to consider.

b)      agrees key advocacy issues.

c)      recommends local targeted rate proposals (if any) for consultation.

d)      recommends BID targeted rates (if any) for consultation.

 

Comments

Regional issues

6.       At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee considered information and analysis on potentially changing the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates.  It resolved to recommend that the council should consult on all of these issues, as part of the process for developing the Annual Plan 2016/2017. 

7.       A summary of these issues and the Finance and Performance Committee recommendations is provided in Attachment A. The detailed reports, setting out the information and analysis provided to the Finance and Performance Committee, can be found here:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/10/FIN_20151028_AGN_6098_AT.PDF

8.       Briefing sessions were held for local board members at the beginning of November.  At these briefings local board members were provided with the detailed reports, and information on the implications of changing the UAGC, ITL, Māori land rates and rural rates.

Advocacy issues

9.       The Local Board may also wish to agree any advocacy priorities for discussion with the Governing Body.

Local targeted rate and BID targeted rate proposals

10.     Any new local targeted rates and/or BIDs must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are required to agree any new proposals for consultation.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

11.     Local Board feedback is being sought in this report. 

12.     Local Boards will also have further opportunities to provide information and views as council continues through the annual plan process.

Māori impact statement

13.     The detailed reports provided to the Finance and Performance Committee have information and analysis on the impacts on Māori regarding proposed financial policies.

14.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the annual plan are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were developed in 2014 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Implementation

15.     Feedback from the local boards will be summarised and provided in full to:

·    inform the Mayoral Proposal process,

·    the Governing Body for consideration at its meeting on 17 December on consultation topics for the Annual Plan 2016/2017.

16.     The Governing Body will adopt Annual Plan consultation material in early February 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Summary of Regional Issues

85

bView

Finance and Performance Committee Report

91

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh, Financial Planning Manager – Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker, GM Financial Strategy and Planning

Karen Lyons, Manager Local Board Services

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Attachment A: Summary of regional issues

 

1.       This paper summarises the regional issues considered by the Finance and Performance Committee, at its meeting on 28 October, for consultation as part of the Annual Plan 2016/2017 process.  The detailed reports, setting out the information and analysis provided to the Finance and Performance Committee, can be found here: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2015/10/FIN_20151028_AGN_6098_AT.PDF

The Uniform Annual General Charge (UAGC)

2.       Legislation allows the council to include the UAGC as a fixed charge in the rates that it sets. The sum of all fixed charge rates may not exceed 30 per cent of the total rates collected. The current UAGC is $385 and set on every separately used or inhabited part (SUIP) of a rating unit e.g. a shop in a shopping mall or each dwelling.

3.       The UAGC sets a minimum contribution that each ratepayer makes towards the cost of running the city. It is not a payment for the minimum level of services, or benefit, that each property receives. The services the council provides are predominantly public goods and the benefit that each property, or resident, receives cannot be objectively measured.

4.       Analysis of the impacts of rates compared to household income has been carried out using census mesh block data for median household income.  This shows a strong relationship between average property value and average household income.  Modelling shows that higher UAGCs lowers the rates burden on higher value properties and raises it for lower value properties.  Conversely a lower UAGC raises the burden on higher value properties and lowers it for lower value properties. 

5.       At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee agreed that consultation on the quantum of the UAGC occur over the range of $350 to $650.

6.       Rates increases have varied widely between ratepayers in the last few years as a result of transition and the recent revaluation.  A material change to the UAGC would result in another year with large numbers of ratepayers facing varying changes.  Retaining the current UAGC would mean this is the first year in which all ratepayers (residential and farm/lifestyle 3.5 per cent and business 2.5 per cent) would face the same rates increase[1].

The Interim Transport Levy (ITL)

7.       The ITL (targeted rate) is an interim measure, for three years, to help fund the accelerated transport program.

8.       The accelerated transport program provides an additional $523 million over three years.  This is funded by $181 million from the ITL, $122 from debt and $215 million from NZTA and central government.  This report does not consider the level of the ITL.  Consideration of the level of the ITL requires discussion of the overall budget, which can be considered as part of decision making on the budget. Rather, this report looks at options for the composition of the ITL.

9.       The levy is $113.85 (including GST) for residential and farm/lifestyle ratepayers and $182.85 (including GST) for business ratepayers.  The council’s options for the composition of the ITL are one or a combination of the following:

·   increase the share of the ITL raised from businesses to the same as the share they pay of general rates. This would increase the business sector’s share of the ITL from 14.7 per cent to 32.7 per cent for 2016/2017 and 32.3 per cent for 2017/18.  The business ITL would move from $182.85 to $407 and the residential (including farm/lifestyle) ITL would fall from $113.85 to $90 including GST.  For 2017/18 the figures would be $402 including GST and $90 including GST respectively

·   share the ITL requirement raised from the business sector based on capital value rather than a uniform fixed rate.  Sharing the business ITL rates requirement on the basis of capital value would provide a better connection with demand for services and ability to pay.  While property value is not a perfect indicator for demand for council services, nor an ideal indication of ability to pay, it has a better correlation to these factors than a fixed charge does.  Following the same logic, the general rate differential of 0.90 would apply to rural business properties under this option.

10.     At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee agreed its preferred options for consultation are:

a)  an increase in the share of the ITL met by businesses from 14.7 per cent to 32.7 per cent for 2016/2017 and 32.3 per cent for 2017/2018

b)  share the business ITL amongst business ratepayers on the basis of capital value rather than via a fixed charge.

11.     Changing the ITL would lead to further change in the distribution of rates for businesses.  Without these changes all business ratepayers will face the same increase of 2.5 per cent (general rates and ITL combined).

Māori land rates

12.     Māori land is defined by the Te Ture Whenua Act 1993 and includes Māori customary land, Māori freehold land (MFL), crown land reserved for Māori, and general land owned by more than four Māori owners. For the purposes of the discussion in this report, Māori land[2] is rateable MFL and crown land reserved for Māori.

13.     Māori land is most often held in multiple ownership.  When an owner passes away the land must be legally transferred to their successors.  This requires a formal legal process.  As most owners only hold a small share in the land this process is often not implemented effectively and many ownership transfers have not taken place extended back decades.  As a result, many blocks of Māori land are very difficult to manage, develop or sell as the agreement of 75 per cent of the owners is required for significant decisions.  This makes it very difficult for Māori land to be used to its full economic potential, should the owners wish to do so.  In addition Māori land cannot be sold to meet debt obligations making it very difficult to raise capital for development.

14.     During consultation on the Long Term Plan (LTP), concern was raised that the valuation of Māori land for rating purposes did not reflect the limitations on use and the special status of land that had never been alienated from its current ownership.  In response, the council directed officers to report on rating options for Māori land.

15.     Staff considered three options:

a)   retaining the current Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy

b)   amending the:

·    Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy to provide for further adjustments to valuation for Māori land, and remission for marae over 2 hectares in size

·    Rates remission and postponement policy to provide for remission of the UAGC where multiple blocks are managed as a single entity

c)   creating a remission that remits all rates on MFL.

 

16.     Analysis on these options was provided to the Finance and Performance Committee.  Staff did not recommend retaining the current Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy, as further amendments to the policy deserved additional consideration to ensure that the rating policy is fairly applied to Māori land to ensure the goals in the Auckland Plan for Māori are appropriately weighted.

17.     Staff recommended consulting on the following potential amendments:

·   Rates remission to adjust valuations (Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy)

A rates remission could be applied to Māori land properties to achieve the following:

-     apply an adjustment to valuation where properties have significant barriers to development due to owners being deceased or not succeeded to

-     adjust rates to the equivalent of those that would have been charged, had the property been valued excluding any potential use that is unlikely to be achieved within Māori ownership.

o The expected cost of applying this remission would be approximately $100,000, but further analysis is required to determine the extent of eligibility.

·   Rates remission for marae over 2 hectare (Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy) 

o Under the Local Government Rating Act (2002), Māori freehold land, and crown land reserved for Māori that are used for marae are non-rateable up to an area of 2 hectares. Some marae exceed this limit, and so are part-rateable. 

o As part of the council’s objective to encourage thriving and self-sustaining marae, the council could consider remitting the rates for these properties.  There are no marae on a single blocks over 2 hectares, but there are likely to be blocks used in conjunction with marae that may qualify.

o An initial analysis of such properties indicates that the cost of extending this remission scheme will be less than $10,000.

·   Remission of fixed charges for land managed as a single property (Rates remission and postponement policy)

Māori land blocks usually are not in the same ownership. This is due to the historic conversion of land into individual titles, and the subsequent process of ownership succession. Māori land that is farmed as a single property already qualifies for the remission scheme for fixed charges. Staff recommended that the remission scheme be extended to include all Māori land, regardless of use, where the land would otherwise be treated as a single rating unit except they are in separate ownership. This will include land that is not contiguous, so long as it is clearly used as a single property. Fixed charges (excluding charges for services provided) would be remitted for all the rating units making up the property other than the first rating unit, and any rating unit with one or more dwellings or other separately used part of the property.

The cost of extending this remission scheme is expected to be less than $10,000.

18.     Staff did not recommend creating a remission that remits all rates on MFL.  At present the council does not offer full rates remissions for any property, Māori or general, that has private dwellings or which is used for private pecuniary profit. People residing, farming or running businesses in Auckland benefit from and create demand for council services. Staff considered not rating such properties would be inequitable, and also noted that issues relating to redress are primarily the responsibility of the Crown, not the council, and that not all Māori landowners agree with the view that all Māori land should not be charged rates.

19.     At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee agreed that its preference is to consult on an amendment to the:

a)  Māori freehold land rates remission and postponement policy to:

i)       remit rates for marae and urupa that exceed the 2 hectare limit for non-rateability

ii)      increase the adjustment for the number of owners up to the 10 per cent maximum, where properties have significant barriers to development such as owners being deceased or not succeeded to

iii)     adjust rates to the equivalent of those that would have been charged, had the property been valued excluding any potential use that is unlikely to be achieved within Māori ownership

b)  rates remission and postponement policy (remission scheme for fixed charges) to:

i)     remit fixed rates where the land would otherwise be treated as a single rating unit except they are in separate ownership.

20.       The Finance and Performance Committee also requested that further detailed and specific policy changes be sought from Māori (including Māori landowners and the Independent Māori Statutory Board) as part of the consultation process.

Rural rates review

20.     Farm and lifestyle properties are charged 80 per cent of the urban residential property rate. This reflects council’s view that they have less access to council services compared to urban properties.

21.     During development of the LTP the council asked for a proposal to reallocate rates within the farm/lifestyle sector to be discussed with the rural community.  The proposal maintains the rates take from the differential with the following changes:

·   large farm/lifestyle (50 hectares or more) 60 per cent of the urban residential general rate

·   small farm/lifestyle (less than 6 hectares) 83 per cent of urban residential general rate

·   no change to rates for medium farm/lifestyle (6-50 hectares) or other categories of rateable properties.

22.     The decrease in rates for large properties is funded by the increase in rates for small properties. There is no rating impact on medium sized farm/lifestyle properties, or non-farm/lifestyle properties.  The average rate change for small farm/lifestyle properties is an increase of $73, and large farm/lifestyle properties will experience a decrease of $1,180.

23.     Analysis undertaken by staff shows that:

·   there is no clear relationship between size of property and benefit from council services

·   large firms and forestry are able to use their land productively, and have tax benefits not available to small lifestyle properties

·   a sized based differential is simple to implement and administer.

 

24.     An alternative, to set rates based on land use rather than size, was also considered but not supported given issues with classification and the fact there is not a material imbalance in rates charged to farm/lifestyle properties in relation to use.

25.     Pre-engagement has been undertaken with rural communities. Many larger property owners were concerned at the size of their rates relative to the services they received.  However, more than 90 per cent of feedback, mainly lifestyle block owners, opposed the proposal. Some respondents felt than the burden of any change in rates should be shared across all of Auckland.  This would cost other ratepayers around $3 per year or add 0.1 per cent to their rates increase. 

26.     At its meeting on 28 October, the Finance and Performance Committee agreed its preference is to consult:

a)  on the proposal to reallocate rates from large farm/lifestyle properties over the entire rating base

b)  on an amendment to the rates remission and postponement policy to remit the difference in rates between what a property is charged for its smaller individual blocks, and what it will be charged if it was rated as a single combined property.

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 











































Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Report for November 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/24466

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to respond to Local Board requests on transport-related matters and to provide information to Elected Members about Auckland Transport (AT) activities in the Local Board area since the last report.

Monthly Overview

2.       The Transport Portfolio Lead briefing on transport matters in the Puketapapa area was held on 28 October 2015.  Items discussed were:

·           Management of pole banners and cross street banners

·           Various matters were discussed with the area roading engineer

3.       Scheduled this month is a meeting on the transport capital fund on 16 November to discuss the projects. Also scheduled this month is a workshop on the Ernie Pinches to Wesley Community Centre cycle path.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receives the Auckland Transport November 2015 report.

 

Reporting Back

Consultation Report

4.       Consultations forwarded to the Local Board for comment in the last reporting period, details are in Attachment A.

Farrelly Avenue (Resolution number PKTPP/2015/228)

5.       Auckland Transport sincerely regrets the recent fatality on Farrelly Avenue and our thoughts are with the family concerned. Auckland Transport takes the safety of all road users very seriously and all requests for traffic calming are investigated.

6.       Farrelly Ave has been surveyed twice in recent years for vehicle speed and vehicle numbers.  The original survey was done as baseline in February 2014 before the O’Donnell Street local area traffic management devices were installed and then in October 2014 after the traffic calming had been in place for some time.

7.       The results in October 2014, substantially showed that the traffic calming in O’Donnell Avenue has not affected the speeds or traffic volumes on Farrelly Avenue.  The 85% speed on Farrelly Avenue at two of the locations on Farrelly Avenue was below 50km/hr, with the third being 50.8km/hr. The number of vehicles using Farrelly Avenue showed similar results to the February count, even slightly lower than the February counts, in the main. 

8.       The speed data indicated then that Farrelly Avenue should be assessed as low risk and therefore any speed control measures such as speed tables were not high on Auckland Transport’s priority list for funding compared to other local urban road corridors in the region.  Therefore allocating funding for speed tables in Farrelly Avenue was not considered appropriate in the foreseeable future.  

9.       All road corridors are subject to robust prioritisation processes that ensure equity and transparency in terms of investing funding in areas of greatest need.  In assessing Farrelly Avenue, there was no previous crash history reported over the previous five years, except for one non- injury crash that occurred at the intersection of Farrelly Avenue and Hedley Road. The speed environment as surveyed is within the 50km/h range ( although it is acknowledged that at times speeds may be higher) and traffic volumes are in the order of 1300 vehicles per day.

10.     Auckland Transport takes the safety of all road users very seriously and for this reason it has a robust process whereby AT engineers  investigate serious and fatal injury crashes with the NZ Police Serious Crash Unit. In view of community concerns and  considering this recent crash, Farrelly Avenue will be reassessed.

11.     AT has welcomed the opportunity meet with the Local Board to discuss this matter in the first instance, and has arranged a date for this meeting.

Local Board Transport Capital Projects

12.     The Puketapapa Local Board has access to the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) for the construction of transport related projects in its area. This fund is administered by Auckland Transport.  Each year, Local Board’s transport capital fund allocation is $379,117, and this amount can be accumulated within each electoral term.

13.     As the electoral term extends beyond the financial year, it is also possible to anticipate the allocation from the first year of the new electoral term.  As project planning for the selected projects proceeds, it will become clearer if this is necessary. Some projects, such as cycling projects, can take some time to plan and deliver and may need two electoral cycles to plan, consult and construct.

Local Board Capital Projects approved:

Parau Street /Duke Street

Resolutions:

Nov 2014: Agree to fund the Parau Street/Duke Street safety project to $25,000.

Updates:

Project Completed

 

Duncumbe Street Greenway

Resolutions:

Nov 2014: Confirms the project “Duncumbe Street Greenway” proceed to detailed design

with the basic cycleway as described to a budget of $170,000.

Updates:

Project Manager appointed and investigation has begun. The project manager will discuss progress with TPL in May 2015.

May 2015

the concept designs are being prepared for internal discussion within AT.  Once this is completed, the project manager will discuss this with the transport portfolio lead, it is expected this will be most useful at the June catchup.

June 2015

The project manager will meet the transport portfolio lead at the June catchup to discuss progress.

July 2015

The scheme assessment for the Duncumbe Street greenway is making good progress and the proposed treatments for the sections were discussed at the monthly catch up with the Transport Portfolio lead.  Once the scheme assessment is completed (expected to be July) the project will proceed to public consultation, and dependent on feedback, detailed design.

August 2015

The scheme assessment for the Duncumbe Street greenway will be complete by mid-August. A parking survey has also been commissioned, and with the parking survey report expected to be complete by late-August. External consultation documents are currently being prepared, and is expected to go out early September.

This will be discussed with the portfolio holder at the August catchup.

September 2015

Following the completion of the scheme assessment report, a detailed discussion on proposed treatments on various parts of the Duncumb Street Greenway was held at the monthly catchup meeting.

Public consultation on the routes and the proposed treatments is due in September/October.

October 2015

Consultation is due to go out in mid-October along with the Duke Street speed calming project. The results of the consultation will discussed with the transport portfolio lead and depending on the results of the consultation, both projects will be delivered together early next year.

November 2015

Public consulation began on the cycle improvements has been combined with the proposed traffic calming project on Duke Street. The correspondence is attached as Attachment B.

 

Fearon Park Pathway

Resolutions:

Nov 2014: Agree to add the widening of the path through Fearon Park to the Duncumbe

Street greenway proposal to a budget of $190,000.

October 2015:

Instruct Auckland Transport to construct Stage1A of the pathway through Fearon Park, to a width of 2.5 metres, noting that the pathway can be extended further into the Harold Long Reserve once the stormwater works are completed and budget allows.

Updates:

AT have appointed a project manager.  He is in discussions with AC Parks to coordinate the upgrade of the park and the construction of the shared path.

May 2015 - Auckland Council is undertaking the redevelopment of the park and the design of the cycleway is part of that work.  The cycle path is not expected to be completed until stormwater works in the park are completed.

October 2015

Discussions on this have taken place with Auckland Council Parks centering around the timing of the project and the path width.  Due to stormwater works scheduled to take place in Harold Long Reserve in 2016, it is recommended that the Fearon Park pathway goes ahead as soon as practicable instead of waiting for the completion of the stormwater works. That would mean that Stage 1A of the pathway from Fearon Avenue, (shown as Stage 1A, Attachment B) through Fearon Park could be constructed independently from the area due to be impacted by the stormwater work.  If Stage 1A was constructed to a 2.5 metre width, a saving of approximately $40,000 would made. If Stage 1A was constructed to a 3 metre width, this stage would need all the $190,000 funding allocated to the project.  The remaining part of the path could then only be finished if further budget was committed to the project.

 

November 2015

Auckland Transport and Auckland Council will now arrange an inter-service agreement and the project will sit with Auckland Council Parks to tender and construct.

 

Lynfield Reserve Shared Path

Resolutions:

Nov 2014: Agree to the installation of a shared path for the Lynfield Reserve to a maximum of $30,000.

May 2015 – This has now been completed.

 

Keith Hay Park Lighting Project

Resolutions:

Dec 2014: Agree to fund the Keith Hay Park Lighting Project ROC $330,000 subject to availability of funds within the 2014/15 financial year with priority given to the northern section (ROC $189,000) if full funds are not available.

April 2015: b) Agree that Auckland Transport work with Auckland Council to deliver the Keith Hay lighting project within a fiscal envelope of $330,000 (from the Board’s Transport Capital Fund) after a site visit with Board members and Parks advisor to confirm the project scope.

c)   agree that if the tender process indicates savings on the allocated $330,000, that this money be spent on the Richardson Road carpark design.

May 2015: b) confirm the Keith Hay Park lighting project proceed and that the scope of the project be limited to the northern section of the park to Noton Road at this stage and that any savings in this work be allocated to detailed design from the Noton Road carpark through to Richardson Road.

September 2015

b) instruct Auckland Transport to deliver the Keith Hay Park lighting project within the $330,000 budget and authorises Auckland Transport to reduce the scope of the project, if necessary, to fit within this parameter.

Updates:

Auckland Transport is currently engaging a consultant to complete the electrical design, utility liaison and consenting for the work. One this is completed a Firm Estimate of Cost will be brought back to the Board for consideration and approval.

 

March 2015

The firm estimate of costs is expected to be known at the end of March and will come back to the Local Board in April for final approval to move to construction, if it falls within the LB’s allocation. Auckland Council and Auckland Transport can then work through who is best to deliver the project and in what timeframe.

April 2015

the firm estimate of costs from the consultant has been calculated now that the lighting design is complete. The firm estimate of costs for both sections from the South Western Motorway to Noton Road (excluding the pathway by the kindergarten to Richardson Road) is close to the $330k mark.  This includes 45 lights.  To complete the pathway and light it  through from Notons Road to Richardson Road would require additional funding as path widening needs to occur by the kindergarten as well as a realignment of the car park. Therefore to keep the costs for the lighting project within the 330k allocation suggested by the Local Board, it is recommended to light through only to Notons Road.  Final costs will only be known once the project is tendered. If the tender indicates savings on the estimate, AT requests an indication from the Local Board if the saving can be spent on the carpark design.

May 2015

A site visit with Local Board members Holm and Wood has been arranged with appropriate officers.

June 2015

Auckland Transport notes the May resolution and is working with the designer to complete the detailed design and consent application. Following receipt of the consent the work will be procured through an Auckland Council Parks contract with work expected to commence late spring/early summer when ground conditions are best suited for this type of work.

July 2015

The consent application process is still being worked through with Auckland Council.

August 2015

The consent has not yet been lodged.  AT is awaiting advice on realignment of the path in the vicinity of the cricket club and the contract template from Auckland Council.

September 2015

The methodology for the project has been the subject of discussion with Auckland Council arborists.  Originally the arborist was suggesting that hydrovacing would be the most appropriate method for laying the cables.  However after discussions and a site visit, approval has been given to go ahead using trenching for the majority of the path with hydrovac being employed through a small section where two trees are very close to the path, on the condition that an arborist supervises the work. The new estimate for costs for this project shows that the latest cost schedule that includes the extra work and the  hydrovacing has added extra costs to the project.  At the time of writing, Auckland Transport was verifying these extra costs and it is expected that a resolution will be needed at the September meeting to extend the approved budget amount.

October 2015

Auckland Transport notes the September resolution of the Puketapapa Local Board and continues to work with Auckland Council to obtain the necessary consents for the project.

November 2015

Auckland Parks are preparing the documents to go to tender.

 

Ernie Pinches to Wesley Community Centre cycleway

Resolutions:

Oct 2014: Move forward to discussions with the local community on the broad concept of the Sandringham Road Extension to Wesley Community Centre cycle link to gauge community support through its engagement advisor.

Oct 2014: Allocate $25,000 from the Transport Capital Fund for investigation of the Sandringham Road cycleway from Ernie Pinches Drive across SH20 to the Wesley Community Centre and War Memorial Park following successful consultation on the draft concept.

Feb 2015: Reconfirm Resolution CP2014/24495 that $25,000 from the TCF be released for investigaton of the Sandringham Rd Extn cycle link from Ernie Pinches Drive across SH 20 to the Wesley Community Centre and War Memorial Park following successful consultation on the draft concept.

July 2015: Allocate up to $140,000 from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund for the scheme assessment and detailed design of the Ernie Pinches to Wesley Community Centre cycleway in the understanding that Auckland Transport will come back to the Local Board to discuss the recommended option and its estimated cost for the cycleway, before detailed design commences.

Updates:

AT and the LB’s engagement advisor took the concept out to the community in December 2014/January 2015.

Consultation was completed in January 2015. Community support for the project was noted.

April 2015

A project brief is being prepared and from there a project manager will be appointed.

May 2015

The project brief has been completed and a project manager has been appointed.  Further updates to the LB are expected in the next month or two.

June 2015

A feasibility study is now underway to look at options for this route which will also provide information on costings. A report back to the Local Board on this is expected in mid July.

August  2015

The Local Board were briefed on the feasibility study at a workshop in July. Several different options are possible with various costings. The project team will now take the Local Board’s feedback and proceed to a scheme assessment report which is expected to produce a recommended treatment.

September 2015

The scheme assessment report is still in progress.

October 2015

A November workshop has been booked with the Local Board to discuss recommended treatments and their costs. After this workshop, Auckland Transport will be seeking further direction from the Local Board at their November board meeting.

 

Keith Hay Park Carpark Realignment, Richardson Rd

Resolutions:

July 2015:

Request a Rough Order of Costs for the estimated costs for realignment of the cyclepath in the Keith Hay Park carpark (Richardson Road entrance), subsequent realignment of the car parking area, widening of the path past the kindergarten, lighting improvement and associated works and allocate up to $30,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the design of this improvement.

Updates

August 2015

This is still in progress.

October 2015

Discussions are being held with Auckland Council Parks with a view to the design process for the carpark passing to Parks to action.

November 2015

This will be discussed with the transport portfolio lead in November.

 

Seating Project

Resolution:

April 2015: Request the Puketāpapa Local Board Engagement Advisor to undertake consultation with community groups including retired people and families with preschool children on where seating might best be provided in the Local Board greenways areas with a view to providing Auckland Transport with a programme for seat installation under the Transport Capital Fund with timings to be confirmed.

Updates:

September 2015

The initial consultation on a possible seating programme is now being scoped.

November 2015

Local Board engagement with key stakeholders is underway.

 

Mt Roskill Safe Routes Scheme

14.     Resource consents for the work are expected to be lodged on 12 November, which represents a small delay.  Some redesign of the Dominion Road/Memorial Avenue intersection has been required to provide for future bus lanes on Dominion Road. It is now expected that this intersection will be fully signalised.

15.     Auckland Transport now expects to be in a position to tender the contract for construction in in January and for the work to begin in March 2016.

Double Decker Buses

16.     Auckland Transport is undertaking works along the Mt Eden Road corridor to  allow for the introduction of double decker buses on this route in 2016.

17.       As part of this work,  twenty six utility poles on Mt Eden Road, between Balmoral and Rewa Rds will need to be moved. Work will start soon and continue until February. There will be some localised impact, which will be managed by Vector.

Berm Management Guidelines

18.       Auckland Transport received feedback on it’s draft guidelines for ‘Private Planting in the Road Corridor’ from nineteen of the twenty one local boards. This feedback is being assessed with a view to taking into account as much as possible.

19.       A new draft of the guidelines will then go to Auckland Transport’s executive team and the AT Board, with a final version of the guidelines likely to be available in the New Year.

Proposed New Network Public Transport Network for Central Auckland

20.     Over the next few years Auckland Transport is moving to a simpler and more integrated public transport network for Auckland. This will deliver a New Network of buses, trains and ferries that will change the way people travel – including the need for some passengers to transfer at key interchanges. In return, the New Network will allow more passengers to simply ‘turn up and go’ rather than plan trips around a timetable. It will offer flexible travel options over large parts of the city, making public transport more useful for a range of travel purposes.

21.     Although the New Network describes the new way in which buses, trains, and ferries will work together – AT is currently consulting only on proposed changes to bus services across Auckland. The consultation for the central and eastern areas started on 1 October 2015.

22.     Consultation packages have been sent to all Local Boards in the central and eastern areas and Auckland Transport will attend various events during the consultation period to answer questions and promote feedback from Aucklanders on the new network. Consultation is open until 10 December 2015.

Auckland Transport News

Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Cycle Path

23.     Construction has started on one of Auckland’s biggest walking and cycling projects, connecting Auckland’s eastern suburbs to the Waitemata Harbour. A dawn blessing and sod turning ceremony marked the start of the construction phase on 21 October.  The sod turning ceremony was attended by representatives of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board, Orakei Local Board, Auckland Council, New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Transport and the Hon Simon Bridges, Minister of Transport.

24.     The shared path starts at Merton Road in Glen Innes and follows the rail line all the way to Tamaki Drive and will connect communities and provide a route into the city for people on bikes and is another step on the way towards easing traffic congestion.

25.     The path will be around four metres wide and constructed mostly in concrete.  Timber boardwalks will cross the water at Orakei Basin and concrete will be used for longer structures such as the proposed Hobson Bay crossing. LED lighting will extend the hours of access, particularly during the winter months. Although the geography is hilly in places, the pathway is designed to keep gradients as low as possible.

26.     The first stage of the shared path from Merton Road to St Johns Road is due to be finished in late 2016.

Cycling Numbers Increasing

27.     The number of people cycling in Auckland is up 7% according to research released recently by Auckland Transport.  An independent survey conducted earlier in the year, looked at the walking and cycling habits of more than 1600 people living in Auckland and compared the findings with last year.

28.     It found that the number of people who said that they did any cycling at all went from 20% to 27%. The number of people cycling at least once a week was also up to 11% compared with 6%, 12 months ago.

29.     While the reason for cycling is still exercise or fitness (68%) or recreation (48%), there was a steady growth in those saying cycling to work was the reason they get on a bike (up to 16% from 12%). The survey also gathered information about where people lived and found that those living directly east and west of the city have the highest proportion of people cycling.

30.     This research is a source of real data in order for AT to plan ahead for the future cycle improvements. Putting in protected cycle facilities in the right parts of the city will make people feel and be safer when riding around the city. To maximise the investment which has come from local and central government, AT plans to improve the network for cycling into and around the city centre as well connections to public transport interchanges.

31.     People living in the inner city and the corridor running north-south from the city have the highest potential for growth in cycling. To get people cycling, overcoming perception of safety seems to be the greatest barrier.

Let’s Carpool Campaign

32.     Auckland Transport is running a public  campaign in November to encourage carpooling. The key objective is to reduce the amount of single vehicle occupancy trips into central Auckland by encouraging people to give carpooling a go and visit the Let’s Carpool website to register. The target audience is people aged between 20 and 45 years working in Central Auckland.

Road Safety Young Driver Marketing Campaign

33.     Young driver crashes are a high strategic priority  identified in “Safer Journeys” and locally this issue is of high concern due to the number of deaths and serious injuries resulting from these crashes. From 2010 to 2014, there were 664 death and serious injury crashes involving young drivers and these crashes resulted in 74 deaths and 749 serious injuries.  Targeting 18-24 year old male and female drivers, the main campaign objectives are:

·        To contribute towards a reduction in serious injury crashes imvolving young drivers across the Auckland region

·        To increase young driver’s safety awareness and understanding of the consequences of dangerous driving

·        To continue to grow the Snapchat and Facebook database of young drivers. This follows on from the success of the May 2015 young driver campaign, whereby AT generated 2,193 new likes on the “Youredriving” Facebook page and 5,185 new Snapchat followers.

34.     Based on the tagline of “You wouldn’t do that”, the three road safety themes are Distraction, Speeding and Drink Driving. Three different scenarios will be developed into short 10 second videos and released on Snapchat and Facebook:

·        You wouldn’t text while in a job interview. Don’t Text. You’re Driving.

·        You wouldn’t drink before hitting the gym. Don’t drink. You’re Driving.

·        You wouldn’t rush through a hot date. Don’t speed. You’re Driving.

35.     To help incentivise  people, AT will run a competition challenging Snapchat users to send in a snap of their own 10 second video (or static photo) showing a scenario where they “Wouldn’t do that”. The best entries will be posted on Snapchat for the public to vote on and the favourite choice each week, over a three week period, will receive a prize of an iphone 6.

New Manukau Bus Station

36.     The proposed Manukau Bus Station is a key part of the roll out of a new public transport network across South Auckland. It will provide Aucklanders with a new network of buses and trains that will get them to their destination faster and more efficiently.

37.     The Manukau train station sees an average of 1037 daily week day passenger trips and is currently the 13th busiest station in Auckland.

38.     Auckland Transport (AT) has now developed concept design plans for the proposed new high quality bus station, aimed at making it easy to transfer between trains and buses, as well as between bus services.  It will be designed to have sufficient capacity for long distance coach services. The facility will also feature a large enclosed waiting area similar to an airport lounge. 

39.     Auckland Transport seeks feedback on the concept design to help make an informed decision to provide a high quality bus station and customer experience.

40.     Located right next to Manukau train station, the Manukau civic offices car park on Putney Way (between Davies Avenue and Osterley Way) will be transformed to a 23-bay bus station. The train and bus stations will be linked by a covered walkway.

41.     The Auckland Transport project, in partnership with the Transport Agency, is expected to cost approximately $26 million.

42.     The entire structure will be designed to provide a high quality public transport experience which will be safe and accessible for everyone.  Temporary bus stops will be installed on Davies Avenue to allow the new network to operate smoothly until the station is constructed and opens in the second half of 2017.

43.     To support the rollout of the new network in south Auckland, Auckland Transport is also is building new bus and train stations at key locations like Pukekohe and Otahuhu.

Bus station features

The bus station is likely to feature the following:

·        Convenience kiosks

·        A ticket office

·        AT Metro customer service

·        Drop off and pick up facilities

·        Cycle parking facilities

·        Taxi parking

·        Customer waiting areas

·        Bus staff office facilities

·        24 hour security, help points and CCTV

·        Toilets

HOP Card Increase

44.     AT reviews costs, such as the price of public transport fares against a cost/benefit matrix, on a regular basis. The AT HOP card originally cost customers $10, including GST, when it was launched in 2012 but for much of the time it has been discounted to $5 to assist in encouraging uptake. This approach has been very successful with over 80% of public transport trips on a weekday now made with a HOP card.

45.     The 20,000 cards now sold monthly are usually for lost cards. The card itself costs Auckland Transport $9.82 (including GST) which, with 600,000 cards sold means Auckland’s ratepayers and taxpayers, have been heavily subsidising the card.

46.     AT is offering a final opportunity for a $5 AT HOP card before the card goes up to its true cost on 17th December. This gives customers an opportunity to be ready with their HOP card when they return from their Xmas/New Year break.

47.     Also, from 1 July 2016 Super Gold card holders will be required to have an AT HOP card. AT is writing to Grey Power, Age Concern, CABs, Budgetary Advisory Services and major rest homes to ask organisations to encourage their members to purchase a card before the price reverts back to $10 on 17 December this year.

Scenic Bike Rides in Auckland

48.     Ten scenic bike rides in the Auckland region have been featured on the Auckland Transport website (www.at.govt.nz/greatrides). One of the ten bike rides featured in Auckland Transport’s Great Ride Passports is the Twin Streams bike ride in suburban Henderson. It runs alongside a stream and is surrounded by native bush and birds.

49.     Each passport contains a map of a ride with a description of the terrain, length, amenities and points of interest along the way. The ten passports are available at local libraries or on the AT website.

50.     The rides are suitable for most ages and abilities and take in a variety of environments, scenic vistas and points of historical and cultural interest. The “Great Rides” are:

·        Matakana Trails

·        Te Ara Tahuna Pathway: Orewa Estuary

·        Green route: Devonport to Takapuna

·        Hobsonville Point

·        Twin Streams: Henderson Creek and Opanuku Stream

·        Auckland Waterfront; Britomart to Mission Bay

·        Pakuranga Rotary Pathway

·        The Cascades paths: Pakuranga, botany and Meadowlands

·        Waikaraka Cycleway: Onehunga to Mangere Bridge

·        Wattle Downs

Issues Raised through/ by Board Members

Location or Name of Issue

Description

 

AT Response

Denny Avenue/Stoddard Road

Egress problems are being experienced at Denny Avenue / Stoddard Road (pensioner units) due to increasing in parking.

 

As a result of AT’s investigation and on-site meeting with the resident, Auckland Transport will be installing parking limit lines either side of the driveway on Denny Avenue to improve visibility for exiting vehicles.  The markings are expected to be installed by the end-December 2015. AT did consider the option of installing yellow no stopping lines to keep a larger area clear of parking, however, we don’t believe that this is necessary because visibility is relatively good and traffic volumes using the road and the driveway are relatively low.

Cape Horn Road

 

A member of the public has requested that BYLs be added to the entrance (even number) side of Cape Horn road for about three car spaces.  The entrance to the road is narrowed by cars parking on both sides. Previous engineer has looked at this and said that the parked cars act as a traffic calming device and if BYLs were added there is a risk of cars speeding off Hillsborough Road down Cape Horn Road. However they have asked for it to be reassessed.

AT’s engineer has revisited the site at the request of the local board and reviewed the original decision not to extend parking restrictions at this site.  AT’s  reassessment has concluded that the parked vehicles are not considered a safety concern as there is adequate forward visibility for passing motorists to see each other in opposing directions and the parked vehicles encourage lower vehicle speeds and greater care when driving.  However, at the request of the Local Board, AT is reviewing whether to discuss parking removal with residents on one side of the road (even numbers).

Pah Road Footpaths

A complaint has been received about the existing footpath between numbers 132 and 140 Pah Road with a request for it to be ripped up and replaced.

This matter has been logged for investigation.

Commodore Drive and Griffen Park Rd intersection

 

AT to assess the intersection with particular regard to any measures to prevent vehicles moving from Griffen Park Road to Commodore Drive

This issue has been logged.

Denbeigh Avenue and Richardson Road

Complaints about congestion in this area and a request for BYLs near intersection

This issue has been logged.

Buckley Road/Rowan Road Alleyway

Request for AT to remove the barrier down the alleyway to allow cyclists and wheelchair users to use it.

This issue has been logged.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Consultations on Roading and Parking Changes

145

bView

Duke St-Duncumb St Consultation Plan Combined Maps

147

cView

Auckland Transport Letter dated 16/10/15 re Proposed shared path on Duncumb Street and Speed Calming on Duke Street

153

     

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Auckland Transport Quarterly Update to Local Boards
For the quarter 1 July to 30 September 2015.

 

File No.: CP2015/24268

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform local boards about progress on activities undertaken by Auckland Transport (AT) in the three months from 1 July to 30 September 2015 and planned activities anticipated to be undertaken in the next three months.

          Attachments (as relevant to each individual local board area) include:

          A – Auckland Transport activities

          B – Travelwise Schools activities

          C – Decisions of the Traffic Control Committee

          D – Report against local board advocacy issues

          E – Report on the status of the local board’s projects under the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Auckland Transport Quarterly report for the quarter, 1 July to 30 September 2015.

 

Significant activities during the period under review

Strategy and Planning

2.       Penlink

·     The Notice of Requirement for the alteration to the designation and consents has been completed.

·     AT and its witnesses have completed their evidence and submitted these to the independent hearings panel.

·     The evidence was presented at the hearing held during the week 22 – 25 September 2015.

·     A set of designation conditions was agreed to between Auckland Council and AT and these were presented to the commissioners.

·     Recommendations from the commissioners are expected later this year.

 

3.       Regional Public Transport Plan (RPTP) Variation

          The AT Board adopted the Hearings Panel recommendations on changes to the RPTP with minor alterations on 27 July 2015.  A revised RPTP will be published over the next quarter.

Investment and Development

4.       SMART (Southwest Multi-modal Airport Rapid Transit)

·     Feasibility level alignments for both a heavy rail and light rail corridor have now been identified.

·     The benefits and risks of the two-mode options were documented in an Interim Business Case.

·     Independent peer review has been concluded on the costs of each option.

·     Risk assessment was completed on the route protection for each option.

 

PT Development

5.       Double Decker Network Mitigation works

          Of the total eight double decker bus routes identified to be delivered in the long term plan, three routes (Botany, Mt Eden and Northern Busway 2) will be implemented this financial year (FY).  The remainder (Great North Road, Manukau, Remuera, New North Road and Onewa) will be delivered in the next two FYs.

 

6.       Bus Infrastructure Programme

          There are 200 bus stop improvement sites planned to be delivered this year across the region.  At the end of September, 30 sites are now complete.

 

7.       City Rail Link

          The project continues with reference design, enabling works detailed design, property purchase and consenting process.  The Environment Court reached a decision and the Notice of Requirement (NoR) was confirmed.  Pipe Jack resource consent was granted.  The Britomart to Wyndham Street resource consent hearing was concluded and a decision was reached (which is currently in the appeals period).  Enabling Works and detailed design scope continue to make progress (Contract 2 substantially complete).

 

8.       EMU Procurement

          All 57 electric trains are now in Auckland, and provisional acceptance has been issued for all but the last, which is due to be completed early in October.

 

PT Operations

9.       Highlights for the quarter

·     AT Metro’s 12 month rolling patronage record passed the 80 million mark in August with rail services exceeding 14 million.

·     Train services had record performance on the network.  September 7th recorded the best performance ever for a single business weekday, with 97.6% punctuality and 99.2% reliability and only four cancellations out of a total of 500.  Statistics also showed 100% service delivery and no cancellations on the Pukekohe diesel shuttle.

·     Swanson Station’s new park and ride carpark with eco-rain gardens opened on 6th July providing an additional 136 parking spaces.

·     A total of 53 new double decker buses have been ordered by Howick & Eastern Buses, Ritchies and NZ Bus, under contract to AT.  The first buses arrive in the next few weeks for testing with the new fleet targeted for full operation by mid-2016.  A second double-decker vehicle was introduced to the Northern Express service in July by Ritchies.

·     First tenders for Auckland’s New Network bus services (the first under the fully contracted PTOM procurement model) were released on 17 August, with responses received on 28 September.

·     Central and East Auckland New Network: Public consultation commenced on 1 October and runs through to 10 December 2015.

Road Design and Development

10.     Te Atatu Road Improvements

          Underground services relocation works continue within the road berm of Edmonton Road and Flanshaw Road. Removal of trees, hedges and the like is underway, in accordance with the resource consent; this is site clearance in preparation for both the road widening and the agreed property works.

 

11.     Jennys Road Construction – Great Barrier Island

          This road was established as an outcome of an Environment Court decision.  The road has been designed as a single lane road with passing bays. Stage 1 was completed in May 2014, and Stage 2 commenced in October 2014.  Physical works and the final walkover with the contractor have been completed.

 

12.     Redoubt Road-Mill Road Corridor Improvements

          The project on Redoubt Road provides for four lanes from SH1 to Murphys Road, and includes bus priority lane, cycle lanes and a 60km/h speed limit, and signals and bus priority lane at the Hollyford Drive/Redoubt Road intersection.  The hearing has now been completed and the commissioners’ decision is expected within one to two months.

 

Services

13.     Driver Licensing Challenge

          Young Driver safety is a high priority in the national Safer Journeys strategy, and Auckland Young Driver death and serious injury (DSI) rates make up 30% of the regions DSI crashes.  This issue is exacerbated by the high proportion of unlicensed young drivers in the region.  An inter-agency Co-Design Lab was founded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment that explores ways to improve access to driver licensing.  AT is part of the team along with ACC, Ministry of Education, Auckland Council, Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) and Otara youth based at the Otara's Crosspower youth centre.  The Co-Design team will engage with Maori and Pasifika youth at Crosspower where over 250 youth attend each week.  The initial stage of this four month project will end in November with recommendations to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

 

14.     Primary Schools Lead Teacher Workshop

          Over the past five years there has been an increase in deaths and serious injuries (DSI) for 5-10 year old pedestrians during weekdays in peak traffic hours.  The Travelwise team looked to address this issue at a recent primary schools lead teacher workshop in the CBD.  Seventy teachers attended the workshop by rail to explore ‘Transporting our Students into the Future’ and develop curriculum programmes that would support safer travel for students and increased use of active transport (Public Transport PT, Walking and Cycling) options to help reduce congestion.

 

15.     Travel Demand (2014/15 Year)

          The Commute travel planning programme has a focus on engagement with commuters and businesses this year.  This quarter has seen the development of a campaign to promote travel choice which will be launched in October.  A focus has been the development of travel demand plans for the Devonport Peninsula, Albany Highway and City Rail Link, and implementation of these plans is underway.

 

16.     Route Optimisation

          The regional Route Optimisation is underway, which forms part of the programme for Network Optimisation, including traffic signal improvements, minor changes to the road network and the inclusion of transit lanes, freight lanes and trial of Dynamic lanes.

 

Road Corridor Delivery

17.     Key Highlights

          In the 2015/2016 financial year, AT is planning to deliver 37.7 km of pavement rehabilitation, 480.1 km of resurfacing (which includes 88.9 km of hotmix and 391.2 km of chip-sealing), 75.7 km of footpath renewals and 82.7 km of kerb and channel replacement.  This represents a total of 676 km or around 9% of work on AT’s 7,300km network.  Table 1 below outlines this work in more detail.

 

Table 1: Progress against Asset Renewal Targets

 

18.     The new Streetlight maintenance and renewal contracts commenced on 1 August 2015.  There are now four contracts across the region with one dedicated contract for the Hauraki Gulf Islands.  The new contractors are Downer (Central and South), Electrix (North and West) and NorthPower (HGI).  Tenders have also been called for the supply of 8,000 LED luminaires to replace existing 70W HPS lamps on the network in the 2015/2016 financial year.

19.     AT’s second Asset Management Plan (AMP) covering the period 2015-2018 has been published and is available to download from the AT website.

20.     Monitoring of Temporary Traffic Management (TTM) at work sites is continuing to ensure compliance with the approved traffic management plans and to identify opportunities for improvement.  The average percentage of low risk sites for Quarter 1 is 96%*[3] (The target is 90%)

 

Fig 1:  Compliance with approved traffic management plans ‘

 

21.     The Corridor Access Request (CAR) team continues to process around 1,300 applications per month.  These requests are for network operators from the water and telecommunication industry to access and maintain their assets sitting within the road corridor.  Access is also sought by private operators and individuals who need to access the road network to undertake activities such as private water connections etc.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Schedule of activities undertaken for the first quarter (2015/16) ending 30 September 2015

161

bView

Travelwise Schools activities broken down by local board

173

cView

Traffic Control Committee Decisions broken down by local board

175

dView

Local Board Advocacy Report

177

eView

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report

179

     

Signatories

Authors

Various Auckland Transport authors

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 













Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board Local Grants: Round One 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/20571

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for round one of the Puketāpapa Local Board Local Grants 2015/2016.  The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has set a total community funding budget of $31,000 for the 2015/2016 financial year.

3.       A total of $1,400 was allocated in quick response round one, leaving a remaining balance of $29,600 to allocate for the 2015/2016 financial year.

4.       Ten applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $46,190.67

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board consider the applications listed in Table One and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

 Table One: Puketāpapa Local Board Round One Local Grant applications

Organisation Name

Project

Total

Requested

Eligible/

ineligible

Adult Literacy Tamaki Auckland Inc.

Supporting Refugee Women at the Safari playgroup project

$2,204

Eligible

Lynfield Community Church

Children's Christmas party

$2,150

Eligible

 

Children's Autism Foundation

Community support programmes, to support families who have children affected by autism and their communities

$7,551.17

Eligible

5Tunz Communications Ltd T/A HummFM / Roshila Prasad

Holi - Colours in the Park - 2016

$3,226.50

Eligible

Communicare CMA (AK) Inc.

Hillsborough Communicare Centre

$1,800

Eligible

Mika Haka Foundation

Emerging Leaders Programme

$10,365

Eligible

New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education Limited

MindPlus Auckland Central

$3,000

Eligible

OUTLine New Zealand Incorporated

Operating lesbian gay bisexual transgender intersex telephone helpline for Puketāpapa

$1,200

Eligible

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Towards costs for the Roskill Training Cafe

$13,488

Eligible

RainbowYOUTH

HealthWEST Partnership

$1,206

Ineligible due to applicant being unable to provide quotes

 

Total

$46,190.67

 

 

 

 

Comments

5.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2015/2016 and the Puketāpapa Local Board adopted its grants programme on 30 April 2015 (see Attachment A).

6.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

7.       The Puketāpapa Local Board will operate two local grant rounds and five quick response rounds for this financial year.  The first local grants round closed on 11 September 2015.

8.       The new community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the new council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have also conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas, which have been attended by approximately 1000 people across the Auckland region.

9.       For the 2015/2016 financial year, the Puketāpapa Local Board set a total community grants budget of $31,000. 

10.     A total of $1,400 was allocated in quick response round one, leaving a remaining balance of $29,600 to allocate for the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     Ten applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $46,190.67

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

12.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Puketāpapa local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

13.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

14.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

16.     Following the Puketāpapa Local Board allocating funding for round one local grants, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme

185

bView

Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One applicaiton summaries

189

     

Signatories

Authors

Fua  Winterstein - Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

























Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board Quick Response Grants: Round Two 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/22937

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present applications received for round one of the Puketāpapa Local Board Quick Response Grants 2015/2016.  The local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these applications.

Executive Summary

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has set a total community funding budget of $31,000 for the 2015/2016 financial year.

3.       A total of $1,400 was allocated in quick response round one, leaving a remaining balance of $29,600 to allocate to community grants for the 2015/2016 financial year.

4.       The local board have indicated that they wish to reallocate the multi-board grant budget of $115,000. This budget was previously allocated to community groups through the Central Joint Funding Committee. A report on the reallocation of this budget will come to the local board meeting in February 2016.

5.       Two applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $1,328.87

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board considers the applications listed in Table One and agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in this round.

Table One: Puketāpapa Local Board Round Two Quick Response applications

Organisation Name

Project

Total

Requested

Eligible/

ineligible

Afro Fit

Afro Fit

$578.87

Ineligible due to project commencement date does not meet the Puketāpapa grants programme timeframe

Earth Action Trust

Resource recovery and creative sewing

$750

Eligible

 

Total

$1,328.87

 

 

Comments

6.       The implementation of the new Community Grants Policy commenced on 1 July 2015. The policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme for 2015/2016 and the Puketāpapa Local Board adopted its grants programme on 30 April 2015 (see Attachment A).

 

 

 

 

 

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board will operate five quick response rounds and two local grants rounds for this financial year.  The second quick response round closed on 16 October 2015.

9.       The new community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the new council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters and Facebook pages, council publications, radio, local newspapers and community networks. Staff have also conducted a series of public workshops in local board areas, which have been attended by approximately 1000 people across the Auckland region.

10.     The Puketāpapa Local Board has set a total community funding budget of $31,000 for the 2015/2016 financial year.

11.     A total of $1,400 was allocated in quick response round one, leaving a remaining balance of $29,600 to allocate for the 2015/2016 financial year.

12.     The local board have indicated that they wish to reallocate the multi-board grant budget of $115,000. This budget was previously allocated to community groups through the Central Joint Funding Committee. A report on the reallocation of this budget will come to the local board meeting in February 2016.

13.     Two applications were received in this round, with a total requested of $1,328.87

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Puketāpapa local board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

15.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

Māori impact statement

16.     The provision of community grants provides opportunities for all Aucklanders to undertake projects, programmes, activities that benefit a wider range of individuals and groups, including Maori. As a guide for decision-making, in the allocation of community grants, the new community grants policy supports the principle of delivering positive outcomes for Maori.

Implementation

17.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long Term Plan 2015-2025 and local board agreements.

18.     Following the Puketāpapa Local Board allocating funding for round one quick response, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board decision.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme 2015/2016

217

     

Signatories

Authors

Fua  Winterstein - Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Community Grants Operations Manager

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Libraries Work Programme 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/21843

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report presents the Libraries 2015/2016 Puketāpapa  Local Board work programme for approval.

Executive Summary

2.       This report provides information to support local boards to make decisions required to approve the Libraries 2015/2016 work programme.

 

3.       The  draft  Libraries work  programme  aims to  provide  a  defined  work  programme for  the 2015/2016 financial year.

 

4.       The Libraries work programme for the Puketāpapa  Local Board has been aligned to the following 2014-2017 Puketāpapa  Local Board Plan priorities:

·        People with a voice who can make a contribution

·        A strong sense of belonging and local identity.

·        Healthy, safe people and places

·        Vibrant popular parks and treasured natural environment

·        Thriving local economy, good local jobs

 

5.       Local boards are being requested to approve the Libraries work programme for FY 2015/2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board approves the 2015/2016 Libraries work programme (Attachment A).

 

Comments

6.       The Libraries work programme for 2015/2016 aligns to the Puketāpapa  Local Board plan 2014 2017 and Te Kauroa – Auckland Libraries Future Directions 2013-2023.

 

7.       The Libraries work programmes align to the following 2014 2017 Puketāpapa  Local Board Plan priorities:

·        People with a voice who can make a contribution

·        A strong sense of belonging and local identity.

·        Healthy, safe people and places

·        Vibrant popular parks and treasured natural environment

·        Thriving local economy, good local jobs

 

8.       A workshop was held on 16 September 2015 with the local board and Libraries staff to ensure activities align with the local board priorities and meet the needs of the Puketāpapa community.

 

 

9.       Local Boards are requested to approve the Libraries work programme for 2015/2016. Library staff will continue to work with the Libraries portfolio holder and the local board to ensure actions are delivered and evaluated.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

10.     The draft 2015/2016 work programme was considered by the local board at a workshop on 16 September 2015. The views expressed by local board members are reflected in Attachment A

Māori impact statement

11.     Improving Maori outcomes is core to library services and is defined in Te kauhanganui. The Libraries work programme supports Maori initiatives in both programme and service delivery at local libraries.

Implementation

12.     Libraries staff will continue to meet with the Libraries portfolio holder to provide updates on the work programme and ensure it is progressed. The Libraries work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2015/2016 budget and reported on through the quarterly reporting process.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Libraries Work Programme FY2015/2016 Puketāpapa  Local Board

223

     

Signatories

Authors

Debbie  Ashton - Service Delivery Manager Owairaka

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Manager Cust. Experience - South and East Libraries

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Scope for local dog access rule review

 

File No.: CP2015/22612

 

  

Purpose

1.       To determine the timing and scope of the Puketāpapa Local Board review of local dog access rules in 2015/16.

Executive Summary

2.       In 2012, Auckland Council’s Governing Body made the Dog Management Bylaw and the Policy on Dogs. The governing body delegated the review of the dog access rules on local parks, beach and foreshore areas, to local boards.

3.       The governing body delegation requires local boards to review their beach and foreshore dog access rules. The local board has full discretion on whether to review other local dog access rules, including those on local parks.

4.       The governing body has established a standard process to assist local boards with the review. The current review process started in September 2015 and is due to end in October 2016.

5.       The local board’s decision on the review scope is the first step in determining what aspects of dog access rules are reviewed and consulted on, in 2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)   confirms the review of the following local dog access rules for 2015/16

b)   confirms the inclusion of the following additional matters within the scope of the review:

i.   review of the generic rules and dog exercise areas

ii.  review of local parks adjacent to beach and foreshore areas

iii.  review of high-use parks and parks of concern to local board

c)   delegates to member [insert name], to determine local board engagement initiatives for the review of the local dog access rules in (a) within existing local board budgets, and to be the spokesperson for this project during the pre-consultation period.

 

Comments

Responsibilities

6.       In 2012, the governing body made the Policy on Dogs, and delegated the review of the dog access rules on local beaches, foreshore and parks to local boards. This includes a requirement to review all local beach and foreshore areas by a date determined by the local board (resolution number GB/2012/157).

7.       Responsibility for areas of regional significance (including regional parks) and Tūpuna Maunga are delegated to the Auckland Council Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee and the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority respectively. The Regulatory and Bylaws Committee has overall responsibility for the Policy on Dogs 2012 and region-wide dog access rules (e.g. council playgrounds, sports surfaces, roads, car and boat parking areas, cemeteries, campgrounds and holiday parks).

 

Process and funding

8.       In August and September 2013, local boards were consulted on the level of priority for the local board dog access rule review within their local board areas. As a result of this prioritisation, the Puketāpapa Local Board is scheduled to commence its review of local dog access rules in 2015, with any changes effective from Labour Weekend 2016.

9.       In order to facilitate the local board’s review of their dog access rules and take advantage of economies of scale, a regionally funded standard process has been established. The standard process timeline is structured around council’s annual dog registration process which takes place in June each year.

10.     The Dog Control Act 1996 requires all dog owners to be notified of any proposed changes to the dog access rules and to follow special consultative procedure under the Local Government Act 2002 (see Attachment B). Therefore, the standard process for this review consists of the following phases and timeline:

·        summer 2015/16: staff will gather information and community views to inform the development of proposed changes

·        April/May 2016: proposed changes will be adopted by the local board

·        June 2016: proposed changes are notified for consultation to align with the dog registration process

·        August and September 2016: public hearings and deliberations will be held and a final decision is made.

11.     The regional funding provides for the review of beach and foreshore dog access rules, generic public notification initiatives and generic signage to implement decisions. These activities include:

·    desktop research

·    site visits (beach and foreshore areas and high-use parks only)

·    on-line survey of beach and foreshore areas

·    internal stakeholder engagement with staff from parks, animal management, and biodiversity

·    statutory consultation process (which includes public notification, submission collation,  analysis and associated reporting, staff support at hearings and deliberations).

12.     Local boards are required to resource:

·    any additional external workshops or engagement not included in the standard process outlined above

·    advertisements, media / social media releases not included in the standard process outlined above

·    the organisation and running of hearings

·    funding of non-standard signage.

13.     Further details of the process and funding are provided in Attachment C.

Existing local board rules

14.     The existing dog access rules in the Puketāpapa Local Board area consist of both local dog access rules and regional dog access rules.

15.     The regional rules were considered as part of the 2012 review of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs and apply to all local board areas. The regional rules take precedence over any local dog access rule for common public places such as playgrounds, sports fields, roads, car and boat parking areas, cemeteries, campgrounds and holiday parks.   

 

 

16.     Within the Puketāpapa Local Board area, the following access rules apply:

·        a default under control on a leash dog access rule which applies to all areas unless otherwise specified

·        time and season rules on all beaches and foreshore areas

·        general rules around significant ecological areas, picnic and fitness apparatus areas

·        ten dog exercise areas. 

17.     The full list of dog access rules for the Puketāpapa Local Board area is included as Attachment A.

Options for the local board to consider

 

18.     The first decision for the local board is to consider when to commence the review of their local dog access rules, that is, in 2015/2016 or 2016/2017.

19.     If the local board resolves to undertake a review of the local dog access rules in 2015/16, the local board then needs to consider what, if any, rules that relate to local parks will be reviewed (in addition to local beach and foreshore areas which is required).       

Start of review

Option A1: Commence the review of the local dog access rules in 2015/16 as scheduled

20.     This option involves commencing the local dog access review in 2015/16 as currently scheduled. Under the delegations to the local board, the local board must review their beach and foreshore areas.

21.     As part of the beach and foreshore areas review, the local board must consider whether the regional time and season standard is appropriate for each beach and foreshore area. 

22.     The benefits of this option are that:

·        it allows for the implementation of dog access rules that are in keeping with the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012, community preferences, and wildlife considerations by October 2016 as currently scheduled

·        it allows for the consideration of access rules that are simpler to follow and enforce on the ground

it aligns with the expectation created in the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 that the local board will consider whether or not the regional ‘time and season’ standard is appropriate to be applied to the beaches and foreshore areas within their jurisdiction. 

23.     The disadvantages of this option are that:

·        local board resource is required to investigate options or undertake formal special consultative process with hearings in 2016

·        it adds to the workload of local board members during the 2016 pre-election period. 

Option A2: Defer the review of the local dog access until 2016/17

24.     This option involves deferring the local dog access review until 2016/17. Under this option staff will bring a second report to the local board in 2016/17 to consider what will be included within the scope of the local dog access review.

25.     It is noted that while the local board may defer the review of the local dog access rules, it is required by the delegations to undertake a review of their local access rules.

 

 

 

26.     The benefits of this option are that:

·        no local board resource is required to investigate options or undertake the formal special consultative process with hearings in 2015/16

·        there is no additional workload for local board members during the 2016 pre-election period. 

27.     The disadvantages of this option are that:

·        resource required in 2016/17 may conflict with 2017 local board plan reviews

·        confusing or inappropriate dog access rules remain in effect until October 2017

·        there may be unmet expectations of dog owners that the local board will consider whether or not the regional ‘time and season’ standard is appropriate to be applied to the beaches and foreshore areas within their jurisdiction, from the review of the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012.

Recommendation

28.     Staff recommend that a review of the local dog access rules commence in 2015/16 as scheduled (Option A1), as it allows for the implementation of dog access rules that are in keeping with the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 which are more practical and simpler to understand by the general public.

29.     Furthermore, the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 has created an expectation that the local board will consider whether or not the regional ‘time and season’ standard is appropriate to be applied to the beaches and foreshore areas within their jurisdiction.

Scope of local dog access review

30.     As discussed above, where the local board resolves to undertake a review, the board must review the local beach and foreshore area rules.  However, the board has discretion as to whether or not it considers any rules that relate to local parks. The scope of the review may include either a single option, or a mix of options B2 and B3 as identified below. 

 Option B1: No review of local parks (status quo)

31.     This option involves only reviewing the beach and foreshore areas with no local park rules being considered as part of this review. 

32.     The benefits of this option are that:

·        any consultation carried out around the beach and foreshore rules will be simpler with fewer issues for the public to consider

·        any changes or impacts of the changes to the local dog access rules will be limited to the beach and foreshore areas

·        no additional resource is required to investigate or assess local parks. 

33.     The disadvantages of this option are that it:

·        retains multiple sets of general rules that are often confusing and difficult to communicate and enforce

·        does not allow for an integrated approach to be taken between beach and foreshore areas and the adjacent parks and reserves

·        does not allow for a review of high-use parks or areas of potential concern to the local board or the community.

Option B2: Targeted review of park rules

34.     This option involves three parts; a review of generic rules on parks (i.e. dog access around picnic areas and fitness apparatus etc.) and dog exercise areas, a review of parks adjacent to beaches and foreshore areas, and a review of all high-use parks and parks with identified concerns.

35.     The reviews of the generic rules are technical reviews and will consider the appropriateness and applicability of the dog access rules for where there are fitness apparatus and picnic areas which are typically difficult to define on the ground and enforce.

36.     The review of the dog exercise areas is to evaluate whether or not the existing dog exercise areas meet the definition of ‘dog exercise area’ within the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012 as a dog priority area or whether it is better described as a shared space for multiple users.

37.     The review of the parks adjacent to beaches ensures an integrated approach to the activities within the coastal environment.

38.     The review of high-use parks and the parks with identified concerns is a targeted review of selected parks to identify conflicting use and the appropriateness of the dog access rules which will include site visits and internal workshops as required.

39.     The benefits of this option are that:

·        it allows for an integrated approach to be taken to the review of the dog access rules on the beach and foreshore areas and the adjacent parks and reserves

·        a targeted review of high-use parks and parks with identified issues will limit areas affected by any changes in the dog access rules

·        it removes or replaces confusing rules that are difficult to communicate and enforce

·        it will result in generic rules being replaced with site specific rules where appropriate which will be easier to understand and better provide for public safety and comfort or protection of wildlife

·        it will result in the reclassification of ‘dog exercise areas’ as either ‘designated dog areas’ (where the dog owner is the priority user) or under control off-leash areas in accordance with the criteria in the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012

·        a targeted review allows for resources to be concentrated on areas with the greatest impact on users.

40.     The disadvantages of this option are that:

·        it may result in parks adjacent to the beach and foreshore having different access rules than other local parks

·        it may result in high-use parks and other local parks having different dog access rules

·        it will increase the complexity of the issues considered as part of the review

·        changes to the access rules will affect a number of parks, given the general nature of the generic access rules and the dog exercise areas

·        it may be perceived by dog owners as a reduction in dog access in popular or high amenity parks.

Option B3: Detailed review of all local parks

41.     This option involves a detailed review of all parks (both high and low use) in accordance with the ‘Dog Access Rule Change Procedure’ and implements the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012.

42.     This option would involve site visits to all parks with consideration as to what dog access rules are best suited to activities occurring on the park, and a network-based approach to the wider provision of dog access.

43.     In contrast to Option B2 the local board would be required to co-ordinate and fully fund this option.    

44.     The benefits of this option are that it:

·        allows for a detailed site-specific review of all parks based in accordance with the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012, community preferences and wildlife considerations

·        allows for an integrated approach to be taken to the review of the dog access rules on all parks and reserves

·        provides greater certainty in all parks and reduces the potential for conflict in these areas

·        removes or replaces confusing rules that are difficult to communicate and enforce.

45.     The disadvantages of this option are that:

·        the local board will be required to co-ordinate and fund this detailed review of all parks and reserves which will be resource intensive[4]

·        it will increase the complexity of the issues to be considered by the local board and the community as part of the consultation on any proposed changes to the dog access rules

·        a detailed review is likely to result in changes to a larger number of parks

·        additional local board resources would be required when Option B2 is likely to achieve the same outcome in most areas of interest.

Recommendation

46.     Staff recommend that a review of the local dog access rules incorporates Option B2 as a targeted approach to the review which strikes the most appropriate balance between implementing the Auckland Council Policy on Dogs 2012, the complexity and scope of the review, and the resource required to undertake the local dog access review.   

Consideration

Local board views and implications

47.     The views of other local boards have not been sought on the scope of this review.  In the 2013/14 and 2014/15 reviews, other local boards chose to review their beach and foreshore areas and adjacent parks, high-use parks, generic rules and dog exercise areas.

48.     Consistency with other local board dog access rules is also a factor that the local board may want to take into consideration. Staff will provide advice on decisions made by other local boards during the options analysis and deliberations stages of the review.   

Māori impact statement

49.     The views of 23 iwi in relation to dog access were sought as part of hui consulting on a range of bylaws held in October 2013 and in March 2015.

50.     Feedback from the hui related to the ability of iwi to determine dog access on marae, and focused on control, responsible dog ownership, and ensuring the protection of sensitive ecological areas. The review of areas with protected wildlife is a matter recommended to be included in the review.

Implementation

51.     Staff will work with local board members, engagement advisors and communication advisors to develop a more detailed engagement plan in accordance with the decisions of the local board and existing budgets.

52.     Implementation costs, such as updating basic standard signage, are expected to be from existing regional budgets.

53.     Potential implementation issues to come from local board budgets include; additional research, engagement, and public notification initiatives, and any non-standard signage.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Current Puketāpapa Local Board dog access schedule

235

bView

Dog access review decision-making framework

241

cView

Process and timelines for local dog access review

247

     

Signatories

Authors

Kimberly Rees - Policy Analyst

Justin Walters - Policy Analyst

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 






Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 






Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Adoption of Local Fees and Charges 2015/2016

 

File No.: CP2015/22627

 

  

 

Purpose

1.    This report seeks an amendment to the Local Fees and Charges Schedule for 2015/2016.

Executive Summary

2.    In June 2015, local boards adopted a Local Board Agreement 2015/2016 outlining local priorities and budgets, and a supporting local fees and charges schedule for 2015/2016.

3.    In August 2015, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to “waive fees for sportsfields in central local board areas until a region-wide policy is adopted in the 2016/2017 financial year”.

4.    Attachment A outlines an updated local fees and charges schedule for 2015/2016 to reflect the zero sportsfield charges, for approval by the local board. A region-wide policy will be considered in 2016/2017.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      amend the Local Fees and Charges Schedules for 2015/2016 to reflect updated sportsfield user charges of no charge in 2015/2016 (Attachment A)

 

Discussion

5.    In June 2015, local boards adopted a Local Board Agreement 2015/2016 outlining local priorities and budgets, and a supporting local fees and charges schedule for 2015/2016.

6.    In August 2015, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to “waive fees for sportsfields in central local board areas until a region-wide policy is adopted in the 2016/2017 financial year”.

7.    Attachment One outlines an updated local fees and charges schedule for 2015/2016 to reflect the zero sportsfield charges, for approval by the local board. A region-wide policy will be considered in 2016/2017.

Consideration

Local Board

8.    Engagement with the community, including consultation, and a number of workshops and meetings were held by the local board and with the governing body to finalise local board agreements for 2015/2016.  The local fees and charges schedule is a supporting document to this agreement

Māori impact statement

9.    Content for local board agreements have been developed through engagement with the community, including Maori.

Implementation

10.  The amended local fees and charges schedule for 2015/2016 will be updated online.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Updated Local Fees and Charges Schedule 2015/2016

251

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh- Financial Planning Manager – Local Boards

Jane Aickin – Manager Local and Sports Parks Central

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell – General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2015-16 for period ended 30 September 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/24426

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       Attaching for the board’s information the Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) quarterly report for the period ended 30 September 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       N/A

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2015-16 for period ended 30 September 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Regional Facilities Auckland First Quarter Report 2015-16 for period ended 30 September 2015

255

     

Signatories

Authors

Judy Lawley, Regional Facilities Auckland Local Board Engagement Manager

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 




















Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2015/24105

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Executive Summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop proceedings provides a record of the Board workshops held in October 2015.

These sessions are held to give an informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Workshop Notes for 7, 14 and 21 October 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Notes for October 2015.

277

    

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 




Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action Schedule, November 2015

 

File No.: CP2015/24106

 

  

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide the Board with a schedule of resolutions that are still pending action.

Executive summary

2.       Updated version of the Resolutions Pending Actions schedule is attached.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board receives the Resolutions Pending Action Schedule for November 2015.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Resolutions Pending Action Schedule for November 2015.

283

     

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

26 November 2015

 

 

    

    



[1] With the exception of Franklin business properties which will fact an average general rates increase of 4.7 per cent due to the merging of Franklin business differentials with the rest of the region.

[2] Note that Māori customary land is non-rateable, and has therefore been excluded from discussions.

[3] Note this represents 96% in July, 96% in August and 97% in September.

[4] It is expected that a detailed review would take approximately 3 months at 1 FTE per board.