I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

1.30pm

Level 26
135 Albert Street
Auckland

 

Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Calum Penrose

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Ross Clow

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Chris Darby

Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Mike Lee

 

 

Cr Dick Quax

 

 

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

 

 

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Len Brown, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Penny Hulse

 

Independent Maori Stautory Board (alternate)

Member David Taipari

 

Ex-officio

(without voting rights)

All other Councillors

 

 

(Quorum 8 members)

 

 

 

Ashleigh Pihema

Democracy Advisor

 

19 April 2016

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8114

Email: ashleigh.pihema@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Areas of Activity

 

·         Provision of regional facilities and open space

·         Regional frameworks for local facility and open space provision

·         Encouraging healthy lifestyles through participation in sport and recreation sectors

·         Facilitating partnerships and collaborative funding models across the sport and recreation sectors

·         Performing the delegation made by the Governing Body to the former Parks, Recreation and Heritage Forum,  under resolution GB/2012/157 in relation to the Dog Policy

 

Responsibilities

 

Within the specified area of activity the Committee is responsible for:

 

·         In accordance with the work programme agreed with the parent committee, developing strategy and policy, including any agreed community consultation, to recommend to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

·         Acting as a community interface for consultation on policies and as a forum for raising community concerns, while ensuring community engagement is complementary to that undertaken by local boards

·         Making decisions within delegated powers

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the Committee’s responsibilities

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (see Governing Body responsibilities)

(b)     where the Committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee or a local board

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million other than for land purchases which shall have a limit of $5 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee

 

 

 

 

 

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC – WHO NEEDS TO LEAVE THE MEETING

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Only staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB)

 

·         Members of the IMSB who are appointed members of the meeting remain.

·         Other IMSB members and IMSB staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs)

 

Representatives of a CCO can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the CCO.

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          8

6.1     Julia Parfitt Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chair - Long Bay Restaurant 8

6.2     Vanessa Neeson Henderson - Massey Local Board Chair - Lincoln Road to Westgate Corridor Improvement Project                                                          8

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                          9

9          General Manager's Report - Parks, Sports and Recreation                                   11

10        Auckland's Greenways - Contributing to achieving a connected Auckland        21

11        Lowtherhurst Reserve Highway 16 Western Ring Route-Lincoln Road to Westgate Corridor Improvements Project                                                                                 35

12        Reclassification of part of Albany Domain to accommodate the proposed Albany Community Hub                                                                                                           47

13        Reclassification of Alison Park's former bowling club building footprint           55

14        Forward Work Programme Update - April 2016                                                       69  

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies from Cr AM Filipaina, Cr C Darby and Cr J Watson have been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 9 March 2016, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 


6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

6.1       Julia Parfitt Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chair - Long Bay Restaurant

Purpose

1.       Julia Parfitt, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chair, will address the committee regarding the Long Bay Restaurant development project.

2.       Mrs Parfitt will be accompanied by Mr Brian Moore (resident) for this item.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      thank Julia Parfitt, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Chair, and Brian Moore, resident, for their presentation.

 

 

 

6.2       Vanessa Neeson Henderson - Massey Local Board Chair - Lincoln Road to Westgate Corridor Improvement Project

Purpose

1.       Vanessa Neeson, Henderson – Massey Local Board Chair, will address the committee regarding the Lincoln Road to Westgate Corridor Improvement Project.

2.       This item will address the loss of public open space land in the Henderson – Massey Local Board area and that any financial compensation from the divest of land be allocated to open space projects within the local board area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      thank Vanessa Neeson, Henderson – Massey Local Board Chair, for her presentation.

 

 

 

 


7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

General Manager's Report - Parks, Sports and Recreation

 

File No.: CP2016/06694

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Committee on activities undertaken by the Department of Parks, Sports and Recreation to support implementation of plans and policies of Auckland Council.

Executive Summary

2.       This report has been written to update the Committee across a range of issues and progress with respect to approved work programmes.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the update report from the General Manager – Parks, Sports and Recreation.

b)      reccomend that the existing Community Access Grant agreements be continued for the 2016/2017 financial year, noting that the Community Access Guidelines will be developed for the 2017/18 annual plan. 

c)      approve the Hato Petera College grant ($28,000pa) for the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 financial years being reallocated in alignment with the draft Community Access Guidelines in consultation with the Kaipataiki Local Board.

Comments

Operations Stability

Achievements and Highlights

3.       Recently Lloyd Elsmore Park and Papatoetoe Leisure Centre’s were approached to support a local teenager from South Auckland who was part of the Pathway to Podium programme. The programme is run in conjunction with Auckland Council, Aktive and Sport New Zealand and provides targeted individual support to athletes throughout Auckland.

Auckland council’s involvement with the programme was recognised at an event held by Aktive on the 21 March. The teenager is now taking part in the NZ Open championships which is a qualifying event for the Rio Olympics.

4.       The end of the official summer season and the closing of the outdoor pools were marked in style for two of our Leisure centres.

a.         Massey Park Pool, managed by CLM, held a Dog Day Out event on the 2 April to mark the last day of the season. The pool had 36 dogs and around 50 people in attendance and was a great day enjoyed by all. All the outdoor pools were used with various toys/treats to give out and play with. There was lots of positive feedback given to the centre and it is being requested to be an annual event.

 

b.         Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa Pool and Leisure centre kept its outdoor pool open for an additional two days after season ended. The outdoor pool was meant to close on Sunday 27 April but due to Easter weekend and the warm weather the pool was kept open. The result was a highly utilised pool for the entire weekend. The decision was in line with the local board plan of having a range of facilities open to meet the diverse needs of the community.

5.       Massey Leisure Centre had basketball team The Breakers visit the centre during late February. The centre, managed by YMCA ,invited local schools to bring their children along to play with the team and experience positive role models in their community. The event was a great success with over 250 children in attendance.

6.       East Coast Bays Leisure centre recently introduced its Tiny Tots program. The program is a pre-school dance which encourages Kauri Kid’s children to be booked in for the afternoon. The centre has seen increased bookings over the last couple of weeks and head teacher Paula Albertsma has had great response from all involved.

7.       In January Mt Albert Community Leisure centre was involved in the ‘Kids in Parks Teddy Bears Picnic’ event. The centre hosted over 300 families at the free family event which focused on kids’ activities in a local park. The event was run in conjunction with the local board partnership and was a fantastic day enjoyed by all.

8.       The Leisure networks overall school holiday visitor numbers have increased by 6% which translates into an additional 627 participants in the programme since January 2016. Due to the popularity of the programme, staff at some facilities are currently exploring options to increase the opportiunity for the future.

9.       The "Sport Beyond School" Active Communities Project won New Zealand Recreation Association Outstanding Community Recreation Programme Award for 2015 earlier this year.  This project was a partnership between the University of Auckland, Auckland Council, College Sport and the four Regional Sports Trusts.  The award recognised excellence, innovation and effectiveness in the provision of a community recreation programme. 

10.     On 19 February Sport and Recreation unit in conjunction with Aktive and Sport New Zealand hosted the Sport and Recreation Sector Forum in Auckland’s viaduct. It was attended by more than 100 people who are leaders in their field including the Minister for Sport and Recreation Dr Jonathan Coleman and Auckland’s Mayor Len Brown.

The forum was held to launch new research that will help shape the future of sport in Auckland. As part of this there were three reports presented; Sport and Active Recreation in the Lives of Auckland Adults, The Economic Value of Sport and Recreation to the Auckland Region and Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan – Annual Report 2015.

The research includes adult participation figures from Sport NZ’s latest Active NZ Survey. These show that 78 per cent of Auckland adults take part in sport and recreation in any given week, compared with the national figure which is 74 per cent. The research also shows that sport and recreation make a significant contribution to the Auckland economy - $1.7 billion per annum, or 2.2 per cent, of regional GDP

11.     Recently the first Sport and Recreation Investors Forum of the year was held. This brought together many of the key sport and recreation funders in Auckland to discuss strategic priorities and ensure strong collaboration around joint strategic priorities.  There is a strong willingness to continue to build these relationships to coordinate and align investment into the sector.

12.     Greenways

a.         Local Board cluster briefings were held in March to discuss the future positioning of greenways as part of a connected active transport network, the Auckland Transport / Auckland Council draft design guide, and an emerging greenways identity.  These were received with a high degree of interest and engagement from local board members who attended.

b.         The Greenways Leadership Group met in March and supported the development of a creative identity to support a future marketing/awareness campaign. This work was presented by BBDO/Colenso a strategic partner on greenways.

c.         Work continues to ensuring that greenways programme is complementary to and meshes well with Auckland Transport’s cycleway programme and future investment in this programme

13.     Parks and Open Space Volunteering

a.         Arrangements confirmed for Health and Safety workshops for community groups to be held in May and September.

b.         Early exploration of opportunities with the Department of Conservation on a joint volunteering approach in Auckland

14.     Recently, the Botanic Gardens “Sculpture in the Gardens” opened on 29 November 2015 and closed on 6 March 2016.  During this three month period, total visitation was 338,000, with 93.8 of all visitors satisfied with their experience.  Most visitors were from central Auckland, slightly more than from South Auckland.  A total of 39,600 international visitors attended the exhibition.  At the opening, it was announced that the Friends of the Auckland Botanic Gardens had purchased two artworks for permanent display at the Botanic Gardens.  A third artwork has also been donated to the Botanic Gardens.

15.     Sculpture in the Gardens concluded with a public event on Sunday 6 March.  Khulu by John Ferguson was announced as the winner of the $5,000 People’s Choice Award.  Nine of the twenty artworks included in the exhibition were sold.

16.     Elvis in the Gardens took place on Sunday 13 March at the Botanic Gardens.

17.     At Western Springs, the botulism infection in ducks is now dropping off with the decline in warm humid weather.  A testing and lake quality programme is underway to ensure future outbreak events are minimised and to investigate options to manage the high nitrogen and phosphorous levels entering the lake.

18.     The installation of a new toilet block has now been completed at Wairaki Stream Reserve.

19.     Dedication ceremony was held to mark the start of works on boardwalk between Taumanu and Bamfield Reserves in Puketapapa.

20.     Over 200 hectares of parkland vested as regional park at Te Arai North.  This brings the total area of Te Arai Regional Park to approximately 300 hectares. 

21.     The construction of a new toilet block adjacent to the main car park at Wenderholm Regional Park is underway and replaces an existing 45 year old structure.

22.     Western regional parks worked with Ark in the Park and the Biosecurity Team to undertake a proactive wasp baiting programme utilising the recently released wasp bait ‘Vespex’ across 565 hectare area of the Ark in the Park area of the northern Waitakere Ranges. The operation was run by Ark in the Park with input from volunteers, western regional parks assisting in the planning and logistics. Early results are positive with a substantial reduction of wasps in the area.

23.     As reported in March, a 10-year old student, Alex Wackrow, ran a fundraising effort in February selling cupcakes to raise funds for the Waitakere Ranges Regional Park.  She raised $200 which she presented to regional parks as a donation on 18 March 2016.

24.     The summer period has been a particularly busy time for filming activity in western regional parks, which has extended into March.  Seventeen filming applications were received and processed through the later part of February and March.  These included 11 one-off applications for commercials and a further six applications for an ongoing series.


 

25.     The Arataki Visitor Centre hosted of a number of prominent international visitors including the Foreign Minister from Estonia, at the request of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and two members of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, at the request of the Mayor’s Office.  The Arataki Visitor Centre provides a superb introduction to Auckland with spectacular views of both harbours, the city and Waitakere Ranges.

26.     The southern Regional Parks team managed a six month Kaitiaki Mana Whenua Trainee Programme.  Four trainees were selected for the trial and undertook a multitude of training and worked alongside the park rangers. The trial was a success and may lead to a mana whenua park ranger cadetship in the near future.

27.     The Manukau Beautification Trust has committed funding of $15,000 towards continuing the research commenced last year into the establishment of sustainable wildflower meadows in Auckland.  This research will be undertaken by a student from Auckland University.

29.     Public toilet renewal at Eastern Beach (Howick Local Board) included showers which have been well used over summer months.  The design also incorporated historic photos of Eastern Beach which have created a great deal of interest.

 

 

30.     The installation of new exercise equipment has attracted significant interest and use since completion at David Lange Park (Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board).

 

 

31.     The Manukau Beautification Trust worked with local parks to complete a major clean-up of Moyle Park, Mangere involving a large number of fabulous volunteers who contributed 240 hours of volunteer work improving the presentation of the park.

   

32.     A new playground for the Hunua village green will open in mid-April (Franklin Local Board).

Te Waka Tai-ranga Whenua

33.     The Maunga Authority have been instrumental in the actioning of a number of significant projects on the maunga.  Approval of a café or function centre of the Maungawhau kiosk, along with the successful vehicle restriction program, will both change the way this site is managed and used by visitors.  Strong partnerships have also been developed with stakeholders and visitors through consultation and engagement process for both these projects.

 

34.     The Maunga Authority’s, draft Integrated Management Plan has been notified for public submission.  The plan will supersede the existing reserve management plans and provide future direction for how the tupuna maunga will be managed.

Issues/Challenges

35.     Auckland Council is reminding people that despite its natural beauty, the Hunua Falls also pose a number of risks that have led to drownings.  Over 120,000 people visit this popular site every year. Hunua Falls contains deep water, up to 19m depth, and there are slippery surfaces and sharp drops in depth from the perimeter. The water is cold, which can cause shock and rapid skin cooling, and may impact on a person’s ability to breath properly.

36.     Coming out of a 30m drop, the water in the falls is very aerated, and coupled with the fresh water source, there is less buoyancy than in salt water.

37.     The council regularly reviews safety measures in place at the falls, and in the past has installed detailed warning and advisory signage and supplied Angel Rings (life rings) to be available on site for visitors to use if there is an emergency situation. Council Park rangers visit the site every day, and amongst other activities will check on the signage and safety devices.

38.     For those who choose to swim at this site, follow basic water safety code procedures – be prepared, watch out for yourselves and others, be aware of the dangers, and know your limits.

39.     A multi-agency review is being undertaken to ensure best practice continues to be undertaken at Hunua Falls to ensure visitors have the best information to remain safe and are aware of the hazards.

 

Long Bay Site Remediation

40.     Plans for a large-scale restaurant on Long Bay Regional Park have halted indefinitely out of respect for the cultural significance of the beachfront site and lack of a suitable alternative location.

 

41.     Working together with mana whenua, the existing restaurant licensee and Heritage New Zealand, has come to a decision not to progress development of a restaurant any further.  Since the first discovery of koiwi (historic human remains) on the restaurant redevelopment site in July 2013 we have followed the rules for managing heritage discoveries set down by Heritage New Zealand (and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage) and been guided by iwi with tribal ties to the parkland.

42.     A closer working relationship with mana whenua has also emerged out of this situation. We continue to be guided by our iwi representatives on finalising the most appropriate final resting place for the koiwi that were unearthed during the construction works and on the best way to restore the discovery site.

43.     A new large-scale restaurant will not be planned for Long Bay Regional Park again, following the general understanding that the foreshore area is a burial site and was potentially a site of occupation and perhaps conflict in the past. Other parts of the park are not suitable for a restaurant development due to terrain, access or other heritage areas.

44.     Plans for the discovery site will be finalised in the coming months.

45.     A café-style food service will remain on the park which also offers self-catering picnic sites, barbecue areas, Auckland’s largest all-access children’s playground, walking tracks, a historic homestead and one of the east coast’s most popular white sandy beaches.

46.     Sport and Recreation unit manage council’s funding relationships with 11 third party facility providers to facilitate community access to these facilities.  These grants are outside of scope of the Community Grants Policy as they are “recurring grants to third parties to deliver asset-based or core services (i.e. services that the council delivers in-house elsewhere) via ‘outsourced’ or partnership delivery models.  

47.     Sport and Recreation are seeking feedback on the draft guidelines to provide a framework for future decision making, this will be reported to this committee in July for approval.  Given the timing of the guideline approval and the need to give certainty for the next financial year to the organisations that currently receive funding it is proposed that the existing agreements for 10 of these organisations be rolled over for the 2016/2017 financial year.  

48.     The total budget allocation for these grants $978,000 is included in the draft Annual Plan for 2016/2017. It is also proposed that there is a reallocation of the Hato Petera College grant ($28,000pa) for the 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 financial years.  The funding has historically been provided to support the maintenance of their sports fields and in return secure community access.  This funding is no longer required as council is supporting the college with maintenance directly via our collective contracts.  In consultation with the local board and aligning with the draft guidelines staff recommend this funding be utilised to support Netball North Harbour to improve accessible community access to their facility.

Projects

49.     The Waitemata Greenways Project in the Western Sector has had a section of shared path through Hakanoa Reserve completed.  Good feedback has already been received from a cyclist and local park user.

50.     Manukau Sports Bowl (Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board) has a renewed basketball court that has seen an increase in use since completion in March.

40.     The Franklin Local Board has approved the final design for the new Pukekohe skatepark with construction to begin in May.  A project advocated for by the Franklin Youth Advisory Board and local skaters.

51.     Seaside Park, Otahuhu has had a major renewal of their sports platform with the summer season assisting the project greatly and the platform now ready for winter football.

 

 

          Te Waka Tai-ranga Whenua

52.       A project of high interest to Aucklanders, and which will gain national coverage, is the planting of trees on Maungakiekie.  This project has been a number of years in the making and will incorporate the involvement from the Maunga Authority, mana whenua, key partners and the wider community.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

53.     There has been no specific engagement with local boards in relation to this update report. Programmes and initiatives associated with Local and Sports Parks, together with Pools and Leisure are led by Local Boards.  Local Boards are consulted with respect to specific operational aspects of Regional Parks and Cemeteries within their District

Māori impact statement

54.     There has been no specific engagement with Māori in relation to this update report.  The report briefly summarises the status of initiatives and projects which are however, on an individual basis, the subject of engagement with Māori.

Implementation

55.     No issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

Auckland's Greenways - Contributing to achieving a connected Auckland

 

File No.: CP2016/02992

 

Purpose

1.         To recommend an approach to implement greenways on parks and open space that contributes to achieving a connected Auckland through active transport. Additionally, to outline and seek endorsement of interim criteria to guide allocation of the greenway component of the parks development (growth) programme, on parks and open space.

Executive Summary

2.         Active transport provision (walking and cycling) is currently primarily delivered by both Auckland Council and Auckland Transport (with NZTA funding). This split responsibility presents a challenge to deliver a connected network and coordinate multiple funders, governance responsibilities, and delivery methods. Recent research on active transport (walking and cycling) shows users make trips for many reasons including commuting, recreating or linking to local destinations. These users desire a connected network that is safe and easy to find their way around.

3.         A shift is proposed to consider active transport provision and delivery in a more joined up way across Auckland Council (parks and open space) and Auckland Transport to achieve the objective of a connected Auckland through active transport. This approach would align current activities across Auckland Transport and Auckland Council supported by strategic leadership which includes commercial and interest group partners. The benefit of this approach will be to deliver an active transport system that focuses on users. This approach includes:

a)         through a strategic leadership group better coordination across multiple agencies, interest groups, and funding sources of active transport programmes

b)         better alignment of existing funding across multiple sources, including the regional greenway development (growth) funding allocated by the committee

c)         the opportunity to leverage alternative funding sources to achieve green benefits such as biodiversity improvements and community empowerment through activation of spaces (e.g. volunteering activities, play, art, community gardens) for greenways

d)         realising commercial opportunities for investment in the network including partners who have already confirmed support for greenways.

4.         Greenways are an important part of an active transport network as they provide an opportunity to safely connect local communities to local destinations such as schools, town centres, public transport stops, community facilities and recreation spaces by walking and cycling. Equally as important, greenways provide a range of opportunities to green Auckland (such as through biodiversity corridors and stormwater treatment) and for local communities to reflect local identity, pride and connection to place. Greenways can occur in parks and open space and through the street network. Attachment one illustrates the position of greenways in an active transport system.

5.         Regional investment in greenways on parks and open space, through the greenways development (growth) fund, can contribute significantly to a connected Auckland through active transport. Interim criteria are recommended in this report to support consideration of local board greenway route development, and the allocation of the greenways development (growth) fund by the committee.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)         endorse local greenways as a key tool to support delivery of a connected Auckland through active transport.

b)         endorse the following interim criteria to support annual decisions on regional funding of greenways on parks and open space:

i)          The extent to which the route will provide for anticipated future household growth and the geographic area the route will serve

ii)         The extent to which regional greenway investment is leveraging investment from other sources

iii)        Whether the greenway route is prioritised in a Local Board greenway plan or a priority aspiration in a Local Board Plan

iv)        The level of improved connectivity to local schools and community facilities and destinations the route will provide

v)         The alignment of the project with other active transport projects or routes

vi)        The state of readiness of the project.

c)      receive a report from officers in September 2016 and annually thereafter to consider and confirm the allocation of regional greenway funding against the criteria in (b) above and receive an update on delivery progress for the previous year.

 

Comments

Background

6.         The core function of a greenway is to safely connect local communities by walking and cycling to local destinations. A number of local boards have funded the development of local greenway plans, with several greenway projects recently completed, and more underway.

7.         A greenway provides an opportunity to safely connect local communities to local destinations such as schools, town centres, community facilities and recreation spaces by walking and cycling. In addition to this core function, greenways provide opportunities for community ownership and activation, and green the city through environmental enhancement initiatives. A successful greenway network will be realised through routes that are able to use local streets and connect to local parks and reserves, and which are used, valued and loved by local people. Greenways do not need to be located on Council controlled land, and could be established on private land, land of other public agencies (such as schools) or on land governed by mana whenua.

8.         In developing greenway plans to date local boards have applied different interpretations of a greenway to arrive at a proposed local network. The plans are, however, generally bound by a common aim to provide walking and cycling connections to local destinations, augmented by opportunities for environmental enhancements such as the establishment of biodiversity corridors and stormwater treatment.

9.         The Budget Committee made resolutions in November 2014, and May 2015 alongside the development of the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 regarding the development of a greenways plan for Auckland.


 

10.      The May 2015 resolution was that the Budget Committee:

a)         endorse the development of a regional greenways network plan to complement Local Board greenway plans and Auckland Transport active transportation plans.

b)         endorse the establishment of a greenways advisory group to oversee the development and implementation of the regional greenways plan

11.      In September 2015 the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee made recommendations on the parks growth programme which includes the regional greenways programme. A three year view of greenway and walkway projects proposed to be funded in this programme was presented. The Committee resolved to receive an annual report detailing the previous financial year’s delivery, and the next financial year’s programme.

Proposed Approach

12.      It is proposed local greenways (on parks and open space) be included in an approach to achieve a connected Auckland through active transport. Attachment one illustrates the role of greenways in an active transport system.

13.      The following benefits are proposed to be achieved from this approach:

a)         through a strategic leadership group better coordination across multiple agencies, advocacy groups, and funding sources of active transport programmes

b)         better alignment of existing funding across multiple sources, including the regional greenway development (growth) funding allocated by the committee

c)         the opportunity to leverage alternative funding sources to achieve green benefits such as biodiversity improvements and community empowerment through activation of spaces (e.g. volunteering activities, play, art, community gardens) for greenways

d)         realising commercial opportunities for investment in the network including partners who have already confirmed support for greenways.

Elements of an active transport system

14.      To achieve a connected Auckland through active transport three elements of an integrated network are proposed. These being primary paths, greenways, and recreational trails. Successful delivery of each of the elements of a programme will support the realisation of a connected network.

15.      Auckland Transport is implementing a cycleway programme to the value of $111M over the next three years to primarily support commuter cyclist routes around Auckland. This is a three year programme with significant investment from the NZTA urban cycleway fund. Auckland Transport and Auckland Council officers are working to align planning and funding approaches to deliver these complementary networks. This approach is anticipated to deliver a connected experience for Aucklanders through better alignment between the two organisations. The map of the Auckland cycleway network (with the red and blue paths being primary paths) and the current map of local greenway networks of plans completed by local boards are attached to this report (as Attachments Two and Three). By adopting the approach recommended in this report these two networks would be merged as a single network but distinguished under each of the elements identified in the table below.

16.      The table below describes the differences in each element of the connected Auckland active transport network, funding and role of local greenways.


 

Table: Components of a Connected Active transport network, delivery and funding

Element

Delivery Partners

Primary Capital Funding Sources

Design Standards / Guidance

Commuter paths: Cycle and shared path commuter routes

Auckland Transport / NZTA

Auckland Transport / NZTA Urban Cycleway Programme

Current three year programme ($101M)

Auckland Transport Code of practice

Local Greenway routes (shared on street and on parks and open space and other non-street routes)

Auckland Council

Auckland Transport

Commercial Partners

Community groups / entities

Private land owners / mana whenua

Utility corridor operators

Development funding on parks (growth) ($14.8M provisionally allocated for 3 year programme)

Renewals

Local Board discretionary capital (Auckland Council and Auckland Transport)

Community funding

Corporate partnership / sponsorship

Park and open space acquisitions

Auckland Transport / NZTA (approximately $10M additional to the Urban cycle way funding identified above)

Greenway Design Guide (in development by Auckland Transport / Auckland Council)

Recreational paths and trails (e.g.footpaths, tracks and bridle paths)

Auckland Council (Local and Regional)

Community groups / entities

Development funding on parks (growth) ($2.74M provisionally allocated for three year programme)

Renewals

Local Board discretionary capital (Auckland Council and Auckland

Transport)

Community funding models

Park and open space acquisitions

NZ Handbook for Tracks and Outdoor Visitor Structures –

Ministry of Tourism – Cycle trail design guide

AUSTROADS

 

17.      By adopting the above framework funding, delivery ownership and design requirements are clarified across multiple agencies.

Greenways Leadership Group

18.      Auckland Council chief executive Stephen Town and Auckland Transport chief executive David Warburton have recently established a Greenways Leadership group to provide strategic leadership across organisations, community and the commercial sector to realise the potential of a connected Auckland through active transport. Membership of this group blends political and interest group leadership with support from the commercial sector, and also from other public funders. Cr. Darby is the governing body representative on this group with Simon Randall (Maungakiekie-Tamaki chair) as the local board representative. While the initial focus of this group is on greenways, it is proposed to span all elements of a connected Auckland through active transport in time.

19.      The Greenways Leadership Group last met on 4 March 2016, and will be providing strategic direction to a marketing position, develop opportunities to unlock community led models of delivery and community empowerment, and smarter solutions for resourcing and delivery of an active transport programme.

Funding

20.      As outlined in the table above there are multiple funding sources for local board greenway projects. Development funding for greenway routes on parks and open space has been budgeted as part of the Long Term Plan 20150-2025 and included within the broader parks development (growth) programme. This regional funding is allocated by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee in a similar way to the sports field capacity development programme over recent years.

Regional Greenways Development Interim Funding Criteria (Parks and Open Space)

21.      An initial allocation of this funding was presented to the committee in September 2015 as part of an overall parks and open space development (growth) programme. Local Board engagement is underway alongside the annual plan on potential allocation of this funding for the next financial year, and provisional allocation for the two following financial years (overall a three year forward view). The interim criteria below are recommended for endorsement by the committee to support local boards shaping their requests for this funding, and to guide the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee in future greenway funding decisions.

22.      A possible investment plan for greenways and long term funding implications will be progressed by the Parks and Recreation Policy part of council and be reported to the committee at a later date.

23.      It is planned that a proposed greenway programme be reported to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee on an annual September cycle. For the current financial year, and the two that follow, a total of $14.8M is budgeted to be allocated to greenway projects.

24.      To be eligible for allocation of funding received from development contributions under the Local Government Act a project needs to be located on Council parks and open space, or Ministry of Education land.

25.      With this initial prerequisite satisfied interim criteria to assess a proposal, with accompanying explanation, are recommended to be:

i)          The extent to which the route will provide for anticipated future household growth and the geographic area the route will serve

As the majority of funding within the regional greenways budget is sourced from development contributions the infrastructure must be demonstrably necessary to provide for future population growth, and identify the geographic area of benefit. Proximity to spatial priority areas and Special Housing Area developments will also support consideration against this criteria.

ii)      The extent to which the Council investment is leveraging investment from other sources

Funding can be leveraged from other funding sources include commitment of local board discretionary funding, commercial partner funding or other funding sources. A recent example of a project which has leveraged investment from other sources is the Te Whau Pathway. This has the benefit of allowing regional funding to stretch across and leverage more projects.

iii)     Whether the greenway is prioritised in a completed Local Board greenway plan or a priority aspiration in a Local Board Plan

Many of the local board greenway plans which have been completed to date have included priority connections. Alternatively local board plans may indicate priority aspirational routes for local greenway development supported through community engagement.

iv)    The level of improved connectivity to local schools and community facilities and destinations the route will provide

A key component of a greenway is the ability to make local connections to local destinations such as schools, shops, community facilities or parks and recreation spaces and provide an alternative to a busy road, or less safe existing routes.

v)      The realisation of opportunities for the alignment of the project to other active transport projects the project can connect to.

There is an opportunity to align a local greenway project with commuter routes which may also be planned or upgraded in an area. This stands to maximise investment made in providing both local and regional connectivity benefits. There is also the potential to achieving community engagement, procurement and project management efficiencies from aligning projects and completing at the same time.

vi)     The state of readiness of the project

Whether concept design has been completed and any resource consent or other approvals obtained which would support timely delivery of the project.

Where the committee is able to confirm these interim criteria the consideration of regional funding allocation to greenways alongside the 2016/17 annual plan will be clearer to local boards, and the preparation of a three year programme view possible.

Greenways Design Guide

26.      There is currently no consistent guidance to support the design and construction of greenway projects within the street or on parks and open space. Auckland Transport and the Parks, Sports and Recreation department of Auckland Council have commissioned development of a design guide to support delivery of greenway projects across the network. This design guide is in draft and has been shared with local boards members who attended informal local board greenway cluster meetings held in March 2016.

27.      Key components of the parks and open space component of this design guide are guidance and choices of width, materials, lighting, stormwater control, biodiversity and environmental enhancement elements.

 

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

28.      The greenway concept has been led and championed by a number of local boards. Seven local boards have completed local greenway plans, and a further eight local boards have greenways plans in development. There are a number of projects underway or planned which are giving effect to these local greenway plans. Additionally local boards without greenway plans continue to rely on local walking and cycling plans developed under previous legacy Councils to inform their investment and advocacy in local routes.

29.      Greenways were referenced in about 470 feedback points to the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 of which the majority (about 320) supported the concept. About 60 feedback points did not support the concept. In many cases the feedback received referred to a Local Board greenway plan (where a local board has one).

30.      Confirmation of the interim criteria for assessing the committee funding of local board greenway projects will support local boards in advocacy and project prioritisation along the annual plan 2016/17 and future financial planning cycles. It is recommended these interim criteria, if agreed, be circulated to Local Boards to support this advocacy.

31.      Local board greenway cluster meetings were held at the end of March 2016 to provide an update on the draft greenways design guide.

Māori impact statement

32.      Greenway projects completed to date have reflected expressions of Māori identity through design elements incorporated into the greenway, and in the alignment of greenway routes to protect sites of cultural significance. These responses are generally developed through consultation and engagement undertaken to support the planning and construction of a project. A programme view across all elements of an active transport programme will support opportunities to reflect Māori identify across the programme.

33.      Greenways do have the potential to promote Māori wellbeing through the environmental enhancement, water quality improvement initiatives and in supporting the health benefits of a more active lifestyle for Māori.

Implementation

34.      The recommended approach provides for continued delivery of greenway projects that are underway, while providing for a more aligned and user focussed planning and delivery of projects in the future. This approach seeks to extend opportunities for alternative funding and more cost effective delivery of projects.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Greenways Position

31

bView

Auckland Cycle Network

33

cView

Local Board Greenway Plans

35

     

Signatories

Author

Bryce Pomfrett - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

Lowtherhurst Reserve Highway 16 Western Ring Route-Lincoln Road to Westgate Corridor Improvements Project

 

File No.: CP2016/06597

 

  

Purpose

1.       To seek  the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval to: 

a)             divest land designated by the New Zealand Transport Agency at Lowtherhurst Reserve

b)             grant easements to New Zealand Transport Agency across the reserve

c)             acquire an easement across New Zealand Transport Agency designated land.

Executive Summary

2.       The New Zealand Transport Agency is upgrading the State Highway 16 Western Ring Route from Lincoln Road to Westgate.

3.       To enable the improvements to be undertaken, the New Zealand Transport Agency is seeking to acquire 7518m2 of land within Lowtherhurst Reserve under Sections 50 and 52 of the Public Works Act 1981. The area is designated in the operative district plan for roading purposes. They are also seeking two permanent easements totalling 1711m2 for construction, maintenance and access into the reserve.

4.       Staff have been in discussion with the New Zealand Transport Agency to agree a mitigation package to reduce some of the effects of the loss of open space land. Some aspects of this mitigation has been approved by Henderson-Massey Local Board in accordance with decision making allocation. Mitigations include:

·    financial compensation for loss of reserve land

·    improved design of the pond and associated wetland

·    public access by way of an easement across land to be owned by the New Zealand Transport Agency, to a proposed walking/cycling pathway around the pond and a multi-purpose activity area.

5.       All costs associated with the acquisition of land, easements, and mitigation works will be met in full by the New Zealand Transport Agency.

6.       Council staff will negotiate with the New Zealand Transport Agency on the basis of a full replacement cost for any land acquired by them under the Public Works Act.

7.       To help mitigate loss of open space in the area it is recommend that any financial compensation received be made available to support open space acquisition and development priorities identified in the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan.

 

 


 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)            approve the divestment of approximately 7518m2 of Lowtherhurst Reserve (Attachment A) designated by the New Zealand Transport Agency for motorway improvements pursuant to Sections 50 and 52 of the Public Works Act 1981(all areas being subject to final design and survey). The land being legally described as:

i)        Part Lot 25 DP43421 (2320m2 more or less)

ii)       Allotment 703 PSH OF Waipareira CT NA58B/833 (5198m2 more or less)

b)            approve the granting of easements over 1711m2 of Lowtherhurst Reserve to the New Zealand Transport Agency for construction, landscape maintenance and access purposes (Attachment B).

c)            delegate to the Director Community Services, under delegation from the Chief Executive, the authority to approve the final terms and conditions of the disposal and easement of land to New Zealand Transport on Lowtherhurst Reserve.

d)            approve an easement 1107m2 across New Zealand Transport Agency land (Attachment C) to allow access to the proposed walking/cycling path and multi-purpose activity area.

e)            recommend to that the Finance and Performance Committee approve that any compensation received from the sale of Lowtherhurst Reserve under the Public Works Act be made available to support the priorities identified in the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan.

 

Background

 

8.       State Highway 16 is the primary route to and from West Auckland and the Auckland CBD and forms part of a strategic link known as the Western Ring Route. It is a government priority roading project of national significance.

9.       The New Zealand Transport Agency is proposing to upgrade State Highway 16 to provide a safer, more reliable route to increase traffic efficiency through the Western Ring Route.

10.     To enable improvements to be undertaken, the New Zealand Transport Agency applied for a ‘Notice of Requirement’ to increase their existing designation to accommodate the Western Ring Route Improvements in 2010. The current designation extends over 9213m2 of Lowtherhurst Reserve.

11.     The New Zealand Transport Agency is seeking to purchase land within Lowtherhurst Reserve under Sections 50 and 52 of the Public Works Act 1981.

Lowtherhurst Reserve

12.     Lowtherhurst Reserve is owned by council and classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 with a total land area of 43,903m2. The reserve comprises of approximately 14500m2 of generally flat grassed areas, with the greater area being mainly of bush with steep gradients in parts. The Rarawaru Stream runs through the reserve.

13.     The nearest neighbourhood reserves to Lowtherhurst Reserve are Taitapu Reserve (2400m2) approximately 700 meters south and Tatyana Park (7863 m2) 950 meters to the north. 

 

Land requirements and conditions

14.     To accommodate the proposed motorway improvements to State Highway 16, the New Zealand Transport Agency has identified a land requirement of 7518m2 from Lowtherhurst Reserve for the construction of a wetland treatment pond as highlighted in pink in Attachment A.

15.     To enable works associated with the construction and maintenance of the wetland pond the New Zealand Transport Agency require two permanent easements over land within Lowtherhurst Reserve. These easements comprise of a total area of 1711m2 as shown in blue in Attachment B. These are summarised in Table 1.

Table 1: Proposed divestment and easement of park land to New Zealand Transport Agency for Lowtherhurst Reserve.

 

Physical Address

Lot and Deposited Plan

Portion of the site subject to the proposal

Legal status

Proposed divestment of land

4A Lowtherhurst Road, Massey

Part Lot 25 DP43421

2320m2

Recreation reserve held under the Reserves Act 1977

4A Lowtherhurst Road, Massey

Allotment 703 PSH OF Waipareira CT NA58B/833

5198m2

Recreation reserve held under the Reserves Act 1977

Proposed easement of land

4A Lowtherhurst Road, Massey

Part Lot 25 DP43421

412m2

Recreation reserve held under the Reserves Act 1977

4A Lowtherhurst Road, Massey

Allotment 703 PSH OF Waipareira CT NA58B/833

1299m2

Recreation reserve held under the Reserves Act 1977

 

16.     Delegation to the Director Community Services, under delegation from the Chief Executive, the authority to approve the final terms and conditions of the disposal and easement of land to New Zealand Transport on Lowtherhurst Reserve is sought from the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee.

Impact and mitigation

17.     The Henderson Massey Local Board Open Space Network Plan (2015) identifies a projected population increase of 53,000 within the area over the next 30 years and continued urban intensification placing considerable pressure on existing open space provision. The divestment of part of Lowtherhurst Reserve represents an unplanned loss of open space provision for the local area.

18.     Staff and the New Zealand Transport Agency have held a number of meetings to consider options to mitigate the effects of the construction of the stormwater pond and battering of the reserve for new motorway support. This led to two options being considered, in addition to the financial compensation for the loss of land.

 

19.     Henderson-Massey Local Board approved a preferred mitigation package at their business meeting held on 7 April 2016 which included the following:

·    new gate in to Lowtherhurst Reserve from Huruhuru Road

·    multi-purpose activity area (proposed cycling training area and other activities)

·    artful interventions (fencing) of the wetlands/stormwater pond  

·    replanting post construction – wetland/stormwater pond planting and reinstatement planting to be detailed as part of construction package

·    all existing and new paths/walkways to be interlinked.

20.     Included in the mitigation package is an easement 1107m2 (subject to Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approval) in favour of Auckland Council across New Zealand Transport Agency land to enable the use of the proposed walking/cycling path and multi-purpose activity area, and for maintenance requirements (Attachment C).This easement was supported by the local board.

21.     This mitigation package provides for a number of additional improvements to those statutorily required at no development cost to council.

Financial compensation

22.     A valuation for the land will be undertaken by council on the basis of full open space replacement costs and will inform negotiations with the New Zealand Transport Agency on appropriate compensation for the loss of open space.

23.     As the divestment of open space land was unplanned, officers are of the view that there is a case to be made for the divestment compensation to be allocated as a new budget to contribute to funding some of the high priority open space actions identified in the Henderson Massey Local Board Open Space Network Plan.

24.     These priorities include acquiring and developing new parks in Henderson and Glendene and improving the amenity of Taitapu Park, Tatyana Park and Lowtherhurst Reserve.

Next Steps

25.     Subject to the approval of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee, staff will proceed with the required processes to:

·    obtain a valuation for the land to inform compensation negotiations with New Zealand Transport Agency and once approval has been given Corporate Finance and Property will negotiate the compensation and easements with the New Zealand Transport Agency

·    seek approval from the Minister of Conservation for the divestment of recreational reserve land held under the ‘Reserves Act 1977’

·    seek approval from the Finance and Performance Committee to allocate the divestment compensation as a new budget to support the priorities identified in the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan.

 Local Board views and implications

26.     Two workshops were held with the Local Board during February 2016.

27.     A report went to the Henderson-Massey Local Board on 7 April 2016 which outlined various mitigation options and details pertaining to the divestment and easements on Lowtherhurst Reserve. The local board passed the following resolutions:

 

 

 

Resolution number HM/2016/37

MOVED by Member B Brady, seconded by Member LW Wilson:

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      support  the divestment of approximately 7518m2 of Lowtherhurst Reserve (Attachment A) designated by the New Zealand Transport Agency for motorway improvements pursuant to Sections 50 and 52 of the Public Works Act 1981(all areas being subject to final design and survey). The land being legally described as:

i)        Part Lot 25 DP43421 (2320m2 more or less)

ii)       Allotment 703 PSH OF Waipareira CT NA58B/833 (5198m2 more or less)

This being subject to the mitigation agreed by the local board.

b)      support the granting of an easement over 1711m2 of Lowtherhurst Reserve to the New Zealand Transport Agency for construction, landscape maintenance and access purposes (Attachment B).

c)      approve the temporary occupation of an area 470m2of Lowtherhurst Reserve  outside the designation, by the New Zealand Transport Agency and their contractors for a 30 month period from July 2016 to Feb 2019 (Attachment C).

d)      delegate to the Director Community Services, under delegation from the Chief Executive, the authority to approve the final terms and conditions of the disposal, easement and temporary occupation of the land by New Zealand Transport Agency for the duration of the works required on site and all associated works within Lowtherhurst Reserve.

e)      approve Option B for the mitigation of the effects of the divestment on Lowtherhurst Reserve and give approval for proposed mitigations that relate to local board delegations.

f)      recommend Option B to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee to obtain an easement across New Zealand Transport Agency land ( Attachment C) to allow access to the proposed mitigations identified in Option B.

g)     request any compensation received from the sale of Lowtherhurst Reserve under the Public Works Act are retained for the priorities identified in the Henderson-Massey Open Space Network Plan and be held in the Henderson-Massey local board budget.

h)      Requests speaking rights at the Sports and Parks committee meeting on 26 April 2016.

i)       Notes that maintenance for the project is cost neutral and funded from existing Parks maintenance budget and this should be taken into account when approving mitigation measures outlined in option B (p 37) of the agenda.

Māori impact statement

28.     The New Zealand Transport Agency has undertaken consultation with mana whenua for the State Highway 16 Northwestern Motorway improvements. A series of hui have been held to discuss the overall aspects of the project, and to seek direct input into stormwater design and urban design elements. The design of the project has evolved in response to feedback and input from mana whenua. The last meeting was held on 27 November 2015.

29.     On 28 October 2015, a hui/site visit to Lowtherhurst Reserve was held at which the proposed local road improvements were discussed with representatives from:

·    Ngati Tai Ki Tamaki

·    Te Akitai Waiohua

·    Te Kawerau A Maki


30.     Discussions at that hui focused on stormwater discharges, vegetation clearance and earth works of the reserve, periodic site visits when the project is underway. A range of measures to manage stormwater discharge and works on site were agreed which included water quality testing of Rarawaru Steam and Huruhuru Creek and reports on any ecological and archaeological reports completed.

Implementation

31.     Subject to the required approvals the New Zealand Transport Agency are scheduled to start works from July 2016. The project will take approximately 2 ½ years to complete.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Proposed divestment of land on Lowtherhurst Reserve

43

bView

Proposed easements on Lowtherhurst Reserve

45

cView

Proposed easements around wetland (AC)

47

     

Signatories

Author

Paul Clark - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

Reclassification of part of Albany Domain to accommodate the proposed Albany Community Hub

 

File No.: CP2016/05272

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee approval to reclassify part of Albany Domain from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) to enable the construction of the Albany Community Hub.

Executive Summary

2.       The establishment of the Albany Community Hub (the hub), has been a long term desire of the Upper Harbour Local Board and the former legacy North Shore City Council. 

3.       The Hub is a local multi-functional community facility, and listed as a priority in the 2014 Upper Harbour Local Board Plan. It is intended to provide a community facility that caters for the growth in the Albany area and is approved and funded through the Long term Plan.

4.       The hub is to be sited within a portion of Albany Domain described as Section 15 SO 456618 and classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.   Section 15 is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation (DOC) and vested in the Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes. (Attachment A)

5.       In order to comply with the requirements of the Reserves Act, the portion of Section 15 to be occupied by the hub needs to be reclassified from a recreation reserve to a local purpose (community buildings) reserve before a resource consent application can be granted.

6.       The development of a community hub on this site is a key priority of the local board.  On 10 September 2013 the board resolved among other things to support the reclassification to enable the community hub to progress:

The Upper Harbour Local Board:

d)    Endorses commencement of the reserve classification process from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve for the proposed Albany Community Hub building, terrace and car park footprints.

UH/2013/190

Subsequently in August 2015 the board resolved:

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

b)     approve a maximum of $10,000 from the Community Response Fund for the

re-classification of the Albany Domain including:

·    surveying cost;

·    all assessments;

·    Iwi consultation;

·    public notices;

·    the publishing of public notices in the New Zealand Gazette; and

·    registration of the gazette notice with Land Information New Zealand (LINZ).

UH/2015/133

7.       Iwi consultation has been undertaken with no objections to the reclassification.  A public notice was placed in the North Harbour News on 28 January 2016 advising the intention to reclassify part of the reserve and one month was allowed to receive submissions.  No submission either for or against were received by the closing date of 29 February 2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      approve, pursuant to Section 24 (1) of the Reserves Act, of the reclassification of 5431 square metres (subject to survey) of Albany Domain being part of Section 15 SO 456618 from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve to allow for the construction of the Albany Community Hub.

Comments

8.       The area of land identified forms part of the wider Albany Domain which is bisected by Albany Highway.  The area in question is part of the southern portion of land adjacent to the existing Albany Community Hall and Albany Community Preschool.  The reclassification is for an area of 5431 sq metres from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings). (Attachment B).

9.       Albany Domain is owned by the Crown through DOC and was set apart by the Crown as a public domain pursuant to Section 32 of the Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Act 1949.  In 1979 the domain was classified by the Crown and continues to be held under the Reserves Act

10.     As part of investigations into the proposed site selection it was found that the approved reserve management plan for Albany Domain stated “It is not envisaged that there should be any more buildings or sports fields on the reserve, nor that the reserve should become home to any sports clubs”.  (Albany Domain Reserve Management Plan 1999).

11.     After investigation it was found that an amendment to the reserve management plan was not required provided public and iwi consultation was undertaken as part of the reclassification and it was clearly identified in the consultation that council intended to construct a facility on this site.

12.     An external consultant was engaged to manage the process of the reclassification.  Iwi consultation has been undertaken.  Under section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act a single notice in a local newspaper declaring the intention to reclassify and specifying the reasons for doing so was published.  This included the information that the construction of a new building was not provided for in the approved Reserve Management Plan for Albany Domain.

13.     The public notification process has been completed with no submissions for or against the proposal to reclassify part of the reserve received.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

14.     The Upper Harbour local board have indicated their support for the reclassification on 10 September 2013 and in August 2015 set aside funding to enable the reclassification to proceed.  The proposed Albany Hub is a key priority in the Upper Harbour local board plan and budget is in place for the facility to commence construction mid-2016.

Māori impact statement

15.     The Reserves Act requires Iwi consultation as part of any reclassification.  The  following responses to consultation have been received:

a)         Ngai Tai ki Tamaki have advised they have no issues with the proposal.

b)         Ngai te Ata Ngai te Ata have advised that no engagement is required.

 

c)         Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua has advised they support the proposal.Nga Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Trust requested to meet with council to discuss the proposal.  This meeting took place on 11 November 2015 where iwi indicated their support for the reclassification and that they would like to be involved with the project going forward. 

d)         Ngati Whatua Orakei Trust - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

e)         Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority - undertook a cultural assessment in 2013 and indicated in this assessment that they support the development in principle and support the reserve reclassification.

f)          Ngati Tamatera - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

g)         Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

h)         Te Akitai Waiohua Iwi Authority - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

i)          Ngati Maru Runanga Incorporated - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

j)          Ngati Whanaunga Incorporated - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

k)         Te Patukirikiri Incorporated - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

l)          Ngati Tamaoho Trust - no comment was offered or any opposition to the proposal was received.

Implementation

16.     Provided the Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee endorse the resolution to reclassify a portion of Albany Domain, the portion to be occupied by the hub will need to be redefined by a survey plan, before the reclassification process can be completed and a gazette notice issued.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Spatial map

53

bView

Site plan with area to be reclassified

55

     

Signatories

Author

Jan Brown - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 



Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

Reclassification of Alison Park's former bowling club building footprint

 

File No.: CP2016/06259

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee approval to reclassify a portion of Alison Park on Waiheke Island, being the building site of the former Oneroa Bowling Club, as local purpose (community buildings) reserve pursuant to Section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977, to enable the building to be leased for community purposes.

Executive Summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board supported a review of the future use of the former Oneroa Bowling Club building.  The bowling club had occupied the building for some 20 plus years and vacated this in 2012.

3.       Following an initial round of community consultation on this in mid-2015, there was strong support for the building to available for a wide range of community uses.  Alison Park is held as a recreation reserve pursuant to the Reserves Act 1977.  The local board notified the intention to reclassify the building footprint and engaged with iwi in November 2015.

4.       The board received 20 formal submissions and held a hearing in early March 2016.  Following deliberations the board resolved to endorse the reclassification and this report now seeks the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee formally resolve to reclassify the building footprint as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      resolve, pursuant to Section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977, to reclassify approximately 330m2 of Alison Park, being part of Lot 237 DP22848, being the building footprint of former Oneroa bowling club, as contained in Computer Interest Register 632271, from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

Comments

5.       Alison Park on Waiheke Island, being Lot 237 DP 22848 comprising of 3.7603 hectares, is owned by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 as recorded by Gazette Notice No. 802785.1 (Part New Zealand Gazette, 5 April 1979, No. 28, page 1040), and vested in the Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes.

6.       Alison Park was not created as the required reserve contribution from an adjoining Crown owned state housing subdivision, but as a straight grant of land by the Crown to local government as a recreation reserve for the benefit of the local community.

7.       In mid-2015, the Waiheke Local Board supported the preparation of a new concept plan for Alison Park and a review of the future use of the former Oneroa Bowling Club building.  The bowling club had occupied the building on Alison Park at 100 Mako Street, Oneroa, for some 20 plus years and vacated this in 2012.

8.       The board had strong feedback in the initial round of consultation on this project to make the building available for a wide range of community uses. To enable community use of the building the board supported the notification of the reclassification of the building footprint, being of approximately 330m2 of Alison Park, from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with section 24 of the Reserves Act.  Refer to Attachment A indicating the building footprint.

9.       In addition the board supported the notification of a minor variation of the Alison Park Management Plan 1995 in accordance with section 41(9) of the Reserves Act 1977 to remove reference to the Oneroa Bowling Club and to state the building will be leased to a community group or groups that would then make the building available through a booking system to wider community use.

10.     The public notification commenced on 14 November 2015 and closed on 15 January 2016.  Thirty formal submissions on the reclassification were received, of which 21 supported the reclassification and 9 opposed this.

11.     It appears from some of the submissions that the complex requirements of the Reserves Act have not always been fully understood by some of the submitters.  The objections to the reclassification predominantly focused on the proposal to lease the building out, with the submitters wishing this to be part of the council booking system.  A number of submitters also took the opportunity to comment on aspects of the wider draft Alison Park Concept Plan which was outside the scope of this submission process. 

12.     The local board has considered all the submissions and the decisions of these deliberations are included in the submissions table in Attachment B.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.     The Waiheke Local Board at its meeting held 22 October 2015, endorsed the notification of the reclassification that would enable community use of the former bowling club building as follows:

14.     That the Waiheke Local Board:

f)       supports the public notification of a reclassification of approximately 330m2 of Alison Park, being the footprint of the former bowling club building, from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977.

15.     The Local Board at their meeting on 25 February 2016 then resolved the hearing date to be Thursday 3 March 2016 and confirmed the hearing panel would consist of all Local Board members.

16.     At the hearing the Waiheke Local Board Hearing Panel reviewed all the submissions and heard eight parties speak to their submissions.  The panel deliberated on all the submissions, with their responses noted in the submission summary in Attachment B, and confirmed they would endorse the reclassification to enable the future community use of the building.

17.     The hearings report was then considered by the Waiheke Local Board on 24 March 2016 and their resolutions included:

That the Waiheke Local Board:

b)      endorses the reclassification of the former bowling club building footprint, being approximately 330m2 of Lot 237 DP22848 which comprises of 3.7603 hectares and is contained in Computer Interest Register 632271, from recreation reserve to local purpose (community buildings) reserve in accordance with section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977 and Section 17 the Local Government Auckland Council Act 2009.

c)      request officers undertake a formal survey of the building footprint and arrange the issue of a gazette notice declaring the reclassification.

18.     The local board was advised that every classification or reclassification of any reserve must be endorsed by the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee and that a report to endorse the recommendations of the local board will be placed on the Committee’s agenda.

Māori impact statement

19.     Ngati Paoa, NgaiTai Ki Tamaki, Ngati Te Ata Waiohua, Ngati Maru, Ngati Whanaunga, Ngati Tamatera and Te Patukirikiri were contacted at the initiation of this project in early June 2015.  Ngati Paoa and Ngai Tai ki Tamaki expressed an interest and provided input into the preparation of the draft concept plan following a site visit to the park.

20.     All iwi were then asked on 5 November 2015 whether they wanted to be engaged on both the draft concept plan and the Reserves Act processes, being the minor variation and the reclassification of the building footprint.  Ngai Tai ki Tamaki and Ngati Paoa have provided support for the Reserves Act processes being undertaken to enable the local board to enter into a new lease of the building to a community group or groups.  In the case of Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, this support is conditional on the future lessee making the building available to others at a reasonable rate.

21.     The local board has included in the management plan variation a policy that states any future lessee would be required to provide access, at a comparable community rate, to other community groups on a fair and transparent basis.

Implementation

22.     If the Committee resolves to reclassify the building footprint as local purpose (community buildings) reserve this will enable the building to be leased to a community group or groups. 

23.     Reclassification of every reserve must be defined by a survey plan if that reclassification involves any portion of an existing defined land parcel.  The Waiheke Local Board’s project has included the survey costs, as quoted at $6,200. 

24.     A survey plan is necessary so the council can issue a gazette notice declaring the reclassification.  Issue of the gazette notice is part of the statutory process of the Reserves Act and will be arranged with Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) following the Committee’s endorsement and will be managed by the Property Team. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Footprint of the former bowling club building to be reclassified

61

bView

Detailed submissions and Waiheke Local Boards responses

63

     

Signatories

Author

Annette Campion - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 








Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016

 

Forward Work Programme Update - April 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/07283

 

Purpose

1.         To provide an update on the 2015/2016 forward work programme and to seek approval for minor amendments.

Executive Summary

2.         The 2015/2016 forward work programme was approved by this committee on 29 July 2016 (PAR/2015/54).

3.         At the request of the Chair the following meetings were added:

a.            Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee workshop – 13 April 2016

b.            Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee meeting – 26 April 2016

4.         The amended 2015/2015 forward work programme is included at agenda attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

a)      receive the 2015/2015 forward work programme update.

b)      approve the minor amendments to the 2015/2016 forward work programme to include the 13 April workshop and the 26 April committee meeting.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee 2015/2016 Forward Work Programme

73

     

Signatories

Authors

Ashleigh Pihema - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee

26 April 2016