I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 7 July 2016

3.30pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Desley Simpson, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kit Parkinson

 

Members

Ken Baguley

 

 

Troy Churton

 

 

Kate Cooke, JP

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Mark Thomas

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

29 June 2016

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - St Heliers Business Association - Wendy Caspersonn            5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Notice of Motion - Member Churton - Review of Workshop Times and Protocols 7

13        Ōrākei Local Board Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/2017 11

14        Parks, sport and recreation draft annual work programme financial year 2016-2017                                                                                                                                        19

15        2016/2017 Local Economic Development ATEED work programme                    29

16        Business Improvement District Programme draft work programme financial year 2016_2017                                                                                                                     35

17        Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants                                                            39

18        Community of St Luke, St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall, Meadowbank Community Centre and Tahapa Hall Funding Agreements and Licences to Occupy and Manage                                                                                                                          45

19        Sport and Recreation Investment - Community Access Scheme guidelines and future allocation of residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund         49

20        Approval of Proposed 2016/2017 Local Environment and Development Work   63

21        Housing for Older People Partnering Proposal                                                       69

22        Auckland Transport Update - July 2016                                                                 109

23        Draft 2016 Elected Members’ Expenses Policy                                                      113

24        Health, Safety and Well-being May 2016 Update                                                   133

25        Delegated feedback on the Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015                                                                                                                             161

26        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                165

27        Board Member Report - Kit Parkinson                                                                   197

28        Board Member Report - Ken Baguley

This report was not available at the time of printing and will be tabled at the meeting.

 

29        Board Member Report - Troy Churton                                                                   207

30        Board Member Report - Kate Cooke                                                                       209

31        Board Member Report - Colin Davis                                                                       211

32        Board Member Report - Mark Thomas                                                                   215

33        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     217

34        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                    221

35        Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings                                                    227  

36        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 2 June 2016 and the minutes of the extraordinary meeting held on Thursday, 9 June 2016 be confirmed as true and correct records. 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - St Heliers Business Association - Wendy Caspersonn

Purpose

Wendy Caspersonn, St Heliers Business Association Manager will be in attendance to provide an overview to the Board on the St Heliers Business Association activities for the 2015/2016 year and an update of current progress to date.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      thank Wendy Caspersonn, St Heliers Business Association Manager for her attendance and presentation updating the Board on the St Heliers Business Association activities.

 

 

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 3.11.1 a Notice of Motion has been received from Member Churton for consideration under item 12.

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Churton - Review of Workshop Times and Protocols

 

File No.: CP2016/13699

 

  

 

Executive summary

1.       Member Churton has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice signed by Member Churton is appended as Attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      trial starting any remaining Ōrākei Local Board workshops to the end of term at 3.30pm.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Signed Notice - Member Churton

9

      

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/2017

 

File No.: CP2016/11466

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report presents the Arts, Community and Events (ACE) 2016/2017 Ōrākei Local Board work programme for approval.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information to support local boards to make decisions required to approve the ACE 2016/2017 work programme.

3.       The proposed ACE work programme aims to provide a defined work programme for the 2016/2017 financial year. The work programme covers the following areas:

·        Community Empowerment

·        Arts and Culture

·        Events

·        Community Places.

4.       The ACE work programme for the Ōrākei Local Board aligns with the following 2014-2017 Ōrākei Local Board Plan priorities:

·        distinctive, people-centred town centres and a thriving local economy

·        quality parks, reserves and places to be active

·        well-built community centres, enhanced libraries and well-designed neighbourhoods shaped by the community.

5.       Local boards are being requested to approve the ACE work programme for FY 2016/2017. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the 2016/2017 Arts, Community and Events work programme (Attachment A).

 

 

Comments

 

ACE Work Programme 2016/2017

6.       The ACE work programme for 2016/2017 has been developed using a co-ordinated departmental approach. The programme reflects the community empowerment approach through a number of cross-unit and cross-departmental activities. Over time, the principles of community empowerment will drive the ACE work programme. Future work programmes will demonstrate a more joined-up departmental approach. Each ACE unit has aligned their projects and initiatives to the Auckland Plan directives and the Ōrākei Local Board plan 2014-2017.

7.       The ACE work programme aligns to the following 2014-2017 Ōrākei Local Board Plan priorities:

·        distinctive, people-centred town centres and a thriving local economy; through supporting events of community importance

·        quality parks, reserves and places to be active in; by giving people the opportunity to attend events in local spaces

·        well-built community centres, enhanced libraries and well-designed neighbourhoods shaped by the community; through projects that align to a sense of belonging and connectedness.

8.       The ACE work programme 2016/2017 for the Ōrākei Local Board includes the following areas of activity:

·        Community Empowerment: These projects and programmes aim to deliver a range of social outcomes for local residents. This includes an age friendly assessment of the local board area, community grant funding and youth focussed initatives

·        Arts and Culture: This includes supporting the educational activities for the Manu Aute Kite Festival which is a key Matariki event

·        Events: This work programme includes a range of community events such as Anzac services, citizenship ceremonies and providing funding for community events

·        Community Places: This includes the provision of community facilities and administering a venue hire subsidy for particular groups.

9.       The work programme includes scoped initiatives that align with local board priorities, as well as budget allocation and established timelines.

10.     The local board considered the draft work programme at a workshop with ACE staff on 19 May 2016. Staff incorporated the local board’s feedback into the work programme.

 

The Empowered Communities Approach

11.     The Community Empowerment Unit is operationalising the Empowered Communities Approach, a new way of working. Community empowerment means communities having a sense of control over what happens at a local level and council fostering the conditions that support this. For 2016/2017 the unit is focused on delivery within four key areas:

·        initiatives that are joined up and delivered with other departments of council and the CCOs and that support local board plans

·        capacity building programmes and projects for the community and voluntary sector and residents

·        initiatives designed to enhance participation and engagement in council decision making

·        collaborative Auckland-wide initiatives that respond to complex issues where the advantage of council’s size will have a significant impact on outcomes.

12.     The placemaking project, the Eastern Bays Network, is an example of the Empowered Communities Approach. The Eastern Bays Network will be reviewed with the aim of identifying a suitable community organisation to manage the network in the future. Once a suitable organisation has been found, the Community Empowerment Unit will manage the transition from council led to community led. This demonstrates enhanced partnering and collaborative ways of working between council and community.

13.     Local Boards are requested to approve the ACE work programme for 2016/2017. ACE staff will continue to work with relevant portfolio holders and the local board to ensure these projects are delivered and evaluated.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     The draft 2016/2017 work programme was considered by the local board at a workshop on 19 May 2016. Feedback from the local board was considered and incorporated into the local board work programme (Attachment A).

Māori impact statement

15.     Improving Māori outcomes is a priority for the region. One of the Auckland Plan targets is to increase targeted support to Māori community development projects. A key objective of ACE is to deepen and integrate relationships with mana whenua, mataawaka and Marae, in our everyday work.

16.     ACE is commited to supporting strong Māori communities through engagement, capacity building and contributing to Māori wellbeing. This can be seen through activities such as the Manu Aute Kite Festival, part of Matariki which gives the community the opportunity to engage in Māori cultural activities and traditions.

Implementation

17.     Once the work programme is approved, ACE staff will monitor and evaluate progress throughout 2016/2017. Staff will continue to meet with portfolio holders to provide updates on the work programme and ensure it is progressed in a timely way. The ACE work programme will be implemented within the annual plan 2016/2017 budget and updates on progress will be available at the end of each quarter.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Local Board Arts, Community and Events Work Programme 2016/2017

15

     

Signatories

Author

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Parks, sport and recreation draft annual work programme financial year 2016-2017

 

File No.: CP2016/09964

 

  

 

Purpose

1.      The purpose of this report is to present the draft 2016/2017 Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Annual work programme (AWP) for the consideration and approval of the Ōrākei Local Board.

Executive summary

2.      This report presents the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme for the 2016/2017 financial year (FY17). 

3.      The work programme includes the Local Board capital expenditure and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme of works but excludes any works associated with external agency projects.

4.      Should unforeseen works arise or work priorities change from those attached and approved, the Parks, Sport and Recreation staff will discuss this with the appropriate local board portfolio holder/s.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approves the Ōrākei Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 financial year as detailed in Attachment A to this report;

b)      delegates the approval for any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2016/2017 to the appropriate Parks, Sport and Recreation advisor and local board portfolio holder/s.  

 

Comments

5.      Staff discussed the scope of the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 at a workshop with the local board on 21 April 2016.

6.      This report presents Parks, Sport and Recreations draft AWP for the 2016/2017 financial year, but reflects a three year view of the outlying years.  This is with the exception of Growth funding, which is approved on a year by year basis only.

7.      There are separate AWPs for Sport and Recreation: Leisure; Local and Sports Parks.   

8.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 has been developed with a strategic focus, in that many projects will be delivered over two or more financial years. 

9.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 presented as Attachment A, needs to include some flexibility to account for any unforeseen factors beyond Parks, Sport and Recreations control that may arise. 

10.     Staff may need to adjust priorities as unforeseen complexities in delivering planned projects arise.  Any changes to the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/17 will be consulted with the local board Portfolio holder for the project, who will make a decision on the proposed changes or decide whether it needs a decision by the local board.  

11.    PSR renewals and leisure development projects will be reported separately and led by Community Facilities. 

12.    Projects may be funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: Asset Based Services (ABS) CAPEX or OPEX; Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) CAPEX or OPEX; Growth funding; external funding or sponsorship. 

13.    Growth programme
Asset Based Services CAPEX includes Growth funded projects where the project meets the criteria to be allocated development contribution funding.  Local and Sports Park projects are split into four different work streams for Growth:

·    General park development;

·    Play space development;

·    Sport development;

·    Greenway and walkway development.

14.     The overall Growth programme should reflect that development contributions make up 70% of the total programme budget and other contributions (such as rates, third party contributions etc.) make up the remaining 30%.

15.    The draft AWP shows the allocated FY17 Growth funding for information only.  Any funding in subsequent years is indicative as Growth funding is signed off annually.  Projects that are identified to receive Growth funding in FY17, but are being delivered over more than one year, will be considered as priority for Growth funding in the subsequent years. 

16.    For FY17, funding has been allocated to projects based on the analysis of the criteria below.

17.     Projects identified in the FY17 draft AWP which are eligible for FY17 Growth funding have been included in the attachment for the Local Board’s information only and will be confirmed to the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee in September 2016.  

18.    Criteria for Growth funding allocation

All projects funded through the FY17 Growth programme need to be development projects on Council owned reserve or Ministry of Education land.  Projects were ranked based on the following criteria:

·    Whether the project is multi-year and received Growth funding in the 2015/2016 financial year;

·    Alignment with a parks programme – the project should align with one of the four park development programmes (i.e. General, Playspace, Greenway and walkway, Sport);

·    The proportion of the project that is caused by growth - projects are ranked on the percentage of demographic growth in the area that the project will serve. For example, greenfield sites or new housing areas will be ranked higher than an area of low or no growth; 

·    The proportion of the project that will benefit a new community in the next ten years;

·    Whether a project aligns strategically with a governing body, local board or spatial priority;

·    Whether a project leverages additional investment or provides for reduced or no operating cost to Council over time;  

·    Project readiness and deliverability - design work is complete; all consents and funding are in place; works are procured and where applicable a funding agreement is in place and full project cost funding is available. 

19.    Other budget types contributing to the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

The Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) programme is part of this draft AWP. PSR projects resulting from external agency partnerships are not included unless they have an element of local board funding attached to them. 

20.     Leisure, and sport and recreation activity programmes do not show a budget amount but have been included in the work programme for information and future quarterly reporting. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     The local board provided feedback on the proposed Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 at a workshop on 21 April 2016.  Feedback from this workshop has informed the draft programme included as Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

22.     Parks and open spaces, as well as sport and recreation activity contributes significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.  Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua, appropriate consultation will follow.

Implementation

23.     Once approved the delivery of projects identified in the Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017 will take place from 1 July 2016. 

24.     The progress of the Parks, Sport and Recreation Annual work programme 2016/2017 projects will be reported to the local board quarterly. 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Parks, Sport and Recreation draft Annual work programme 2016/2017

23

     

Signatories

Author

Lynda Lucas - Parks Liaison & Development Team Leader

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

2016/2017 Local Economic Development ATEED work programme

 

File No.: CP2016/12871

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the Local Economic Development ATEED work programme for the 2016/2017 financial year.

Executive summary

2.       This report introduces the proposed 2016/2017 Local Economic Development ATEED work programme for the Ōrākei Local Board set out in attachment A.

3.       The proposed work programme comprises, support for the Young Enterprise Scheme, and Ōrākei event leverage.

4.       The total value of the Local Economic Development ATEED work programme is $26,000.

5.       The Board is being asked to approve the 2016/2017 Local Economic Development ATEED work programme.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the Ōrākei Local Economic Development ATEED work programme for the 2016/2017 financial year (Attachment A) as follows:

i)        Young Enterprise Scheme ($1,000)

ii)       World Masters Games, Lions Tour, Ellerslie Flower Show and PGA Golf Event Leverage ($25,000).

 

Background

6.       The 2016/2017 Local Economic Development ATEED work programme has been developed having regard to the Ōrākei Local Board’s priorities for local economic development set out in the Local Board Plan (2014) and the Ōrākei Local Economic Development Action Plan.

7.       The proposed LED programme comprises the following activities.

 

Support for the Young Enterprise Scheme ($1,000)

8.       The Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) provides practical, hands on experience for young people to develop and execute a business idea. The YES is delivered in Auckland on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust by ATEED.

9.       In 2015 the Dragons Den and Regional Awards events were held in five sub-regional locations: North, West, Central, South and East Auckland. However, the success of the programme and the resulting growth has resulted in substantially increased event costs. Each event is now required to cater for approximately 300-400 students, plus teachers, business mentors and supporters. The cost of venue hire and the associated cost of delivering these events amounting to approximately $5,000 per event. In total, this equates to approximately $50,000 (five Dragon’s Den and five Regional Awards) to run the programme on a sub-regional basis.

10.     Due to the rising costs, ATEED has had to centralise these events into one centralised Dragon’s Den event in May 2016 and one Regional event in October 2016.

11.     Initial feedback from schools and the local community has been that they perceive considerable value in the delivery of the events at the local (sub-regional) level - in terms of the connections built between schools, and with the businesses. Therefore, in order to respond to the feedback ATEED is seeking Local Board support to deliver an expanded programme of events being held in five sub-regional locations, and respond to the feedback that has been received.

12.     Auckland employers and tertiary institutions have also been asked and are contributing both financially and ‘in kind’ to support delivery of the YES in the Auckland region.

13.     A contribution is sought from local boards where there are schools participating in the YES. The amount of support requested has been worked out using a formula of $500 per school in the local board area. It ranges from $500 to $3,500 per local board. The Ōrākei Local Board is being requested to contribute $1,000 to the YES.

 

Ōrākei event leverage ($25,000)

14.     The World Masters Games 2017, Lions Rugby Tour, Ellerslie Flower Show, and the PGA golf event at Remuera Golf Club, have the potential to attract visitors to the Ōrākei Local Board area. The World Masters Games alone is expected to bring approximately 25,000 competitors to Auckland to compete in 28 sporting disciplines at over 45 venues across Auckland. This presents a great opportunity for the Local Board to work with business associations and other local businesses to maximise the benefits of the high number of competitors and visitors that will be potentially coming to Auckland and the Ōrākei Local Board area in 2017.

15.     It is proposed that the local board allocates $25,000 towards partnering with Business Associations to leverage off of these four events to increase the economic benefits of the events to the local board area.

16.     Activities that could be undertaken include, the development of promotional offers to encourage visitors to stay and eat in the local board area and visit local attractions. Activation/entertainment and short term visual improvements/artworks in local centres focused around the events could be implemented to make the centres more attractive and give visitors a reason to visit, stay longer and spend in the local area.

 

Unallocated funds ($9,000)

17.     The Local Board should note that there is an additional $9,000 allocated to local economic development. The use of this additional budget will be discussed and finalised in the first quarter with the portfolio holder and reported back to the Local Board for agreement.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     Section 5 of the Ōrākei Local Economic Development Action Plan relates to Business Support and capability building. Action 5.6 seeks to promote the young Enterprise Scheme and encourage participation by schools in the Local Board Area. 

19.     Section 6 relates to Area, branding marketing and events. Action 6.2 seeks to identify cluster branding to promote and capitalise on residents and visitor retail experiences.

20.     The proposed LED programme was presented to the Local Board at the 19 May 2016 workshop, and has been amended to reflect the comments received.

Māori impact statement

21.     There are no direct impacts as a result of this report on Māori. However, in implementing the programme consideration will be given to the need to consult with Iwi and consider any impacts on Māori arising from the specific project being undertaken.

Implementation

22.     Following approval by the local board the Local Economic Development team at ATEED will begin to implement the programme as approved by the local board. Where there is a need further scoping of activities will be undertaken and presented back to the local Board as required.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Local Economic Development: ATEED Work Programme 2016/2017

33

     

Signatories

Author

John Norman  - Strategic Planner - ATEED

Authorisers

Paul Robinson  - Manager Local Economic Growth - ATEED

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Business Improvement District Programme draft work programme financial year 2016_2017

 

File No.: CP2016/13173

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the draft 2016_2017 Business Improvement District (BID) work programme for the consideration and approval of the Ōrākei Local Board.

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Business Improvement District draft annual work programme for the 2016-2017 financial year (FY17).

3.       The work programme includes the Local Board Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) programme of work relating to business associations in their area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the Business Improvement District (BID) Programme draft annual work programme for the 2016-2017 financial year, which is Attachment A to this report.

 

 

Comments

4.       Officers discussed the scope of the Business Improvement District draft annual work programme for FY17 at a workshop with the local board on 19 May 2016.

5.       The four business associations (Remuera, St Heliers, Mission Bay and Ellerslie) within the local board area undertake work that contributes toward creating distinctive, people-centred town centres and a thriving local economy.

6.       Traditionally, the local board has granted grants of $20,000 pa to each business association.

7.       The local board would like to continue to provide support toward work the business associations undertake that support the local board objectives.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       The local board provided feedback on the proposed Business Improvement District draft annual work programme for FY17 at the workshop on 19 May 2016.

Māori impact statement

9.       A thriving economy contributes significantly to Māori well-being. Town centre events and promotions encourage participation and involvement.

Implementation

10.     Once approved, the business associations will continue with their current process of applying for grants from the local board.  The local board will have to decide whether to provide those grants.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Local Board Programme

37

     

Signatories

Author

Rose Cosgrove - BID Partnership Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Principal Advisor CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants

 

File No.: CP2016/13615

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with criteria for a tree protection grants programme for adoption.

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board has allocated funding from its 2016/2017 LDI budget for the protection of trees as part of its grant budget. The Board recognises that trees, whether identified for protection or not, are significant contributors to the amenity and character of the Ōrākei Local Board area.

3.       This report proposes a Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants programme for approval which is intended to provide owners of all large trees within the Ōrākei Local Board area access to grants to support tree works that support the long term health of large trees and consequently their retention.

4.       The eligibility criteria, scope of the works supported, exclusions and details of grant programme operation are provided in this report.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2016/2017 Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme and attached criteria for implementation.

 

 

Comments

 

Background

5.       Amendments to the Resource Management Act in 2012 and 2013 removed blanket protection of urban trees and required councils to specifically identify notable trees or groups of trees for protection.  District Plans are required to provide certainty to landowners by requiring trees to be protected to be clearly described and identified.  Trees which are not listed are not subject to any removal controls.

6.       Following the Ōrākei Local Board resolution OR/2016/38 supporting Member Churton’s proposal to incentivise the retention and maintenance of non-scheduled trees to minimise the loss of trees from the Ōrākei ward area, options for an incentive scheme have been investigated.

7.       The criteria for the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme have been developed considering legacy council tree protection incentives, current council grant processes and best practice and input from council resource consent arborists.

 

Eligibility criteria

 

 

 

8.       It is recommended that the Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants be offered to homeowners owners within the Ōrākei Local Board area who have either a scheduled notable trees and/ or qualifying non-scheduled trees on their property or both. Providing access to homeowners with either a scheduled notable trees and non-scheduled trees on their property will avoid a perception of inequity from homeowners required to adhere to conditions of scheduling and not having access to incentives.

9.       Incentive options for non-scheduled trees are supported by Council arborists as providing incentives for significant non-scheduled landscape trees will ensure a continual  cycle of trees maturing to potentially meet the requirements for scheduling. Eligibility criteria for the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme are based on criteria for assessing trees for scheduling. 

10.     Eligibility criteria take into account:

·    Age and Health

·    Character or Form

·    Size

·    Visual and neighbourhood amenity contribution 

11.     A detailed description of each eligibility criteria and score has been circulated for the Board’s information and comment and is provided in Attachment A.

12.     For scheduling as notable, a tree is required to score above 20.  With eligibility for the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme including significant non-scheduled landscape trees an assessment score of 15 is recommended.

13.     The proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme supports work on private land, applications must be made by the property owner and no more than one application per annum per tree can be submitted. 

14.     Given grants are allocated to private homeowners there is risk that if properties are subsequently sold non-scheduled trees could be removed.  To minimise this risk it is recommended that Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants be awarded with the condition that recipients would be requested to repay funding should the property be sold within 12 months of grant allocation.

Work supported by tree protection grants

15.     As the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants would be focused on ensuring tree retention and maintenance, it is recommended that eligible work be limited to that which will ensure the long-term health of the tree.  The type of work supported includes

·    Pruning for safety

·    Pruning for form

·    Soil environments improvements i.e. mulching with compost, in ground vertical mulching and soil aeration. 

16.     It is recommended that tree work solely for aesthetic reasons or for the protection of built structures is not supported by the Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants.

17.     Tree work must be completed by a qualified arborist and as part of the application process the tree will be inspected by a council arborist.

18.     Applicants can apply for up to 50 per cent of the cost of work or a maximum of $2,000, whichever is lower, and must supply quotes for work as part of their application.  Grants will be paid via a reimbursement process with recipients required to complete tree work before the grant payment is made.

Delivery of tree protection grant programme

19.     For the 2016/2017 financial year funding rounds for the Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants will be aligned with Ōrākei Local Board Grants programme quick response funding rounds 2 and 3.

20.     Applications will be assessed with subject matter expert input from council arborists and funding recommendations will be presented to the local board within the same timeframe as quick response grant applications.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

21.     This report seeks the view of the Board.  Criteria and operation of the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme can be reviewed annually alongside the local boards community grants programme.

Māori impact statement

22.     All grant programmes should respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations or individuals delivering positive outcomes for Māori.

23.     It is recognised that positive environmental outcomes are interwoven with Māori outcomes. The proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme provides an opportunity for Ōrākei Local Board area residents to undertake tree maintenance and protection work which positively affect the mauri of the local environment.

Implementation

24.     Budget has been allocated for the proposed Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants Programme in the Ōrākei Local Board 2016-2017 community grants programme.

25.     Targeted advertising and promotion of the Ōrākei Local Board tree protection grants will be developed for potential applicants across the Ōrākei Local Board area.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Local Board Tree Protection Grants

43

     

Signatories

Author

Fran Hayton - Environmental Grants and Incentives Manager

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

Jennifer Rose - Operations Support Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Community of St Luke, St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall, Meadowbank Community Centre and Tahapa Hall Funding Agreements and Licences to Occupy and Manage

 

File No.: CP2016/13703

 

  

Purpose

1.       To approve funding agreements and licences to occupy and manage the community operated community centres within the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Executive Summary

2.       Local boards have a role in determining the term of funding agreements for groups who operate local community centres, houses and hubs.

3.       The current funding agreement for St Lukes Presbyterian Church, St Heliers Church Community Centre and Glendowie Hall and Meadowbank Community Centre House Incorporated expire on 30 June 2016 and this report seeks a decision from the local board on future funding, the term of the agreement and approval of the licence.

4.       There are three options for the term of funding agreements and licences to occupy and manage, which are:

·        continuation of an annual agreement

·        a three year term or

·        a five year term.

5.       Staff developed criteria to help assess the appropriate term for community operated centres, houses and hubs. Where a group has demonstrated good stewardship of funding previously, has established a stable practice and is performing well, staff recommend that the local board consider a three or five year term.  This will enable community groups to plan for the future and maximise the benefits of secure tenure and income.

6.       A three year term is recommended for the St Lukes Presbyterian Church, and the Meadowbank Community Centre House Incorporated. A five year term is recommended for the St Heliers Church Community Centre and Glendowie Hall. These groups are stable, experienced organisations. The groups have received regular funding over many years. They provide audited annual reports, deliver expected outcomes, and report on time and to the expected standard.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve a funding agreement with St Lukes Presbyterian Church for the years 2016-2019, terminating on 30 June 2019, for the operation of the Community of St Luke.

approve funding for St Lukes Presbyterian Church of $21,880 per annum to be adjusted in accordance with Council’s agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

b)      approve a funding agreement and licence to occupy and manage with St Heliers Church Community Centre and Glendowie Hall for the years 2016-2021, terminating on 30 June 2021, for the operation of the St Heliers Community Centre and Glendowie Hall.

c)      approve funding for St Heliers Church Community Centre and Glendowie Hall of $66,474 per annum, to be adjusted in accordance with Council’s agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

d)      approve licence to occupy and manage granted to St Heliers Community Church for Glendowie Hall at 83 Crossfield Road, Glendowie, being Lot 214 DP 43378 (as per Attachment A - site plan of Glendowie Hall – this will be circulated under separate cover):

i)        Term – 5 years commencing 1 July 2016;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per term if requested;

e)      approve a funding agreement and licence to occupy and manage with Meadowbank Community Centre House Incorporated for the years 2016-2019, terminating on 30 June 2019, for the operation of the Meadowbank Community Centre and Tahapa Hall.

f)       approve funding for Meadowbank Community Centre House Incorporated of $49,885 per annum to be adjusted in accordance with Council’s agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

g)      approve licence to occupy and manage granted to Meadowbank Community Centre House Incorporated for Meadowbank Community Centre at 29-31 St Johns Road Meadowbank, being Lot 1 DP 166537 and Tahapa Hall at 22 Tahapa Crescent, Meadowbank, being Lot 1 DP 318605 (as per Attachment B - site plan of Meadowbank Community Centre and  Attachment C - site plan of Tahapa Hall – these will be circulated under separate cover):

i)        Term – 3 year commencing 1 July 2016;

ii)       Rent - $1.00 plus GST per term if requested;

 

Comments

 

7.       Community facilities are an important part of realising the vision for Auckland to become the world’s most liveable city. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can connect, socialise, learn and participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities foster improved lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride among residents.

8.       Local boards exercise oversight of community centres, houses and hubs.  Where the facilities are operated by community organisations, local boards approve the funding, licence to occupy and the term of these arrangements.

9.       Staff have developed a simple criterion for guiding decision making regarding the term of these agreements.

(a)        1 year term:

One year term is recommended in a variety of situations such as where a new committee has been recently established or the current governance structure is unstable, a group maybe underperforming or if there are changes in location, buildings or licence terms which need to be worked through by the group in the short term. It could also be where an established organisation is going through significant change in asset portfolio.

(b)        3 year term:

An experienced organisation delivering stable operations, or an established organisation with significant change in the membership/governance.

(c)        5 year term:

A multi-service organisation delivering high service outcomes.

10.     At the end of the approved term staff will assess each centre, house and hub against the established criteria and make recommendations to the local board.

Allocating funding for FY 2016-17 and beyond

11.     Staff recommendations and comments are outlined in the table below:

Recommended funding for community centres

Community Group

Term of grant (from 1 July 2016)

Total to be allocated

Purpose of funding

Comment

St Lukes Presbyterian Church

 

Three year

$21,880 to be adjusted in accordance with Councils agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

To deliver the proposed work programme at the Community of St Luke

 

The St Lukes Community Centre has been in operation since 1978 and has approximately 70,500 visitors through its doors per annum. Activities cater for all ages and stages with one manager working 26 hours per week. The centre is an experienced organisation delivering a stable operation. It has a committee with proven management expertise and delivers reports in a timely manner. This organisation delivers well to local board outcomes and has alignment between its operation and governance.

 

St Heliers Church Community Centre and Glendowie Hall 

Five year

$66,474 to be adjusted in accordance with Councils agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

To deliver the proposed work programme at the St Heliers Community Centre & Glendowie Hall.

 

 

The Saint Heliers Community Centre has approximately 110,000 visitors per annum. They have operated the Glendowie Hall on behalf of council since 2012. The Glendowie Hall has approximately 60,000 visitors through its doors per annum and caters to all ages and stages. There is one manager that supports the activities and operations of the community centre spaces. This is a multi service organisation which consistently delivers high service outcomes through experienced operations. The St Heliers Community Centre provides a large number of quality community programmes and services which align to local board outcomes. In 2007, St Heliers Church and Community Centre received a grant which enabled re-development of the facility. On completion of refurbishment in March 2015, there has been a considerable increase in utilisation of spaces in order to meet a variety of uses and improve the quality of service for the community. This has resulted in an organisation with a strong and sustainable level of governance and financial expertise.

 

Meadowbank Community Centre House Inc

 

Three Year

$49,885 to be adjusted in accordance with Councils agreed inflationary mechanism, once confirmed.

To deliver the proposed work programme at the Meadowbank Community Centre and Tahapa Hall

 

The Meadowbank Community Centre has occupied the council owned site since 1984. The centre has approximately 61,102 visitors through its doors per annum and caters to all ages and stages. There is one manager that supports the activities and operations of the community centre spaces. The centre is an experienced organisation delivering a stable operation. Its committee has proven management expertise, as demonstrated by its delivery of reports in a timely manner and its alignment with local board outcomes. It also has alignment between daily operation and governance.

 

 

Terms and conditions of grants, and ongoing monitoring

12.     Staff will continue to monitor, assess and report progress and performance to Local Board on a regular basis during the term of the grant.

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Māori impact statement

14.     St Lukes Presbyterian Church, St Heliers Church Community Centre and Meadowbank Community Centre endeavour to improve well-being among Māori within the work programmes they deliver. Council staff continue to work with these centres to support and build capability to enhance wellbeing and outcomes for Māori.

Implementation

15.     Following decision making, staff will finalise the agreement with the operating group.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan of Glendowie Hall  (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Site Plan of Meadowbank Community Centre (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Site Plan of Tahapa Hall (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Signatories

Author

Jennifer McKay -  Place Manager, Community Places

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Sport and Recreation Investment - Community Access Scheme guidelines and future allocation of residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund

 

File No.: CP2016/11720

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To obtain local board feedback on the draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines and the future allocation of the residual legacy Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund.

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council inherited 14 operational funding agreements and residual Hillary Commission Community Sport funding that contributed to sport and recreation outcomes. 11 of the funding agreements, and the Hillary Commission funding were deemed out of scope of the Community Grants Policy 2014.

3.       At the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee meeting on 18 November 2015, draft Community Access Scheme guidelines and options for the use of the residual $2.5m Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund were considered. Both were approved for sector and local board consultation.

4.       The purpose of the Community Access Scheme is to leverage access to non-council facilities to support increased levels of sport and recreation participation and reduce inequities of access to opportunities.

5.       This report provides background and overview of the draft Community Access Scheme guidelines (the Guidelines) (Attachment A), and options for the use of the residual Hillary Commission funding. 

6.       This report requests local board feedback on the draft Guidelines and the use of the residual Hillary Commission funding.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Community Access Scheme guidelines for the Governing Body to consider.

b)      support the allocation of the residual $2.5m Hillary Commission Community Sport Fund toward the implementation of the Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme with a priority given to identified need in the legacy Waitakere ($1.1M) and Auckland City ($1.39M) Council areas.

 

Comments

Draft Community Access Scheme

 

7.       Auckland Council supports sport and recreation in a number of ways including through the provision of facilities and open space, delivering programmes and sector investment.

8.       Council’s region-wide investment programme in sport and recreation supports the implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASARSAP) to encourage Aucklanders to be more active more often. The investment programme consists of the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme, Region Wide Strategic Partnership Grants and the Community Access Scheme (Attachment B). Additionally many local boards invest in sport and recreation organisations that provide outcomes aligned to their local board outcomes. The 29 July 2015 Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved a regional sport and recreation work programme that included the development of strategic region wide guidelines for the allocation of sport and recreation grants outside the scope of the Council Grants Policy including community access/operating grants and the residual Hillary Commission fund.

9.       Following an October workshop the draft Guidelines were approved at the 18 November Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee meeting for local board consultation.

10.     An update was provided to the 23 November Local Board Chairs Forum and workshops were held with all local boards that have existing funding relationships.

11.     The proposed Community Access Scheme provides guidance for the existing 11 legacy arrangements and a framework to address identified gaps and future needs.  The draft Community Access Scheme is primarily targeting regional gaps in sport and recreation facility provision and/or improving equity of access through local solutions.  For organisations to be eligible they must identify a solution to meet an identified need in the Sport Facility Investment Plan (currently under development) and/or Community Facility Network Plan. 

12.     The Community Access Scheme will enable council to move investment in response to highest need/demand and invest on a three yearly cycle aligned to the Long-term Plan.  Like the Sports Field Capacity Development programme this is a region-wide scheme allocated locally.

13.     Investment will be made in facilities to:

·    fill a specific sport gap as identified in the Sport Facility Investment Plan

·    optimise and increase the use of existing facilities

·    support the start-up phase of multisport facilities

 

Existing community access funding agreements

14.     The 11 existing community access funding agreements were reviewed against the draft Guidelines to determine eligibility and strategic alignment. Staff will ensure those that are no longer eligible or do not align with the principles of the draft Guidelines, are supported through other mechanisms.

15.     Given the timing of the Guidelines approval and the need to give certainty for the next financial year, on 26 April, the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee approved the existing community access agreements be continued for the 2016/2017 financial year via the General Manager PSR report with the exception of one reallocation.

16.     The following table illustrates current approved investment for the 2016/2017 financial year:

 

Table 1.

 

 

Investment Area

Who

Amount

Asset based term grant – community access

Sovereign Stadium Mairangi Bay

School/community/council partnership

$58k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Avondale College

School/community/council partnership

$17k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Tamaki Recreation Centre

School/community/council partnership

$100k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

ASB Stadium

School/community/council partnership

$80k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

Waiheke Recreation Centre School/community/council partnership

$75k p.a.

Asset based term grant – community access

North Harbour Netball

(reallocation from Hato Petera College)

$28k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust

Operational support

$340k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Papatoetoe Sports Community & Charitable Trust (Kolmar)

Operational support

$100k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Dacre Park

Cost-equity – contribution to field maintenance

$17k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Auckland Netball

Sport-equity – contribution to facility maintenance

$150k p.a.

Asset based term grant – operational support

Manukau Tennis Centre

Sport-equity – contribution to facility maintenance

$41k p.a.

Total

 

$1.006m

 

Community Access Grant update for Ōrākei Local Board:

ASB Stadium

17.     ASB Stadium is located on Selwyn College, Kohimarama and is managed by the East City Community Trust.  The stadium is used by both the school and the community.  It fills a local role in the provision of indoor recreation facilities as it is the only indoor recreation facility in the eastern bays. Its sports leagues also attract many participants from the wider central isthmus.  Auckland City Council contributed funding to its construction.  It has a Licence to Occupy from 1986 for 30 years, with a right of renewal for another 30 years with an expiry in 2046.

18.     Council has had a community access arrangement with the Trust since 2002, with Council providing operational funding of $70,000- $80,000 per annum.  In return for this funding, the Trust provides community access to the 3 court sports hall.  The school has exclusive access to the stadium during school hours.    The community access hours are 4.30pm – 10pm weekdays and all day weekends and school holidays.

19.     Funding for this facility aligns with the draft Community Access Guidelines, as it meets an identified geographic gap.

 

Auckland Netball Centre

20.     The Auckland Netball Centre is located on Ngahue Reserve in St Johns.  Auckland City Council granted $10m to the construction of the facility in return for community access. It fills a sub-regional and local role in the provision of hard court facilities.  The centre comprises 3 indoor and 30 outdoor courts.  Council since 2010 has provided operational funding to Auckland Netball of $150,000 per annum to support community access to the outdoor courts when not booked. 

21.     Funding for this facility aligns with the draft Community Access Guidelines, as it meets an identified facility gap.  There is an on-going partnership with Auckland Tennis for use of the outdoor courts outside of netball season as well as irregular booked and un-booked use of the facilities by many other users.  There is opportunity for future community access arrangements to include the indoor court space as this is in high demand across Auckland.

 

Future use of Hillary Commission Funding

22.     In June 2002, Sport and Recreation New Zealand (SPARC, now Sport NZ) ceased the annual funding through the Community Sport Fund. The fund was administered through territorial local authorities and supported sport and recreation projects and initiatives.

23.     The fund was allocated to councils on a population based approach and was distributed to the community through a combination of contestable grants and loans.

24.     Following the end of the Community Sport Fund, SPARC advised councils that any remaining Community Sport funding held or returned via loan repayments could be allocated in a manner consistent with the desired outcomes of the fund.

25.     Prior to Auckland Council, councils took a varied approach with most using remaining funds for capital projects or allocated in grants to sport and recreation groups.

26.     At amalgamation Waitakere ($1.1 million) and Auckland City Council ($1.39 million) had remaining Community Sport Funds due in the most part to their approach of funding low interest loans to sport clubs which have since been repaid.

27.     Four options for the future use of the residual Hillary Commission fund were discussed at the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee workshops on 17 June 2015 and 14 October 2015 and subsequently approved for local board consultation at the 18 November 2015 meeting. Further analysis of these four options is outlined in Attachment C.

·    Develop a new contestable grants programme either regional or aligned to legacy Waitakere and Auckland City areas. A new contestable grants programme could be established. It could provide a wider criteria for achieving sport and recreation outcomes including facility or capital, and operational and programme related funding. It would need to be considered how this would fit with the regional and local grants programme including the new local discretionary capital fund.

·    Allocate as part of the new Community Grants Policy (CGP) Regional Sport & Recreation Grants Programme. The new regional sport and recreation grants programme that has been established as part of the Community Grants Policy (CGP) has a budget of $508K per annum. This funding could be split across the first three years and added to the current budget, for distribution against the criteria in the CGP.

·    Allocate towards the implementation of Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASARSAP) priority initiatives with potential to target legacy Waitakere and Auckland City areas. The funding could be used to deliver on some of the focus areas of ASARSAP, for example, addressing inequity in sport and recreation support, sustainability of sport work programme, and the Sport Facility Network Plan implementation. Progress and outcomes would be reported via ASARSAP annual reporting.

·    Allocate as part of a proposed Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme to address inequities across sport and recreation either across Auckland or in the legacy Waitakere and Auckland City areas. This would increase the budget available to support community access to non-council facilities in areas of demand and provide operational support to new or existing sport and recreation facilities, including multisport hubs, for example, supporting netball hubs, and incentivising new multisport/co-location. This is a big gap area for sport and recreation funding support and would support and increase the sustainability of sport and recreation facility provision.

28.     Allocating the funds to the Community Access Scheme is identified as the preferred option. It will add to existing funding over say a five year period, and provide support for community access to non-council facilities in areas of high demand, establishment of operational support to new sport and recreation facilities, including multisport hubs and support code specific sports hubs. This is a gap in sport and recreation funding and supports the sustainability of sport and recreation provision.

29.     Including the residual Hillary Commission fund in the Community Access Scheme would provide further funding to leverage access to non-council facilities to support increased levels of sport and recreation participation and reduce inequities of access to opportunities. It is proposed that the Hillary Commission funding be allocated over a five year period and priority be given to identified need in the legacy Waitakere and Auckland City Council areas.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

30.     Local Boards were consulted during the development of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASARSAP) which sets out how the priorities and strategic directions of the Auckland Plan will be put into action. This community access scheme implements these plans.

31.     Local boards with facilities that have existing community access agreements have been engaged in on-going dialogue with staff about potential future change in agreements since amalgamation. Workshops have been held with the directly affected local boards on the draft Guidelines and their impact on the existing funding agreements.

32.     The three West Local boards have expressed a view that the residual Hillary Commission funds from legacy Waitakere City Council should be retained and distributed for the benefit of the West community.

33.     Central Local boards have informally expressed a view that the residual Hillary Commission funds from Auckland City Council should be retained and distributed for the benefit of the legacy Auckland City Council community.

Māori impact statement

34.     The ASARSAP includes actions focusing on improving the health and well-being of Māori. Initiative 3.7 – Partner with regional Māori sports organisations to identify opportunities to increase participation by Māori in recreation and sport activities, including programmes in Te Reo, Māori settings and cultural activities.

35.     ASARSAP key initiative 15.2 sets out the task for Te Waka Angamua and partners to lead the development of Te Whai Oranga – the Māori Sport and Recreation Plan; this will be reported to the Parks Recreation and Sport Committee in due course. Te Whai Oranga and the ASARSAP will guide delivery of specific programmes that will benefit Māori and improve delivery of against outcomes.

36.     The Community Access Scheme will support Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori and support positive outcomes for Māori participation in sport and recreation through investing in eligible organisations that help achieve this objective.  Matauranga Māori / Māori knowledge and world views will be respected. We will ensure that we:

·    Engage effectively with Māori to identify investment opportunities to increase access

·    Provide appropriate capacity building support to those invested in to support increased Māori participation in sport and recreation

Implementation

37.     A report will be provided to the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee in July 2016 seeking approval of the Community Access Scheme guidelines and use of the residual Hillary Commission fund.

38.     The existing eligible community access agreements will be reviewed over 2016/2017 to determine appropriate funding amounts and levels of service for 1 July 2017 onwards.  Relevant local boards will be involved in this process.

39.     Decisions on future community access partnerships will be undertaken through annual plan or long-term plan processes in line with identified gaps in sports network and available budget.

40.     Upon resolution from the July Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee staff will work with relevant local boards on the implementation of the residual Hillary Commission funds.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Sport and Recreation Community Access Scheme guidelines

55

bView

Sport and Recreation Investment diagram

59

cView

Options Analysis for residual Hillary Commission fund

61

     

Signatories

Authors

Ken Maplesden - Team Leader Local Partnerships

Emma Morgan - Principal Advisor Investment Programme

Authorisers

Sharon Rimmer - Manager Sport and Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 





Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Approval of Proposed 2016/2017 Local Environment and Development Work

 

File No.: CP2016/10490

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the proposed 2016/2017 local environment work programme for the Ōrākei Local Board totalling $80,000.

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board has identified an aspiration in their local board plan 2014-2017 to achieve ‘pollution-free, beautiful and ecologically healthy natural areas and waterways that people value, want to get up close to and help protect.’

3.       To give effect to this aspiration the local board has committed $80,000 in total to local environmental projects in their locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for 2016/2017.

 

4.       To deliver on this budget a proposed work programme was prepared and discussed at a workshop with the board on 19 May 2016 (Attachment A). Feedback was also sought from the environment portfolio holders prior to the May workshop.

 

5.       Based on these discussions, staff recommend the board approve a work programme consisting of four projects in 2016/2017:

 

·   $33,000 for Hobson Bay catchment care project

·   $17,000 for Madills Farm stream restoration

·   $10,000 for restoration of a significant ecological area (SEA) in Remuera

·   $20,000 for streamside assistance programme

 

 

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $80,000 for environmental projects to be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate in 2016/2017 as detailed in this report and summarised in the table below:

Project

Budget

Hobson Bay catchment care project

$33,000

Madills Farm stream restoration

$17,000

Restoration of a significant ecological area (SEA) in Remuera

$10,000

Streamside Assistance Programme

$20,000

Total budget

$80,000

 

b)      note that any significant changes to this work programme will be brought back to the board for decision making.

 

Comments

6.       To achieve the Ōrākei Local Board plan outcome of ‘pollution-free waterways, tree-lined suburbs, protected built and natural heritage,’ the board allocated $80,000 of its locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to support the delivery of a local environmental work programme.

7.       Staff met with the board at a workshop on 19 May 2016 to discuss options for allocating this local environmental budget and to develop a work programme for 2016/2017. 

8.       Based on these discussions, it is recommended that four projects be delivered by the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate (I&ES) as part of the board’s environment work programme in 2016/2017 (see attachment A). A brief description of each of these projects is provided below.

Project One:  Hobson Bay catchment care project ($33,000)

9.       The local board developed the Hobson Bay Action Plan in recognition of the importance of Hobson Bay for recreational and environmental purposes. This action plan states that the ‘aquatic and marine values (of the bay) have not been well maintained and the water quality is not at an adequate standard for recreational use.’ The plan also notes that the board will ‘advocate and work in a coordinated manner with other projects and initiatives to manage upstream impacts in the wider stormwater catchment at the source to reduce adverse effects on the Hobson Bay environment.’

10.     It is recommended that the board continue to implement a restoration plan for the Remuera Stream, which runs into Hobson Bay. This stream runs through three reserves of significant ecological value, namely Waiata Reserve, Lingarth Reserve and Martyn Wilson Field. Ongoing implementation of the restoration plan started by the board in 2015/2016 will support stream water quality and biodiversity improvement outcomes in the Hobson Bay catchment.

11.     The deliverables for 2016/2017 are listed in the attached work programme. They include:

·    maintenance of 2015/2016 plantings

·    site preparation

·    planting of 1,075 plants via a community planting day

·    design plans for a wetland

·    weed control

12.     The Remuera stream includes an area that is an ideal inanga spawning habitat and the general ecology of the stream will improve with the planting of sedges and grasses.  Options for fixing barriers to fish passage will also be explored.

13.     The local board plan also describes supporting projects that allow its communities to work alongside council on ecological restoration. A number of landowners adjacent to the stream are already engaged in weeding and re-planting around the stream and this project builds on community engagement.

Project Two:  Madills Farm Stream Restoration ($17,000)

 

14.     The Madills Reserve Masterplan identified an opportunity to enhance the stream on the eastern boundary of the reserve. A five year work programme for restoration of this stream was included in the Madills Farm Reserve Stream Restoration Plan completed by consultants Te Ngahere in June 2015.

15.     The board funded the first year of this programme, which consisted primarily of weed control, in 2014/2015. In 2015/2016 the board funded further weed control, plant maintenance and a community planting day around the stream. A flyer was also developed and delivered to private properties adjacent to the stream to offer an assistance package to support landowners with weed control.


16.     It is recommended that the board include funding of $17,000 in its local environment work programme to implement year three of the restoration plan in 2016/2017.

 

17.     The 2016/2017 work programme will include the following:

·     maintenance of 2016 plantings

·     site preparation

·     planting of native plants via a community planting day

·     weed control

18.     Restoration planting in the riparian and wetland areas of the stream will restore biodiversity, and ecological function including flood control and water quality.

Restoration of Significant Ecological Area (SEA) in Remuera ($10,000)

19.     Restoration of significant ecological areas (SEAs) help Auckland Council fulfil its regulatory and non-regulatory requirements in the Auckland Plan, the Resource Management Act (1991) and Auckland Council’s own Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy.

20.     A community group in Remuera, which includes over 50 landowners, has identified a SEA site as an opportunity to undertake a community restoration project.

21.     The site in Remuera is bounded by Victoria Avenue, Aldred Street, Portland Street and Remuera Roads. A map showing the site is attached (see attachment B).

22.     The aim of this project will be to achieve eradication of three invasive species; moth plant, ginger and tradescantia to restore the site.

23.     Weed control, followed by pest animal control, enhancement planting of native species, and potentially a survey of stream life will be undertaken.

Streamside Assistance ($20,000)

24.     This streamside assistance programme is a means to support private landowners in the board area who want to improve streams on or immediately bordering their property.  Landowners will be given stream restoration advice, a weed bag, weed stump gel and some free native plants.

25.     The programme will provide streamside assistance to approximately 40 properties, initially targeting properties adjacent to the Kohimarama and Remuera Streams to complement the stream restoration projects in the Hobson Bay Catchment Care Project and the Madills Farm Stream Restoration projects. This will include assisting landowners in the SEAs in the catchment above Madills Farm Reserve where a rare native fish (red fin bully) was found in April 2016.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     The projects align with the local board outcome of pollution-free, beautiful and ecologically healthy natural areas and waterways that people value, want to get up close to and help protect,’ as stated in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan.

27.     This draft environmental work programme was discussed with board members at portfolio meetings held on 21 April 2016 and 12 May 2016 and at a full board workshop held on 19 May 2016. Feedback from these meetings has been incorporated into the recommendations in this report.

Māori impact statement

28.     This report provides information for environmental projects. It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management has integral links with the mauri of the environments and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

29.     Some of the identified activities are of interest to Māori and, where appropriate, provisions for mana whenua participation, contribution, and consultation will be incorporated. Table Two below highlights how each project in the board’s work programme is expected to contribute to Māori outcomes or, which requires consultation and engagement.

Project

Māori outcomes assessment

Hobson Bay Catchment Care Project

No specific consultation with Māori on the Hobson Bay catchment care project has been undertaken. However, iwi have been invited to participate in the planting day.

Māori have indicated strong support for projects to improve water quality in previous council consultations.

Madills Farm Stream Restoration

No specific consultation with Māori on the Madills Farm Stream Restoration has been undertaken. However, iwi have been invited to participate in the planting day.

Restoration of Significant Ecological Area (SEA) in Remuera

No consultation with Māori will be carried out as the project is focused on private land. Iwi may potentially be asked to support the implementation of this project. 

Streamside Assistance

No consultation with Māori is required for this project.

Table Two - Māori Outcomes Assessment

Implementation

30.     There are no further implementation issues arising from this report. Regular reporting on project delivery will be through the quarterly performance report as required.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Local Board I&ES Work Programme 2016/2017

67

     

Signatories

Author

Desiree Tukutama - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

PDF Creator



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Housing for Older People Partnering Proposal

 

File No.: CP2016/12083

 

  

Purpose

1.       This report seeks feedback on Auckland Council’s Housing for Older People (HfOP) Partnering Proposal.

Executive summary

2.       The council currently owns 1,412 HfOP units spread across 62 sites in the north, south and west of Auckland covering 26 hectares of land. A list of these sites is included in the HfOP Consultation document (Attachment A).

3.       In June 2015 the Auckland Development Committee (ADC) resolved to explore how council could deliver the HfOP service through a partnership approach. In December 2015 the ADC endorsed Pānuku Development Auckland (Pānuku) to proceed with undertaking feasibility work with a preferred partner on the partnering proposal.

4.       The partnering proposal, in summary, is for the council to:

·           partner with a third-party social housing provider to create a new legal entity in the form of a new community housing provider (CHP).  The CHP will  have control over the portfolio assets, including responsibility for maintenance and tenancy services through a long-term lease, and will seek access to government subsidies

·           delegate to Pānuku the authority to work with the third party community housing provider to redevelop the portfolio under a framework arrangement; and

·           adopt a new policy on “Housing for Older People partnering” to apply to all decision-making on the proposal.

5.       This proposal allows the council to benefit from external expertise to:

·           improve the quality of housing - the CHP will be able to access the Income-Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) from central government to help improve and develop the portfolio

·           improve tenant satisfaction – more tenants are dissatisfied with the service the council is currently able to provide. Partnering with a third party social housing provider will bring in new expertise into the operations so we can find new innovative and cost effective ways to lift satisfaction and redevelop the portfolio to improve the quality of housing.

 

6.       As the HfOP portfolio is a strategic asset under both the LGA 2002 and the council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, the proposal to transfer control of the portfolio triggers a statutory requirement to publicly consult on the proposal, and to amend the Long-term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 through a special consultative procedure, before the council can agree to adopt the proposal.

7.       The Governing Body approved a consultation document at its meeting on 25th May 2016 which will form the basis of this consultation during the month of June 2016.

8.       Local boards are now invited to submit formal feedback on the partnership proposal (Attachment A) and a proposed new policy on HfOP partnering (Attachment B) through business meetings in June and July 2016.

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on:

i.      the Housing for Older People Partnering Proposal and

ii.     the proposed Housing for Older People Partnering Policy

 

Comments

9.       Auckland Council currently owns 1,412 HfOP units spread across 62 sites in the north, south and west of Auckland covering 26 hectares of land. The portfolio is currently operated by Auckland Council’s Arts, Community and Events (ACE) and Community Facilities departments.

10.     In 2013 the government changed how social housing would be delivered in New Zealand by making a number of reforms. This included providing third party social housing providers with an IRRS, which was historically only provided to Housing New Zealand. Councils and council-controlled organisations are still unable to access this subsidy.

11.     In June 2015, the Auckland Development Committee (ADC) resolved to explore changing how the council would deliver the HfOP service. It agreed to explore a partnership approach, where the council would partner with a third party social housing provider in the management of the portfolio and to establish a new community housing provider (CHP).

12.     The council is committed to maintaining 1,412 units within the HfOP portfolio, as a strategic asset, and may seek to increase the number, subject to further council approval on additional funding and any consultation requirements.

13.     In December 2015 the ADC endorsed Pānuku Development Auckland (Pānuku) to proceed with undertaking feasibility work with the preferred partner on a partnering proposal. Pānuku, on behalf of Council, issued a request for proposal and the council currently has a non-binding arrangement with The Selwyn Foundation as the potential third party social housing provider that council may enter into partnership arrangement with.

What Auckland Council is proposing:

14.     The council is proposing that it partner with a third party social housing provider to enter into a management agreement over the council’s 1,412 units and delegate Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) to act on council’s behalf to develop the portfolio.

15.     Management agreement:

a)    Partner with a third party social housing provider to form a new legal entity, in which the council will have a minority interest. This will be a Community Housing Provider (CHP) to manage the council’s Housing for Older People (HfOP) portfolio.

b)    The legal structure of this CHP will likely be in the form of a limited partnership (NZ registered) between Auckland Council and the third-party social housing provider under a framework arrangement.

c)    The CHP will have control over the portfolio assets, which includes responsibility for maintenance and tenancy services. Legal ownership will remain with the council.

d)    It will include a long-term lease which from an accounting perspective requires a write-off of the assets from the council balance sheet.

e)    The CHP will be structured to be able to receive the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS). We are not able to quantify how much will be received under this scheme as the subsidy, which is paid to the housing provider, is based on a percentage of a tenants income. It will reflect the difference between the income related rent and the market rent. It will also only be paid out for future tenants not current tenants.

f)     The council will provide a $32.5 million capital grant to the CHP, which is equivalent to the current budget for the portfolio renewal maintenance.

16.     Development agreement:

a)    Delegate to Pānuku, a council-controlled organisation, the authority to act on behalf of Auckland Council to work with the third-party social housing provider to redevelop the portfolio.

b)    Pānuku, as Auckland Council’s development agency, will provide skills and expertise to support the development of HfOP portfolio.

c)    This includes, over time, selling some land and buildings to help fund the improvement of the quality of the HfOP portfolio.

d)    The council will provide a $20 million development loan facility which will support the development until sales proceeds can be realised. The sales proceeds will cover repayment of the facility and any associated interest.

17.     These will be carried out in accordance with the new policy to be adopted. A representation of this is shown in Attachment A.

Why is Auckland Council proposing this?

18.     The proposal allows the council to benefit from external expertise to improve tenant satisfaction and the quality of its social housing. There are a few areas of this portfolio that need improvement.

19.     To improve the quality of housing:

Currently, the HfOP portfolio has many poor quality units.  This is clearly not acceptable for the council or its tenants. By partnering with a third party social housing provider we will be able to ensure over time that:

a)      the portfolio can benefit from new external funding from the government, through access to the IRRS

b)      the portfolio will be upgraded and new housing developed to reflect modern standards

c)      the portfolio will become more connected to public transport and other necessary services.

20.     To improve tenant satisfaction:

More and more tenants are dissatisfied with the service the council is currently able to provide, as shown in Graph 1. This is unlikely to improve without some change to how we provide the service. Partnering with a third party social housing provider will improve our tenant satisfaction by:

a)      adding new expertise into the operations of the service so we can find new innovative, cost effective ways of lifting satisfaction.

b)      redeveloping the portfolio to improve the quality of housing, giving our tenants a better quality of life.

 

Graph 1:        Long-term Plan 2015-2025, Level of Service Measure:
Tenant satisfaction over time

Title: Graph 1: Long-term Plan 2015-25, Level of Service Measure: Tenant satisfaction over time. - Description: This graph shows how this proposal is projected to improve tenant satisfaction over time, as outlined in the council's Long-term Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How does the proposal compare with other options?

 

 

21.     The council has been developing the HfOP partnership model proposal since April 2015. The options were developed on the basis that the council has opted to continue to provide housing for older people. Three main practical options (including the proposal) are explained in the following table. Other options identified by the council are listed in the Supporting Information but have not been considered as reasonably practical options at this stage.

Option

Service level impact

Rates impact

Debt impact

Achieves the council’s objectives?

Advantages

Disadvantages

Status Quo:

Continue to manage and develop the housing without external support.

Actual tenant satisfaction levels are at 64 per cent which is well under the target average of 75 per cent. This means the council will be increasingly unlikely to meet its targets over time.

No impact – however tenant satisfaction levels are unlikely to be met.

No impact – however tenant satisfaction levels are unlikely to be met.

·   Does not grow the community housing sector.

·   Does not improve quality of housing.

·   Does not access non ratepayer funding.

·   The council retains full control over the assets.

·   No costs associated with change.

·   Does not address the falling tenant satisfaction.

·   Reliant on rates funding.

Sell or gift portfolio to a CHP:

Sell or gift the units and land to an existing CHP with conditions to ensure the provision of social housing remains.

 

Tenant satisfaction will likely decrease, as it will be difficult for the council to control the quality of housing.

Neutral to slightly positive

The sales proceeds would depend on the conditions placed on the sale. Depending on the conditions placed this could significantly reduce the proceeds from the sale.

Slightly positive to negative

The debt impact would depend on whether the council would still provide the capital grant for improvements to the housing, and any other conditions placed on the sale.

Partly. The council is no longer responsible for providing 1,412 housing for older people units. But, this may grow the wider community housing sector.

·   The council no longer has any risk for operating the portfolio.

·   This may grow the wider community housing sector.

·   The council will have no ownership or control over the units.

·   Long term provision of the service is not guaranteed.

·   The council would not own land and buildings as assets.

The proposal (partnering with a third-party housing provider under management and development agreements)

 

 

Tenant satisfaction will increase, as the council will be able to rely on new expertise from the third party social housing provider, unlock access to government funding and can redevelop the portfolio to improve quality.

Negligible to

slightly negative

Negative

(Debt increases by $48.4 million for the management agreement and a further potential $20 million for the development loan facility).

 

Yes. The proposal aims to increase tenant satisfaction to targeted levels.

·   Allows for an improvement of the quality of housing.

·   Unlocks access to government funding.

·   The council will lose some control over the units.

·   Requires monitoring of an external entity.

·   Development could cause disruption for tenants.

 

 

Proposed Housing for Older People Partnering Policy

22.     In order to include this change in the current Long-term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025, a new enabling policy will need to be adopted.

23.     This policy sets key decision making criteria that are designed to ensure that the council will maintain or improve the quality of housing and tenant satisfaction without overly exposing the council to financial impacts and risk, through:

·        general decision making on the council’s HfOP portfolio

·        the management of the HfOP portfolio by the new CHP

·        the arrangements for the possible redevelopment and/or sale of parts of the HfOP portfolio

A copy of the proposed policy is included in Attachment B.

 

Requirement to consult

24.     The HfOP portfolio is considered a strategic asset under both the Local Government Act (LGA) 2002 and the council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Any proposal to transfer control or ownership of a strategic asset(s) triggers a statutory requirement to publicly consult and to provide for it in the long-term plan.

25.     In order to include this in the current Long-term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025, a new enabling policy will need to be adopted.

26.     Public consultation in June and feedback from local boards will inform the Governing Body’s decision on the partnership proposal and the proposed new policy on HfOP partnering.

Public consultation

27.     A consultation document (Attachment A) and supporting information has been approved by the Governing Body and will be used to consult with the public regarding the proposal to transfer control of the HfOP portfolio to a CHP and redevelop the current housing units.

28.     The consultation document lists the advantages and disadvantages of the proposal as well as the two key alternatives in page 8. The assumptions underlying the proposal, including risks and details on the options analysis, are set out in the supporting information in pages 53, 54 and 56.

29.     The consultation document also provides three main options that have been identified for the delivery of the council’s HfOP service, with the preferred option being the partnership proposal.

30.     The public consultation period is 1 June 2016 – 1 July 2016.

31.     The consultation document was delivered to 1,412 units, local board offices, service centres and libraries before 1 June 2016.

32.     The consultation document includes a feedback form which is expected to be the primary mechanism Aucklanders will use to provide their feedback on this consultation.  The feedback form is also made available online, in local board offices, service centres and libraries. Feedback forms can be submitted via freepost, email or completed online.

33.     There are various Have Your Say (HYS) events planned across the region. The locations were picked so that they are easily accessible for HfOP tenants to attend. These events are listed below for your perusal:

Venue

Date

Time

Takapuna Library

7 June 2016 (Tuesday)

9am – 1pm

Devonport Library

8 June 2016 (Wednesday)

9am – 1pm

Northcote Library

9 June 2016 (Thursday)

11am – 3pm

Glenfield Library

10 June 2016 (Friday)

10am – 11am

New Lynn War Memorial Library

14 June 2016 (Tuesday)

9am – 1pm

Titirangi Library

15 June 2016 (Wednesday)

11am – 3pm

Waitakere Central Library

16 June 2016 (Thursday)

9am – 1pm

Te Atatu Peninsula Community Centre

17 June 2016 (Friday)

2pm – 3pm

Mangere Town Centre Library

21 June 2016 (Tuesday)

9am – 1pm

Sir Edmund Hillary Library, Papakura

22 June 2016 (Wednesday)

9am – 1pm

Pukekohe Library

23 June 2016 (Thursday)

9am – 11am

Waiuku Library

23 June 2016 (Thursday)

12pm – 2pm

Otara Senior Citizens’ Club

24 June 2016 (Friday)

10am – 11am

34.     Public feedback will also be collected at HYS events scheduled from 7 to 24 June 2016. The primary purpose of these events is for elected members or delegates to listen to the views of Aucklanders.  Staff will ensure public feedback is accurately recorded.

35.     The role of elected members (and delegates) at these events is to listen and to provide members of the public with an opportunity to provide their views verbally. 

36.     Staff recommend that delegations are made to councillors, local board members and staff to hear feedback. This is to ensure there is a sufficient number of people able to have spoken interaction with public.

37.     Staff will be in contact with tenants to coordinate logistics to ensure that they have the opportunity to attend the HYS events.

38.     The ShapeAuckland website will be the digital hub for the HfOP communications and engagement campaign. There are a variety of ways in which digital and social media channels will be used to support the communications campaign.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

39.     Local board members have received updates through quarterly performance reports, on the region-wide initiative led by Pānuku to investigate options to partner with community housing providers to manage and develop the HfOP portfolio.

40.     A briefing for local board members was held on this initiative on 30 November 2015.

41.     Local board members were updated in May 2016 through a memo outlining the consultation process as well as invitations to attend Have Your Say events to hear public feedback.

42.     Local boards are now invited to submit formal feedback through business meetings in June and July 2016.

43.     The report to be presented to the Governing Body at its meeting on 28 July 2016 will include all feedback received from local boards. Feedback from the local boards will inform the Governing Body decision on this matter.

Māori impact statement

44.     The new CHP will have a role in giving effect to outcomes directed by the council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. This includes recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tāmaki Makaurau and addressing and contributing to the needs and aspirations of Māori. In order to do this, throughout the development of this proposal various Māori groups have been consulted with. To progress this engagement Panuku has established a Mana Whenua Governance Group comprising four senior representatives of Mana Whenua, plus senior representatives of Pānuku and the preferred partner.

Implementation

45.     A report containing consultation feedback and advice on adopting the HfOP Partnering Policy to amend the LTP 2015-2025 and a delegation to Pānuku to carry out the partnering arrangement will be presented to the Governing Body at the meeting on 28 July 2016.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Consultation document

77

bView

Housing for Older People Partnering Policy

105

     

Signatories

Author

Kat Teirney - Team Leader – Community Facilities, South

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 





























Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 




Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - July 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/02836

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on transport matters for the information of the Ōrākei Local Board on transport issues in the Ōrākei Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager.

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Ōrākei Local Board and its community and matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport (AT) activities or the transport sector.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·           Transport Capital Fund Projects

·           Meadowbank Pony Club

·           Ellerslie Residents Association

·           Glen Innes Train Station

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – July 2016’

 

Comments

 

Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

 

 

4.       The Ōrākei Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is $549,949 per annum.

5.       The Board is currently oversubscribed to this fund and projects will need to be reconsidered following the election.

6.       The Board’s active projects are included in Table 1 below (NB: ROC = rough order of costs; FEC = firm estimate of cost):

Table 1:

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

419

Colin Maiden Park Shared Path

 

3/16

·    Feasibility and detailed design are underway.

·    This project is intended to provide a safe off road connection for pedestrians and cyclists through Colin Maiden Park, from College Road to Merton Road.

·    Auckland Transport understands this project has potential implications for land use surrounding the proposed path. This project has been given priority.

6/16 

Presentation of initial findings was made to the board on 26/5/16. This included the need to increase the amount allocated to this project by $10,000, allowing a geo-technical survey of the land to accurately identify preferred path options. This will take the total cost of the project to $40,000.

7/16

Preliminary designs have been provided to the Board for feedback. Once this has been received AT will be in a position to provide the ROC

296

Ōrākei Station Secure Bike Parking

6/16

This project is ready to be tendered, however additional costs have been identified with electrical wiring to ensure security for the bike racks. Auckland Transport requests the Board to consider increasing the project allocation of funding from $30,000 to $37,000.

7/16

This is currently out to tender and is expected to be awarded in July

109

Mission Bay Streetscape Upgrade

3/16 Contract between all parties has been signed and detailed design tender is currently underway.

4/16

Consultation has begun on this project. AT will report the results of this consultation when available.

6/16

Local businesses have provided AT with feedback on the layout of the dining and pedestrian access. This is being considered in the final design which is currently underway.

7/16

No further updates at this time

 

Martyn Wilson Reserve

7/16

This project has been completed. There has been positive feedback received pupils at Baradene. This project will be deleted from this report

382

Liston Park Walkway

04/16

A shared path is to be installed around Liston Park on to Abbotts Way in Ellerslie. This project is on the Board’s draft greenways plan and has budget approval of $240,000.

AT has transferred this funding to Auckland Council Parks, who are managing this project. Changes to this project at this stage may incur significant costs to the Board, as this project is out to tender and is expected to begin construction at the end of April.

06/16 Construction begun on this project.

7/16

This project has been completed and will be removed from this list.

392

Glover Park Pathway

4/16

The Board proposed a shared path around Glover Park. This would provide a link from Riddell Road to the playground at Glover Park. It is considered to be a key path on the Glover Park Masterplan. The width of the path is proposed to be 2.4 metres and the Board has approved $248,000 for the delivery of this project. There has been an increase in the cost of this project to $304,000, however, AT agree this is a key linking project and will contribute the additional funds from the Walking and Cycling budget.

This project is out to tender and a start date will be provided in the next report. 

6/16

There was a slight delay in tendering this contract as resource consent was required which delayed the project by a month. The expected construction start date is July 2016.

7/16

Discussion with the Board is underway to ensure any new trees, proposed to be planted, are compatible with the historic commemorative plantings in this part of Glover Park.

 

Meadowbank Pony Club

7.       Auckland Transport (AT) and New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) have been in discussions with the Board and the pony club. Discussions have focused around possible short term solutions for the pony club’s location when the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Path construction continues across St Johns Road. NZTA expects enabling work would begin in October or November 2016, construction is expected to begin in February 2017.

8.       There is strong commitment from all parties to ensure that health and safety risks are mitigated for the pony club and a solution is expected to be available to present to the board in August. AT is mindful of the beginning of the pony club season in September and is treating this with urgency.

Ellerslie Residents Association

9.       The Ellerslie Residents Association has approached AT through the Board to gain some clarity around a number of concerns for residents. Below is an update on these issues at the time of the report:

·     Sound barriers between the motorway and the rail lines – This a NZTA issue and is on their programme, however there is no funding available to deliver this project. The assessment, completed while the lane widening project was in progress, did not prove sufficient priority for the screens to be completed at the time of the lane widening. NZTA is currently unable to advise when this project will have enough priority to secure funding.

·     Parking Plan for Ellerslie – This plan is with our parking design team and they are working with the business association.

·     Crash Report Marua Road/Abbotts Way/Ladies Mile – There have been no fatal or serious crashes at this intersection. The small number of minor injury or non-injury crashes can be attributed to driving conditions (dark, wet) and/or driver error (speed), and there is nothing significant in this data that would suggest this is an intersection that requires further investigation. It should be noted that the information collected and held in the crash analysis system is only for those accidents reported through the police, as there is no legal requirement to report non-injury crashes this may not be a complete list.

Glen Innes Train Station

10.     Recently there was a fatality on the railway line near the Merton Road entrance to the Glen Innes Train Station. This entrance is in the Ōrākei Local Board area. The incident report is yet to be finalised, concern has been raised regarding the safety of an at-grade crossing on to the platform.

11.     Auckland Transport is investigating alternative options for this entrance and will report back to the Board later in the year with proposals to make this entrance safer.

 

Tamaki Drive Rock Fall

12.     In May 2016 a small amount of rock fell from the cliff on to Tamaki Drive. 

13.     Auckland Transport conducted a full geo-technical investigation and ascertained that the cause was from a broken pipe at the top of the cliff. This pipe was repaired and further geo-technical investigation has cleared it from the likelihood of a repeat of this event. 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

 

 

14.     The Ōrākei Local Board’s views will be considered during consultation on proposed project schemes.

Implementation

15.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Author

Melanie Dale – Elected Member Relationship Manager , Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Draft 2016 Elected Members’ Expenses Policy

 

File No.: CP2016/12084

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the views of the Ōrākei Local Board on the draft 2016 Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expenses Policy.

Executive summary

2.       Each electoral term, the Remuneration Authority requires all councils to adopt an expenses policy and forward the adopted policy to the Remuneration Authority for its approval.

3.       The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.

4.       The governing body last adopted an expenses policy in July 2014. The Remuneration Authority has requested the council’s policy for July 2016 – June 2019. The governing body will be asked to adopt the 2016 policy at their 21July Finance and Performance Committee meeting.

5.       Staff have reviewed the operation of the current policy and have updated the policy to:

·    have clear principles of what is considered appropriate elected member expenditure

·    remove the duplication of Remuneration Authority allowance tables

·    replace complicated travel, development and conference attendance  approvals with a ‘one up’ approach that requires senior elected member or senior staff approval.

6.       The amended policy is attached.  In addition to the substantive changes, the language and presentation of the policy have been updated to make it more accessible.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide comments on the draft 2016 Elected Members’ Expense Policy to the governing body.

 

Comments

7.       The Remuneration Authority (the Authority) sets remuneration for elected positions in local government annually. It also sets the rules for reimbursement of costs met by members in undertaking their duties.

8.       In its determination, the Authority details some work-related expenses for elected members:

·        the maximum allowances payable by councils to elected members for certain activities, such as transport and communications

·        The criteria for and amounts payable to, elected members sitting on resource consent hearings.

9.       Additionally, the Authority determines the nature of reimbursements made to elected members for costs undertaken on council business.

10.     The Authority requires each council to adopt an expenses policy. The current policy was last approved in July 2014.  It is necessary to review and update the policy prior to sending it to the Authority for approval.

11.     The Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expenses Policy (the policy) sets out the council’s rules under which elected members may be reimbursed or paid allowances for personal costs that arise in the course of council business.

12.     In the draft policy, general travel, accommodation and insurance claim rules have been retained. The continued requirement for a business case for international travel and the publication of all elected member expenditure will ensure transparency. Staff will continue to support the elected members with the required paperwork. The proposed changes relate to the authorisation of expenditure and the introduction of the council’s Elected Member Development Programme.

 

Substantive changes

Professional development and attendance at conferences

13.     The new policy includes provisions related to the 2016-2019 Elected Member Development Programme. Professional development included in the core professional development programme will be pre-authorised. This means that elected members will not be required to provide a business case for development or attendance at conferences that are covered by the l development programme.

14.     Pre-authorisation is subject to the principles of the policy. The funds must be budgeted for and authorised by the appropriate senior manager.

15.     If elected members want to undertake development activities outside the elected members’ core l development programme, a written request must be made to the Manager Democracy Service or the Manager Local Board Services.

 

Domestic travel approval

16.     Changes have been made to approvals. The draft policy reflects a ‘one up’ approach that requires senior elected member or senior staff approval.

17.     Currently elected members are required to seek authorisation from a senior staff member and either the Mayor, the Deputy Mayor, the chair of a committee of the whole or the chair of their local board.

18.     To make authorisations more efficient the draft policy has been amended to allow the Governance Director or the Manager Democracy Services to authorise travel and sundry expense claims for governing body members.

19.     For local board members, the draft policy has been amended with the Governance Director proposed as the approver for local board members and chairpersons.

 

International travel approval

20.     For international travel for the Mayor and the Deputy Mayor, in addition to the Chief Executive, the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee has been added as an approver. This gives additional flexibility for approval if the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee is not available at that time.

21.     For all other elected members the draft policy proposes that the Mayor or Deputy Mayor or the Chair of the Risk and Audit Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee and the Chief Executive or the Governance Director are the approvers.

22.     For sundry expense claims following international travel, the draft policy has been amended to allow the Chief Executive or the Governance Director to authorise the Mayor and the Deputy Mayor claims; the Governance Director or Manager Democracy Services to authorise governing body member claims; and the Governance Director or the Manager Local Board Services to authorise local board member claims.  

23.     The probity check to this approach is threefold:

·    the trip must meet the principles of the policy

·    it must be authorised by a senior elected member or senior staff member (a ‘one up’ authorisation) and

·    all expenditure incurred by elected members on council business continues to be published.

 

24.     The new approvals are in the table below. Changes are underlined.

Table 1. Changes to approvals

Item

Proposed

Previous term

Approvals for domestic travel outside of Auckland – Mayor

No change

·    The Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee

·    or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee

Approvals for domestic travel outside of Auckland – Deputy Mayor

·    The Mayor or

·    The Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance

 

·    The Mayor

·    or the Chair of a Committee of the Whole

Approvals for domestic travel outside of Auckland – councillors

The Governance Director or the Manager Democracy Services

·    The Deputy Mayor

·    or the Chair of a Committee of the Whole

Approvals for domestic travel outside of Auckland – local board Chair

The Governance Director or the Manager Local Board Services

·    Governance Director

·    and report to business  meeting

Approvals for domestic travel outside of Auckland – local board members

The Governance Director or the Manager Local Board Services

·    The Local Board Chair

·    and report to business  meeting

Approvals for international travel - Mayor

·    A business case and both:

·    The Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee

·    And the Chief Executive

A business case and both:

·    the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee

·    and the Chief Executive

Approvals for international travel– Deputy Mayor

·    A business case and both:

·    The Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee

·   And the Chief Executive

A business case and

 

Both:

·    the Mayor or the Chair of a Committee of the Whole

·    and the Chief Executive

Approvals for international travel – Governing Body members

·    A business case and both:

·    The Mayor or the Deputy Mayor or the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee

·   And the Chief Executive or Governance Director

A business case and

 

Both:

·    the Mayor or the Deputy Mayor

·    and the Chief Executive or the Director Governance

Approvals for international travel – local board members

·    A business case and both:

·    The Mayor or the Deputy Mayor or the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee or the Chair of the Finance and Performance Committee

·   And the Chief Executive or Governance Director

A business case and

 

Both:

·    Endorsement by the Local Board

·    then approval by the Chief Executive or the Director Governance

 

If urgent approval is needed:

·    Endorsement by the Chair

·    then approval by the Chief Executive or the Director Governance

·    then retrospective endorsement by the Local Board

Development programmes and conferences

Pre-approved, subject to the cost falling within the annual professional development budget

Various authorisation depending on the role of the requester

Hosting official visitors

If necessary, budget holder approval

Personal expenditure can be reimbursed

 

25.     Other changes have been made throughout the policy to update, clarify or align the policy with current good practice. In addition the language and presentation of the policy have been updated to make it more accessible.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     This report is seeking local board views.

Māori impact statement

27.     This policy is a requirement of the Remuneration Authority. It is for internal use and does not have specific implications for Māori.

Implementation

28.     The Elected Members’ Expenses Policy will come into force once approved by the Remuneration Authority. This is expected to be in July 2016.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2016

119

     

Signatories

Author

Jo Iles, Business Hub Manager, Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - Manager Democracy Services

Lou Lennane - Acting Manager Local Board Services

Rex Hewitt – Relationship Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 















Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Health, Safety and Well-being May 2016 Update

 

File No.: CP2016/11489

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Attaching for the board’s information the Health, Safety and Well-being May 2016 Update report considered at the 24 May 2016 Audit and Risk Committee meeting.

Executive summary

2.       The Audit and Risk Committee resolved as follows:

That the Audit and Risk Committee:

a)           receive the update report on Health, Safety and Wellbeing.

b)           refer this report to the Finance and Performance Committee for its consideration.

c)           note that this report will also be provided to all Local Boards for their information.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the report forwarded by the Audit and Risk Committee entitled “Health, Safety and Well-being May 2016 Update”.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Health, Safety and Well-being May 2016 Update report considered at the 24 May 2016 Audit and Risk Committee meeting

135

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Health, Safety and Wellbeing May 2016 Update

 

File No.: CP2016/08975

 

  

 


Purpose

1.       To provide a summary of health, safety and wellbeing performance as at 30 April 2016, information to support the committee’s due diligence responsibilities and an update  on priority actions since the March 2016 Audit and Risk Committee meeting.

Executive Summary

2.       Auckland Council is committed to being a high performance council, where our elected and appointed members, employees, contractors, volunteers and the people who use our council facilities and services are safe and all major risks are reduced and managed effectively.

3.       Auckland Council’s current health and safety policy statement outlines the vision Health and Safety starts with me – Ka timata te hauora me te aria hauata ki a au. This vision reinforces a key principle of the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015: that we all have a responsibility to ensure workers (including volunteers and contractors) and other persons are given the highest level of protection against harm to their health, safety and welfare.

4.       This report provides a summary of council’s current health and safety performance and an update on the key milestones and deliverables for implementing a strong health, safety and wellbeing culture to ensure council effectively meets its responsibilities as a PCBU (person or organisation conducting a business or undertaking). A key performance issue highlighted in this report is an increase to the Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) since February 2016.

5.       The indicative LTIFR rate for April is 3.86 versus the organisational target of <2.25. LTIFR measures injuries which have resulted in a person needing time away from work. An increase to the LTIFR over the last three months is not ideal, however the current LTIFR provides a more accurate reflection of employee injuries. This is because following an audit of reported incidents against ACC data we now have the full view of lost time injuries versus only those reported as a lost time injury in VAULT.

6.       Further detail is provided in the body of this report to explain the LTIFR audit and the ongoing focus on reporting to ensure those who are injured are known, attended to quickly, and provided the support they need to establish a return to work programme as soon as practical. Critically, the risks or hazards associated with any lost time injury can also then be addressed in a timely way to mitigate any future incident.

7.       Improved reporting remains a key priority for council. To support this, a revised incident management and notifiable event management system will be introduced in May to provide guidance across the organisation. The system will improve council’s response to, and reporting of, incidents and notifiable events and build consistent practice across all business units. Increased near-miss reporting is also a key focus to reduce the likelihood of incidents and injuries occurring.

8.       In addition to current performance metrics, this report also provides an overview of action to deliver against agreed health, safety and wellbeing objectives. Now that the transition to the new legislation is well underway the other main priority is preparation for the ACC Worksafe Safety Management Practices audit, which will take place in October this year. The pre-audit assessment programme began in the second week of May. The outcomes of this programme will inform work needed to meet this year’s audit objectives and provide guidance and recommendations to establish an ongoing health and safety audit and continuous improvement framework.

 

 


 

Recommendation/s

That the Audit and Risk Committee:

a)      receive the update report on Health, Safety and Wellbeing.

b)      refer this report to the Finance and Performance Committee for its consideration.

c)      note that this report will also be provided to all Local Boards for their information.

 

 


Comments

9.       As outlined in the Health, Safety and Wellbeing report to this committee in March 2016, the overall objectives for 2016 are to:

·     have the basics right across the organisation (with business-focused solutions) in line with legislative and audit requirements

·     share good practice and lessons learned

·     effectively educate, upskill and engage our staff and elected members to build a positive and proactive health, safety and wellbeing culture.

10.     Since the March report the strategic goals and key deliverables for health, safety and wellbeing in 2016 have been revised slightly, as a result of further work on the organisational strategy and a health and safety strategic planning day with the Executive Leadership team. 

11.     The key changes are as follows:

a)    The strategic goals for reporting are now split into incident management (reactive reporting) and proactive actions, i.e:

i.  reactive: incident management is executed correctly, with quick responses and reporting and effective corrective actions (and where there is an injury support is provided asap and if it is a notifiable event[1] it is reported to WorkSafe and investigated).

ii. proactive: lead indicators are separately identified and prioritised such as near-miss reporting, site visits and safety conversations to mitigate the likelihood of incidents/injury occurring in the first place.

b)    The wellbeing goals have also been revised and there are now two areas of focus. Overall health and wellbeing will continue to be a priority with increased emphasis on stress, fatigue and mental health and wellbeing. Leadership action on workload, business priorities and flexible work practices is now an additional and stand alone area of focus.

c)    Under projects and deliverables, there is an additional action focused on staff and visitor safety, which involves reviewing protocols for customer-facing roles, facilities- based staff and lone workers to address personal safety risks and the sharing of information when threats occur. Some initial work has begun on this already, including reviewing the lessons learned from the shooting at the Ashburton offices of the Ministry of Social Development and reviewing protocols and training already in place in various areas of council and CCOs.

Performance report

12.     Key performance metrics as at 30 April 2016 are attached in attachment 1. In summary:

a)      Council’s Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate (LTIFR) has increased over the last three months since February 2016. As at 30 April 2016 the LTIFR was 3.86 (indicative) against a target of <2.25. This is a result of increased and more accurate number of injuries resulting in a person not being able to work for a period of time.

b)      A total of 20 health and safety monitoring and inspections were reported into VAULT (these were contractor inspections done by Infrastructure and Environmental Services). A total of 60 corrective actions (arising from investigations) were issued in VAULT.

c)      Near-miss reporting has decreased in April, reversing the previous upward trend over the past three months. The Health, Safety and Wellbeing team, in partnership with the executive and senior leadership teams, will maintain their attention on reporting and continue to promote a proactive reporting culture. The amount of near-miss reporting is low in an organisation the scale of council.

d)      Auckland Council’s Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) bi-monthly dashboard is displaying generally healthy indicators when considering the various change programmes and restructures occurring. The top three work issues staff are accessing the service for are career, relationship with manager and relationship with co-worker.  Council is currently above the national average for these three issues, which reinforces the organisation’s focus on addressing workplace stress and fatigue.

e)      Manager suggested use of EAP has increased to just below the national average (15.6% vs 16.7%). In 2015 manager referrals to EAP were low and this change is a positive indicator of managers encouraging staff to access support if they need it. Self-referral to EAP continues to be the highest engagement indicator; currently council is slightly higher than the national average at 82% versus 80%. Further information on the wellbeing portfolio is included in the attached performance report (Appendix 1) and included in the key initiatives update on page 8 of this report.

Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate

13.     The increase in Council’s overall LTIFR provides a more accurate reflection of incidents. An audit of reported lost time injuries in council’s reporting management system (VAULT) versus ACC data has occurred during February, March and April. The audit has identified additional lost time injuries during March and April. In March there were five additional lost time injuries identified and in April there were four additional lost time injuries identified (over and above those reported in VAULT). These incidents had been reported, however they had not been reported as injuries which resulted in the person needing time off work and therefore potentially needing rehabilitation support and/or a return to work or alternative duties plan.

14.     The table below shows the current rolling 12-month lost time injury frequency rate trend and the data beneath the table summarises LTIFR, first aid and medical injuries.

 

 

Current LTIFR target <2.25

 

April 2016 Indicative LTIFR 3.86

 

The HSW audit of reported medical incidents has uncovered 4 extra LTIs for April and 5 for March. This has increased the LTIFR. The audit will continue and once the final worked hours are known for April this may alter the actual LTIFR for the month.

 

April 2016

·      First aid reported injuries vs 12 month average 74/56.7

 

·      Medical reported injuries vs 12 month average 20/22.3

 

March 2016 LTIFR  indicative vs actual 3.53/3.78

 

February 2016 LTIFR indicative vs actual 2.98/3.94

 

 

15.     An increased LTIFR is not ideal, however the audit has provided improved data accuracy on the number of injuries occurring that result in staff needing time off work and therefore increases council’s ability to support staff who have been injured and work with them and their managers to establish an effective return to work programme.

16.     The audit has also reinforced the critical importance of improving health and safety reporting at council and the accuracy of reporting across the organisation.

17.     In response to this, Council, together with ATEED and Panuku, are reviewing reporting management systems and service specifications to determine which supplier can best meet council requirements. Currently council uses the VAULT system. An improved reporting tool will assist people to report more easily and if Council and a number of CCOs have the same system it will become easier for staff and contractors to report into a similar system.

18.     Highlighting and encouraging the importance of near-miss reporting is also an area being addressed by the Health, Safety and Wellbeing team and departmental managers. Thorough near-miss reporting allows council to minimise likely incidents. Key information and messages on near-miss reporting were provided across the region during the recent Chief Operating Officer roadshows.

Rehabilitation

19.     The rehabilitation and wellbeing team have been meeting with business units across council to focus on return to work programmes and to help managers get an injured person back to work, on alternate duties if necessary to assist with their recovery.

Information on the six aspects of the due diligence duty

20.     Officers of Council (i.e. those in a governance role including elected members, the Chief Executive and potentially other members of the executive leadership team) must exercise a duty of due diligence. There are six aspects to that duty, listed and discussed below. All officers have equal and personal responsibility.

21.     To assist elected members in their role as officers the Head of Health, Safety and Wellbeing, the Director of Legal and Risk and the governance division lead team are working together to establish systems that will enable councillors and local board members to have access to relevant information to fulfill their due diligence responsibilities. This includes developing new quality advice guidance to assist staff preparing advice on projects where a health and safety assessment is necessary for decision-making, quarterly performance reporting to the Audit and Risk Committee, Finance and Performance Committee and local boards and information to be included in the elected member induction programme after the 2016 local government election. 

22.     Staff are also working with the Independent Māori Statutory Board and council’s co-governance entities such as the Maunga Authority, the Parakai Recreation Reserve Board and the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board to ensure they have information and support to assist them with complying with their PCBU duties (as a Board) and their officer duties (as individual members). 

 

Up to date (1): Acquire and keep up to date with H&S knowledge and H&S matters

 

23.     To comply with the officer’s due diligence duty, it is critical that council’s elected members, chief executive and executive leadership team understand the key elements of the new legislation and regulations.

24.     Prior to the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 coming into force on 4 April 2016 there were three briefings provided for elected members to outline the key elements of the legislation, particularly the role of ‘officers’.

25.     The executive leadership team have also been provided with a variety of information, including an initial briefing in the last quarter of 2015, consideration and inclusion of a health and safety business case in the development of the organisational strategy, and a strategic planning day at the end of March.

26.     To ensure elected members and senior management are well informed and up to date on health and safety matters further workshops are being planned for May and June. Governing Body and local board workshops will build on the information sessions to date and focus on putting the legislation into practice, including meeting personal obligations as an officer, what is required for day to day decision making and implications for community groups and volunteers.

27.     Future reporting to elected members and senior management will include information to help officers keep up to date with their health and safety knowledge. Officers may also undertake their own personal actions to keep their health and safety knowledge up to date.

 

Understand (2): Understand Council’s operations and the associated hazards and risks

28.     Council officers will already have a working visibility of Council business. To ensure that officers have a sufficient visibility of the breadth and variety of Council operations to comply with their due diligence duties, highlighting key activity on council’s operations related to health and safety will be part of regular reporting.

29.     It will take time for Council to transition from the previous hazard assessment approach to the more proactive risk-based approach provided for in the new Act. Work is underway across the organisation on reviewing hazard registers, developing business unit/activity risk assessments and then delivering safety risk control plans. Some parts of the organisation have begun risk assessments e.g. City Parks Services and Events.  As this work develops, more detailed information will be reported.

30.     In the interim an overview of reported hazards and risks is provided in the attached performance report (appendix 1).

31.     The Chief Executive and the wider executive leadership team have undertaken some recent site visits both with office-based staff and at council facilities across the region. A health and safety site visit plan for both the Chief Executive (and ELT members) and elected members will be developed over the coming months to provide ongoing opportunities for Council’s officers to experience and better understand Council operations and the health and safety risks in the various parts of the business.

 

Resources and processes (3): Ensure Council has appropriate resourcing and processes to eliminate or minimise risks to health and safety

32.     As part of the organisational strategy a business case for health and safety was developed. It highlighted the need for Council to transition from the previous hazard assessment approach to the more proactive risk-based approach. The business case also considered the level of resourcing for health and safety within the organisation.

33.     As noted above, specific work is underway across the organisation to eliminate or minimise risks to health and safety through risk assessments. A key focus is to build capability within the organisation and prioritise those business areas that need particular training and support.

34.     In addition, health and safety is an integral part of FY16/17 business planning. Guidance on health and safety objectives has been provided as part of the business planning packs for departments. The operations division, for example, has an objective for all departments in the division to undertake risk assessments and develop a plan of action in response during the 2016-2017 financial year.

 

Reporting and investigation (4): Ensure Council has appropriate processes for receiving and considering information regarding incidents, hazards and risks and for responding in a timely way to that information

35.     Health, safety and wellbeing performance reporting has been improved to assist officers and senior management receive and consider information on incidents, hazards and risks. The current approach has been developed with and approved by the executive leadership team. This includes the structure of the report, and the content including lead and lag indicators.

36.     The April 2016 organisation-wide performance report is attached as Appendix 1.  From now on department/business unit reports will also be delivered to senior managers to assist their understanding of key metrics for their departments and business areas. This will improve the ability of the organisation to address the specific risks or opportunities in each area i.e. the health, safety and wellbeing priorities in Parks, Sport and Recreation will differ from those in Democracy Services, Libraries and Animal Management. 

37.     The Health, Safety and Wellbeing and Legal Services teams have reviewed and revised the incident management and notifiable event management plans to ensure Council has processes in place to respond to incidents, hazards and risks. The plans provide clear, step by step guidance on what staff need to do in various situations, including an emergency situation. The plans also specifically include guidance on advising elected members of incidents in their ward/local board area.

38.     An executive/senior leadership Health and Safety Committee has now been established. Part of its role will be to review Council-wide critical risks and issues, including investigations of incidents that involve notifiable events and WorkSafe or Police investigations.

39.     A fit for purpose safety management system and timely reporting will also be crucial to enable Council to receive and consider information on incidents, hazards and risks. As discussed above, a review of the current system (VAULT) and other suppliers is underway.

 

Monitor (5): Ensure Council has, and implements, processes for complying with any duty or obligation

40.     A crucial aspect of ensuring that council has systems in place for complying with its obligations is the setting of high level policy and strategic direction. The Chief Executive and executive leadership team attended a strategic planning day at the end of March. This included a review of council’s strategic direction for health and safety and confirmation of the current policy position of Health and Safety starts with me – Ka timata te hauora me te aria hauata ki a au.

41.     Part of the strategic planning day was also discussion of complying with council’s obligations as a PCBU.[2]

42.     Council’s health and safety policy statement, manual and all documents and procedures connected to these are under review against the new legislation and regulations.

43.     Staff awareness of health and safety obligations will contribute to compliance. Health and Safety at Work Act overview seminars have been offered to all staff at seven locations across Council. A total of 384 staff attended the sessions with another 80+ looking to undertake the next round of training offered. Business units with specific risks, e.g. working with asbestos, are ensuring staff will have relevant training aligned to the new regulations and the Chief Engineer and her team have been delivering safety in design training.

44.     Council’s Do it Right legislative compliance programme is currently working with some pilot business units to develop legislative compliance business unit plans. Work is underway to incorporate health and safety objectives into these plans.

45.     To build the internal capability to support business units with complying with health and safety obligations, members of the Health, Safety and Wellbeing team have recently undertaken Incident Causation Analysis Methodology (ICAM) investigation training and lead auditor training.

46.     Effective and supported health and safety representatives also contribute to council complying with its health and safety obligations. A health and safety representative training plan is being developed, which will include roadshows and a representative handbook. Other work includes a review of health and safety committee structure and a toolkit for managers. 

Verify (6): Take reasonable steps to verify the provision and use of resources and processes through reviews and audits

47.     At regular intervals the Audit & Risk Committee will consider Council’s compliance with its PCBU obligations and Council officers’ compliance with their due diligence duty. That feedback is made by way of recommendation to the Finance and Performance Committee. All officers of Council need to continue to ensure that they keep thorough records of their compliance with their individual due diligence duty.

48.     Council will be audited via an ACC Worksafe Safety Management Practices (WSMP) audit in October 2016. This audit will assess council’s compliance against ACC accreditation criteria. Tertiary is the highest level of accreditation. Council currently has secondary level accreditation.

49.     Pre-audit assessments will begin across the organisation in May and will be undertaken by an external auditor. The priority for pre-audit are business areas identified in the last audit as needing to improve or areas of high risk activity, such as City Parks Services, Parks, Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities, Licensing and Compliance and Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

50.     The pre-audit assessment will provide council with a clear view of current state and direction on where action is needed to meet tertiary accreditation standards. Both the Head of Health, Safety and Wellbeing and the Head of Internal Audit will oversee the ACC WSMP audit programme.

Health, Safety and Wellbeing work programme: delivery to date and priority actions May – June 2016

51.     Key initiatives delivered since the last presentation to the March 2016 Audit and Risk Committee include:

a)    Good practice (and compliance). Transition to the new legislation. As noted above Health and Safety at Work Act overview seminars for all staff were conducted at seven locations across Council. A total of 384 staff attended the sessions with further sessions to occur.  Preparation for the ACC pre-audit assessment.

b)    Engagement and due diligence. Continual improvements are being made to the reporting framework for the executive leadership team and elected members. The communications programme is progressing to raise employee engagement and participation, including a review and update on the current health and safety intranet page.

c)    Monitoring and reporting.  A final draft of incident management and notifiable event management and reporting processes (including notification to WorkSafe NZ of notifiable events) is complete and will be distributed in May. Investigations on an improved or alternative reporting management system are coming to an end with recommendations to follow in May.   

d)    Wellbeing. A pilot session for psychological health and wellbeing facilitated by EAP was undertaken with a target group in late April. An alternative session facilitated by the Mental Health Foundation took place the first week of May. Further sessions targeting managers will be trialled in May across selected parts of the Council. The goal is to have a number of programme options that address the varying needs of people and business units. The Wellbeing 360 survey began 27 April.

52.     The focus for the remainder of this financial year and the start of FY 16/17 will be:

a)    pre-audit assessments, starting with City Parks Services and Community Facilities

b)    Ongoing staff and elected member training. This training will build on previous training sessions (including the introduction to the legislation sessions for elected members and staff and the safety in design training for staff in relevant parts of the organisation), and focus in more detail on putting the legislation into practice in day to day Council business and decision-making.

c)    Contractor management: under the new Act Council owes the same duty to employees of contractors and subcontractors as it does its own employees, because they are all workers pursuant to the Act. Where there are overlapping duties between council and its contractors, all parties must also consult, co-operate and co-ordinate together. New contract terms have already been developed to support council complying with its obligations, and guidance for staff on contractor management is being developed. The council-wide contract management strategy includes a health and safety workstream.   

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

53.     Briefings for elected member, including local boards were provided in preparation for the legislation change on 4 April. Further workshops are planned for later in May and June.

54.     This report will be provided to all local boards and a briefing on this report and will take place at the May 2016 local board chairs forum. 

Māori impact statement

55.     The health, safety and wellbeing of Māori staff, elected and appointed members, volunteers and members of the public is a priority as are the Māori wellbeing priorities identified in Council’ Māori responsiveness framework, Te Toa Takitini work programmes, and other relevant documents. 

56.     Staff are working with the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Council’s co-governance entities, such as the Maunga Authority, Parakai Recreation Reserve Board and the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board to ensure they have information and support to comply with their PCBU duties (as a Board) and their officer duties (as individual members).


Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Health, safety and wellbeing performance report

 

    

Signatories

Author

Claire Richardson - Executive officer COO

Authorisers

Christine Etherington - People & Capability Director

Deborah James - Executive Officer

Marguerite Delbet - Manager Democracy Services


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Delegated feedback on the Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015

 

File No.: CP2016/10931

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to inform the local board of the delegated feedback made on the Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015.

Executive Summary

2.       The Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015 was considered at the local board’s  May 2016 business meeting, where it was recommended that the local board:

Resolution number OR/2016/90

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provides any views it may have on proposed variations to the 2015 Contributions Policy for the Governing Body to consider.

b)      delegates authority to the Chair and Member Thomas to provide the Board’s feedback on the Contributions Policy Variation A before the end of May 2016.

3.       This report and the attachment are to complete the feedback cycle by ensuring all local board members are aware of the feedback made.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the delegated feedback made on the Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback on the Proposed Variation to the Development Contributions Policy 2015

163

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2015/13780

 

  

 

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the Ōrākei Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s July 2016 report.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Chairperson's Report: July 2016

167

bView

Local Board involvement in resource consent processes

175

cView

Hearings Committee Report: Local board involvement in resource consenting processes

191

dView

Appointment of local board members to a working party to review the role of local boards in resource consenting processes

195

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 








Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 











Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 





Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 




Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Board Member Report - Kit Parkinson

 

File No.: CP2016/13385

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on portfolio activities and projects, and other activities since the last Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Parks, Reserves and Recreation Facilities

Alternate Portfolio Holder: Infrastructure (Non Transport)

 

Other Appointments: Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum member; Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board member; Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority member; Ōrākei Basin Advisor Group Member; Mission Bay-Kohimarama Residents Association member; Mission Bay Business Association; Lunn Avenue/Stonefields business area; Friends of Madills; Friends of Kepa Bush; Friends of Waiatarua; Friends of Tahuna Torea

Significant points from monthly Board workshops and briefings

 

1.   Oceania Football Club reopening fields for community use on Monday 4th July 2016.

 

Portfolio activities for the month

 

Monday, 23 May                    Ōrākei Local Board Swimming Pool Exemptions Committee

Tuesday, 24 May                   Meeting Parks staff regarding search lights on Hapimana Street

                                               Meeting with Meadowbank Pony Club

Wednesday, 25 May              Meetings regarding Colin Maiden Park – University Cricket and East City Gymnastics

Thursday, 26 May                  Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

Saturday, 28 May                  Churchill Park Planting Day (Chair Simpson attended)

                                               Odog Meeting at Roberta Reserve

Monday, 30 May                    Health and Safety Legislation training

                                               Ngāti Whātua Reserves Board

Tuesday, 31 May                   Mens Shed Auckland East meeting

                                               Mission Bay Bowling Club meeting

                                               Meeting with Consultation team

Wednesday, 1 June               Mission Bay Business Association

Thursday, 2 June                   Ōrākei Local Board Business Meeting

Tuesday, 7 June                    Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority IMP Hearings

Thursday, 8 June                   Ellerslie AFC – grounds meeting

                                               Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

                                               Ōrākei Local Board Extraordinary Business Meeting

Saturday, 11 June                  Maungakiekie Tree Planting Ceremony

Sunday, 12 June                    Restoring the stream in Madills Farm Reserve

Monday, 13 June                   Ellerslie Residents Association

Tuesday, 14 June                   Parks Portfolio

                                               OBAG meeting

Wednesday, 15 June             TEEF meeting (Member Davis attended)

Thursday, 16 June                 Ohinerau (Mt Hobson) native and Daffodil Planting

                                               Finance Update OLB

                                               Meeting with Grants officer

Sunday, 19 June                    Tahuna Torea Reserve Planting Day

Monday, 20 June                   Enviroschools Silver Sign at Remuera Intermediate School

                                               Meadowbank Residents Association Annual General Meeting and Meet the Mayoral Candidates

Tuesday, 21 June                  Meeting at Albert Street re Ngahue Reserve

                                               Meeting re Colin Maiden Park

                                               Tour of Sacred Heart College

Thursday, 23 June                 Ōrākei Local Board Chair / Deputy Chair meeting

                                               Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

                                               Ōrākei Local Board Volunteer Awards

Friday, 25 June                      OFC meeting with Tai Nicholas re road and CMP

Saturday, 26 June                  Matariki Kite Day and Whenua Planting Day

Saturday, 26 June                  Netball Auckland consultation meeting on new CMP road

Sunday, 26 June                    Watched Winter Splash

Monday, 27 June                   BMX meeting with Carol Stewart

Tuesday, 28 June                  Glover Park playground fencing request meeting

Thursday, 30 June                 Local Board Briefing – Community Centre levels of service review

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board meeting minutes

199

     

Signatory

Author

Kit Parkinson – Ōrākei Local Board Councillor

Date: 27 June 2016


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 








Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Board Member Report - Troy Churton

 

File No.: CP2016/13388

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on portfolio activities and projects, and other activities since the last Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Regulatory, Bylaws and Compliance; Resource Management Consents; Libraries (joint)

Alternate Portfolio Holder: Parks, Recreation and Sports; Environmental and Heritage; Unitary Plans

 

Other Appointments: Meadowbank-St Johns Residents Association (lead); Remuera Residents Association (alternate); Meadowbank Community Centre (lead); Friends of St Johns Bush (lead); Friends of Madills (alternate)

 

Portfolio and other activities for the month

 

Excluding regular Board workshops and meetings activities:

 

·        attending Meadowbank St Johns Resident meetings and AGM.

·        provision for resident meetings in Kohimarama.

·        liaising with residents regarding dog by law issues.

 

2.       I also hope to be successful in appointment to the working party to review local board inputs to various resource consent processes.

3.       I have also had a number of complex applications requiring comment for notification purposes. For example I have sent in several comments for a matter on the cliff top of Selwyn Avenue which resulted in my final comments along the following lines:

4.       The fact of a past consent for the property is inconclusive as to the current proposal, and there is always a chance that a past proposal may have relied on inadequate AEE content or notified evidence

5.       Important extracts from the current LA report include, inter alia:

·        the site is clearly associated with the cliff-line of Pipimea Point and Tamaki Drive rather than more sheltered residential enclave along the northern part of Selwyn Avenue. 

·        The setting necessitates that the assessment of effects considers not only the biophysical terrestrial environment, but also the built environment and potentially the seascape, in particular the interface between the sea and the land. 

·        The subject property is located in an area of high landscape value. ​

·        Despite the prominent elevated location of the site the potential visual catchment area is relatively well defined by the landform, existing development and established vegetation. 

·        ​This comprises a large audience which is likely to be relatively sensitive given the landscape context and likely expectations for a high degree of visual amenity in this coastal setting. ​

·        Prominent natural features include the seascape, the landform and vegetated cliff, which although degraded by the large stone retaining wall and proliferation of weeds, still exemplifies one of the key contributors to the sense of place associated with the Tamaki Drive coastline. 

·        ​From this property, following development, the proposed apartment would become a significant component of the outlook and block the central part of the view.  ​

6.       However, the conclusions in para 4.7 and 4.20 and 4.27 and 4.31 and 4.37 of the LA report are TOTALLY REJECTED. I consider Mr Hogan's assessment a very well-constructed and tailored piece of rhetoric and nothing short of enabling wider public input should be permitted to test it for such a landmark site and proposal that will have a dramatic effect on the Mission Bay area as much as the coastal landscape from the marine environment and so on.

7.       For example, It is a further objective NONSENSE to suggest the loss of mature coastal trees can be mitigated or compensated by some replanting in order to manage the lost visual and ecological effects. Mature trees are MATURE. Their contribution takes 100 years to replicate. It is INCORRECT to suggest a replanting will manage the adverse effect from their proposed removal in this highly sensitive zone.

8.       I now strongly recommend that this matter be publicly notified.

9.       If your planner recommendation is likely to reach a different conclusion then I suggest Mr White arrange our meeting with my Board and we consider the use of a further independent consultant to peer review the 'significance' or special' nature of  issues for notification purposes.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatory

Author

Board Member Troy Churton

 Date: 27 June 2016


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Board Member Report - Kate Cooke

 

File No.: CP2016/13389

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on portfolio activities and projects, and other activities since the last Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 

Recommendation

That this report be received.

 

 

Portfolio Lead:  Arts, Culture and Events

Alternate Portfolio Holder: Community Development; Economic Development and Urban Design; Environment & Heritage; Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 

Other Appointments: Meadowbank-St Johns Residents Association (lead); Ellerslie Business Improvement District (lead); Ōrākei Community Association; Remuera Arts Trust (alternate); Ōrākei Community Centre (lead); Meadowbank Community Centre (alternate); Ellerslie War Memorial and Leicester Hall (alternate); Friends of Kepa Bush (lead); Friends of St Johns Bush (alternate)

Portfolio activities for the month

2.       The annual Winter Splash was held on Sunday, 26 June at Mission Bay.  In spite of a bad weather forecast a good crowd gathered and the prizegiving and swim took place under sunny skies.  This year’s theme was animals and there were some colourful and innovative costumes.  The Board wishes to thank Kelly Tarlton’s, Mission Bay Business Association, Auckland Zoo and Auckland Whale and Dolphin Safari for sponsoring this event by donating generous prizes.  Without their support, this fun event could not take place.

Other activities

 

25 May            Eastern Bays Network Meeting at Ōrākei Marae

 

26 May            Creative Communities art showcase at Aotea Centre

 

28 May            Planting Day at Churchill Park

 

29 May            Stonefields Residents Association AGM

 

1 June             Unveiling of mural at Ōrākei Community Centre

 

2 June             Ōrākei Local Board business meeting

 

7 June             Events portfolio catchup

Public Art catchup

Meadowbank-St John’s Residents’ Association

 

9 June             Board workshop

Extraordinary Board business meeting

Ōrākei Community Association meeting

 

18 June           Attended Matariki Dawn Ceremony on Waiheke Island

 

20 June           Ellerslie Business Association meeting

Meadowbank-St John’s Residents’ Assocation AGM and Mayoral Candidate Forum

 

21 June           Winter Splash update meeting

 

22 June           Eastern Bays Network meeting at St Heliers Community Centre

 

23 June           Ōrākei Local Board volunteer awards presentation

 

24 June           Update meeting for Carols on the Green

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatory

Author

Board Member Kate Cooke

Date: 27 June  2016


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Board Member Report - Colin Davis

 

File No.: CP2016/13390

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on portfolio activities and projects, and other activities since last reported.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report be received.

 

 

Portfolio Lead:  Environment and Infrastructure; Heritage; Libraries (joint)

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Transport; Regulatory, Bylaws and Compliance; Civil Defence and Emergency Management; Local (non sports) Parks (joint)

Environment and Infrastructure

 

I attended the recent meeting of the Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum. An Auckland Transport engineer gave a presentation on the Van Damme’s Lagoon and associated works. Other matters discussed were mussel re-seeding in the Tamaki River and severe erosion on the Point England Walkway at Wai-o-Taiki Bay. This walkway runs along the coast from Tahuna Torea and up the Omaru Creek and would be part of the larger network linking St Heliers with Glen Innes, established under the 2008 Greenprint scheme. I raised the matter of erosion occurring at Anderson’s Bay likely caused by speeds of vessels using the Tamaki River.

 

I attended the assembly at Remuera Intermediate School, gave a speech to the students and teachers and with Board member Parkinson presented the Enviroschools Silver award sign.        

 

The programme of community planting in various reserves, such as Madills Farm stream bank, Waiatarua Reserve, Waiata Reserve etc, is continuing. A new Board initiative is partial funding weed control and planting in the Portland-Victoria SEA. Working with Kings School, contractors worked for one day on weed control there and with a residents’ group for one day on weed control at the lower end of the SEA valley. The intention is to start at the Kings School end and gradually work down the valley.  

Heritage

 

 

 

World War One Commemorations

As a member of the Council’s WWI Centennial Memorial Working Party, which reports to the WWI Commemoration Political Steering Group, I attend regular meetings of both.

 

Restoration Heritage Searchlight Emplacements – Tamaki Drive

A positive on-site meeting was held on 24 May with representatives of Vector, parks and Ngati Whatua Ōrākei regarding the removal of the unsightly leaning power pole and sagging lines behind searchlight emplacement no. 3 with the intention of undergrounding those lines. Until that is done no further works can be carried out on this emplacement. These works would include the arborist completing the removal of vegetation from the structure, painting, and the heritage architect measuring the shutters and progress works to the other two emplacements.

 

Emplacements nos. 1 and 2 have now been painted.

 

A meeting was held on 24 June with the Council’s heritage staff to progress and finalise the text which I prepared and the images to be used for the sign. I have been invited to continue to assist the heritage researcher, heritage plans and places, with research and to obtain the appropriate photographs to illustrate the text.

 

Dingle Dell

A further final version of the new illustrated sign has now been agreed and hopefully the new signs will soon be erected at strategic entry points to the reserve. I have asked Parks to liaise with Auckland Transport to erect a further sign at the presently unmarked entry point in Fern Glen Road for the Winifred Huggins Walkway, which is located between Long Drive and Fern Glen Road north.  

 

Stonefields Heritage Trail

A tender for construction has now been let. 

 

Libraries

 

Patronage is steady at both the Remuera and St Heliers libraries. With the closure of the video stores at Remuera and St Heliers there has been an increase in patronage at the libraries for videos. Each library is very active in providing not only the traditional library services but also a wide variety of events, authors’ talks, and sessions for all age groups.

 

The Remuera Library has initiated a scheme whereby the children’s librarian visits Ōrākei School on a monthly basis to help years 7 and 8 children with reading choices and taking books to the school. Remuera library has also initiated “after-hours” sessions for patrons to listen to invited authors. It also has a “tween” (children aged 11-13) book club which meets monthly at the library.

 

St Heliers library also has an outreach programme with monthly meetings of residents’ book clubs at St Andrew’s and Grace Joel Retirement Villages. Restoration work is still continuing at St Heliers library with repairs and painting the staff workroom following the recent flooding. St Heliers has started a fortnightly current affairs session.

 

The Win With Words story writing competition for years 7 and 8 (intermediate school) has been ongoing from 2 May to 24 June. The Board is a sponsor. Prize giving will be held at Remuera library on Wednesday 10 August and at St Heliers library on Thursday 11 August.       

 

Civil Defence and Emergency Management

 

 

 

The existing tone-only fixed tsunami siren warning system is under review by Civil Defence. There are no sirens within the Ōrākei Local Board area. Research has been undertaken into evacuation zones looking specifically at the efficacy and limitations of the present system in those zones. The intention is to concentrate on those areas categorised as high risk. Included in these areas are parts of Mission Bay, Kohimarama, St Heliers. The research to ensure regional consistency will look at the status quo, alternatives to the fixed-tone siren warning system, upgrading the existing siren system, upgrading and expanding the network. Progress will be reported at Board workshops.

 

Local (non sports) Parks

 

 

It is understood that the new public toilets adjacent to the Madill’s Farm playground are to be installed early July to the relief of patrons of the playground.

 

Activities since 23 May 2016

As well as assisting with a range of citizens’ enquiries, I have also attended the following to date:

24 May on-site meeting regarding the undergrounding of lines at searchlight emplacement no. 3.

24 May meeting re location of the Pony Clubs.

24 May meeting re proposed Tinana walkway.

25 May meeting of the Stonefields Residents’ Association.

26 May the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

28 May Stonefields Residents’ Association Annual General meeting.

31 May 100th anniversary of the Battle of Jutland commemoration at the Devonport Naval Museum.

2 June the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting.

7 June the OLB public art portfolio holders briefing.

8 June St Heliers Village Association’s networking breakfast.

8 June St Heliers Village Association’s executive meeting.

9 June the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

9 June the Ōrākei Local Board extraordinary business meeting.

10 June meeting with the Chair to finalise the Board’s achievements report.

12 June the annual RAF Bomber Command Commemorative Service and Memorial Re-dedication at the Auckland War Memorial Museum.

11 June community planting at Madills Farm Reserve stream.

11 June the Glendowie Boating Club’s prize giving function.

13 June a meeting of the WWI Commemoration Political Steering Group.

13 June a meeting of the WWI Centennial Memorial Working Party.

14 June the regular scheduled Ōrākei Local Board parks portfolio holders’ briefing.

15 June the Tamaki Estuary Environmental Protection Forum.

15 June meeting of the Stonefields Residents’ Association.

17 June on-site inspection, with the Chair and Board Member Thomas and the Remuera Village Association manager, of the recently erected heritage plaques in the Remuera village.

20 June with Board Member Parkinson presented Remuera Intermediate School with the Enviroschools Silver sign.

20 June a meeting of the WWI Centennial Memorial Working Party.

20 June the Annual General Meeting of the Meadowbank Residents Association.

21 June the OLB libraries portfolio holders’ quarterly briefing.

21 June site visit with other Board members to Sacred Heart College to inspect facilities and buildings under construction.

23 the Ōrākei Local Board’s environment and infrastructure portfolio holder’s briefing.

23 June the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

23 June the OLB Volunteer Recognition Awards 2016 event.

24 June a meeting with Council’s heritage staff to finalise the searchlights emplacements signage.

24 June a meeting with the Senior Policy Advisor to provide input into the governance framework review.

26 June Mission Bay Splash.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatory

Author

Colin Davis, Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

Date: 27 June 2016


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Board Member Report - Mark Thomas

 

File No.: CP2016/13126

 

  

Purpose

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on portfolio activities and projects, and other activities since the last Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the report be received.

 

 

Portfolio Lead:  Economic Development and Urban Design

Sub- portfolios: Strategy, Finance, Rates and Governance; Unitary Plan

 

Other Memberships: Member, Remuera Business Association; Member East City Community Trust/ASB Stadium

Portfolio activities for the month

 

Economic Development and Urban Design:

 

·    Visitor Strategy: Ellerslie, Remuera and Tāmaki trails are progressing

·    Work is underway using the visitor trail work as the main economic development project for 2015/16. Work is being undertaken to look at an event leverage proposal to support our four business associations with the significant events in Auckland next year.

·    ATEED’s implementation proposals involve supporting us on:

Better leveraging events for local businesses

Opportunities associated with Colin Maiden Park

Visitor strategy

 

Remuera Village Upgrade Project (ReVUP)

 

·   The AT/NZTA LED light trial in Remuera is still proceeding

·   The ReVUP project has been reviewed and an update will be presented to the board

·   Liaison continues with PDA and AT on the Clonbern carpark

 

Any other issues

Annual agreement projects

 

Economic Development Strategy The Visitor Strategy – an Ōrākei Economic Development Strategy project – is being progressed. 5/10

 

Hobson Bay action plan:

1)    Pre resource consent work on a mangrove management plan is underway. A recent update has been delivered.

2)    The water quality project is being progressed as part of Colin’s Environment work programme.

3)    Increasing access points around the Bay is being addressed by the proposal to establish a pontoon in the channel behind the cricket club.  Progress 6/10.

 

Ōrākei Visitor Strategy: The primary focus now is progressing the visitor walkways in the Tamaki, Remuera and Ellerslie precincts. 5/10

 

Tāmaki Drive Master Plan implementation: Slow progress. Progress 1/10

 

Unitary Plan:  The Hearings Panel has completed hearings and will provide its recommendations to council by 22 July. Council has 20 days to consider the recommendations and must notify the plan by 19 August. Workshops have commenced within council to prepare to receive the recommendations from the Panel.

 

Other activity

 

·    The usual busy month of meetings and events.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatory

Author

Board Member Thomas

 Date: 30 June 2016


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2016/13739

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar which is a schedule of items that will come before the Board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar be noted.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Governance Forward Work Calendar

219

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

 

File No.: CP2016/02886

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from officers.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Resolution Pending Action Report

223

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings

 

File No.: CP2016/13718

 

  

Purpose

1.       To provide the Board with the record of proceedings for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 9 June 2016 and 23 June 2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board record of proceedings for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 28 April 2016, 12 May 2016 and 19 May 2016 be noted.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Workshop Proceedings - 9 June 2016

229

bView

Workshop Proceedings - 23 June 2016

231

     

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

07 July 2016

 

 

    

    



[1] A notifiable event includes death, a serious injury , illness or incident

[2] As outlined above some of council’s strategic goals changed following this session and a review of policy principles is also to be undertaken.