I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 August 2016

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jill Naysmith

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Brendon Crompton

 

 

Angela Fulljames

 

 

Sarah Higgins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Dr Lyn Murphy

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Anthea Clarke

Democracy Advisor

 

15 August 2016

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: Anthea.Clarke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the quarter ending June 2016 7

13        Draft Annual Report 2015/2016 - Franklin Local Board report

This report was not available at the time the agenda was printed and will be circulated prior to the meeting.

 

14        Franklin Local Board End of Term Report 2013-2016                                               9

15        Franklin Local Board Community Facilities Renewals Work Programme 2016/2017  17

16        Te Puru Community Charitable Trust - Outputs and Performance Objectives for 2016/2017

This report was not available at the time the agenda was printed and will be circulated prior to the meeting.

 

17        Karaka Sport Park Trust lights                                                                                  23

18        Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan                                              29

19        Local Board Delegations - Landowner Approvals                                                  37

20        Auckland Transport Update – August 2016                                                             43

21        ATEED Six monthly report to the Franklin Local Board                                        61

22        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Update 1 January to 30 June 2016 73

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                 83

C1       Acquisition of open space land - Patumahoe                                                          83

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 2 August 2016, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the quarter ending June 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/12841

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board members on progress towards their objectives for the year from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016 as set out in the Local Board agreement.

Executive summary

2.       A financial performance report is presented to the local boards for the accounting quarters ending September, December, March and June. 

3.       To improve overall performance reporting the Financial Advisory Services – Local Boards team produces a combined quarterly financial report and department performance report

4.       The attached report contains the following reports this quarter

i)    Local Community Services including Libraries

ii)   Local Environmental Management

iii)   Local Sports Parks and Recreation

iv)  Local Board Financial Performance

5.       Auckland Council staff from the above departments have also provided a reforecast of what LDI (Locally Driven Initiatives) projects cannot be delivered this year. 

6.       Following discussions with and advice from the board members, reallocation of these LDI funds are provided in the recommendations.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Performance Report for the Franklin Local Board for the financial quarter ended June 2016.

 

Comments

7.       In consultation with local boards this report provides the elected members with an overview of local activities from council departments for discussion.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

8.       The report is presented to the Franklin Local Board members at a workshop prior to the business meeting.

Maori impact statement

9.       Maori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report of the local board financials.  However, this financial performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Maori.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Franklin Performance Report June 2016 (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Signatories

Authors

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Christine Watson - Manager Financial Advisory Services - Local Boards

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Franklin Local Board End of Term Report 2013-2016

 

File No.: CP2016/16664

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the board with information on progress on achieving outcomes and priorities in the Franklin Local Board Plan 2014 during the current electoral term.

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board Plan 2014 sets out the aspirations, required outcomes and priorities for the Franklin community over a three year period, including projects and areas of advocacy that the board undertakes on behalf of the community.

3.       The board undertook community consultation to develop the local board plan, which it adopted in October 2014.  The plan contained the following aspirational outcomes for the Franklin community:

(i)         Cherished natural environment – forests, open countryside and waterways are healthy and local parks are cared for and used for a variety of leisure activities;

(ii)        Thriving local economy – the economy is strong and attracts people to live, work locally and visit attractions in the area.

(iii)       Excellent transport connections and infrastructure – frequent public transport services, including rail, bus and ferry, provide good connections and safe roads make it easy to get around.

(iv)       Growth in the right place, at the right time – growth is well planned to protect rural production and activities, urban sprawl is contained and infrastructure provided at the right time.

(v)        Proud, safe and healthy communities – residents are proud of the area, feel safe and part of the community.

4.       During each of the three financial years 2014/15, 2015/16 and 2016/17, local board agreements were entered into with the governing body, which included areas for advocacy and budgets to deliver key projects and initiatives in the local board plan.

5.       As part of the local board agreement, a list of advocacy initiatives was developed identifying each area of advocacy and the entity that the board will advocate to for the progression of initiatives – either the governing body or council-controlled organisation.

6.       Over the last three years, many of the projects and advocacy initiatives have been achieved (see Attachment A).  Some of the highlights of these achievements are:

·    approved the Waiuku Sports Park concept plan developed in conjunction with the rugby club and school.

·    part of a successful advocacy initiative for hydrodynamic modelling to be undertaken in the Manukau Harbour.

·    continued support for volunteer groups, including the Mudlarks for mangrove removal in Waiuku.

·    supported the introduction of additional recycling drop-off points in Patumahoe and Bombay and initiated the early introduction of kerbside recycling collection following the closure of the privately-run Pukekohe recycling drop-off facility.

·    supported a soil mapping project to help local farmers and growers in their work.

·    helped shape a new bus network to be implemented by Auckland Transport for Waiuku and Pukekohe, developed with local board and community input

·    funded a sport and active recreation facilities plan to identify the priorities for future provision of facilities in Franklin in light of anticipated growth.

·    supported an accessibility audit of all community halls in Franklin and gave direction on implementation of improvements to increase accessibility for all people in the community.

·    initiated a review of rural halls management, board member participation in the process for three rural halls to be handed over to community groups to manage.

·    continued support for key local events such as the Franklin and Clevedon A&P Shows, including local board presence at the shows.

·    continued support for the Franklin Youth Advisory Board, including funding for Youth Week and Children’s Day events run by the youth board.

·    arts broker appointed to develop strategic relationships and contacts and support a programme of community art initiatives.

7.       Other projects may have been deferred or delayed due to budget or resource constraints.

8.       In 2017, working closely and consulting with the community, a new local board plan will be developed.  This will offer the opportunity to review existing outcomes and confirm future priorities.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board notes progress on achieving outcomes and priorities in the Franklin Local Board Plan 2014 (see Attachment A).

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Franklin end of term report 2013-2016

11

     

Signatories

Authors

Jane Cain - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Franklin Local Board Community Facilities Renewals Work Programme 2016/2017

 

File No.: CP2016/14613

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To approve the 2016/2017 work programme for Community Facilities renewals for the Local Parks, Sports and Recreation activity.

Executive summary

2.       Renewals funding is identified at a high level through the long-term plan and a capital works programme is prepared for approval annually. The programme ensures that each council facility can operate to the current level of service articulated in the relevant asset management plan.

3.       Attachment A provides the proposed 2016/2017 work programme for Community Facilities, Local Parks, Sports and Recreation, renewals for local board approval.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the 2016/2017 work programme for Franklin Local Board Parks, Sports and Recreation Renewals

b)      note that the 2016/2017 funding envelope is indicative to deliver this programme of work and any budget variances (within scope) will be managed within the total region-wide renewals funding envelope.

 

 

Comments

4.       Community facilities are an important part of realising the vision of Auckland to become the world’s most liveable city. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can connect, socialise, learn, and participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art, and recreational activities. These activities foster improved lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride among residents.

5.       Investment in this renewals programme will ensure that council facilities remain valuable, well-maintained community assets that continue to meet user expectations. Not undertaking timely renewals will have an undesirable impact on the customer experience and put asset performance at risk, and ultimately increase the cost to maintain the facility.

6.       The renewals programme process ensures that the proposed Community Facility renewals work programme (Attachment A) has received extensive input and assessment from business owners, facility users, and Community Facilities staff.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

7.       Council staff will report quarterly to the local board on how the programme is tracking, and discuss with the local board any arising key risks and notify the local board when projects are completed.

Māori impact statement

8.       The Franklin Local Board Community Facility renewals work programme 2016/17 will ensure that all facilities continue to be well-maintained community assets benefiting the local community, including Māori. Parks and open spaces, as well as sport and recreation activity contributes significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where any aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to Tangata Whenua appropriate consultation will follow.

Implementation

9.       This work programme will be implemented as part of Community Facilities’ usual business practice.

10.     Work programme implementation will be reported quarterly to the local board. The first-quarter report will outline the programme’s delivery schedule.

11.     The 2016/2017 Community Facilities renewals work programme for the Local Community Services activity was presented for approval at the June business meeting.  

12.     Where bundles of assets are presented as projects over multiple years, the assets (listed within each project line) will be renewed in order of priority with as many singular assets being renewed, within the allocated budget, as possible.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Franklin Local Board Community Facilities Renewals

19

     

Signatories

Authors

Hannah Alleyne - Senior Programme Planner

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Karaka Sport Park Trust lights

 

File No.: CP2016/15618

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To consider accepting the sportsfield lights owned and installed by the Karaka Sports Park Trust on Karaka Recreation Reserve, lighting fields 4 and 5.

Executive Summary

2.       The Karaka Sports Park Trust have offered to gift 8 sportsfield lights that are installed on the Karaka Recreation Reserve, lighting fields 4 and 5 to the Franklin Local Board (FLB).

3.       Staff confirm that should the Franklin Local Board accept the gift, the asset will be included in the asset data base and Community Service- Parks will maintain and renew these assets into the future. There are no additional costs to the local board to do this.

4.       A decision to accept the Karaka Sports Park Trust gift of the sportsfield light assets is consistent with parks operational practice in that sportsfield lights are considered an integral component in Council sports park development and ownership.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board accepts the gifting of the eight sportsfield lights from the Karaka Sports Park Trust which are sited on the Karaka Recreation Reserve.

 

 

Comments

5.       The Karaka Sports Park Trust installed the lights in 2014.

6.       The community facilities parks operations team have inspected the training lights and viewed the documentation provided.

7.       The community facilities parks operation team has confirmed that the condition of these assets are sound and are of good quality and meet Council’s standards for sportsfield lights.

8.       The benefits of parks being the asset owner of lighting means there is the ability to maintain and renew, regular inspections and condition grading, this then improves the reliability and safety of the asset. The asset is also available for wider community use.

9.       The local board can choose to accept the gifting of the lights –as noted, there are no additional costs to do this, as the ongoing maintenance and renewals can be met through existing budgets. It is currently Auckland Council policy to develop, maintain and renew training lights on local sports parks in order to maximise their use as training facilities. The lights were installed by the club as council had not funded them through the long-term plan.

10.     The local board could, alternatively, choose not to accept the gifting of the lights. If the offer is declined, the club will need to continue to maintain and operate the lights. They may choose to either renew them or not. If the local board does not accept the gifting, the club may apply to council and other funders for financial assistance to maintain operate and replace the lights.

11.     Staff recommend that the offer by the club to gift the lights is accepted. They will then become part of the council asset database. This will then enable the asset to be maintained through the parks full facility maintenance contract and renewed at the appropriate time. There will be no additional costs to the local board to do this.

12.     Attachments to this report show the layout of the training lights on the sports park and photographs are also provided.

 

Consideration

Local Board views and implications

13.     The Franklin Local Board is the decision maker.  

Māori impact statement

14.     This decision making process does not impact on mana whenua and as a result no consultation has taken place.

Implementation

15.     Should the Franklin Local Board approve the acceptance of this gift of the sports lights then LSP will complete the formalities of including the training lights as part of the LSP asset list and incorporate these assets into the full facility maintenance contract immediately.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Karaka Sport Park Trust light location and photos

25

     

Signatories

Authors

Janine Field - Parks Advisor - Mangere Otahuhu

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Karaka Sport Park Trust Lighting

 

Location: Karaka Recreation Reserve

 

Photos of eight lights installed by KSPT:


 

Lighting Field 5

Lighting Field 4

Typical example:


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

 

File No.: CP2016/17143

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To adopt the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (2016-2026) to guide the provision of sports facilities across the Franklin Local Board area.

Executive summary

2.       In the 2015/2016 Franklin Local Board Plan, the board prioritised a review of sport and active recreation facilities to identify opportunities for optimising use of existing facilities and to prepare a strategy for the development of new facilities. The local board recognises that there will be limited funds to contribute to the development of sport and recreation facilities in future, and it will need to prioritise demand. 

3.       Visitor Solutions Ltd was engaged to research current and future sport and recreation facility needs and to prepare a strategy for provision over the next 20 years.  The scope for the project included ascertaining issues and challenges for clubs and how the use of existing facilities could be optimised. It also considered the impact of forecast growth and what facilities will be needed in the future.

4.       The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (the plan) was completed in July 2016. The plan will help guide local board decision making for sport and active recreation facility provision in the local board area now and in the future.

5.       Recommended projects in the plan have been prioritised by using a project assessment framework, which was developed with input from the local board. Projects identified as the highest priority are a feasibility analysis for a central indoor court hub, covering two courts at Pukekohe Netball Centre, replacing two hockey turfs and upgrading floodlighting at Rosa Birch Park and developing a gymsports facility in Pukekohe.

6.       The projects and their priority will be reviewed every three years to ensure that information is up-to-date and that priorities reflect the outcomes that are important for Franklin Local Board.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopt the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan to guide the provision of sports facilities and sharing of resources across the local board area.

b)      note implementation of the plan is underway with funding of $84,738.98 allocated from the local board’s locally driven initiatives budget for 2015/2016, to construct five new toilets at Pukekohe Netball Centre.

c)      consider the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan prior to allocating grant funds to community groups and prior to developing further facilities.

d)      review the list of projects identified in the plan and their priority in 2020/2021, to ensure they reflect the outcomes that are important for Franklin Local Board.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Background

7.       Franklin Local Board has invested in several sport and recreation feasibility studies and facility developments since 2010/2011 via the Facility Partnership Fund, such as a pontoon for Clevedon Paddling Club and a feasibility study for the Kariotahi Surf Life Saving Club).

 

8.       To date, opportunities for investment by Franklin Local Board in facilities, has been considered with advice provided by staff.  However there has been no clear local framework for these decisions. While this approach can mean that decisions are made with the best intensions, funds may not be allocated for maximum effectiveness.

Sport and Recreation Facilities Research

9.       In 2015, Franklin Local Board funded a research project to ascertain current and future sport and recreation facility needs within the local board area.  The board was seeking guidance for its investment decisions to maximise outcomes from future investment. 

10.     The research objectives included:

·        ascertaining club membership and identifying issues and challenges for clubs

·        reviewing demand for existing sports facilities

·        identifying gaps in facility provision

·        identifying opportunities for sharing resources and optimising the use of existing facilities

·        preparing a strategy and priorities for the development of new facilities and additions to existing facilities and

·        ascertaining what sport and recreation club code/s should be accommodated at Belmont Sports Park.

11.     The project scope included sport and active recreation groups operating from both council-owned and club owned facilities as well as relevant private and school facilities.  Groups that use community halls (except if used for sport or active recreation), fitness centres and aquatic facilities were excluded.  Aquatic facility provision is addressed by the Community Facilities Network Plan.

12.     For the purpose of the research, passive recreational groups (e.g., chess club), were excluded as council’s focus is on: i) the targets and priorities in the Auckland Plan and ii) key initiatives in the Auckland Sport and Active Recreation Strategic Plan.  These strategic documents focus on increasing participation and providing fit for purpose facilities.

13.     At the request of Waikato District Council, sports groups based in the northern Waikato District Council area were included within the project scope.  Franklin Local Board saw benefits for both councils from a greater understanding about clubs and facilities located in close proximity to the councils’ boundary line.

Methodology

14.     Visitor Solutions Ltd was engaged to undertake the research.  The methodology included:

·    an online survey for clubs in Auckland (73% response rate) and the northern Waikato area (57% response rate)

·    telephone discussions with sports club representatives

·    meetings and workshops with Auckland Council staff and Franklin Local Board

·    meetings with key groups such as Counties Manukau Rugby Football Union and Pakuranga Netball Centre 

·    visits to parks and privately owned sites (e.g., Franklin A and P Showgrounds) within the local board area.

Draft Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

15        A draft plan was circulated to council staff and the local board in May 2016.  Feedback was received from the local board at workshops on 10 May and 5 July and this is outlined in Table 1 in the Consideration section of this report.

 

Final Report – Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

16        The final plan was completed in early July 2016 and presents recommendations for Franklin Local Board to consider over the next 20 years.  Planning was underway for some projects when Visitor Solutions Ltd started the research and others were identified during the research.

17        The plan is presented in Attachment 1 and includes background information on sport and recreation clubs, a summary of demographic trends and a list of prioritised projects for consideration.  The projects were prioritised using a Project Assessment Framework and this is presented in Attachment 2.

18        The high priority needs identified are:

·    indoor court expansion planning to ascertain options and feasibility of a central indoor court hub to cater for a growing population in Franklin and the northern area of Waikato District Council

·    covering two courts at Pukekohe Netball Centre which is likely to increase the use of existing assets

·    replacing two hockey turfs in the next 10-20 years and upgrading floodlights at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe 

·    developing a new gymsports facility in Pukekohe due to increasing participation and the club operating near capacity

·    providing toilets at Pukekohe Netball Centre.  This project was supported by Franklin Local Board with a grant of of $84,738.98 in June 2016. 

18      While the majority of clubs are operating within their facility capacity, with the forecast growth, facilities will reach capacity and will eventually limit the clubs’ ability to provide sport and recreation opportunities.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19        The local board reviewed the draft plan in May 2016 and considered the recommended projects at workshops on 10 May and 5 July 2016.  Table 1 below summarises the feedback provided by the local board.

Table 1 – Summary of feedback provided on the draft plan by the Franklin Local Board.

 

Feedback provided

How feedback was addressed

1

Population data for some areas of Franklin is not up-to-date.  The board acknowledged that this is out of the control of the Sport and Recreation Advisor and Visitor Solutions Ltd.

The report was finalised using the latest data available from council’s research unit (ART data, Scenario I, version 9).

2

Rosa Birch Park services a catchment for hockey broader than Franklin and should remain as a high priority.

Counties Manukau Hockey Association’s project to upgrade floodlighting and replace two hockey turfs is listed as a high priority.

3

There was discussion about the Franklin Gymsports Club project being a high priority given the lower level of membership compared to other groups.

Staff advised the local board that the gymnastics project is prioritised as “high” due to the strong strategic alignment (children and young people) and that the club has grown every year for the last five years, and is forecast to grow significantly.

4

Bombay Multisport Project was prioritised as a medium priority.  The local board requested this be changed to “medium /high”

The project is listed as a medium/high priority as it will be a sporting hub for the surrounding areas, including areas of Waikato District Council.  There is potential for more codes to be incorporated into the proposal as people will travel to participate.

5

Kariotahi Surf Life Saving Club project to construct new clubrooms was prioritised as a medium priority.  The local board requested this be changed to “medium /high”

The project is listed as a medium/high priority as the club provides a public service to not only Franklin residents but also Waikato residents. 

6

Pukekohe Netball Centre’s project to construct five new toilets was prioritised as medium.  The local board requested that this project be a high priority.

The project is listed as a high priority project as lack of toilets was seen as a health and safety issue for girls and women .  Funds were granted by the local board in June 2016 ($84,738.98) to contribute to the cost of this project.

7

Puni Rugby Club would like to develop a dual use netball/car park training court for the local netball teams.  This was listed as a low priority.  The local board requested this be prioritised as a medium/high priority.

This is listed as a medium/high priority as the netball club would be based at the reserve with Puni Rugby Club.  The local community would benefit as netball players could practice in their local area.

8

Kawakawa Bay boat ramp expansion:  it was requested that this project be added to the list of projects.

The project has been added as a medium priority as it is one of the most highly used boat ramps in Auckland.  It services a wider population and is a key asset for water based recreation.

9

The local board raised concern that the groups with projects listed may get the impression that the local board has funds to contribute to all the projects.

A statement was added to page 17 of the final report, as follows: “the following project prioritisation should not be interpreted as an indication of financial support on behalf of the Franklin local board”.

 

Māori impact statement

20.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan will assist the local board with decision making to increase community participation, including the potential to increase participation for Māori.  Within the Franklin Local Board area, 13.2% of the population are Maori.  Of the projects that are listed as a high priority, the two netball projects are likely to impact Maori.  This is due to the high participation of Maori in netball, in comparison to the other codes that have projects listed as a high priority. 

21.     Given the variety of projects identified in the facility plan, it is likely some Māori will benefit from the projects identified.

Implementation

22.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan provides recommendations for the future provision of sport and recreation facilities in the local board area.  Once adopted, the board can use the plan to assess funding requests for these facilities.

23.     It is recommended the board review the plan every three years to ensure the prioritisation remains relevant to the local board priorities.

24.     Communication between Auckland Council and Waikato District Council staff is likely to continue, to ensure duplication of facilities is avoided and that collaboration between sport and recreation groups can be facilitated where there is an opportunity.  

25.     In future, the Project Assessment Framework will be used to assess projects so that the funds invested in facility development reflect the local board’s strategic direction, in accordance with the Auckland Plan and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan.  Should the strategic direction change, the Project Assessment Framework can be reviewed and updated to ensure there is alignment with council’s strategic direction

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Attachment 1 - Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

bView

Attachment 2 - Project Assessment Framework

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Attachment 2 - Project Assessment Framework

Criteria

Key Guiding Considerations

Score out of 100

Weighting (%)

Sharing Facilities

·      Level of willingness to operate under a shared facility/multisport arrangement.

·      Is the club is seeking genuine partnership with other codes and clubs for the development of this facility? 

Note: Some clubs may not be able to operate under this model for reasons such as Health and Safety (i.e. Gymsports) such codes will not be unduly disadvantaged by this criterion.

·     

·      10

Current Participation / Membership

·      Total active membership - For maximum score total playing membership greater than 750

·      Total junior membership (relative to the demographic profile of the code) - For maximum score greater than 500 juniors. If less than 500 juniors calculate score as ratio of the total membership.

·      Growth in membership in the past 3 years  (in actual numbers)

·     

·      15

 

·     

Projected Participation / Membership

·      Does the facility have a catchment which will extend into a known Council growth area?

·      Level to which population / demographic projections support the facilities / clubs membership increasing.

·      Degree to which external factors are likely to erode membership in the future.

·     

·      15

Level of Strategic Alignment

·      Level of alignment to local, regional and national facility strategies, code development strategies and Council plans and strategies.

·      How well does the facility contribute to an integrated local facility network?

·     

·      10

Appropriate scale of facility 

·      The spaces and size of the facility is core to the delivery of the sport and appropriately scaled.

·     

·      10

Sustainability of the facility

·      How sustainable is the facility likely to be (considering partnerships, trends, financial issues etc)?

·      Is the club a strong club overall with a strong future?

·      Will the facility enhance the future delivery and operation of the sport(s)?

·     

·      20

Capital funding

·     What ability do proponents have to assist with capital funding themselves (i.e. not including public funding)?

·     Are the required funding splits realistic within the projects development timeframes?

·     

·      20

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Local Board Delegations - Landowner Approvals

 

File No.: CP2016/17071

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To confirm the process for local board decision-making and delegations relating to minor landowner approval applications over local parks in Franklin. 

Executive summary

2.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities Departments receive numerous requests for landowner approval to undertake various activities on council park land. The current local board practice requires that all applications, regardless of their complexity, are workshopped and reported to the local board for approval. This can mean it takes between two to four months to process applications.

3.       A workshop was held with the local board on 8 December 2015, to consider the current local board process.  To improve the customer experience with respect to minor landowner approval applications (permanent private and public infrastructure, affected party approvals and developer-led park developments), the local board informally supported following the process set out in the Local Board delegations protocols for utilising the council delegations by enabling specific board members  to either support staff to make the decision under  delegation and complete the process, or require that the matter be reported to the full local board for consideration. Criteria were agreed for what is considered a minor application.

4.       This proposal is recommended for a period of six months from the date of the resolution after which time it will be reviewed.

 

Recommendations

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Nominate Board Members to utilise the process outlined in the Combined Chief Executive Delegations Register authority, for minor land owner approvals relating to park land for a period of six months from the date of this resolution.

b)      Review the process after six months.

c)      Continue to receive all other landowner approval applications relating to park land considered moderate or complex to a full local board workshop and subsequent business meeting for a decision.

 

 

Comments

5.       The Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities Departments receive numerous requests for landowner approval for various activities on park land including permanent public and private infrastructure (e.g. stormwater pipes, clubrooms), activities with no permanent infrastructure (e.g. events, mobile commercial operations, community gardens), affected party approvals, development led park developments, temporary use, plaques and memorials.

6.       To improve the customer experience when seeking landowner approval, staff are looking at how current systems and processes can be improved. This includes reviewing current processes with local boards.

 

Current local board process

7.       The current process for all landowner applications regardless of their level of complexity, is as follows;

·   Application received and assessment undertaken by staff

·   Discussion and negotiation with applicant to obtain the best outcome

·   Workshop with the local board

·   Report to the local board

·   If the application is approved staff formalise the proposal via the appropriate mechanism which includes reinstatement/mitigation conditions (e.g. letter, easement, lease etc.). If not approved, the local board resolution is provided to the applicant

·   Monitor reinstatement and/or mitigation.

8.       The process for approval can take between 2-4 months.

 

Delegations

9.       The local board delegation protocols set out the powers that are to be exercised by local boards, with staff being delegated remaining powers. Before staff can exercise their powers, they need to check if the portfolio holder wishes to have the decision made by the local board, rather than staff.

10.     There is no requirement in the protocols for workshops prior to the staff decision, but the portfolio holder can work with staff to develop an appropriate process that works.

Proposed process

11.     Landowner approval requests vary in terms of their level of complexity from minor to complex. Examples of complexity for specific types of landowner approval are provided in the table below.

Type of application

Minor

Complex

Permanent infrastructure - utilities

Short length of underground pipe

New pump station

Permanent infrastructure – building

Small expansion within leased area

New clubrooms

Affected party approvals related to resource consent applications

Small height in relation to boundary infringement

Extensive height in relation to boundary infringement

Developer-led improvements

Specimen tree planting

New playground

 

12.     A workshop was held with the local board in December 2015 to discuss processes around the different complexities of applications. The local board supported board members working with staff in line with the council delegations for landowner applications that are considered to be minor. It is recommended that a minimum of 2 board members be nominated to work with staff.

13.     The process moving forward will involve parks staff assessing the application and seeking the best outcomes in discussion with the applicant. A summary of the application and staff recommendation will be emailed to the nominated board members for consideration. The nominated board members will either advise staff that they can use their delegation to formalise the activity or require that the application be reported to the full local board for consideration. The nominated board members are to respond in five days. Should no response be received staff may assume that it is appropriate for the staff delegation to apply.

14.     The criteria framework agreed for minor applications is as follows;

Type of application

Minor application criteria framework

Permanent infrastructure - utilities (private and public)

·   Upgrade or replacement of existing infrastructure where the location or footprint is largely unchanged

·   Stormwater disposal not involving infrastructure where the park can sustain the runoff (i.e. current and future park assets/uses are not affected)

·   Pipelines or cables less than 10 metres in length that are underground or have minimum impact when works are complete and do not affect current or future use and development of the park

Permanent infrastructure – buildings

·   Alterations to a building(s) within a lease or licence area not exceeding the existing lease or licence boundary or intended purpose, for example building upgrades and small extensions

Affected party approvals related to resource consent applications

·   Yard infringements where the yard is still 75% or more of the allowable distance

·   Height in relation to boundary infringements where the infringement affects less than 1m vertical height of the building or where the infringement affects less than 10% of the building façade; and the impacts on the park are no more than minor

·   Any other infringement (e.g. impermeable surface, temporary construction effects) which has a less than a minor effect on the park

Development of reserves to vest

·   Specimen tree planting offered at no cost to the council

·   Pathways/seats/bins around drainage reserves offered at no cost to the council

·   Pathways/seats/bins around esplanade areas offered at no cost to the council

·   Pathways in accordance with District Plan or adopted Council Park’s plans offered at no cost to the council

 

15.     A set of principles which form the foundation for how applications are assessed was also reviewed at the workshop and supported by the local board (refer Attachment A).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

16.     A workshop was held with the local board on 8 December 2015 where the proposal to change the process to address minor landowner approvals was discussed. The recommendations of this report reflect the outcomes of the workshop.

Māori impact statement

17.     Maori were not consulted in preparation of this report as it is an internal process matter.

18.     When assessing applications for landowner approval, it is standard practice to review the site for any areas of interest to mana whenua identified through the relevant district plan and Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan. Cultural values are also taken into consideration.

19.     Where applications require resource consent, iwi consultation can also occur through this process.  Where a decision relates to a reserve, the council is required to act in accordance with Treaty of Waitangi principles.

Implementation

20.     The new process for minor landowner applications for park land will be activated immediately should the local board endorse the proposal.

21.     Moderate and complex landowner applications for park land will continue to be workshopped and reported to the local board.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

Landowner Application Assessment Principles

41

     

Signatories

Authors

Sophie Bell - Parks & Open Space Specialists Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Auckland Transport Update – August 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/00935

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Providing an update on transport matters for the information of the Franklin Local Board and a register of transport issues in the Franklin Local Board area currently being addressed by Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

Executive Summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Franklin Local Board and its community, matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector, and Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

3.       In particular, this report provides information on:

·      Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund

·      Pukekohe station update

·      Traffic Control Committee report for July

·      New bus and train zones introduced in August.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Franklin Local Board receives the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport Update – August 2016’ and the attached issues register from Auckland Transport’s Elected Member Relationship Manager (South).

 

Discussion

Franklin Items

A1. Local board transport capital fund (LBTCF)

4.       The Franklin Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is currently $434,966 per annum.

5.       The Board’s current LBTCF projects are included in the table below (in which ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

083

Pukekohe East Road-Mill Road/Harrisville Road intersection, Bombay/Pukekohe – installation of variable 70 km/h rural intersection activated warning signage (RIAWS)

·      FEC estimate of $67,000

·      Installation was completed with the signs fully operational on 27-Jun-16.

·      An open road sign is to be installed near the beginning of Harrisville Road.

·      Final costs yet to be reported but expected to be around $60,000.

349

Pacific Street new footpath, Waiuku

·      Revised ROC of $147,500

·      Construction began in Jun-16 and the project is 95% completed.

·      Construction is completed except for one defect to remedy.

·      Final costs are expected to be close to the ROC of $147k.

443

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

·      ROC estimate of $105,000

·      The ROC estimate for the upgrade (developed in conjunction with AC Parks) is $105,000.

·      On 24-Nov-15, the Board approved the project for detailed design and costing.

·      AT is working with the Board’s Strategic Broker to gather their input on the design.  A local workshop is being held in the first half of September where it is expected that the designs will be discussed after being distributed prior.

·      A workshop will then be scheduled with the Board to discuss the outcomes from the local consultation and present designs for consideration.

458

Second View Avenue, Beachlands – installation of new kerb and channel between Wakelin and Bell Roads (both sides)

·      SW component estimate $42,000

·      LBTCF FEC estimate $355,000

·      On 24-Nov-15, the Board approved the project for detailed design and costing.

·      On 22-Mar-16, the Board approved construction based on the FEC of $355,000 and the design tabled at the meeting.

·      Construction has commenced and is expected to be completed by mid to late September 2016.

466

Pedestrian advisory signage at ‘informal crossings’, Pukekohe town centre

·      Updated FEC of $10,000 (for five identified sites)

·      On 28-Jun-16, the Board approved the project for construction.

·      On 2-Aug-16, the Board approved the expansion of the project to include two further crossing points on King Street, for the revised FEC estimate of $10,000.

·      Installation is expected to be completed by 15-Aug-16.

 

 

6.       The Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund to date is summarised below.

Franklin Local Board transport capital fund summary:

Total funding available (across 5 FYs – 2012/2013 to 2016/2017)

$2,174,830

Completed projects reporting actual costs (Second View Ave kerb and channel; Patumahoe/Waiuku/Attewell investigation; Pukekohe station overbridge; Ardmore School footpath; Harris St bench; Pukeoware School signs; Waiuku pavers clean/seal upgrade; Third View Ave kerb and channel project x2; Awhitu flag lighting; Tobin St car park lighting; Kaiwaka Rd footpath; Whitford bus interchange; Kitchener Road angle parking upgrade; Hunua pedestrian facility; Waiuku pavers replacement – stage 1)

-$1,442,288

Projects approved for construction based on ROCs or FECs (Mill/Harrisville RIAWS; Pacific St footpath; Second View Ave kerb and channel, Pukekohe pedestrian advisory signage/ 5 sites)

-$578,600

Projects with ROCs approved for detailed design and costing phase (Beachlands town centre gardens)

-$105,000

Funding still available to allocate

$48,942

 

A2. Pukekohe station update

7.       The scope of works for this project is a bus/rail interchange, park and ride, new station overbridge with lifts, renewal of timber platform surfacing and improvements to the Custom Street, Harris Street and Manukau Road intersections.  This will cater for the new bus network with bus services exiting Custom Street onto Manukau Road.

8.      The project is currently progressing according to programme for overall delivery:

a.   The detailed design for the full interchange is being updated following Auckland Transport internal review

b.   The detailed design and costing for the bus shelter is being finalised but is currently on target

c.   Stage 1 works construction have been tendered and awarded to Intercivil.  This includes the bus turnaround and the intersection works

d.   A pre-construction meeting with Auckland Council has been completed

e.   Corridor access requests have been submitted and granted

f.    A stakeholder letter has been distributed to surrounding neighbours

g.   The KiwiRail permit for entry was granted on 8 August

h.   Works have commenced onsite along Custom Street

i.    Resource Consents and the Outline Plan of Works have been submitted and are awaiting final approval but these affect stage 2 only.  Further contamination testing is being carried out to close out the consent

j.    The project team is awaiting confirmation from Manukau Road streetscape team that improved surfacing will be rolled out onto Custom Street, with a decision due by mid-August

k.   The project team is coordinating with telecom company to accelerate their proposed cabling works along Manukau Road.  If achievable, this will limit damage to newly laid paths along Manukau Road

l.    A sod turning event is being re-planned for mid-October 2016

m.  Auckland Council has agreed to close the Pukekohe service centre’s public car park entrance on Custom Street for a 12-month period.  Auckland Transport will want to review any future changes to the site that may impact on bus services and congestion on Custom Street and Manukau Road

n.   Auckland Transport is speaking with the owner of 99 Manukau Road regarding the need to remove all non-authorised parking in the road corridor.  Further correspondence has been received from the owner regarding previous contact with the former Franklin District Council in 2004.  This has been reviewed by Auckland Transport’s legal team and a response is being prepared

o.   Land purchases on the corner of Harris and Manukau Roads (for historic encroachment) are still under negotiation. High level agreement for land purchase of 4 Manukau Road and AT is to complete a Resource consent amendment for the reconfiguration of car parking spaces on the owners land.  Currently being prepared

p.   Stage 2 is to be tendered and awarded by October 2016.

9.       Construction works have commenced for stage 1 and the contractor’s programme has been prepared to allow the new bus network services to commence from 30 October.  This programme is tight and regular reviews are required to ensure it is met due to the threat of wet weather.

10.     Auckland Council’s Public Arts team is preparing an artwork brief for the engagement of a designer. This will focus on the overbridge roof.

 

A3. Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report for July

11.     . There were no resolutions made by the TCC affecting the Franklin Local Board area in the month of June 2016.

12.     For the month of July 2016, the only TCC resolution affecting the Franklin Local Board area was to amend a previous resolution approving a variable 70 km/h speed limit on Mill Road and Pukekohe East Road either side of the Harrisville Road intersection.  The amendment extended the variable 70 km/h zone another 100m to the west to improve sight line constraints that would compromise the visibility of the sign on the western approach.

 

A4. Consultation documents on proposed improvements

13.     . Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Franklin Local Board for its feedback.  As the Board’s transport portfolio holders provide feedback on the Board’s behalf, the details below are included for general information purposes only.

14.     At the conclusion of consultation, Auckland Transport considers the various consultation responses received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on, or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

15.     Plans for the following proposals have not been individually attached to this month’s report due to size considerations.

16.    Bus stop infrastructure project, Pukekohe and Waiuku – Further proposed bus stop changes are listed below to support planned new network bus services for Pukekohe and Waiuku that will commence from 30 October.  To determine appropriate bus stop locations, an assessment was undertaken by Auckland Transport taking into account key considerations including optimisation of spacing between bus stops to maximise the catchment area; adequate space between driveways to provide a hardstand area for passengers; close proximity to intersections and pedestrian crossing facilities; and choosing a safe location where the road geometry provides safe sightlines for oncoming vehicles.

a.   New bus stop outside #68/70 East Street, Pukekohe, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage

b.   New bus stop outside #3 Cape Hill Road, Pukekohe, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage, Pukekohe

c.   New bus stop opposite #16 Seddon Street, Pukekohe, installation of new bus stop road markings, signage, removal of three time-restricted car park spaces, removal of a kerb buildout, and a minor kerb cutback outside #16 Seddon Street

d.   Removal of bus stop road markings and bus stop sign outside #68 Seddon Street, Pukekohe

e.   Removal of bus stop shelter, bus stop road markings, and bus stop sign outside #72 Kitchener Road, Waiuku

f.    New bus stop outside #13 Mauku Road, Patumahoe, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage

g.   New bus stop outside #84 Kitchener Road, Waiuku, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage

h.   New bus stop outside #2 Queen Street, Waiuku, including installation of new bus stop road markings, and signage, removal of three time-restricted car park spaces, and a kerb cutback

i.    New bus stop outside #4 Victoria Avenue, Waiuku, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage

j.    New bus stops outside #14 & 27 Massey Avenue, Pukekohe, including installation of two new bus shelters, bus stop road markings and signage, and removal of three time-restricted car park spaces each side of Massey Avenue

k.   New bus stop outside #62 Victoria Avenue, Waiuku, including installation of a new bus stop platform, bus stop road markings and signage

l.    New bus stop outside #2A Constable Road, Waiuku, including installation of new bus stop road markings, signage, and a minor kerb cutback.

17.    Proposed minor road improvements along identified routes – Auckland Transport’s Crash Reduction Study Programme is intended to improve road safety at identified locations with a high crash rate over the past five years.  As part of this programme, Auckland Transport is introducing road improvements along Ararimu Road, Hunua Road and Paparimu Road.  Proposed improvements include:

·      Improving the location, size and placement of permanent warning signage along the route and on approaches to curves

·      Improving delineation, including road markings, edge marker posts and signage

·      Installing gateway treatments at some sites with speed limit change

·      Upgrading road markings at intersections

·      Minor seal widening.

18.     Proposed new footpaths, Beachlands – Auckland Transport’s Regional Footpath Improvement Programme aims to support walking by improving safety for pedestrians of all ages with clearly defined pedestrian paths away from motorised traffic, improving access to community facilities such as educational institutions, transport hubs, parks, town centres and employment areas, and completing missing links in the existing pedestrian networks to support a wider variety local walking trips and to utilise surrounding footpaths effectively.

19.    As part of its Regional Footpath Improvement Programme, Auckland Transport is proposing new footpaths in Beachlands at the following locations:

·      along the south side of Beachlands Road, from Bell Road to Shelly Bay Road

·      along the east side of Bell Road, from # 29A Bell Road to Third View Avenue

·      along the north side of Second View Avenue, from Wakelin Road to Bell Road (NB: this is along the same stretch of road where the Franklin Local Board’s project to install kerb and channel is currently under construction)

·      along the south side of First View Avenue, from Sunkist Bay Road to #65 First View Avenue.

20.     The proposed footpaths will be light grey coloured concrete and 1.8 metres in width.  Additional improvements could include dropped kerbs to assist pedestrians at intersections, new kerb lines at the road edge, new storm water drains and reconstruction of dropped kerbs to allow for drivers to access driveways.  AT will also upgrade existing street lighting, or install new street lighting near the proposed footpaths.

General Information Items

B1. Southern Corridor Improvements (SCI) project

21.    The New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA’s) July 2016 SCI project update is included at Attachment A.  To read more about the project, visit the NZTA website:

www.nzta.govt.nz/auckland-southern-corridor.

22.    The NZTA project team will also be attending a Franklin Local Board workshop on 16 August to update the Board directly.

 

B2. Public Transport Patronage

23.     The summary patronage performance for June 2016 is presented below:

 

24.     For the 12-months to June, Auckland public transport patronage totalled 82.9 million passenger trips, an increase of +4.6% on the previous year.  June monthly patronage was 7.0 million, an increase of +3.2% on June 2015.  June normalised adjustment was ~ 3.1% accounting for special event patronage, with the same number of business days and weekend days/public holiday.

25.     Bus services totalled 60.2 million passenger trips for the 12-months to June, an increase of +0.7% on the previous year.  Patronage for June was 5.1 million, a decrease of -0.8% on June 2015.  June normalised adjustment was ~ -0.4% accounting for special event patronage, with the same number of business days and weekend days/public holiday.

26.     Bus patronage has grown by a modest +0.7% which is contrary to the general downward trends experienced across New Zealand where Auckland is only one of two systems (18 in total) that have experienced growth.  The comparison found, after allowing for population changes, the total New Zealand boardings /capita in 2015 declined by 3.2%.  This may be compared with increases in 2013 (+1.0%) and in 2014 (+0.4%).  The main reasons cited for the 3.2% decline include a real reduction in fuel prices impacting boardings by (-1.5%) and car ownership increase as a result of real price reduction in cars of (-0.8% reduction in boardings).  Specifically in Auckland, fare elasticity on a single service resulted in (-1.1%) reduction in boardings.  In addition there were some unique events affecting Auckland, including disruptions as a result of CRL works and a bus strike earlier in the financial year.

27.     Train services totalled 16.8 million passenger trips for the 12-months to June, an increase of +20.6% on the previous year.  Patronage for June was 1.5 million, an increase of +17.3% on June 2015. June normalised adjustment was ~ 15.5% accounting for special event patronage, with the same number of business days and weekend days/public holiday.  Rail patronage during FY16 has continued to grow in line with extra capacity provided by way of a homogenous EMU fleet, improving passenger comfort, punctuality and reliability.  An increase in western line peak frequency in May 2016 with timetable improvements in February 2017 should see continued growth in this mode.

28.     Ferry services totalled 5.9 million passenger trips for the 12-months to June, an increase of +6.2% on the previous year.  Patronage for June was 0.41 million, an increase of +9.6% on June 2015.  June normalised adjustment was ~ 9.6% accounting for special event patronage, with the same number of business days and weekend days/public holiday. Ferry patronage growth of +6.2% has been strong, with Gulf Harbour, Hobsonville and Pine Harbour showing strong growth in line with increased residential development in these areas.

29.     Rapid and Frequent services totalled 31.0 million passenger trips for the 12-months to June, an increase of +9.9% on the previous year.  Patronage for June was 2.7 million, an increase of +7.3% on June 2015.

Media Releases

C1. New bus and train zones introduced in August

30.     Auckland Transport is introducing a new zone-based public transport system to make fares simpler.  The new Simpler Fares system for all bus and train services starts on 14 August 2016 (excluding SkyBus).

31.     The new zone map (see Attachment B) has 13 zones, and fares will be calculated according to the number of zones travelled through for the entire journey.

32.     This is a significant change to bus and train fares in Auckland and it will be much easier for people to work out their fare before they travel.

33.     Colour-coded zones along with a new fare table make it simpler to work out cash or AT HOP fares no matter which buses or trains travellers take. Passengers can simply add up the number of zones they are traveling through and use the fare table to work out their fare.

34.     With an AT HOP card it’s even simpler for bus and train journeys, with a single fare being charged for each journey, even if passengers take several buses or trains to get to their destination.  This will become increasingly important as Auckland Transport rolls out the New Network for public transport over the next two years, beginning with south Auckland later this year.

35.     The New Network aims to be much simpler and easier to understand and use.  It will be better connected and generally more frequent, and the new fare system will help customers to make the most of it.

36.     With an AT HOP card, travellers will pay for one entire journey from A to B, instead of paying for each bus or train separately.  Passengers should continue to tag on and off each bus and train as they do now, and at the end of their journey they will be charged a single fare.

37.     During a journey passengers can use up to five buses or trains within four hours, with up to 30 minutes transfer time between each trip.

38.     The new system means passengers can take the fastest or most convenient option without paying more for doing so by using an AT HOP card.  For example, if travelling from Howick to the city centre, it may be quicker to take a bus to Panmure and a train for the rest of the journey, rather than staying on the bus for the whole trip.

39.     A new AT HOP child weekend fare is also being introduced, to make weekend family outings more affordable by public transport, along with changes to the AT HOP day pass and three new ferry monthly passes.

40.     A child paying with an AT HOP card, with a child concession applied, can travel anywhere in Auckland, making up to 5 bus or train trips over a 4 hour period with up to 30 minutes transfer time between each trip and pay a one-zone fare regardless of how many zones they cross.

41.     A new AT HOP day pass costing $18 provides unlimited travel until midnight on the day it is first used on all buses and trains plus inner harbour ferry services (except SkyBus services).  Inner-harbour ferries are Devonport, Stanley Bay, Bayswater, Northcote Point and Birkenhead services.  SkyBus services are excluded from the new system.

42.     For further information on the fare zones and fares go to www.at.govt.nz/simplerfares

 

C2. City Rail Link work to start at Britomart

43.     Commuters using Britomart Transport Centre will have noticed a few changes from 24 July as the City Rail Link took another step forward.

44.     After years of planning, the first phase of work began at Britomart that week with the closure of the Commerce Street entrance for six months.  The station stays open and is accessible from Tyler, Galway and Lower Queen Street, as well as the eastern entrance at Takutai Square.

45.     A new entrance facility will be built in Commerce Street to replicate the facilities in the historic Chief Post Office (CPO) building which will be closed early next year to allow the CRL tunnels to be built beneath.

46.     Hoardings will be in place throughout construction with way-finding signage to guide commuters to the nearest entrance/exit.  During this phase, bus shelters and the drop off/pickup area will be removed with alternative drop off and mobility parking on Galway Street.  Two delivery and service vehicle spaces will also be available on Tyler Street.

47.     The temporary station entrance will be completed in early 2017 and will house the ticketing office, retail units and will function as the main entrance to the station.  Phase two will begin once the temporary station entrance is complete and is expected to finish in 2020.

48.     For more information on the Britomart construction work visit: www.AT.govt.nz/thebuildison

 

C3. Carpooling takes thousands of cars off the road

49.     Auckland Transport’s annual evaluation shows that each week there are 33,570 fewer cars on the roads during morning peak traffic as a result of the Commute programme engaging with organisations and individuals throughout the region.

50.     This year’s results are a reflection of the increasing number of travel choices available to Aucklanders and their desire to find more efficient ways of commuting.  Auckland Transport’s Travel Demand team work with businesses and individuals throughout the region to promote these travel choices.

51.     The team set a goal of lowering the number of single occupancy vehicles on the roads by 6000 per day and surpassed that goal, reducing the number of cars on the road by 6714.

52.     This decrease equates to an annual reduction of 1.64 million trips and a total distance of 17.2 million km travelled, enough to go around the earth more than 420 times.  It also means a 5582 tonne reduction in CO2 emissions.

53.     Registrations for the Let’s Carpool programme reached 9720, exceeding the target of 8000.

54.     The programme is a way for organisations and individuals to find other people in Auckland making a similar commute, and joins them up to share the ride. It reduces the number of cars on the road and saves drivers money.

55.     For more on carpooling: https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/commute/carpooling/

C4. Plans for more parking at Papakura station

56.     Auckland Transport is looking at ways to extend one of its busiest park and rides at Papakura Railway Station, and is set to issue a tender which could see a significant increase on the 327 parking spaces currently at Papakura.

57.     The extension is to cope with the large jump in numbers of people using the Southern rail line, as passenger growth for the past six months is 19%.

58.     Traditional park and rides are expensive because they rely on buying land, and with Auckland’s high land values, a parking bay can cost $25,000 or more.  Auckland Transport is therefore looking at trialling innovative ways to provide more parking at key locations, including the possibility of using pre-fabricated steel decking.

59.     Auckland Transport is in the early stages of investigating a trial for Papakura, but there are still a number of issues to be worked through, including design and traffic assessments for the site.

60.     In Auckland there are currently 5,500 park and rides bays. There are plans to put in 800 more bays within two years, including 400 at Westgate and new spaces at Silverdale, Pukekohe and Hobsonville.

Issues Register

61.     The regular monthly issues register is Attachment C to this report.

Consideration

Local Board Views

62.     The Board’s views will be incorporated during consultation on any proposed schemes.

Implementation Issues

63.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

NZTA Southern Corridor Improvements Project – July update

51

bView

Zone map for new Simpler Fares system

55

cView

Issues Register – Franklin Local Board – August 2016

57

    

Signatories

Authors

Jenni Wild – Elected Member Relationship Manager (South); Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager; AT

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

ATEED Six monthly report to the Franklin Local Board

 

File No.: CP2016/17197

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the six monthly report from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) on their activities in the local board area.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Franklin Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the local board area for the six months from 1 January to 30 June 2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the six-monthly report for the period 1 January to 30 June 2016.

 

Comments

3.       This report provides the local board with an overview of ATEED activities for discussion.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

4.       This report is presented for local board discussion.

Māori impact statement

5.       Māori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report on local activities. However, this performance report does not impact specific outcomes or activities. As such, the content of this report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on Māori.

Implementation

6.       The report is for information only.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

aView

ATEED Six Monthly report to the Franklin Local Board

63

     

Signatories

Authors

Richard Court, ATEED Manager Operational Strategy & Planning

Authorisers

Paul Robinson, ATEED Local Economic Growth Manager

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Update 1 January to 30 June 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/13256

 

  

Purpose

1.      To give the Franklin Local Board an overview of Panuku Development Auckland. The report also notes any major issues, projects and activities within the Local Board area for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2016.

Background

2.      Panuku Development Auckland was established in September 2015 as a result of the merger of two CCOs – Waterfront Auckland and Auckland Council Property Limited (ACPL).

3.      Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland – from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

4.      Comprised of five Directorates, Panuku manages around $1 billion of council’s property portfolio, which we continuously review to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio or release land or property that can be better used by others.

5.      Panuku works with government, iwi, not-for-profit and private organisations. We use our skills, knowledge and connections to bring land and resources together to create the best outcome for Aucklanders.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board receives the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Update 1 January to 30 June 2016.

 

Local Activities

Portfolio Management

6.       Panuku manages property owned by the council and AT that are not currently needed for service or infrastructure purposes. These are properties that are not immediately required for delivery of a council service or infrastructure development but are being held for use in a planned future project such as road construction, the expansion of parks or development of future town centres.

7.       The property portfolio comprises 1447 properties containing 1121 leases as at the 30 June 2016. The current portfolio includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

8.       The return on the property portfolio for the period ending 30 June 2016 was above budget with a net surplus to the AC and AT shareholders of $3.9m ahead of budget.

9.      The average monthly tenantable occupancy rate for the 6 month period is more than 98% which is above the SOI target of 95%.

Properties Managed in Franklin Local Board Area

10.     Panuku Development Auckland currently manages 53 commercial and residential properties within the Franklin Local Board area.

Commercial Properties

38

Residential Properties

15

Total Properties Managed

53

 

Business Interests

11.     Panuku also optimises the commercial return from business interests it manages on council’s behalf. This comprises two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

12.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Franklin Local Board area.

Acquisitions and Disposals

Acquisitions

13.    14 properties have been purchased this financial year for open space purposes around the region at a value of $29.5m, and 13 properties have been purchased for storm water purposes at a value of $1.3m. 

14.    No properties were purchased in the Franklin Local Board area during the reporting period.

Disposals

15.    To the financial year end 2015/16 Panuku has achieved $55.5m of unconditional net sales against the 2015/16 disposals target of $50.0m for the year.

16.    One property was sold in the Franklin Local Board area during the reporting period. 78 Queen Street, Waiuku, a small strip of land totaling 25m² was sold to an adjoining owner in June 2016.

Portfolio Strategy

Portfolio Review and Rationalisation

Overview

17.    Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets.  This includes identifying properties from within council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate.  Panuku has a particular focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.  Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

18.     July 2015 to June 2016 Target

UNIT

TARGET

ACHIEVED

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$40m disposal recommendations

$53,436,750 as at 30 June 2016

These recommendations include $38,334,000 of sites that are identified for development projects.

 

19.    Panuku works closely with the council and Auckland Transport (AT) to identify potentially surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

20.     July 2016 to June 2017 Target

UNIT

TARGET

COMMENTS

Portfolio Review

$45m gross value recommended for sale

This target includes disposal recommendations and sales for sites that are identified for housing development and urban regeneration projects

 

 

Process

21.     Once identified as a potential sale candidate a property is taken through a multi-stage Rationalisation Process. The agreed process includes engagement with: the council, Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs), local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with local ward and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

22.     Properties currently under review in the Franklin Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

PROPERTY

DETAILS

28 Lockwood Road, Hunua

The property is located next to the Hunua Depot and was transferred in legacy council ownership in the 1960s This property is no longer required for Regional Parks’ service use.  The rationalisation process commenced in May 2016.  No alternative service uses were identified during the rationalisation process.  Local board and iwi engagement to be undertaken in 2016.

9 Hall Street, Pukekohe

Ex Franklin District Council site that was acquired for car parking and completing a road (service lane).  Released by AT as not required for its infrastructure purposes.  The rationalisation process commenced in February 2016.  No alternative service uses were identified during the internal consultation process.  Iwi engagement and initial local board engagement has been undertaken.  Further local board engagement to be undertaken.

42 Seddon Street, Pukekohe

Residual strip of land from the Pukekohe ring road.  Rationalisation process commenced in August 2015.  Watercare submitted EOI requesting time to investigate if this site is a suitable location for a future water pump station.  Extension of time granted.  Rationalisation to be progressed in 2016 pending outcome of Watercare investigation.

Crisp Avenue (adjoining 23), Pukekohe

Accessway reserve, transferred from ACPD as non-service. Rationalisation process commenced in December 2014.  No alternative service uses were identified and the feedback obtained was supportive of divestment.  To be presented to the governing body in 2016 for decision making.

Adjacent 95 Tegal Road, Drury

Stopped road.  Parks Sports and Recreation confirmed it had no requirement for access via this site.  Rationalisation process commenced in December 2014.  No alternative service uses were identified and the feedback obtained was supportive of the proposed divestment.  To be presented to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2016.

27 and 37 Tobin Street, Pukekohe

Residual strip of land from the Pukekohe ring road.  Released from Parks Sports and Recreation as the size and typography of these sites inhibit recreational opportunities.  The rationalisation process commenced in August 2015.  No alternative service uses were identified.  The Franklin Local Board do not support the proposed divestment of these sites.  To be presented to the governing body in 2016 for decision making.

161R Maraetai Drive, Maraetai

Reserve that was created upon subdivision in 1947.  Released by Parks Sports and Recreation as site is not serving, and is not likely to serve, a park function.  Rationalisation process commenced in December 2015.  No alternative service uses were identified and the feedback obtained was supportive of the proposed divestment.  To be presented to the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2016.

Section 1 SO 417727 Middleton Road, Drury

Unformed stopped road.  Currently leased to Winstones Quarry.  Rationalisation process commenced in May 2015.  No alternative service uses were identified and the feedback obtained was supportive of divestment.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved the divestment of this site in March 2016.

Part 15 Austen Place, Pukekohe

Residual vacant land that was acquired by the Franklin District Council with two other properties to use as a dog pound and a refuse transfer station.  The dog pound and refuse transfer station have now been built.  The rationalisation process commenced in August 2015.  No expressions of interest were received during the internal consultation and feedback received support for divestment.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal of this site in May 2016.

172, 174, 180A, 180B Manukau Road, Pukekohe

Released by AT as not required for infrastructure purposes.  Sites were progressed through the rationalisation process to evaluate future use requirements and considerations.  Presented to the Governing Body in July 2014, which deferred decision making until the Pukekohe Area Plan was completed.  Awaiting updated information and advice from AT as to if any of the sites are required for Pukekohe arterial.

 

Housing for Older People

23.    Council owns and operates 62 villages across Auckland to provide rental housing to older people in Auckland. The Housing for Older People (HfOP) Project is a Council initiative that involves procuring a third party provider to partner with council in delivering the rental housing service.

24.    Following the approval by the Panuku Board on 8 December 2015, the Auckland Development Committee noted that HfOP would be an Unlock project for Panuku and that Panuku would prepare a High Level Project Plan (HLPP) that provided the foundation for Panuku to develop and reposition the portfolio to better the needs of older people in Auckland.

25.     These two initiatives would achieve Council’s objectives to grow, develop, and improve the quality of housing for older people.

26.     On December 21, Council announced that The Selwyn Foundation will be its preferred joint venture partner to manage the HfOP portfolio.  The selection of Selwyn being subject to public consultation, due diligence, contract preparation and completion of the business planning process. It is in this context that Panuku has been negotiating a joint venture agreement with Selwyn.

27.     A HLPP to cover the multi-year redevelopment of the network of village sites is being prepared by Panuku. The HLPP seeks Council approval to delegate authority for Panuku to progress the development aspect of the HfOP Project. The HLPP will be presented to Council in August 2016 for approval.

28.     The following HfOP villages are located within the Franklin Local Board area:

Village

Address

Number of units

24 Albert Place Village

1 Albert Place, Pukekohe

30

32 Henry Curd Village

4-8 Henry Curd Terrace, Pukekohe

10

Kent Street Village

14 Kent Street, Waiuku

8

Lawrie Avenue Village

111 Queen Street, Pukekohe

7

Norfolk Rise Village

2 Norfolk Rise, Waiuku

16

Parkway Village

16 Princes Street, Pukekohe

28

 

Development

29.    Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 54 region wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives. The Development directorate drives the implementation phase of the Panuku region wide redevelopment programme.

30.    This directorate works across the organisation, with partners and stakeholders over the life of projects. It also champion’s best practise project delivery to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

31.    A high level update on development activities in the Franklin Local Board area as below.

32.    17-21 Massey Avenue & 33 Edinburgh Street; 1 & 3 Roulston Street; 82 Manukau Road, Pukekohe – The Massey / Edinburgh properties represent a long term strategic development opportunity that have been cleared for sale.  Panuku continues to work on future options. The properties were approved for sale in August 2013. In principle discussions with St Johns regarding a potential land exchange for land at 17 Massey and 1-3 Roulston, for the St Johns site at 21 Roulston; located immediately adjacent to the Franklin Centre, has been initiated.  AT however controls the parking areas in Roulston Street therefore ATs formal endorsement of the proposition must be obtained before it can proceed. AT agree with the proposed exchange in principle. Panuku continues to work with Councils Finance and Corporate team to assess options for relocating the existing Customer Service Centre and Local Board offices at 82 Manukau Road. No Long Term Plan funds are allocated for this project therefore any project costs will need to be funded through the proceeds of the sale of assets. The sale of 82 Manukau could be the source of some of the funding that is required.

Regional Activities

33.    The workload of Panuku has increased significantly with framework planning beginning for the Transform project of Manukau, and the Unlock projects of Northcote and Takapuna.  Alongside our business as usual, managing these projects means that Panuku carefully balances its resource planning. Henderson is the next centre that Panuku is considering, and work has begun on a High Level Project Plan for Henderson centre.

34.    Alongside the development projects, Panuku continues its business as usual activities, including managing the Council’s non-service property disposal and managing the Westhaven Marina.

35.    As expected, workload at Panuku is requiring active management as the number of projects in the Panuku work programme increases.  Panuku is developing a master programme so it can effectively spread its resources across projects, control the scope of its programme to ensure it can retain a strong focus on delivery, and to identify where it will require extra resourcing moving forward. Where extra resourcing or funding is required for urban regeneration within transform locations, Council has endorsed the principle of Transform Project expenditure being funded from reinvestment of proceeds from properties which are disposed within those locations.

36.    Panuku has continued to form strong relationships with stakeholders; with the communities it works within, Local Boards, the Council family and also with the Government.  Mana Whenua engagement activities is significant, with monthly meetings held with all Mana Whenua, and regular one-on-one engagement with Iwi. 

Highlights

37.     The highlights for the last 6 months were:

a)    The Auckland Development Committee approved the High Level Project Plan (HLPP) for Manukau as a Transform location.

b)    The Auckland Development Committee also approved the HLPP for Northcote and Takapuna as Unlock locations.

c)    The Prime Minister Rt Hon John Key and Madam Chang Laiwa, Chair of Fu Wah, turned the ground at the ground-breaking ceremony for the $200 million, 190-room Park Hyatt hotel being built in the Wynyard Quarter.

d)    Including the Park Hyatt hotel, 14 developments are currently underway in the transformation of the Wynyard Quarter, with Willis Bond and Precinct progressing through their respective residential and commercial developments. 

e)    The development of the Airfields site at Hobsonville is continuing, with infrastructure being developed, including the building of new roads and water ponds.  The 20 hectare Airfields site will provide approximately 400 new homes when it is completed.  Panuku has finalised a development agreement with A.V Jennings in April 2016 for the development of Airfields stage 1. The site is 1.6ha which will result in the construction of 102 homes, ten percent being affordable. Panuku is also currently discussing with a potential partner the development of the remainder of the 20 hectare site.

f)     Panuku Development Auckland was given delegated authority from Auckland Council’s Finance and Performance Committee in March 2016 to seek private sector investment to redevelop the Civic Administration Building. Panuku has identified a preferred proposal to redevelop the building and surrounding land and is working through the details with the selected developer. If negotiations proceed as hoped, Panuku should be able to enter into a development agreement later in the year. The preferred proposal will meet Council’s heritage and design requirements for this iconic building and does not require a financial contribution from Council. There will be a full public announcement outlining the plans for the building and surrounding land once the development agreement is signed.

Future outlook

38.     Over the next few months, Panuku will:

a)    Continue to develop Framework Plans for Transform Manukau and progress the Northcote, Takapuna and Henderson, HfOP Unlock projects. As part of this work, Panuku will be defining what affordable housing means in relation to the developments that it works on.

b)    Work on the HLPP for the Onehunga Transform project is continuing.  Panuku is consulting with the New Zealand Transport Agency about the implications on the HLPP from the East-West project route.  It is also working with the Ports of Auckland on the transfer of ownership to Panuku of the Onehunga Port. This means that the formation of the HLPP is taking longer than originally anticipated.

c)    Start the HLPP process for Henderson town centre.

d)    Continue to work with The Selwyn Foundation on establishing the Community Housing Partner for the Housing joint venture for Older People, and to form a development programme for its housing portfolio.

e)    Support the Tamaki Regeneration Company to plan and go-to-market process to redevelop the 2,800 social houses that it recently transferred from Crown ownership to TRC.  The Council and the Crown are owners of the Tamaki Regeneration Company, and Panuku provides advice to the Council on its shareholder interest.  It is working alongside The Treasury (who advise on the Crown’s shareholder interest) to support the go-to-market process which will see the redevelopments which will increase housing from the current 2,800 social houses to 7,500 mixed tenure houses over a 10-15 year period.

f)     Oversee the 14 developments currently underway across the Wynyard Quarter.  A critical component of this is to work closely with Auckland Transport to ensure that essential roading infrastructure work takes place, and to manage through the impacts of any delays in the AT programme of works on the development programme within the Wynyard Quarter.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

39.     This report is for the Franklin Local Board’s information.

40.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries you have relating to a property in your Local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz

Māori impact statement

41.     Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. Through our collaborative partnership approach, Panuku works with Māori towards: joint strategic outcomes; enabling commercial investment, including partnership in commercial and housing opportunities; contribution the urban fabric through recognition of Māori cultural footprint in design, respect for the environment and broader social outcomes; guiding the nature of our working practice when we embed Māori values in our business at a strategic and operational level. A Goals and Actions plan outline for this work is published on the Panuku Website as part of our Māori Engagement Framework 28 October 2015.

42.     In June 2016 Panuku progressed the Goals and Actions plan outline into a business wide Māori Responsiveness Action Plan, detailing at an operational level how we will meet our commitments to Maori. We have additionally agreed a Māori Commercial Relationships Action Plan formalising our processes for encouraging Māori commercial relationships with Panuku.

Local context

43.     There are 10 iwi with mana whenua interests in the Franklin Local Board area. Panuku has been engaging with these groups in respect of potential disposals and development sites in the Franklin Local Board area over the past three years.

44.     If planning progresses for future Panuku led development in Franklin Panuku will work in collaboration with kaitiaki officers from these tribes towards best care for land and people within our area of influence. This work is understood to enable protection of waahi tapu and the optimum health of the mauri (life force) of the natural environment.

45.     We additionally seek opportunities to partner with mana whenua iwi and hapū and other Maori organisations on developments.

Implementation

46.     There are no implementation issues.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Sven Mol - Stakeholder Relations Coordinator - Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Toni Giacon - Team Leader Stakeholder and Community Engagement

Sue O'Gorman - Relationship Manager

      

 


Franklin Local Board

23 August 2016

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Acquisition of open space land - Patumahoe

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space..

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report identifies land the council seeks to acquire for open space..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.