I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

6.00pm

Waitemata Local Board Office
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Shale Chambers

 

Deputy Chairperson

Pippa Coom

 

Members

Christopher Dempsey

 

 

Greg Moyle

 

 

Vernon Tava

 

 

Rob Thomas

 

 

Deborah Yates

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Sibyl Mandow

Democracy Advisor

 

7 September 2016

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 307 6071

Email: sibyl.mandow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          6

12        Councillor's Report                                                                                                       7

13        Auckland Transport Update - September 2016                                                          9

14        Newmarket Laneways - Teed Street Upgrade                                                          21

15        Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2015-16 for the Quarter Ended 30 June 2016                                                                                                                    121

16        Heritage Foreshore Project approval and capex funding                                     141

17        Endorsement of the Final Newton and Eden Terrace Plan for Public Release 207

18        Community Facilities Maintenance Contracts 2017                                              279

19        Temporary arrangements for urgent decisions and staff delegations during the election period                                                                                                                          299

20        Chair's Report - September 2016                                                                             303

21        Deputy Chair’s monthly report                                                                                367

22        Report to the Local Board of Member Vernon Tava
August 2016                                                                                                               
375

23        Final Waitemata Local Board Member Report
September 2016 - Deborah Yates
                                                                                                                                    
431

24        Board Members' verbal reports                                                                               439

25        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 441

26        Actions Pending - September 2016                                                                         445

27        Waitemata Local Board Workshop Notes                                                               449  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 9 August 2016, and the extraordinary meeting, held on Tuesday 30 August 2016 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Councillor's Report

 

File No.: CP2016/13796

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of the report is to provide Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on regional governing body matters.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin – Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Auckland Transport Update - September 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/19167

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To respond to requests from the Waitematā Local Board on transport-related matters, inform the board on the current status of the board’s Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), facilitate decisions on proposed and current LBTCF projects and to provide information to elected members about Auckland Transport activities.

Executive summary

2.       This report covers matters of specific application and interest to the Waitematā Local Board and its community; matters of general interest relating to Auckland Transport activities or the transport sector; and relevant Auckland Transport media releases for the information of the Board and community.

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the report, Auckland Transport Update – September 2016.

 

 

Comments

Monthly Overview

3.       Auckland Transport attended a workshop on Tuesday 2 August 2016 with the Waitematā Local Board on;

·    Light Rail - Currently at the strategic case and capital programme business case stage. Need a solution by 2023. The team will come back to the board for further workshop with rail to airport team. This will occur at the board workshop on September 6 2016.

·    Inner West Cycleway connection briefing - Auckland Transport wants to create a network of cycling routes for the area between Pt Chevalier and the city fringe (bounded by the north-western motorway and the Waitematā Harbour), to provide safer and more convenient connections into the city centre and neighbouring suburbs. Auckland Transport sought public feedback to help identify and improve the key cycle routes in the area. This feedback is still being analysed and will be presented to the board once completed.

·    Tamaki Drive Cycleway – Plumer Street to Ngapipi Road, currently at early feasibility stage, will present to board in early November 2016.

·    Parnell Rise to Tamaki Drive Cycleway - Parking survey shows majority of parking taken up daily by commuters. This project is now on hold while parking issues being worked out and will present to the board again in October/November 2016.

 

4.       Auckland Transport attended a workshop on Thursday 11 August 2016 with the Waitematā Local Board on:

·   Waitematā Greenways Routes. Discussion on the exit from the Grey Lynn Park and into Williamson Avenue, resulted in additional work being done and a further workshop was held with consultation documents being produced based on the feedback received.

5.       The monthly portfolio meeting was held on Wednesday 17 August 2016.  Board Member’s Coom, and Dempsey were present and received updates on:

·   Ponsonby Paid Parking and Residents Parking Zones. Current projects, Parnell Parking consultation, due late September 2106, Grey Lynn Parking consultation, due late October 2016, Arch Hill is currently not in the 2016/17 programme.

·   Ponsonby Road Pedestrian Improvement Project feedback. Project team discussed the feedback received regarding street furniture and the replies that will be sent out.  

·       Judges Bay Road signage and parking restrictions to be implemented.

 

Local board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

6.       The Waitematā Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF is currently $469,789 per annum.

7.       The Board’s current LBTCF projects are included in the table below (in which ROC = rough order of costs, and FEC = firm estimate of cost):

ID#

Project Description

Progress/Current Status

216

·      Newmarket Rail Station Artwork fencing

·      FEC estimate of $5,000

·      The Board approved $5,000 towards the project

·      Handrail manufactured, installation planned mid-2016, Auckland Transport’s contractor currently awaiting KiwiRail approval regarding access to the area near the tracks, expected to be completed by October 2016.

·      $1,277 has been committed to this project and the balance, being $3,723, will be covered by Auckland Transport’s renewals budget.

403

·      Waitematā Greenways

·      Grey Lynn Park – shared path

·      Development of a wider, shared path that supports the Grey Lynn Park development plan and the future Waitematā Greenways Route G1 cycle route

 

·      The Board approved $350,000 towards the project

·      Currently in progress, consultation being planned for the route, concept designs being worked on.

·      Working with AC parks

·      2 presentations given to the board re-route plans.

426

·      Ponsonby Road pedestrian improvements.

Funding to create an improved pedestrian experience, including safety elements and amenity, on Ponsonby Road between Williamson Ave. and Franklin Road

·      The Board approved $703,000 towards the project

·      Design released for public consultation in November 2015

·      Board requested adjustments to plantings and planter boxes in MacKelvie Street. Revised plans presented to the board, awaiting cost regarding trial planters.  

·      Board agreed on option 2 as presented at workshop on 1 March 2016, with adjustments to Mackelvie Street.

·      Updated plans for Mackelvie Street, that include painted flush medium, splitter island and painted lane way, presented to Board May 2016.

·      New rough order of cost for Mackelvie Street now 74,000 (excluding trial planter costs)

·      Consultation regarding street furniture completed.

·      Project put out for tender.

425

·      Newmarket Laneways Streetscape improvements

·      Funding for concept design development for the Newmarket Laneways Plan.

·      Council has allocated $3.5m over the next two financial years to deliver the project

·      The Board approved $500,000 towards the project

·      Concept designs for Teed Street, York and Kent Streets updated with extra $350,000 approved by the Board in June 2016 towards the project 

·      Project being led by Auckland Council, in close consultation with Auckland Transport staff

 

·      Parnell Station footpath connection to Nicholls Lane

·      April 2016 - Board approved Auckland Transport to proceed to ROC on the project and to bring back to the board for a decision on funding, once completed 

·      ROC of $700,000

·      Board approved $350,000 from its LBTCF with Auckland Transport also agreeing to commit $350,000 to this project. 

·      Landowner consent received

·      Project now out to tender.

Expected start date Sept/Oct 2016, with intended completion by March 2017

 

·      Lower Khartoum Place renaming plaque, removal of current material in the footpath and to replace it with a etched name place (of the same material)(new name)

·      Awaiting new name to be resolved by the Board

·      AT intend to have the new wayfinding plaque installed by Suffrage Day (19 September 2016)  

 

 

The Waitematā Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund to date is summarised below.

Waitematā Local Board Transport Capital Fund summary:

Total funds available in current political term

 (Four years including 2012-13)

Amount Approved

Actual Expenditure

$1,879,156

 

 

Spent to Date on Completed Projects

(including money spent on cancelled projects)As follows;

 

 

$    80,940

 

Cancelled Projects

 

 

 

 

·    Newmarket Streetscape Enhancement WTM/2012/365

$237,000

 

$13,320

 

 

 

·     Great North Road advanced cycle stop boxes and feeder lane WTM/2012/365

$28,000

$720

 

 

·     Kitchener Bowen, Victoria St intersections WTM/2012/365

$28,000

$ 2,920

 

 

 

·     Residential traffic Calming project East of Ponsonby Road  WTM/2012/365

·     Newmarket Rail Station Artwork Fencing

($3,723 now funded from AT renewals)

$150,000

 

$5,000

$510

 

$1,295

 

 

Completed Projects

 

 

 

 

·     Grey Lynn Shops footpath Enhancement  WTM/2012/365

$20,000

$20,000

 

 

 

·     Drinking fountain – Four Sites WTM/2013/184

$27,000

$27,288

 

 

 

·     Poynton Terrace Raised crossing WTM/2013/250

$0

$ 1,900

 

 

 

·     Drinking Fountains Carlton Gore Rd Nelson Street, Upper Queen Street – Installation WTM/2014/82, WTM/2014/37, WTM/2015/32

$37,000

$12,987

 

 

 

Total

 

$80,940

 

 

Committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction as follows;

·    Newmarket Railway Station        

·    Waitematā Greenways                

·    Ponsonby Rd Pedestrian improvements

·    Newmarket Laneways

·    Parnell Station footpath

·    Lower Khartoum Place Name plate                                                          

 

5,000

350,000

703,000

 

850,000

350,000

9,085

$ 1,277

$254,752

$108,564

 

$248,856

$2,205

$0

$2,262,085

Percentage of these committed projects spent to date = 27%

Total budget left that needs to be allocated to new projects and spent by the end of the current political term

 

 

 

-$463,867

The current four year budget (and some from 2016-17) is fully committed. No more projects need to be approved

Total of projects assessed to a rough order of cost (ROC) stage but not approved by the Local Board

 

 

$0

 

Funds available from the next political term (2016-17)

 

 

$15,023

This is the unallocated balance of the 2016-17 Waitematā LBTCF budget

 

Ponsonby Road Pedestrian Improvement Project

8.       The Ponsonby Road Pedestrian Improvements Project is underway and at detailed design stage. Consultation is complete regarding street furniture and the detailed design. Feedback has been reviewed and an analysis completed.

9.       36 responses were received, 23 on hardcopy forms and 13 online. A full report will be forwarded to the Board and will appear on next full board public meeting agenda.

10.     The designs for Mackelvie Street have been revised, to include a temporary trial with planting in the middle of the road. Auckland Transport is awaiting a costing from Auckland Council on the trial.

Proposed Local Board Transport Capital Funds Projects

11.     The Waitematā Local Board has committed all available funds for the current term and have committed $464,784 from the first year of the new term.

12.     In August 2016 the Waitematā Local Board approved the project below to proceed to construction.

13.     Project:

·    Lower Khartoum Place renaming plaque.

14.     Project update:

15.     Lower Khartoum Place renaming plaque, material has been ordered and is ready for a new name to be approved by the board, with a view to being installed by Suffrage Day on 19 September 2016.

Consultations

          16.          Public consultation has been undertaken on the proposals listed in the table below. Should  the board wish to give any feedback, the board may choose to make its feedback through formal resolutions or request further engagement or a submissions analysis to be presented to the Board before a formal board position is taken.

         

Recent Proposals Consulted On

Proposal

Timeframe

Change to the name on the bus stop on Great North Road (previously known as Chinaman’s Hill)

Feedback closed, to be amended

Quay and Tyler Street bus lane

Still a work in progress

 Two bus stops on The Strand Parnell

Feedback closed and being analysed

 

Franklin Road Project update

Background

17.     Franklin Road is an iconic Auckland street with significant heritage value and is an important

connection between Ponsonby and the CBD.

18.     There are over 14,000 vehicle trips per day on the road. This includes buses and over-dimension vehicles.

19.     However, the road is in poor condition creating safety hazards for pedestrians, cyclists and

drivers. Over time tree roots have damaged footpaths, drainage infrastructure and road

pavement. There is a high demand for parking, but a lack of well defined parking spaces. This results in drivers parking too close to trees and driving over exposed roots.

 

20.     Some utility providers are also worried about infrastructure conditions in Franklin Road. They are planning service renewals and upgrades soon.

Project objectives

21.     Auckland Transport has plans to upgrade the road to best meet the needs of all users,

including:

• Providing improved pavement surface, footpaths and drainage

• Protecting tree root zones from vehicles by redefining the berm area

• Providing for the safe movement of pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles

• Retaining as much street parking as possible

• Working with utility providers to minimise disruption and deliver an integrated programme of works

• Improving street lighting.

22.     In conjunction with the road upgrade, some utility services will also upgrade their infrastructure.

23.     Auckland Transport is working with utility service providers and taking a ‘dig once’ approach,

incorporating their upgrade works into the project. Watercare, Vector, Chorus and Auckland

Council Storm Water, will all be undertaking works to upgrade and/or future proof their

infrastructure.

24.     Construction is scheduled to take place in two stages, avoiding the busy December Christmas lights period:

·   Stage 1, utility works commencing on site August 2016 – October 2017 (with no works undertaken mid-November 2016 – mid-January 2017 for the Christmas lights event). Note works on Franklin Road will be complete in approximately June 2017, July – November 2017 works are on Collingwood St).

·   Stage 2, works commence March 2017 – April 2018.

Stage 1 Construction Update

25.     A newsletter from Watercare has been distributed to residents, the newsletter content has also been included as part of an update to the project webpage. The contractor, Brian Perry will be undertaking the following works between now and mid-November 2016 prior to the no-works period over Christmas:

·   Establishing their site on Collingwood St (refer Figure 1)

·   Undertaking watermain and Vector works from Victoria Street to Wellington Street on the southern side

·   Undertaking wastewater works on Franklin Road from Wellington Street towards Ponsonby Road - outside Nos. 47-53.

 

26.     These works are shown in Figure 2. The above programme may change if there are unforeseen ground conditions and/or obstacles encountered during the works.

 

 

 

Figure 1: Contractors site establishment in Collingwood St

 

Figure 2: Works to be undertaken in 2016

 

Stage 2 AT Design works update

The indicative timing of Stage 2 (Auckland Transport) works are as shown below.

Date

Activity

September 2016

Scheme Design complete

October 2016

Detailed Design complete

October 2016

Lodge Stage 2 Resource Consent application

December 2016

Award Stage 2 Construction Contract

Mid Nov – end Dec

No works over Christmas lights event period

March 2017

Stage 2 (AT) construction commences

June 2017

Stage 1 construction on Franklin Road complete

October 2017

Stage 1 construction on Collingwood St complete

April 2018

Stage 2 (AT) works finish

 

Status of Design

27.       Previously outstanding design features that have been progressed include:

·    Confirmation of catenary street lighting and footpath pole lighting

Bollard lighting was previously proposed for the footpaths, however on further investigation it was determined that these would not provide an even lighting solution for the footpaths and they also would be more susceptible to vandalism, resulting in higher ongoing maintenance costs.

 

·    Confirmation of cycle lane extension to both Ponsonby Road and Victoria Street.

The raised cycle lanes will be extended to Victoria Street and Ponsonby Road intersections and raised separators will be used close to the intersections, to provide additional safety for cyclists. Discussions are underway regarding changes to signal phasing at each intersection to accommodate cyclists.

 

·    Design around New World

Traffic modelling of the New World entry and Victoria Street has been undertaken and a proposed design has been agreed with New World. This involves reducing the exit from their underground carpark to one lane (at present it is two lanes) and the marking of keep clear areas on Franklin Road at the entry and exit points.

 

·    Road safety audit on scheme design completed and scheme modified

·    Stormwater detailed design is underway

·    Landscape consultation with Auckland Transport and Auckland Council specialists.

Current and forthcoming communications

28.     The following communications are either underway or about to take place:

·  Second distribution of a windscreen flyer to let people who park in Franklin Road know that construction will start soon

·  A project wide AT newsletter with an update on both Stage 1 Construction and Stage 2 AT design works, will be distributed in the next two weeks.

 

Media

Auckland seniors on board with HOP

29.     The latest figures show 97 per cent of seniors travelling on public transport are using SuperGold, AT HOP cards.

 

30.     The numbers have been steadily climbing since the introduction of the SuperGold, AT HOP card, due to Auckland’s senior citizens seeing the benefits of using the cards.

 

31.     Using a HOP card means people can simply board the bus, ferry or train and tag on, which makes journey times quicker for all customers.

 

32.     Auckland Transport is very pleased so many people now have, and are using, their SuperGold AT HOP card.  

 

33.     Auckland Transport had a last minute flurry of SuperGold applications, prior to the cards going live, these are all now loaded into the system. This means there is now a very high percentage of people eligible for SuperGold who are using their AT HOP cards.

 

34.     Since Sunday 14 August, SuperGold paper tickets are no longer available on board buses, from ticket offices or from Customer Service Centres.

 

35.     Seniors without an AT HOP card loaded with a SuperGold concession, are able to purchase a paper ticket to travel on public transport but will have to pay the full adult cash fare.

 

36.     To access the SuperGold public transport concession, passengers will need a AT HOP card with a SuperGold concession applied to it.

 

37.     For more on SuperGold: https://at.govt.nz/bus-train-ferry/at-hop-card/at-hop-card-concessions/senior-supergold-concession/

New bus and train zones

38.       Simpler Fares have been successfully rolled out for bus and train users across Auckland.

 

39.     Simpler Fares is a new zone-based public transport system to make fares simpler and it operates on all bus and train services (except SkyBus).

 

40.     The new zone map has 13 zones, and fares are now calculated according to the number of zones travelled through for the entire journey.

 

41.     Auckland Transport Group Manager Metro Development Colin Homan believes, this is a significant change to bus and train fares in Auckland and it is much easier for people to work out their fare before they travel.

 

42.     Auckland Transport believes, colour coded zones along with a new fare table will make it simpler to work out cash or AT HOP fares no matter which buses or trains taken.

 

43.     Commuters, Simply add up the number of zones they are travelling through and use the fare table to work out the fare.

 

44.     A seamless transition for customers and equipment on all buses, at depots, retailers and stations was successful after the update was completed. 

 

45.     It is expected that approximately 33 per cent of ATHOP customers will see a fare decrease and for 66 per cent there will be no change.

 

46.     With the change in fare structure an AT HOP card makes it’s even simpler for bus and train journeys, with a single fare being charged for each journey, even if a commuter takes several buses or trains to get to their destination. This will become increasingly important as Auckland Transport rolls out the New Network for public transport over the next two years, beginning with south Auckland later this year.  The New Network aims to be much simpler and easier to understand and use. It will be better connected and generally more frequent, and the new fare system will help customers to make the most of it.

 

47.     Auckland Transport believes with an AT HOP card,  customers will pay for one entire journey from A to B, instead of paying for each bus or train separately. By tagging on and off each bus and train as is the current practice and at the end of the journey customers will be charged a single fare.

 

48.     During a journey customers are able to use up to five buses or trains within four hours, with up to 30 minutes transfer time between each trip.

 

49.     Also introduced is a new AT HOP day pass costing $18, which provides unlimited travel until midnight on the day it is first used on all buses and trains plus inner harbour ferry services (except SkyBus services). Inner-harbour ferries are Devonport, Stanley Bay, Bayswater, Northcote Pt and Birkenhead services.

 

50.     In addition a new AT HOP monthly pass costing $200 was introduced and this provides unlimited travel on all buses and trains (except SkyBus services).

 

51.       SkyBus services are excluded from the new system.

 

52.       For further information on the fare zones and fares go to www.at.govt.nz/simplerfares

New lights and sensors make Tamaki Drive safer

53.     Road surface lights with sensors are just some of the traffic calming measures that have been installed at the corner of Tamaki Drive and Ngapipi Road to improve safety for all road users.

           

54.     The lights, one of the first times they’ve been used in Auckland, will illuminate to warn drivers that a cyclist is approaching.

 

55.     In addition, the left turn from Ngapipi Road into Tamaki Drive now has new road markings and a new recommended speed of 25km/h.

 

56.     The traffic calming measures are an interim solution ahead of the overall intersection safety upgrade, which will provide traffic signals at the intersection.

 

57.       This project is expected to start towards the end of this year.

 

58.     Auckland Transport’s Cycling and Walking manager Kathryn King, believes the interim solution will make it safer to cycle on Auckland’s busiest cycle route.

 

59.     Auckland Transport has seen an increase of people now choosing to cycle into the city for work and study. At this intersection people cycling into the city end up between two general traffic lanes and have to merge with traffic turning left onto Tamaki Drive from Ngapipi Road. It is believed these measures will make this maneuver safer.  

 

60.     Bike Auckland chair Barbara Cuthbert says it’s great to see this interim work for this important intersection, “As well as slowing traffic, we hope the lights and new signage will remind drivers to look out for people on bikes and to merge with care,” she says.

 

61.       For more information visit https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/

 

Consideration

Local board views and implications

62.     This report is for the local board’s information and action as required.

Māori impact statement

63.     No specific issues with regard to the Maori Impact Statement are triggered by this report.

Implementation

64.     All proposed schemes are subject to prioritisation, funding and consultation.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

 

 

Authors

Ivan Trethowen – Elected Member Relationship Manager  

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Newmarket Laneways - Teed Street Upgrade

 

File No.: CP2016/18673

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the approval of the Waitematā Local Board for the final Newmarket Laneways Streetscape Upgrade - Findings and Feasibility Design Report and the Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Upgrade Developed Design report (final Concept Design) to enable progression to the Detailed Design and associated consenting phase.

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board has championed the upgrade of streets (referred to as laneways in this report) in the Newmarket area through commissioning of a Newmarket Laneways Plan which was adopted in September 2015. The board has also identified Teed Street as the first Newmarket Laneways streetscape improvement project.

3.       Key principles for this project include enhancing the pedestrian environment and contributing to creating a quality public realm with streets that are locally distinctive, safe, healthy, accessible and social.

4.       At the June 2016 Board meeting, the Waitematā Local Board ‘received’ a tabled Newmarket Laneways Streetscapes Upgrade – Findings and Feasibility Design Report. This report is now recommended for the board’s approval (see attachment A).

5.       The board also approved the Teed Street Upgrade Concept Design which enabled the start of public consultation and the Developed Design phase.

6.       Since this board meeting, staff carried out public consultation on the Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Upgrade Concept Design. This commenced on the 20 July 2016 and ended on the 17 August 2016 (refer to paragraphs 17-21).

7.       The design team has also carried out engagement with mana whenua, including a site visit on 2 August 2016 to Teed Street and the area of the wider Newmarket Laneways upgrade.

8.       A Developed Design (which finalises the Concept Design) for the Teed Street Upgrade has now been completed which includes changes made to the design based on feedback from the public consultation and is recommended for the board’s approval (see attachment B).

9.       The developed design has incorporated feedback from the Waitematā Local Board working group, mana whenua, Auckland Transport, Newmarket Business Association, and the wider public (see attachment B).

10.     If this Developed Design report is approved, this will enable progression of the project to the Detailed Design and associated consenting phase.

 

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the Newmarket Laneways Streetscape Upgrade - Findings and Feasibility Design Report.

b)      approve the Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Upgrade Developed Design report to enable the start of the Detailed Design and consenting phase.

 


Comments

Background

 

11.     The Waitemata Local Board has funded the upgrade of Teed Street laneway in Newmarket. The project aims to celebrate the character of Newmarket and recognise the historic and cultural heritage of the area.

12.     Key principles for this project include enhancing the pedestrian environment and creating a quality public realm with streets that are locally distinctive, safe, healthy, accessible and social.

13.     At the board meeting on 21 June 2016 the Waitematā Local Board ‘received’ the tabled Newmarket Laneways Streetscapes Upgrade – Finding and Feasibility Design Report.

14.     They also approved the Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Upgrade Concept Design to enable the start of public consultation and the Developed Design phase.

15.     The board also delegated to the Waitematā Local Board Newmarket Laneways Working Group authority to approve the Teed Street Upgrade Public Consultation and Communication Plan.

16.     Finally, the board approved an additional $350,000 for the Teed Street Upgrade construction works from the Waitematā Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Public feedback on concept design

17.     Since this board meeting public consultation has been carried out on the Concept design from 20 July 2016 to 17 August 2016. Key feedback points received in response to questions asked are summarised below.

18.     Consultation question: What aspects of the proposed concept do you like?

Key themes in feedback received included:

·    Wide footpaths and priority of pedestrians.

·    More trees and plants.

·    Love the market concept.

·    Less cars and more public space.

19.     Consultation question Are there any further opportunities or issues you feel need to be addressed?

Key themes in feedback received included:

·    More cycle parking.

·    Less car parking.

·    Slow zone for cars – or make Teed Street a shared space.

·    Use current car parking for planting or public space.

20.     Consultation question: What are your thoughts on the mixed/flexible parking proposal in Teed Street?

·    Less car parking.

·    Break up car parking with more tree planting.

·    Too car focused.

21.     This public feedback has been incorporated into the Developed Design in several ways as detailed below.

Amendments to Developed Design

22.     Amendments have been made to the design layout throughout the Developed Design phase for a variety of reasons, including underground services investigations, on-going iwi consultation, accessibility consultation, public consultation feedback and general design development.

23.     Amendments made include:

·    Exploration of the use of tree-pits and cabbage tree grove areas to perform a bio-retention function.

·    Repositioning of cabbage tree groves to maximise stormwater quality.

·    Repositioning of trees to minimise services conflicts.

·    Reduction in provision of parallel car parks on south side of street from eight to five (in response to public consultation feedback and accommodating vehicle crossings and minimising underground services conflicts).

·    Increased number of cycle racks, in response to public consultation feedback.

·    Relocation of the light columns to the southern side of the street which will help define the edge of the 'active' or dining zone.

·    Inclusion of Puriri as a street tree species with a single tree at the north east end of street (in response to iwi consultation).

·    Relocation of mobility parking spaces to ensure they are in close proximity to the pedestrian crossing points (in response to accessibility consultation).

·    In-situ concrete surface to raised table at intersection of Teed and Osborne Streets which is consistent with the design at the intersection of Kent and Osborne Streets.

24.     The above changes were presented to the Newmarket Business Association. In general they were supportive of the changes listed above. However they asked the design team to explore changing the outdoor dining area on the southern side, east of the mid-block pedestrian facility into P10 parking. This request is still being investigated with Auckland Transport. 

25.     Auckland Council’s Public Arts team are working with mana whenua, the project team and Newmarket Arts Trust to incorporate artwork into the design. The scope of artwork and its exact location is still under consideration, however a project brief has been developed.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

26.     The Waitematā Local Board has been updated on the Developed Design through a Working Group workshop (on 6 September 2016) and full board workshops (13 September 2016).

27.     To date the project team has received general support for the Newmarket Laneways Streetscape Upgrade Findings and Feasibility Design Report and the proposed Teed Street Upgrade Concept Design report.

Māori impact statement

28.     Engagement with mana whenua has occurred through the City Centre Integration Unit and more recently the Infrastructure and Environmental Services monthly hui (held on 13 May 2016). The Teed Street Concept Design Report has been presented and discussed. A site visit with mana whenua was held on 2 August 2016.

29.     Mana whenua feedback has been supportive of a design approach which will provide a more pedestrian friendly environment through wider footpaths, seating, quality pavement surfaces and reduced car parking.

30.     The use of Pohutukawa trees on the southern side, one Puriri and use of ti kouka - cabbage tree on northern side has also been supported. Ideally the use of progeny of Te Tī Tūtahi (a cabbage tree of historic significance to mana whenua) has been requested where feasible.

31.     Mana whenua have given feedback the project should contribute to improving stormwater quality. Further options for stormwater quality improvement have been explored by the design team, particularly in regard to tree pit design and potential for cabbage tree groves to provide a bio-retention function. The Developed Design has succeeded in providing these improvements to stormwater quality through changes in the tree pit design.

Implementation

32.     If the Teed Street Developed Design is approved, the project team will commence the Detailed Design and consenting process.

33.     A project update on the Teed Street Detailed Design will be provided at a future Local Board meeting prior to Construction stage.

34.     Construction is anticipated to begin on site in early 2017.

 

 

No.

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Page

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Newmarket Laneways Streetscapes Upgrade – Findings and Feasibility Design Report

25

b

Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Developed Design Report

93

Attachments

     

Signatories

Authors

Albert Ang – Senior Engineer

Lisa Spasić - Senior Project Leader

Authorisers

Ralph Webster - Manager Development Programmes

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 


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Regional Facilities Auckland Fourth Quarter Report 2015-16 for the Quarter Ended 30 June 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/19844

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) is pleased to present our Fourth Quarter Report for the 2015-16 year. The purpose of the quarterly report is to ensure the Board is regularly informed of the key strategic issues and focus areas of RFA activities, and to report on the key deliverables and financial performance. 

Executive summary

2.       The Executive Summary of this final report for the 2015-16 year highlights some of the activities, events and developments across RFA facilities from April to June.

3.       There has been steady growth in the range of activities for Aucklanders, and overall attendance numbers continue upwards. 

4.       The Waitemata Board area has particular regional significance and key regional facilities within the Local Board area include the Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland Zoo, ANZ Viaduct Events Centre, Aotea Centre, Auckland Town Hall, The Civic and Western Spring Stadium.  RFA Plus facilities also within the Board’s area are the Auckland War Memorial Museum, MOTAT and Voyager Maritime Museum.  

5.       In August, RFA staff including the CEO, Chris Brooks have met with the Board on two occasions to discuss the on-going work to activate Aotea Square, the development of Auckland Stadiums and other issues of interest to Board members.   

6.       In the new council term RFA will work actively with the board towards the board’s goal to develop a precinct plan for the Western Springs area, and will also engage with the board in regard to RFA’s contribution to the 2017-2020 Waitemata Local Board Plan. If the board wishes, presentations from Directors of RFA facilities will be organised early in the new term.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         receive the Fourth Quarter Report 2015-16 for the Quarter Ended 30 June 2016             report.

 

 

Comments

7.       The Waitemata Local Board area has particular regional significance.  Key regional facilities within the board area include the Auckland Art Gallery, Auckland Zoo, ANZ Viaduct Events Centre, Aotea Centre, Auckland Town Hall, The Civic and Western Springs Stadium.  RFA Plus facilities also within the Board area are the Auckland War Memorial Museum, MOTAT and Voyager Maritime Museum. 

8.       In August, RFA staff including the CEO, Chris Brooks met with board members on two occasions to discuss the on-going work to activate Aotea Square, developments of Auckland Stadiums and other issues of interest to Board Members.

 

 

Highlights of the Fourth Quarter Report

9.       The Executive Summary of the Report highlights a number of key achievements during the quarter. There has been steady growth in the range of activities for Aucklanders, and overall attendance numbers continue upwards.  Auckland Art Gallery has received a range of prestigious awards, earned by the new website, the exhibition in Pursuit of Venue (infected) which drew 48,800 visitors over four months and other exhibitions and activities.

10.     At Aotea Centre the Writers Festival drew a record-breaking 65,000 visitors, The Ice Rink returned for winter, and the giant floor piano has proved to be a popular school holiday and lunch time attraction.

11.     Auckland Conventions staged 174 events including the five-day Australian and NZ College of Anesthetists conference that was attended by 1500 medical specialists from around the world.

12.     Auckland Zoo welcomed two capybara pups and farewelled the giraffe Zuri who moved to Wellington Zoo.  Working with The Warehouse Zoofari programme for children from low-decile schools, the Zoo hosted students from seven Northland schools.  The Zoo continues to make significant contributions to conservation projects, such as preservation of the kakapo, weta punga and the rare cobble skink. 

13.     Auckland Stadiums announced important upcoming events including Cold Play at Mount Smart and the Wellington Phoenix to play at Mount Smart and QBE Stadium.  Auckland Stadiums delivered a waste management report that showed significant improvements in the removal of waste after major events. 

 

No.

Title

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RFA Fourth Quarter Report

123

Attachments

  

 

Signatories

Authors

Judy Lawley – Manager, Local Board Engagement

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 


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Heritage Foreshore Project approval and capex funding

 

File No.: CP2016/18037

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek the Waitematā Local Boards approval of the draft interpretation panels and to approve capex funding for the manufacture and installation of interpretation panels for the Heritage Foreshore Project.

Executive summary

2.       The Heritage Foreshore Project has been directed by the Waitematā Local Board Heritage and Urban Design Portfolio holders since 2012. As part of the project, a Heritage Foreshore Walk linking together interpretation panels in 25 locations between Point Erin Park and Parnell Baths has been developed. There is no allocated capex funding for the manufacture and installation of the interpretation panels.

3.       Approval is sought from the Waitematā Local Board on the content and design of the draft interpretation panel.

4.       Approval is also sought from the Waitematā Local Board for the allocation of capital budget in FY2016-2017 for the manufacture and installation of the interpretation panels.

 

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the draft interpretation panels, as set out in Attachments B to F, and delegate editorial rights to make any subsequent minor changes to the Heritage, Urban Design & Planning Portfolio holders.

b)      approve $82,000 of their Locally Driven Initiatives capital expenditure budget in FY2016-2017 for the manufacture and installation of interpretation panels for the Heritage Foreshore Project.

 

Comments

5.       The Heritage Foreshore Project has been directed by the Waitematā Local Board Heritage and Urban Design Portfolio holders since 2012. The premise of the Heritage Foreshore Project is to promote and celebrate the historic foreshore of the Waitematā. This is being achieved through a standalone project – the development of a Heritage Foreshore Walk linking together interpretation panels in 25 locations, along a route tracing the 1840 Mean High Water Mark of the Waitematā foreshore between Point Erin Park and Parnell Baths.

6.       A document showing the Heritage Foreshore Walk route and locations for the interpretation panels is included as Attachment A.

7.       Resource consent (R/LUC/2015/2474) has been obtained for the installation of the interpretation panels. Landowner approvals were obtained on the basis that formalised agreements in relation to renewals and maintenance occurred prior to installation commencing.

8.       The interpretation panels have been designed in accordance with guidance provided by the Communications Department to conform to council branding and style.

9.       The content of the interpretation panels incorporates information on mana whenua connections to localities along the Waitematā foreshore, late 19th century / early 20th century modification of the Waitematā historic foreshore, and current connections.

10.     All mana whenua groups with an interest in the Waitematā Local Board area were approached to collaborate in the development of the content of the interpretation panels.Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua; Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua; Ngāti Paoa have provided specific content that has been incorporated within the draft interpretation panels.

11.     A draft of each interpretation panel design is included as Attachments B-F.

12.     It is recommended that the draft designs of the interpretation panels are approved by the Waitemata Local Board and that editorial rights to make any subsequent minor changes are delegated to the Heritage and Urban Design Portfolio holders.

13.     No capex budget has been allocated for the manufacture and installation of the interpretation panels.

14.     An indicative cost estimate for the delivery of this stage of the project is $82,000 ($50,000 for manufacture and $32,000 for all installation related costs).

15.     The Waitematā Local Board currently has $141,000 of unallocated Locally Driven Initiatives capex capital expenditure budget in FY2016-2017.

16.     The manufacture and installation of the interpretation panels will need to go out to tender.

17.     It is recommended that the Waitematā Local Board approves $82,000 of their Locally Driven Initiatives capital expenditure budget in FY2016-2017 for the manufacture and installation of interpretation panels for the Heritage Foreshore Project.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     At the Waitematā Local Board workshop held on the 16th August 2016 it was recommended that these matters be presented to the next business meeting of the Local Board.

19.     At the meeting, the Local Board members requested that the route map located on the right hand side of each interpretation panel was amended to make the map more legible; to potentially include a note in each interpretation panel explaining how to get from the current location to the next; that a modern picture of Parnell Baths overlaid with an historical photo of Parnell Baths on interpretation panel 25 is either replaced or removed; that each interpretation panel is future proofed by including a QR code; and that an investigation occur into the costs associated with using the STQRY app.

20.     The original route map located on the right hand side of each interpretation panel has been amended to make it more legible, including using revised colour schemes, the addition of a key, the addition of a north arrow, the inclusion of the Northern Motorway and Harbour Bridge, as well as only using key names of streets and localities on the map. Further amendments to the route map, such as changes in the colour, size and format, will reduce the graphic quality of the image for printing on the interpretation panels.

21.     The project team are currently assessing options for including details explaining how to get from the current location to the next.

22.     A modern picture of Parnell Baths overlaid with an historical photo of Parnell Baths on interpretation panel 25 has been removed.

23.     A QR code has been included on the right-hand side of each of the draft interpretation panels. The QR code used links back to Walk Auckland app. The Walk Auckland app can be downloaded directly onto a smartphone. The Walk Auckland app already hosts Auckland Council central city walks (Downtown Auckland Heritage Walk; Midtown Auckland Heritage Walk; Uptown Auckland Heritage Walk). Content can be uploaded to this app including additional content to that displayed on the panels, for example more detailed mana whenua content; detailed maps and instructions on how to get to each interpretation panels; and translated content.

24.     The incorporation of the Heritage Foreshore Walk into the Walk Auckland app and the translation of the content into multiple languages are separate projects and have not been scoped to be part of the current Heritage Foreshore Walk project. To deliver the incorporation of the Heritage Foreshore Walk into the Walk Auckland app or the translation of the content into multiple languages, each project would need to be scoped out and have funds allocated to it by the Waitematā Local Board.

25.     The translation of the content into multiple languages would incur translation costs. For example, the Communication Department has indicated that, if there is the capacity in-house to translate the content on the interpretation panels into Te Reo, this would cost $0.80 (excluding GST) per word. Using external translators is likely to incur higher costs.

26.     There is an annual subscription fee of $1000 (excluding GST) for STQRY. The subscription holder would then be able to manually enter content onto STQRY, which in turn requires a staff time commitment.

Māori impact statement

27.     As noted under ‘Comments’, iwi representatives were collaborated with on the development of the draft interpretation panels. Specific content requested by iwi representatives has been added. The implementation of the interpretation panels has the potential for positive effects for all local people including Maori. In particular, the interpretation panels incorporate information on mana whenua connections to localities along the Waitematā foreshore providing an opportunity for this knowledge to be shared and recognised.

Implementation

28.     The Heritage Unit needs to work with the Procurement Department to prepare an Request For Tender for the manufacture and installation of the interpretation panels. Once a contract has been signed with the successful tenderer, the Heritage Unit will provide an update to the Waitematā Local Board Heritage and Urban Design Portfolio holders on agreed delivery timeframes.

29.     The interpretation panels installed in parks and reserves would become parks assets, and as such the Parks, Sports and Recreation Department would pick up responsibility for maintenance/renewals going forward. There are 13 interpretation panels in parks and reserves.

30.     A further 10 interpretation panels would need to be added to AT’s maintenance/renewals contract by the Waitematā Local Board.

31.     Clarity on maintenance responsibilities still needs to be worked through for sites 4 and 10 where interpretation panels will be attached to fences owned by NZTA (site 4) and Watercare (site 10). The successful tenderer will be responsible for the formalizing of all maintenance agreements and for the registering of the assets for capital renewals. The Heritage Unit will provide an update to the Waitematā Local Board Heritage and Urban Design Portfolio holders on the finalised maintenance agreements.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Heritage Foreshore Project Route and Interpretation Panel Locations

145

b

Draft Interpretation Panels 1-6

181

c

Draft Interpretation Panels 7-12

187

d

Draft Interpretation Panels 13-15

193

e

Draft Interpretation Panels 16-19

197

f

Draft Interpretation Panels 20-25

201

     

Signatories

Authors

Chris Mallows - Team Leader Cultural Heritage Implementation

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 


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Endorsement of the Final Newton and Eden Terrace Plan for Public Release

 

File No.: CP2016/18435

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek formal endorsement from the Waitematā Local Board for public release and publication of the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan. To note that the Albert-Eden Local Board considered the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan at its business meeting on 7 September 2016.

Executive summary

2.       Both the Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards are responsible for the endorsement of the content of the final Newton and Eden Terrace Plan. Once approved, the final plan will be developed into a publication for public release and become part of the council’s planning framework for implementation.

3.       On 11 June 2013, the Waitematā Local Board endorsed the development of a local area-based plan for Newton to provide a non-statutory planning framework to guide how the area could grow and change over the next 20 to 30 years and to implement at the local level, a number of Auckland Council’s strategic policies and planning documents. 

4.       Preparation of the draft Newton Plan was undertaken from June 2013 to April 2014 and a five week public consultation commenced in April 2014. A summary of the feedback received was released publicly in July 2014.

5.       From August to October 2014, the draft Newton Plan was re-scoped and reviewed to include an extended study area into Eden Terrace south of Mount Eden station, within the Albert-Eden Local Board area. A second round of public consultation was undertaken on a revised draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan from November to December 2014.

6.       From May to August 2016, the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan was prepared. During this time targeted further engagement was also undertaken to inform the preparation of the final draft plan.

7.       The final draft plan includes:

a.   details on the local and strategic context

b.   identification of challenges to address and development opportunities

c.   five key moves and outcomes to respond to challenges and opportunities

d.   an implementation plan which outlines projects, delivery partners, timeframes and funding status

8.      A copy of the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan is attached to this report (Attachment A). Further minor amendments may occur after the local board business meeting and before publication. 

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   approve the final Newton and Eden Terrace Plan, as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report, for document production prior to public release.

b)   delegate authority to the Waitematā Local Board chair and deputy chair to approve any minor changes to the final production of the document prior to public release in September.

c)   note that the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan has also been considered by the Albert-Eden Local Board at its 7 September 2016 local board meeting for approval.

 

Comments

Background

9.       In June 2013, the Waitematā Local Board endorsed the planning process for the development of a local place-based plan for Newton to set out how the area could change and grow over the next 20 to 30 years with a proposed new train station coming in as part of the new City Rail Link project.

10.     From June 2013 to April 2014, the council held a number of internal and external workshops with stakeholders and the community to discuss the context of the area and potential opportunities for change to inform the drafting of the plan.  Alongside this exercise, research and analysis of plans and projects relevant to the Newton area was undertaken. 

11.     In April 2014, the Waitematā Local Board endorsed the release of the draft Newton Plan for a five week public consultation.

12.     In August 2014, Auckland Transport announced the planned City Rail Link station at Newton would no longer be included as part of the City Rail Link project. Further study revealed that redeveloping and extending Mount Eden Station had distinct benefits beyond the previous ridgeline Newton Station. This change meant that the plan study area needed to be extended south to include the catchment area of Mount Eden station and consequently the draft Newton Plan needed to be revised. The revised study area also included part of the Albert-Eden Local Board area. 

13.     From September to October 2014, the revised draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan was prepared and in November 2014 the Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards endorsed the release of the revised draft plan for a five week public consultation. 

14.     During 2015, council officers were resourced to work on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan and work on finalising the Newton and Eden Terrace Plan was suspended temporarily. From April to July 2016, council officers met with internal subject matter experts, iwi, the Uptown Business Association and Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards to discuss the preparation of the final draft plan, and seek further feedback on the key moves and outcomes.  Targeted community engagement was also undertaken over this period. 

 

Strategic context

15.     The Newton and Eden Terrace Plan is guided by, and implements at the local level, a number of Auckland Council’s strategic policies and planning documents. 

16.     The Auckland Unitary Plan will be the council’s main land-use planning document setting the regulatory framework for the land contained in the Newton and Eden Terrace Plan study area. Once operative, the Newton and Eden Terrace area will be predominantly zoned as ‘Mixed Use’ with a ‘Town Centre’ zone identified around Upper Symonds Street.  The wide range of development and activities provided for under the Mixed Use and Town Centre zones will help enable the development opportunities identified in the final Newton and Eden Terrace Plan, while balancing this growth with retaining the special character business and housing areas in these communities. 

17.     A primary outcome of this plan is to inform preparation of the next Long Term Plan 2018-2028, and also the next Albert-Eden and Waitematā Local Board Plans funding cycles.

 

Community and Stakeholder Engagement

18.     From 10 April to 14 May 2014, a five week public consultation took place on the draft Newton Plan. Feedback was sought through written representations, an online survey and through four public drop-in sessions.

19.     From 19 November to 17 December 2014 a further five-week public consultation was undertaken on the revised draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan.  Similarly, feedback was sought through written representations, an online survey and through four public drop-in sessions.

20.     In addition to the above public consultation periods, targeted engagement was undertaken throughout 2014 with the local community, iwi, Uptown Business Association, infrastructure providers, community providers and organisations, council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) to discuss the draft plan and obtain their feedback on the draft plan.

21.     From April to July 2016 further targeted engagement on the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan was undertaken which included further engagement with council departments, CCOs, iwi, the Uptown Business Association, Newton Central School and the community. A community day took place on 25 June at Lot 23, Minnie Street, Eden Terrace, to raise awareness about the draft final plan and other projects going on in the local area. 

 

Feedback received

22.     The majority of respondents to each of the public consultation stages and those from the targeted engagement exercises supported the proposed five key moves.  

23.     Some common themes that were raised through consultation and engagement included:

·    promoting improved connections and links for pedestrians and cyclists within the area and to neighbouring centres

·    enhancement of existing parks and better integration with the surrounding area

·    improvement of the public realm

·    promotion of new community facilities to cater for the growing population

·    growth of the area as a distinct business/town centre with its own identity

·    development of higher quality housing

·    protection of the remaining character and heritage buildings.

24.     All of the feedback received has been considered in the development of the final draft plan. 

 

Key components of the final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan

25.     The final draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan provides a framework to guide how the area could grow and change over the next 20 to 30 years (see Attachment A) and sets out:

·    the purpose of the plan

·    a future direction and desired outcome for the area and its contribution to achieving Auckland’s vision to be the world’s most livable city

·    the relationship of the plan with the council’s strategic policies and planning documents

·    the local context of the area to provide a baseline for future changes

·    key opportunities that the plan seeks to address

·    the context to the City Rail Link project, the Mount Eden redeveloped station, and a  potential Light Rail Transit option

·    five key moves and supporting outcomes that respond to the challenges and opportunities of the area

·    identification of a number of future development opportunities in the area, and

·    an implementation strategy for how the plan will be delivered over the next 30 years, and an implementation plan listing the actions and projects aimed to achieve the desired key moves and outcomes.

 

26.     The final draft plan takes into consideration the direction set by the Auckland Plan, City Centre Masterplan, Auckland Unitary Plan, Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Board Plans and the City Rail Link project.

27.     The key moves respond to the challenges and opportunities facing the area. In particular, key move 5 supports and links the delivery of the City Rail Link to the Newton and Eden Terrace area, which is to “promote the City Rail Link and public transport improvements as the catalysts for new investment and growth in the area”.

28.     A number of specific projects and actions have been identified in the implementation strategy. The strategy outlines the timeframes, delivery partners, funding mechanisms, and monitoring and review process.  It is a 30-year plan and the implementation strategy is designed to be a ‘living’ document. The strategy will be refined and updated every three years and this process will be aligned with the council’s Long Term Plan (LTP) and Local Board Plan processes to allow consideration of any necessary changes to funding and project prioritisation.

29.     The delivery of the plan’s outcomes, actions and projects will require a collaborative approach with the community and iwi, and key delivery partners including the Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards, Auckland Council, CCO’s, Government Agencies, developers and private landowners.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

30.     Albert-Eden Local Board members Easte and Haynes, with Waitematā Local Board members Dempsey and Thomas, have represented the Local Boards through the process of developing the draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan. The project team has met with them on a regular basis to discuss the development of the final draft plan, including addressing any issues that have arisen. The members also attended the public events during community engagement and have been presented with the feedback received.

31.     Post community engagement, the Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards were presented with the summary of feedback received and have been engaged in the refinement and development of the final draft plan. Both Local Boards have been supportive of the plan development process and are in a good position to finalise the plan for adoption.

32.     The Waitematā and Albert-Eden Local Boards will play a significant role in ensuring that the plan’s aspirations and projects are followed through from investigation to implementation over the next 30 years. This role may take many forms from direct investment in public works to advocating for positive changes to the area.

Māori impact statement

33.     In early 2014, the council developed a proposal for iwi involvement in the development of the Karangahape Road and Newton Plans. As part of this proposal, it was agreed that an independent consultant would be commissioned to engage iwi in the development of the two plans and to provide one Māori Heritage report addressing the two areas

34.     From June to August 2014, the council engaged with iwi representatives to understand their aspirations for the area and provide feedback on the draft plan. The iwi representatives were also invited to give feedback and contribute to the preparation of the Māori Heritage report. The council received input and feedback from six iwi including: Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Maru. Ngāti Maru prepared its own Māori Heritage report for the Karangahape Road and Newton area. All feedback has been captured into the final Māori Heritage Report and this, alongside Ngāti Maru’s report, has been used to inform the development of the final draft plan.

35.     From June to July 2016, the council re-engaged with iwi representatives to discuss previous iwi engagement on the draft plan and the progress made on the plan preparation since 2014. Korero was held with Ngati Maru, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei and Ngaati Whanaunga.  Ngai Tai ki Tamaki and Te Akitai Waiohua attended a hui in June with council officers and Local Board members.  The feedback has been used to further inform the final draft plan. 

36.     The final draft plan includes a mana whēnua history local context section alongside a number of outcomes and actions supported by mana whēnua in the area. These include (amongst others):

·      celebrating and protecting the unique local cultural, Māori and built heritage of the area through collaboration

·      new development and place-making initiatives reflect, acknowledge and incorporate Māori cultural values and association, historical narratives and natural landscape elements where appropriate

·      recognising and supporting the economic aspirations of Māori

·      ensuring on-going engagement with mana whēnua through all stages of future major and public projects

·      promotion of native planting.

 

Council departments and CCOs

37.     Information to inform the preparation of the plan has been compiled through discussion with a number of council departments and CCOs responsible for the maintenance and delivery of a range of types of infrastructure. This has included liaison with:

·      Plans and Places (Heritage)

·      Community Facilities

·      Parks, Sports and Recreation

·      Auckland Design Office

·      Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development Ltd

·      Auckland Transport

·      Watercare

 

38.     Furthermore, the public consultation and targeted engagement with the community has been assisted by Te Waka Angamua (Māori Strategy and Relations); Arts, Community and Events; and Community and Engagement. 

39.     The achievement of the projects and actions identified in the implementation strategy will depend on strengthening links and coordination of projects with internal departments and the CCOs. 

 

Community and key stakeholders

40.     This plan is not just Auckland Council’s vision for the Newton and Eden Terrace area. The final draft plan has included the aspirations of the community and key stakeholders. 

41.     Consideration has been given to specific impacts that might arise as a result of the implementation of the final plan.  In principle, the plan will benefit all sectors of the community by providing the framework to the delivery of strategic and local infrastructure projects to improve the area and helping to achieve more sustainable development. Any possible impacts would arise at the point at which funding is identified and projects are actually delivered.

42.     It will be important to continue to engage and connect with the community and key stakeholders so that they can continue to be involved in the future of Newton and Eden Terrace.

 

Implementation

43.     The work of area spatial planning at a local place based level is the responsibility of teams within the Chief Planning Office (CPO) in collaboration with other parts of the council and CCOs. This work is only partly budgeted for in the CPO budget. Thus far, targeted use of external resources for purposes of community engagement, options development or research and plan development has been sourced from allocated budgets within the CPO.

44.     Section 9 of the final plan includes an implementation plan which identifies a number of projects and actions to be delivered, whether the actions are funded or unfunded (aspirational), the Local Board’s role, who is the lead or responsible for delivery and the key stakeholders and partners involved. Some actions do not require public funding and need to be delivered by private development. The implementation plan will be a living document and subject to refinement and updating on average every three years to include engagement with key stakeholders and delivery partners. It is flexible in order to recognise that some projects and actions require further work such as additional scoping, consultation, feasibility testing, detailed planning and design, a works programme and/or funding

45.     Internal discussions were held with relevant Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments, and CCOs, and Local Board members were also consulted to determine realistic timeframes for the implementation of the various projects and actions within the implementation plan. Given that it is a 30-year plan, each action has been identified as either on-going (business as usual), immediate (12 months), short term (within 1-3 years), medium term (3-7 years) or long term (7 years or more) actions.  

46.     The timeframes for the delivery of projects and actions are also influenced by the sequencing and roll out of other plans and budgets, such as the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council’s LTP and Annual Plan, Local Board Plans (3-year review), Auckland Transport work programmes, and other council strategies and action plans. Some of the projects are already budgeted for in the LTP 2015-2025 or the Regional Transport Plan. The council will soon be developing the 2018-2028 LTP and this may have an impact on the prioritisation and funding of projects in the Newton and Eden Terrace area for the next ten years. The City Rail Link will continue to remain a critical budget item as part of the future LTP budget. Where possible, the final plan has prioritised projects in alignment with the delivery and completion of the City Rail Link and redeveloped Mount Eden station.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Final Draft Newton and Eden Terrace Plan

215

     

Authors

Joao Machado - Team Leader Planning - Central/Islands

Barbara-Ann Overwater – Principal Planner, Central/Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 Signatories

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Community Facilities Maintenance Contracts 2017

 

File No.: CP2016/17928

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek local board feedback on proposed maintenance service specifications where they may have an impact on levels of service for local activities, to inform a Request for Proposal to the supplier market (due to be published in early October 2016).

Executive summary

2.       The majority of Auckland Council’s existing contracts to maintain buildings, grounds, open space and parks amenities expire on 30 June 2017. A Request for Proposal process is planned to be underway in October 2016 followed by contract negotiations, to determine new maintenance contracts to take effect from 1 July 2017.

3.       The Governing Body is responsible for procurement decisions of major service delivery contracts.  Local boards set, and can increase levels of service for local activities subject to minimum levels of service set by the Governing Body.

4.       Local boards play a key role in providing input to proposed maintenance service specifications where they may have an impact on levels of service for local activities.  This report is seeking feedback from local boards by 23 September 2016 to inform a Request for Proposal to the supplier market, including the following:

·   Proposed geographical clusters for community facilities maintenance contracts (Attachment A)

·   Proposed service specifications by asset group (Attachment B)

·   Smart procurement principles (Attachment C)

·   Delivery model options for Gulf Islands (Attachment D)

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to provide the board’s feedback on the proposed service specifications, local outcomes and the overall structure for new Community Facilities maintenance contracts by 23 September 2016.

OR

b)      provide feedback on the proposed service specifications, local outcomes and the overall structure for new Community Facilities maintenance contracts, including:

·   Proposed geographical clusters for community facilities maintenance contracts (Attachment A)

·   Proposed service specifications by asset group (Attachment B)

·   Smart procurement principles (Attachment C)

·   Delivery model options for Gulf Islands (Attachment D)

 

 

Comments

Background

5.       Auckland Council currently has 38 Community Facilities contracts to maintain buildings, grounds, open space and parks amenities.  The majority of these contracts are scheduled to expire on 30 June 2017.

6.       A project has been setup to implement new facilities maintenance contracts to serve the Auckland region from 1 July 2017. 

7.       The Governing Body is responsible for procurement decisions of major service delivery contracts.  Local boards set, and can increase (with Locally Driven Initiative funding), levels of service for local activities subject to minimum levels of service that are set by the Governing Body.

8.       Local boards play a key role in providing input to proposed maintenance service specifications where it may have an impact on levels of service for local activities.(e.g. “neighbourhood parks – lawns are presented in a way that encourages general walkability and allows for passive recreational activity”)

9.       The objectives of this project include implementing:

·     standardised contracts, but with flexibility to accommodate local board governance decisions (e.g. change the use of an asset, increase baseline service levels through locally driven initiative funding)

·     outcomes that reflect local character and social outcomes (e.g. promote local employment, support local design of facilities)

·     smart procurement outcomes (e.g. sustainability)

·     consistency in service delivery across the Auckland region

·     value for money

·     improved contract performance and auditing

·     improved local board reporting to inform governance decision making

10.     A Procurement Working Group consisting of 12 local board chairs has provided regular direction and guidance over the last four months on this project’s strategy and intent.

11.     Cluster workshops were held throughout August with all local boards to discuss this project’s intent and direction and obtain informal feedback.  Formal feedback is now sought from all 21 local boards by 23 September 2016, on the proposed service specifications, local outcomes and the overall structure for new Community Facilities maintenance contracts prior to finalising a Request for Proposal to the supplier market in early October 2016.

In Scope

12.     This will include the following services:

·     Cleaning (including all toilets and car parks)

·     Facilities management (all buildings including toilets, clocks)

·     Green maintenance (parks, gardens, streets, mowing, Healthy Waters green assets)

·        Outdoor leisure amenities and equipment (e.g. playgrounds, skate facilities, courts, park structures)

·     Hard surfaces (e.g. park paths, boardwalks)

·     Beach, coastal assets (beach furniture / paths, boat ramps & seawalls)

·     Access management (gates and toilets)

·     Loose litter collection

·     Pest control (in and around a building)

·     Lighting (internal and external amenities)

13.     The following specialist services require niche suppliers and will be considered throughout this process, but may be contracted separately to minimise risk in the provision of these services:

·     Arboriculture

·     Ecological restoration and external / environmental  pest control

·     Sports fields renovations and upgrades

·     Painting

·     Pool plants, water features, fountains

Out of Scope

14.     Services excluded from this project include general building compliance maintenance work as follows, as existing contracts do not expire for another two years:

·        Building Warrant of Fitness management

·        Fire evacuation schemes and training

·        Fire alarm monitoring

·        Fire systems maintenance

·        Lift maintenance

·        Security systems maintenance

·        Small water professional services

·        Rubbish collection and recycling from Council buildings

Proposal

15.     To maximise economies of scale whilst still providing a local flavour, staff propose to create five facility maintenance contracts across each of the geographical cluster areas outlined in Attachment A.

16.     Proposed baseline service specifications defining outcomes expected across a range of asset groups are outlined in Attachment B.

17.     Smart procurement outcomes identified as important to local boards, that will be considered in the procurement of each facility maintenance contract are outlined in Attachment C.

18.     Council is exploring the possibility of directly engaging Great Barrier and Waiheke maintenance service providers to deliver services on the islands. Proposed procurement models are outlined in Attachment D.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

19.     A Procurement Working Group consisting of 12 local board chairs was setup to provide direction and advice over the last four months on this project’s strategy and intent.

20.     Workshops were held with each of the proposed geographical cluster groups in August 2016 to outline proposed service specifications, proposed structure of new maintenance contracts and to obtain verbal feedback.

Māori impact statement

21.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.

22.     Māori responsiveness requires the collective effort of everyone. Under the new contracts, suppliers will work collaboratively with council to achieve better outcomes with Māori and for Auckland. This will include:

·        Building positive relationships with Māori – effective communication and engagement with Māori, developing resilient relationships with mana whenua

·        Significantly lift Māori social and economic well-being

·        Building Māori capability and capacity

Implementation

23.     A Request for Proposal for facility maintenance contracts is due to be published to the supplier market in early October 2016 with contract negotiations formally concluded in April 2017.

24.     A transition period will be in place before new contracts take effect from 1 July 2017 to ensure a smooth implementation.

25.     Local boards will have the opportunity to set local performance targets for 2017/2018 as part of the Annual Planning process in early 2017.  Staff will provide clear and concise information enabling the local board an opportunity to allocate locally driven initiative (LDI) funding to increase maintenance service specifications between March and May 2017.  

26.     Facility contract terms and conditions will be negotiated in early 2017 and will enable the ability for local boards to increase local maintenance service levels through the annual planning process each year.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment One – Proposed geographical clusters

283

b

Attachment Two – Proposed service specifications

285

c

Attachment Three – Smart procurement principles

293

d

Attachment Four – Delivery model options for Gulf Islands

297

     

Signatories

Authors

Kate Marsh - Financial Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Matthew Walker - GM Financial Strategy and Planning

Kathryn Martin - Senior Local Board Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Temporary arrangements for urgent decisions and staff delegations during the election period

 

File No.: CP2016/18116

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek the local board’s approval for temporary arrangements during the election period for:

·    urgent decisions

·    decisions made by staff under delegated authority from the local board that require consultation with portfolio holders under delegation protocols.

Executive summary

2.       Between the last local board business meeting of the current electoral term, and the first business meeting of the new term, there may be decisions needed or routine business as usual to process that cannot wait until after the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

3.       Temporary arrangements are therefore needed for urgent decisions of the local board, and decisions made by staff under existing delegated authority.

4.       Between the last business meeting and the declaration of election results (likely to be 13 October), current members are still in office, and can make urgent decisions if delegated to do so. If the board does not have an existing urgent decision-making process already in place, it is recommended that the board delegate to the chair and deputy chair the power to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board during this period.

5.       Following the declaration of results, the current members are no longer in office. New members come into office the day after the declaration of results, but cannot act until they give their statutory declaration at the inaugural meeting. During this period, urgent decisions will be made by the chief executive under his existing delegated authority.

6.       All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive.  This delegation is subject to a requirement to comply with delegations protocols approved by the local board, which require, amongst other matters, staff to consult with portfolio holders on certain matters. The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks.

7.       After the election, there will be no local board portfolio holders to consult until new arrangements are made at the first business meeting in the new term. During this time, staff will need to continue to process routine business as usual matters, including routine requests from third parties for landowner approval. 

8.       As a temporary measure, approval is sought from the local board to allow officers to continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until after the local board’s first business meeting. This is irrespective of the requirements of the current delegation protocols to consult with the nominated portfolio holder on landowner consents. 

9.       Appointments made by the local board to external bodies will cease on the date of the election. New appointments will need to be made by the local board in the new term.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      utilise the board’s existing urgent decision-making process OR Delegate to the chair and deputy chair the power to make, on behalf of the local board, urgent decisions that may be needed between the final local board business meeting and the commencement of the term of office of new local board members.

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of members elect until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board, urgent decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under existing delegations.

c)      approve that staff, as a temporary measure, can make business as usual decisions under their existing delegated authority without requiring compliance with the requirement in the current delegation protocols to consult with the nominated portfolio holder, from 8 October 2016 until new arrangements are made at the first business meeting in the new term. 

d)      note that existing appointments by the local board to external bodies will cease at the election and new appointments will need to be made by the local board in the new term.

 

Comments

10.     Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results[1] (likely to be 13 October 2016).

11.     The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting[2]

12.     Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, there may be decisions needed or routine business as usual to process that cannot wait until after the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

13.     Temporary arrangements need to be made for:

·    Urgent decisions

·    Decisions made by staff under delegated authority from the local board that require consultation with portfolio holders.

Urgent decisions

14.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results (likely to be 13 October), current members are still in office, and can make urgent decisions if delegated to do so. If the board does not have an existing urgent decision-making process already in place, it is recommended that the board delegate to the chair and deputy chair the power to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board during this period.

15.     Between the declaration of results and the inaugural meeting, the current members are no longer in office, the new members cannot act until they give their statutory declaration, and new chairs and deputies will not be in place. During this period, urgent decisions will be made by the chief executive under his existing delegated authority (which includes a financial cap).

Decisions made by staff under delegated authority

16.     All local boards have made a delegation to the Chief Executive. The delegation is subject to a requirement to comply with delegation protocols approved by the local board. These delegation protocols require, amongst other things, staff to consult with nominated portfolio holders on certain issues.

17.     The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. The portfolio holder can refer the matter to the local board for a decision. 

18.     Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland. The majority of these need to be processed within 20 working days (or less), either in order to meet the applicant’s timeframes and provide good customer service, or to meet statutory timeframes associated with resource consents. Only a small number of landowner requests are referred by the portfolio holder to the local board for a decision. 

19.     Prior to the election, staff can continue to consult with portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols. However, after the election, there will be no portfolio holders in place to consult with until new arrangements are made at the first business meeting of the local board in the new term.

20.     During this time, staff will need to continue to process routine business as usual matters, including routine requests from third parties for landowner approval such as commercial operator permits, temporary access requests and affected party approvals.

21.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that the local board allow staff to process routine business as usual matters without consulting with the nominated portfolio holder, where these matters cannot wait until new arrangements are made in the term.

Appointment to external bodies

22.     Appointments made by the local board to external bodies will cease at the election. New appointments will need to be made by the local board in the new term.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

23.     This is a report to all local boards.

Māori impact statement

24.     These arrangements do not have specific implications for Māori.

Implementation

25.     This decision will allow routine matters to be processed during the election period.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Felicity  Prance - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex – Relationship Manager

Kathryn Martin - Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Chair's Report - September 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/13802

 

  

 

Executive Summary

Providing the Chair with an opportunity to update the local board and community on the projects and issues he and the Waitemata Local Board have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Portfolios

Board Chair: Governance, Local and Civic Leadership, Board Strategy, Policy and Planning Leadership

Portfolios: Arts, Culture & Events (lead), Parks & Open Spaces

Positions: Heart of the City, Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

Committees: Finance and Grants, Central Facility Partnerships (chair), Auckland Domain Committee (deputy chair)

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

(a)     receive the Chair’s report.

 

(b)     consider its position on any matter raised within this report.

 

 

Activities undertaken from 2 May to 4 September 2016

This report covers activities undertaken during the period from Monday 2 May 2016 to Sunday 4 September 2016.

 

Highlighted activities, projects and issues

There are some specific activities, projects and issues that I wish to highlight; some for board members’ interest and as appropriate, some for decision.

 

1 Introduction

This is the last business meeting of the 2013-16 triennial, and other than rounding up board activities over the last three months since my last report, and update projects, it is time to reflect on the last three years.

 

During this period, Board members also continued to progress Local Board Plan priorities and current and proposed Local Board Agreement local projects and community concerns in their respective portfolio areas, LIPs proposals, residents, business association and community advocacy, providing input to regional policies, plans and strategies in workshops and briefings, providing input into resource and landowner consent matters, and responding to constituent and media enquiries.

1.        

2.    2 Shared Governance Engagement

3.     

2.1 Engagement with Mayor/Governing Body

·    Waitemata Local Board/F & P Committee annual budget discussions, 9 May 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee, Albert Street, 15 June 2016 – Unitary Plan

·    Auckland Development Committee briefing re UP following receipt of the IHP recommendations, Town Hall, 27 July 2016– Unitary Plan

·    Auckland Development Committee to consider IHP Unitary Plan recommendations, 10 August 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee continuation, Town Hall, 12 August 2016 – Unitary Plan

·    Auckland Development Committee continuation, Town Hall, 15 August 2016 – Unitary Plan

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee, 31 August 2016 – Symonds Street Cemetery Maintenance Budget.

4.             

3 Board Strategies, Policy and Planning Update

 

3.1 Unitary Plan

 

Last month the Governing Body passed the Unitary Plan following a mammoth five-year process to unify the former regional and all district council plans into one. This is something both to celebrate, and to reflect on, as it is clear our city in the years to come will change significantly. We must now work to deliver on the promise and potential of a unified plan for Auckland.

 

Your local board has been involved from the beginning – I was one of four local board chairs on a working party to develop the high level concepts of the draft - supportive of good process, quality design, the compact city and appropriate intensification, and building a liveable city, all whilst endeavouring to protect our built and natural heritage and working to secure affordable housing.  It has not been an easy task. Views still differ on the imperatives driving the need for the Plan to go so far. Meanwhile as the housing and affordability crisis deepened, the need to address the supply of housing became greater.  We all want to see our children and grandchildren housed.

 

The Plan enabled a doubling from the draft of available housing supply to 422,000, and the plan is now a little bit more than a little bit out and a little bit up. It focuses on increasing the quantity of dwellings rather than the quality and design. Supporters argue this now provides more affordable housing choice, including within areas closer to the centre, and transport routes, whilst others argue it is a deregulation of planning rules, overly focused on development, rather than sustainability of our built and natural heritage. Both are right.

 

The full zoning recommendations were adopted. These provide for more homes to be built in the existing urban area of two to three stories, and up to six stories close to town centres and transport hubs. With the historic heritage values of the inner city centre fringe mostly recognised, and existing development, the Plan has less impact on the inner city communities than elsewhere in Auckland. Our Clr Mike Lee gained a commitment to a plan change early in 2017 to address technical errors and property anomalies that this blanket approach to zoning inevitably raises.

 

We were disappointed to see the precautionary pre-1944 demolition overlay Clr Mike Lee and the board worked hard for abandoned, but the continuation of the historic character overlays to areas zoned Res 1 and 2 (now Isthmus A and B) were retained. Protection for heritage in the remaining pre-1944 areas in Grey Lynn around Grey Lynn Park and central Westmere still zoned Single House but with no character overlay will now be achieved through plan change.

 

The pre-1944 overlay concept, still much watered down from the Brisbane model, introduced provisions preventing unconsented demolition of pre-1944 buildings, and applied to parts of Auckland which were settled pre-1944 and where there is a concentration of pre-1944 buildings. A resource consent was to be required before pre-1944 buildings could be demolished or removed. This is was intended as an interim measure to control demolition until full heritage surveys could be completed in these areas.

 

The rules did not prohibit demolition of all pre-1944 buildings covered by the provision, but provided an opportunity for Council through the resource consent application process to assess the heritage values of the building and whether demolition was appropriate or not. It was to be the protector of the community interest.

 

The interim rules reflected feedback from communities wanting to protect historic heritage properties in their local area that hadn’t previously been assessed under the old district plans.

 

Our local board took the view that assessments once completed may have been largely academic if suburbs had already been up-zoned for future intensification in the Unitary Plan, and worked very hard to have much of Grey Lynn and Westmere stay down zoned. These were the only two suburbs so treated. We celebrated the outcome.

 

Minimum apartment sizes and the requirement for resource consent for more than 2 dwellings were retained. Parking minimums for town centres, apartments, and mixed use zones were removed. This is a significant decision that will improve housing affordability. 

 

In Ponsonby, a small area of Terraced House & Apartment Building (THAB) zone replaced Mixed Housing Suburban (MHS) at Ponsonby Tce. Mixed Use zone replaced THAB at Jervois Road and Curran St. Mixed Use zone replaced THAB for St Marys School, and Mixed Housing Urban (MHU) replaced Single House (SH) around Emmett and Sarsfield Streets.

 

Key changes recommended by the Independent Hearings Panel and subsequently agreed to by Council are outlined.

 

In Grey Lynn, MHU zone and some THAB zone replaced MHS zone around Turangi Road and MHU zone replaced MHS zone around Ivanhoe Rd. MHU zone replaced MHS and SH zone around Sherwood and Wellpark Ave, Stanmore Rd, and Tawariki St. MHS zone replaced SH zone on Sackville St, and some pockets of MHU zone replaced SH zone around Allen Rd, Dryden St and Dickens St.

 

In Westmere, there is a general increase in MHS zone from SH zone, around Westmere Park Ave and Rawene Ave. There is an increase of MHU zone on streets to the west of Garnet Rd and Westmere Cres and the Edgars Rd, Weber St and Livingstone St block.

 

In Newton and Grafton, some light industrial north of Boston Road changed to Mixed Use. A Grafton Precinct has been added.

 

In Parnell, Mixed Use zone replaced Light Industry zone at Augustus Terrace and The Strand. West of Parnell Road was increased to THAB zone. MHS zone replaced SH zone in places along Takutai St, Ayr St and Judges Bay. MHU zone replaced MHS zone at Taurarua Tce and Gladstone Rd. SH zone replaced Mixed Use zone on the corner of Rushkin St and St Georges Bay Rd.

 

In Newmarket there was an increase to the Metropolitan Centre zone from Mixed Use along Khyber Pass Rd, Carlton Gore Rd, Gillies Ave and north of St Marks Rd. Height controls have been removed from Newmarket Metropolitan Centre where the volcanic viewshafts apply. Areas in-between viewshafts have additional control e.g. between Carlton Gore Rd and Sulter St ranging from 28m to 55m. he University of Auckland Newmarket 2 Precinct has been deleted, and the extent of the Metropolitan Centre has increased over the university site and adjoining blocks. Newmarket 1 and Carlaw Park Precincts have been deleted.

 

There was an increase to Mixed Use site height in Parnell, Newton and Grey Lynn, varying from 21m in Newton and parts of Parnell, to 32.5m at Carlaw Park.

 

With the Unitary Plan now finalised the Government can no longer blame Auckland’s rulebook for the housing crisis. It now needs to play its part.

 

3.2 Parnell Train Station

 

Connections

 

Advocacy Project - Provide accessible pedestrian and cycling connections to Parnell Station. Secure the future protection of the Greenways route alongside Waipapa Stream and create an accessible pedestrian connection from Parnell station to The Strand and to Parnell Town Centre.

 

In June the board approved the allocation of $350,000 from the AT Capex Fund for providing an improved connection from Parnell station to Nicholls Lane. This is subject to landowner approval by the Auckland Domain Committee at its meeting in July and further approval by the board of the final design.

The Parnell station connections project is to be jointly funded by AT and the board.  The board’s funding was contingent on receiving satisfactory confirmation from AT as to when the Parnell station is to open, and servicing what lines.

On July 27, the Auckland Domain Committee (ADC) endorsed the layout and design of the pedestrian connection through the Auckland Domain connecting the western platform of the Parnell Rail Station to Nicholls Lane and to the Watercare access road, noting that Auckland Transport will develop this prior to the opening of the Parnell Rail Station.

The ADC also delegated to the Manager Auckland Domain to both approve Auckland Transport’s detailed designs (including associated signage) for the pedestrian connections through the Auckland Domain, being a) from the western platform to Nicholls Lane, b) from the western platform to the woodchip yard and c) through Bledisloe Grove, and the commencement of construction of these connections.

 

Parnell Station

Advocacy Project - Ensure Parnell station is open and fully operational at the earliest opportunity.

 

The board played a strong advocacy role for the construction of Parnell train station. The new station, at the end of Cheshire Street, will be developed in two stages at a cost of $7.6 million.

In response to the letter I sent to Lester Levy Chair of AT requesting that the board are kept informed of when the station is planned to open and which routes it will service, Lester has advised that the completion and opening of Parnell station remains a priority for AT. The AT Board recently agreed that the planned opening of the Parnell station will be from March/April 2017, with southern line services stopping at Parnell Station. Once the Newmarket Level Crossing Project has been completed (date currently subject to resource consent and environmental court appeals) it is anticipated all western line and southern line services will stop at Parnell, both inbound and outbound from Britomart. Over the next six months the project delivery team will be working towards completion of the remaining station construction works, including the Nicholls Lane connection.

 

3.3 Greenways Regional Fund

 

Advocacy Project - Secure a regional budget to enable the implementation of Greenways across Auckland.

 

A set of interim criteria to support annual decisions on regional funding of greenways on parks and open spaces was endorsed by the Parks, Recreation and Sports Committee on 26 April 2016.

The Committee also decided that a report shall be brought back in September 2016 and from then onwards on a yearly basis to consider and confirm the allocation of regional greenway funding against this criteria.

Given current pressures on local board agendas, the committee decided to defer consideration of a longer-term greenways prioritisation framework, including engagement with local boards, until after the election. Officers will advise a new timeframe later in the year once the new council is established.

 

At a local level, the Waitematā Greenways Project route through Grey Lynn Park provides a wider shared path that aligns with the Grey Lynn Park Development Plan and the future Waitematā Greenways Route G1 cycle route. This path will connect with a separate AT on road project to link to Cox’s Bay Reserve. Progress on the Grey Lynn greenways route has been made with the widening of the Hakanoa Reserve pathway which was completed in May. The Grey Lynn Park section of the greenway was officially opened at an event at Grey Lynn Park on 9 July, with a ribbon cutting and blessing to celebrate the completion of this project. The AT design of the on-road sections of the route will be available for public input in September.

A meeting was held on Tuesday 23rd August 2016 with the consultant working on the re-branding of Greenways and the Parks officer leading the working group. The group is currently liaising with local boards to sense their appetite for a name change and to gauge whether they will be interested in participating in the launch of the ‘new brand’ in 2017. The officers will come back to the board once the concept is more finalised.

At a local board briefing on August 1st the proposed new identity for Greenways was presented to all local boards. The overarching ‘Auckland Paths’ identity is comprised of Express Paths (shared paths, cycleways), Local Paths (on street paths and off street paths (through parks and reserves) and trails (rural or track routes).

The AT/Parks joint team working on this approach advised that an “identity” launch is currently planned to occur in early 2017. The launch is planned to be rolled out in stages, in about five local board areas per year, and include activities that recognise existing walking and cycling routes and which seek future community engagement in the places and spaces around these routes.

 

3.4 254 Ponsonby Road

 

Advocacy Project - Secure funding to deliver the community’s agreed vision and design for 254 Ponsonby Road.

A total of 15 people are now part of the facilitation (steering) group to collect ideas from a diverse range of local people in order to develop a brief to inform the site design and budget implications, which will be discussed with the Board to inform the advocacy position. The new group are also linking in with a wider communication network that has been formed throughout this process.

A grant of $10,000 from the board was given to this group in 2015/2016. Approx. $7,660 remains for the group to continue the community led design process.

At the Community portfolio meeting on 22 June 2016 it was agreed that the group is in a strong position to continue and the advisor (Rachel Orr) will maintain contact with the group, but will no longer attend their meetings.

 

Representatives from 254 Ponsonby Road presented to the board on 16 August on the community led project. The group updated the board on progress to date and the outcomes of their survey of local community and businesses. The group are meeting every month, have established communications networks, and built relationships with architects and designers. They are engaging with partners such as University of Auckland third year Bachelor of Architecture students and the Landscape Design School at Unitec. The group are progressing the development of a brief which will guide the site design and budget implications, which will be discussed with the Board to inform the advocacy position.

 

3.5 Auckland Cycle Network

 

Advocacy Project – Completion of the Auckland Cycle Network.

Auckland Transport undertook consultation in the western area of Waitemata (from Pt Chevalier to Herne Bay) covering the basic Auckland Cycle Network including the Boards greenways routes. The Pt Chevalier to city cycle improvements project involves creating a corridor between Pt Chevalier and Herne Bay, likely using Pt Chevalier Road, Meola Road and West End Road. This route connects Pt Chevalier to the city via Herne Bay and provides an alternative for cyclists coming to the city from the North-western cycleway.

AT undertook consultation on cycleways in Parnell, Newmarket and Remuera in June.

The feasibility study was completed in April 2016 for the Midtown cycleway and presented to the Board in June 2016. AT are proceeding with the scheme assessment and once completed will go to public consultation, which is expected to be completed by February 2017. Detailed design is scheduled for between March and September 2017. Completion is estimated for 2018.

The Great North Road cycleway/bus priority project links Karangahape Road to the Grey Lynn shops. Public consultation is programmed for September 2016. Estimated completion is 2018.

The Ian McKinnon Drive Cycleway is a separated cycle path that will offer a high level of service linking the Northwestern cycleway at Virginia Street to the intersection with Alex Evans Street and Upper Queen Street. It connects the Northwestern cycleway and Dominion Road more efficiently to the city centre via the Grafton Gully cycleway and the Lightpath. Public consultation started early July and completion is estimated for 2017.

The Karangahape Rd Streetscape Enhancement and Cycleway public consultation will be completed in August.

The Nelson Street Cycleway is a multi-phase project to deliver a shared path and separated cycle lanes linking Upper Queen Street (and the Grafton Gully cycleway) to Quay Street via the Lightpath. Phase one from Upper Queen Street to the corner of Victoria Street and Nelson Street is now complete. Phase two connecting with the waterfront at Quay Street will be completed in 2017.

The Herne Bay to Westhaven Drive cycleway will connect the Herne Bay area to the Westhaven Promenade. Estimated completion is 2018.

The Westhaven to city centre cycleway completes an approximate 1.5km link from the end of Westhaven Drive to Quay Street via Beaumont Street, Gaunt Street and Customs Street West in the Viaduct Harbour. Estimated completion is 2017.

Waitemata Safe Routes has three cycleway routes: Old Mill Road/Surrey Crescent; Richmond Road; and the Greenways Route from Richmond Road to Bond Street through parks and residential streets.

 

At the August 23rd workshop, the board was presented with three options for the Greenways routers around Grey Lynn Park, being Option 3 the recommended option (taking the route down Grosvenor St). A discussion was held around mitigation, safety, legibility, desire lines and route directness.

AT will go out for consultation on the two options decided at the meeting (Options 2 and 3), asking people what they like or dislike about each route, without giving a preference for the official route.

Although the current proposal is not to widen the path along the skate ramp, AT is willing to do both routes and would fund widening the path connection the Grosvenor Street entrance if needed and reflected through community feedback.

The current plan is to consult on the cycleway concept designs in September/October 2016. AT aim to present 2-3 design options for key stakeholder and public feedback. It is expected that the whole programme will be constructed by mid-2018.   

 

3.6 Central Community Recycling Centre Drop Off sites.

Advocacy Project - In collaboration with the three local boards (Waitematā, Albert and Puketāpapa) the purchase of one or more sites in the central area will provide drop off locations for local residents.

 

An agreement between Waste Solutions (I&ES) and Community Places (ACE) was reached in May 2016 to co-manage the Great North Rd drop off site.

As part of the stakeholder consultation period, council staff organised a meeting on 14 June with Albert-Eden, Waitematā and Puketāpapa local board members. The focus of this meeting was to provide an update on key issues and hold a discussion on the initial design concept.

The initial concept includes a drive thru drop off, a reuse shop, a sales yard, an environmental education café and a community hall. An area will be retained for horticultural garden beds.

The operator for the site will be sought using social procurement principles as in Waiuku, Helensville and Devonport. This process will not start until early 2017.

Waste solutions team is working with Earth Action Trust and Grey Lynn 2030 to build capacity and expertise so they are prepared to participate in the procurement process.

As the Great North Road site continues to develop, the three local boards will continue to be consulted on key aspects of the project such as the design concept and the community engagement process which will include local schools, neighbours, MOTAT and other key stakeholders.

A council-owned site was secured for waste processing in Victoria St, Onehunga, where a site assessment has already begun.

Once these first two sites are further developed, it’s estimated that in six months’ time, the search for a second drop off facility will begin. Puketāpapa and Waitematā will be asked for specific feedback to assist in this process.

Next steps for the Great North Road project are:

September-October 2016 –prepare developed design

October 2016-April 2017- lodge and process resource consent

May-June 2017- start site works

July 2017- site opens

 

3.7 Facilities Partnership Fund

Advocacy Project - Reinstate a sub-regional fund similar to the Central Facilities Partnership Fund. Request approval for the Central Facility Partnership Committee to undertake under its governance responsibilities the ability to re-invest funds, up to the value of current commitments, in the event of a current facility partnership commitment failing to crystallise.

The Finance and Performance Committee resolved at their meeting in May to request a report on the operations of the Local Board capex fund and the concerns that have been raised by Local Boards in relation to the barriers to use this fund in a similar way to the disestablished fund, so that this can inform the next Annual Plan.

 

3.8 Open and Closed Cemetery Maintenance Budget

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Advocacy Project - Secure a regional maintenance budget to maintain a base service level for open and closed cemeteries.

The board’s advocacy was instrumental to an application to the Governing Body to secure more funding for conservation of heritage monuments in cemeteries. Officers have requested that $20,000 in FY16/17 is used for Symonds Street Cemetery. A report was presented to the Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee on 31 August 2016 asking for the approval of a heritage memorial management operational strategy but restricted to safety issues and not to address the issues of damaged and deteriorating headstones generally. I spoke to this to this item, had by resolution the local boar’s work in this area in Symonds street Cemetery recognised, and more work was asked of officers, along the lines of our prioritisation.

The outcome of this resolution will inform a potential decision by the board to consider if the funds that were allocated for the Symonds St maintenance budget ($20,000 Opex for FY16/17), at least from 2017/18 onwards could be reallocated.

3.9 Grey Lynn Park Changing Rooms

Advocacy Project - Secure the allocation of $100,000 Sports Infrastructure Development Programme funding in 2016/2017 and $1.65 million in 2017/18 to deliver the feasibility, design, consent and build for the development of community changing rooms and toilets in Grey Lynn Park, which is future-proofed for the future build of Richmond Rovers clubrooms upstairs.

 

The $100,000 funding for FY 16/17 is confirmed. The 2016/17 Growth Fund prioritisation programme, including the Grey Lynn Changing Rooms was recently endorsed by the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee at its August meeting, so funding and the project look to be secure.

 

3.10 Child and Youth Friendly City

Advocacy Project - Continue to put children and young people first and become a child and youth friendly city that is fit for all.

 

The New Zealand Child Friendly accreditation process is being progressed by UNICEF NZ, and they expect this to be finalised by December 2016. Once the process has been finalised Waitematā will be able to seek accreditation, and the timeframe for this is to be confirmed. The Community Empowerment Unit is liaising with UNICEF New Zealand to keep updated on the process and to ensure there is continuity in their plans to progress the Child Friendly City initiative.

The Child Friendly Waitematā Steering Group have developed a terms of reference. The stocktake of all the activity taking place in the local board area is continuing, led by the Steering Group, as part of the accreditation process. Buzz Channel have been engaged to undertake the stocktake of the local board area with the purpose of providing the local board information about what to continue doing/supporting, what to advocate for, and what the current gaps are.

Another focus for the group is to share ideas for the delivery of child friendly events and identify consultation and engagement opportunities. Underpinning the Child Friendly Cities initiatives is the notion of getting children involved in consultation processes. Child friendly surveys continue to be advocated across Local Board planning projects, including recent engagement on the Newton and Eden Terrace Plan and the playground renewal at Western Park.

 

The Community Empowerment Unit continues to liaise with UNICEF New Zealand to keep updated on the Child Friendly Cities accreditation process and to ensure there is continuity in their plans to progress the Child Friendly City initiative. They expect this to be finalised by December 2016. Once the process has been finalised Waitematā will be able to seek accreditation, and the timeframe for this is to be confirmed.

The stocktake being collated by Buzz Channel is well underway and will provide an analysis of how the local board is tracking in relation to the Child Friendly Cities criteria.  The Steering Group continues to meet regularly and have recently received a presentation from Buzz Channel and contributed to the stocktake. 

The board’s Community Broker advised that on 5 August 2016 a local contribution to the Global Big Latch On was delivered by a member of the steering group and supported by staff in the Community Empowerment Unit.  The Global Big Latch On is an international event held annually in World Breastfeeding Week 1-7 August.  This local initiative is a result of a finding from research conducted by Plunket: ‘Experiences of parents living in inner city Auckland’, which indicated there is a shortage of spaces for inner city residents and tourists to feed and change their children.  The event was held in the Aotea Centre and brought parents and caregivers together to connect and promote breastfeeding in the city.

 

2015/16 Achievements Report

 

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The local board’s sixth annual Achievements Report for the 2015/16 year has recently been published and is now available online. The series demonstrate what has been achieved in six short years, and this latest is the largest production yet. See http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/AboutCouncil/representativesbodies/LocalBoards/Waitematalocalboard/Pages/waitemataplans.aspx#achievement

 

 

4 Project Updates

 

Community

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Pippa Coom and Deborah Yates.

4.1 Grey Lynn Community Centre

Following investigations as part of the Grey Lynn Community Centre roof renewal it was determined that there are serious water egress issues and a remedial design for the roof needs to be developed and constructed.  Cove Kinloch has been engaged to manage this project and attended a workshop in April with the Board to discuss the outcomes of the investigation and proposed approach. Community Facilities met with the Centre Manager and representatives of the Centre Management Committee to discuss operational implications and briefed the Board at the workshop on 11 August 2016.

The Community Facilities team advised that the Centre has recently undergone an extensive building survey to identify what repairs and maintenance may be required in the coming years. Part of the survey involved air quality testing and the results indicated the building is safe and suitable for the public to operate in. Monitoring will continue on a monthly basis and should there be any change to that situation, Auckland Council has a contingency plan in place. The Community Facilities team is currently gathering information and investigating future options for the Grey Lynn community, taking into account the growing population of the area and its future needs. Opportunities will be explored to realise the best use of rate-payers money. While this research work is underway, the building will continue to operate.

4.2 Community Centre Funding Agreements

At the board meeting on 14 June 2016 the board approved the three year funding agreements and licences for Grey Lynn Community Centre, Ponsonby Community Centre, and Parnell Trust. The board delegated to the Community Portfolio holders approval of the final footprints for the Grey Lynn Community Centre, Leys Institute Gymnasium and Parnell Community Centre licences to occupy and manage. The final footprints were provided to the portfolio members for discussion at the 27 July 2016 portfolio meeting and were approved.

4.3 Ellen Melville Centre

Consultation was completed this year on the concept designs for the redeveloped Ellen Melville Centre and Freyberg Place, with resource consent and building consent granted for the building works, and construction commenced in August 2016 for a nine to twelve month period.

4.4 Waitemata Youth Collective

The Waitemata Youth Collective were supported by the Community Empowerment Unit (CEU) to access funding to run their successful Youth Week 2016 event and to purchase some items to increase their visibility in the Waitematā community.  Youth Collective members were present at the YAP Youth Summit on 30 April when the Youth Voice Transition Project team tested five youth-designed concepts.  Staff from the CEU have been supporting the Youth Collective to consider the best operating model for them in future. This project is ongoing and will be agreed in Q1 for 2016/2017.

The Youth Collective elected new co-chairs Carmen Sezeto and Naushyn Janah in June 2016, who have now taken over from previous co-chairs Nurain Janah and Imogen Watt. Alex Johnston will remain in the Youth Collective as a member and is still the Deputy Chair of the Youth Advisory Panel (YAP) for this term of Council. The board continue to support them including with provision of the boardroom for their meetings. All budget was spent from their allocated 10k for 2015/2016.

Natural Environment

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Deborah Yates and Rob Thomas.

4.5 Low Carbon Plan Implementation

4.5.1 Low Carbon Lifestyles project

 

EcoDesign is about to start a trial at the Waiatarua Terraces apartments. The pilot is not only focused on hot water but on other energy components such as lighting, heating and draft stopping. The contractor is conducting a survey in 11 apartments and will hold individual interviews with the residents in the week starting August 29. The survey will then be shared to all 150 apartments, who will be offered the shower devices and customised advice. 

Once the pilot in Waiatarua Terraces is finished, the officers will look for additional block of apartments to continue the project.

4.5.2 Food Waste Feasibility Study

Grasshopper Solutions was engaged to investigate options to increase food waste composting by businesses in the Waitematā area. The project is split into two phases: phase one involves consideration and recommendations regarding the feasibility of reducing business food waste and phase two will comprise of an awareness raising programme based on these recommendations.

The Phase 1 Report that will inform the second stage of the project was presented at the last Natural Environment portfolio meeting on 24 August 2016. The study found out that there is little data available on business food waste, but the preliminary information available for the local board area points to the food and hospitality sectors are the largest producers of food waste.

The research also found out that there is a fledgling industry supporting the collection and processing of food waste which is likely to see further innovation and growth once the council’s imminent food waste collection for households is determined after the trial phase.

The recommendations supported by the portfolio for Phase 2 of the project were the development of collateral and resources to support activations and events led by business owners who are already processing their food waste. Comms will be working collaboratively with the contractor to develop some key message so other businesses get to hear the benefits of composting.

Another recommendation was to explore opportunities to support current programmes which provide incentives to restaurants and cafes to better manage their food waste (through a label system).

4.5.3 Waitematā Low Carbon Community Network

The network is a collective of individuals with diverse backgrounds, including the Waitemata Youth Collective co-chairs, experts in food composting, engineering students and environment advocates, who get together to share knowledge, skills and ideas in order to find practical ways to reduce the carbon footprint in our area through education and environmental care.

 

A Pecha Kucha event with short six minutes’ presentations will be held at Studio One Toi Tu on 28 September 2016. The contractor is currently in the process of liaising with potential speakers, who will present on their ‘low carbon living’ ideas and current activities.

The group has also set up a Facebook page (Waitemata Low Carbon Network) to improve engagement and communication within the members.

The fourth meeting will be held after the Pecha Kucha event, with a tentative date of 24 October 2016 still to be confirmed.

 

Transport

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Pippa Coom and Christopher Dempsey.

4.6 Ponsonby Road Pedestrian Improvements

The board is working with AT on improvements for pedestrians along Ponsonby Road between Franklin Road and Williamson Ave. The scope of the project is to provide a continuous pedestrian experience by improving crossing facilities at 8 intersections on Ponsonby Road. The board have approved $703,000 towards the project, funded from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

AT have undertaken consultation on all 8 intersections, with businesses, stakeholders and iwi. The works are planned to start early October subject to timeframe for tendering and evaluation. AT have advised that it is likely the funds will be found for all 8 intersections, and this is to be confirmed.

The designs for Mackelvie Street were revised following feedback from the board, to include a temporary trial with planting in the middle of the road. The plans will take account of the need for future works being part of a holistic view of the approach to laneways in Ponsonby. The rough order of cost for Mackelvie Street is now approx. $74k, excluding the trial planters. The costs and design of the temporary planters are to be advised by AT, and a decision will need to be made by the board regarding proceeding with the temporary trial.

4.7 Franklin Road Improvements

A community BBQ prior to the commencement of Stage One construction of the Franklin Road Improvements project was held on 14 August.

Auckland Transport confirmed a budget for the Franklin Road Improvement project and community consultation on the design was undertaken in April 2016. Resource consent for stage 1 works has been secured by Watercare and a construction contract has been awarded. The utility works are programmed to start in the first week of August 2016 and it is anticipated AT’s will start in February 2017. Further communication with residents is planned to inform them about construction plans.

In conjunction with the road upgrade, some utility services will also upgrade their infrastructure. Stage 1 utility works will commence in August 2016 to February 2017 (with no works undertaken mid-November to January for the Christmas Lights Event) and Stage 2 works will commence January to October 2017. The Stage 2 indicative timeline is for final design to be completed 31 July 2016, resource consent to be lodged end of August and the Stage 2 construction contract awarded end of October 2016. This project will see a complete renewal of the street with services undergrounded, 3.5 metre wide footpaths, tree pits, on-street parking retained, a slightly raised cycle path on both sides of the road, a new roundabout at Wellington Street and raised speed tables at all side roads.

 

4.8 Residential Parking Zones

The Freemans Bay Residential parking zone will be implemented in September.

Consultation was completed on the Ponsonby Residential Parking scheme and the Ponsonby Parking Plan.

The Ponsonby Residential Parking scheme will be implemented in October.

The consultation for the Grey Lynn parking plan will be undertaken in October, with implemented planned for February 2017.

The consultation for the Parnell residential parking zone will start in September.

 

Heritage, Urban Design & Planning

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Christopher Dempsey and Vernon Tava.

4.9 Bonus Floor Through Link Provisions

The final draft story and selection of photos were approved by the Heritage, Urban Design and Planning portfolio and are in the process of being uploaded after final amendments to reflect current closures. The story will be published in Our Auckland, Facebook and the board’s website. As an addition to the list and photos, the feature will include a link to the document ‘An assessment of bonus floor spaces in Auckland’ by Master of Urban Planning students of the University of Auckland.

4.10 Newmarket Laneways

At the 14 June 2016 board meeting the board approved the Newmarket Laneways Teed Street Upgrade Concept Design to enable the start of public consultation and the Developed Design phase. The board delegated to the Waitematā Local Board Newmarket Laneways Working Group the approval of the Teed Street Upgrade Public Consultation and Communication Plan. The board approved an additional $350,000 for the Teed Street Upgrade construction works from the Local Board Transport Capex Fund.

Subject to some amendments, the Newmarket Laneways Working Group approved the Teed Street Upgrade Public Consultation and Communication Plan at its meeting on 7 July. A project update on the Teed Street Concept design will be provided at the September Local Board meeting (once all the public consultation feedback has been analysed) to seek approval of the final Concept design.

Consultation commenced on the Teed Street concept at the end of July for a 4 week period. A survey was uploaded onto Shape Auckland and 41 responses were received. The data has been analysed and any changes to the draft design plan incorporated into the report before the Board this month.

 

4.11 Newton and Eden Terrace Plan

The final draft of the plan is on this month’s business meeting agenda for final endorsement. The draft has been discussed and amended by the joint Waitematā and Albert-Eden local boards delegates and two joint workshops were organised during July and August to share progress with the whole two boards, with a final Waitematā workshop on the final draft plan last week.

Sport and Recreation

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Greg Moyle and Rob Thomas.

4.12 Grey Lynn Park changing rooms

Parks, Sports and Recreation officers held a Project Design team meeting with representatives of Richmond Rovers Rugby League Club and board members and an initial concept design discussion document has been produced. The concept design is currently being varied based on feedback from the club.

The concept design was presented at the Parks Portfolio meeting on 7 September 2016.

Tentative next steps for the project are:

·    September 2016 – Workshop with the board to seek guidance on the options being discussed

·    December 2016 – Options to come to the board for approval in order to go out to consultation

·    February/March 2017 – Tentative date for community consultation

·    October/March 2017 – Detailed design/Specifications

·    April/June 2017 – Procurement for build

·    July/January 2017 – Construction of building

·    February 2018 – Opening

 

4.13 Newmarket Play Space

The Sports and Recreation Portfolio are waiting for confirmation from NZTA around finalisation of Master Plan and allocation of space within the plan.

After the area is confirmed, Allan Walton (Acquisitions and Disposals) will work with NZTA on the lease agreement details. NZTA agreed in principle to proceed with a peppercorn rental.

The location of the youth space is likely to be shifted closer to the end of Clovernook Road. NZTA have said they would like to consider including some additional commercial area next to the youth space. Council staff accepted some flexibility in the configuration of the space, which should have a minimum area of 2,500m2.

In terms of timeframes, NZTA indicated that they are looking to go to market for expressions of interest for the rest of the viaduct area in the next 2 to 3 months. No budget is currently allocated or identified in the LDI to progress this project (for example in terms of consultation, design and consenting process) if NZTA approval is provided. The consultation will incorporate child and youth focused engagement.

4.14 Pump Track Grey Lynn Park

The team has successfully finished their fundraising campaign and the resource consent application process is underway.

In terms of landowner approval, while support was already given in principle, Parks have requested the design to be at least at developed design level with some engineering detail outlining how the site challenges around stability, stormwater and contamination will be dealt with. The detailed design needs to include construction methodology, planting details, stormwater measures to ensure a fit for purpose asset will be built.

As soon as the Pump Track team provides more details, a meeting will be organised with the Parks advisor to progress the full landowner approval and present to the board for a decision.

4.15 The Boroughs

The Boroughs basketball court at Victoria Park is under construction. A construction contract was signed with Fulton Hogan, and construction commenced on 30 August 2016 with an expected completion by 19 October 2016. The team requested for the works to come forward due to Auckland Marathon. An exciting new addition of central Auckland premier youth park.

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An appropriate opening event including the community is in the planning.

4.16 Economic Development

1.    Below is the list of the business associations with their respective board member representative:

2.    Heart of the City – Shale Chambers (BID)

3.    Newmarket Business Association – Greg Moyle (BID)

4.    K Road Business Association – Vernon Tava (BID)

5.    Parnell Inc. – Christopher Dempsey (BID)

6.    Ponsonby Business Association – Pippa Coom (BID)

7.    Uptown Business Association – Rob Thomas (BID)

Grey Lynn Business Association – Deborah Yates

I thank all board members for their dedication and application to the business of their respective business association over the last three years.

4.17 Uptown Innovation Project

The results of the scoping and feasibility study commissioned by ATEED and supported by the board is planned to be received later in September 2016. ATEED officers will present the outcomes of this research in a workshop in September 2016 and a report for the board’s endorsement in the coming months.

5 Portfolio Updates

 

5.1 Events, including Civic

 

This Portfolio of Arts, Culture and Event has been led by myself this term, ably supported by Greg Moyle.

 

5.1.1 Events Programme

 

The Waitemata Local Board based events that Council Events or ATEED have consulted the local board on, for events occurring since July, are attached and marked as Attachment A.

 

5.2 Arts & Culture

5.     

5.2.1 POP Programme

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The POP programme for 2016 started on 4 April and ran until the end of May 2016. The programme included a repeat of two successful 2015 projects, POP Plinths and POP Ping Pong, alongside ten new projects. The new POP projects were developed in collaboration with artists following an open call for proposals held in November 2015 at Studio One Toi Tū. New projects include POP Hula, POP Skip Jump, POP Gardens, POP Riders and more.

The Arts portfolio received the POP 2016 Project Evaluation Report at their last meeting. In total, 13 projects were delivered under the POP programme in 2016, compared to five in 2015. The projects were expanded from the Waitematā area to include other suburbs across the region such as New Lynn, Onehunga and Takapuna.

 

In general the projects were diverse in genre and consistent in look and feel, in line with POP’s spirit were playful and interactive. The most popular projects in terms of audience numbers were POP Ping Pong, Pop Plinths and Pop Marbles.

 

The officers identified some areas for improvement for next year, such as reducing the length of the season and the number of projects.

 

The POP proposals for next year will be assessed in October. The work programme will be presented to the local board in the November/December period. The delivery of the POP Programme 2017 will run probably during April and May 2017.

 

5.2.2 Rainbow Machine

6.    The local board funded the original concept designs for this project. It is being progressed with regional public arts funding. The purpose of Rainbow Machine is to create interactive play opportunities in the city centre and assist in creating an urban environment that is stimulating, fun and welcoming to children and families.

7.     

8.    The Arts team presented an alternative plan to deliver the Rainbow Machine art installations as mobile sites, after AT confirmed that they were not going ahead with Sale St corner as planned. The artwork will be moved around different locations. Each set up and installation would be done in around 3 to 4 hours at a low cost of around $1,000.00

9.     

10.  The first installation site is expected to be Karanga Plaza on the waterfront, while another option suggested was Lower Queen Street following conversations with Fresh Concept, who are leading the activation of the area.

11.   

12.  The Arts and Culture Portfolio received some images but the detail design phase is still to be completed. Some of the materials for the artwork are imported from China so the timeframes are dependent first on shipping and then on testing, but the first installation should be ready around spring.

13.   

14.  5.2.3 Studio One

15.  Studio One currently has two existing documents that guide its operation. The Strategic Direction 2013-2016 includes strategic purpose (vision), mission and objectives and three year priorities, while the Operational Business Plan 2013-2016 includes aspirations to achieve by 2016 and a work programme with priority areas. These were approved by the local board in 2013 and as they are now reaching the end of the three year cycle, staff have reviewed the documents and prepared a set of proposed steps to take place in Q1 FY16/17.

Some of these steps include reviewing the action plan, developing new annual priorities, updating venue information and other data such as visitor satisfaction and local board demographic profiles.

 

The Operational Business Plan 2016-2019 includes aspirations to achieve by 2016 and a work programme with priority areas. These were approved by the local board in 2013 and as they are now reaching the end of the three year cycle, staff have reviewed the documents and prepared a set of proposed steps to take place in Q1 FY16/17. Some of these steps include merging and updating the documents into a single operational business plan document, combining duplicates into a consistent format, reviewing the action plan, developing new annual priorities, updating venue information and other data such as visitor satisfaction and local board demographic profiles.

 

The draft Studio One Toi Tu Business Plan review will be presented to the board in a workshop scheduled for 15 September 2016.

 

5.3 Parks & Open Spaces

 

This Portfolio has been ably led this term by Vernon Tava, supported by myself.

 

5.3.1 Fukuoka Friendship Garden

Construction has started at the site, which is expected to be completed early in 2017.

The final design is effectively the same that was approved by the board in May 2015, except for the decision to align the entrance to the path running into the garden, which was originally located at a 90 degree. This change was introduced to minimise the risk of vandalism.

Concept plan designed by Zen Environmental Design, in collaboration with Fukuoka City Greenery Department and Auckland Council

Some structures that were part of the original 350-square-metre garden have been conserved and will be incorporated into the new design. They include lanterns and a water basin, paving stones, bonsai trees, and the entrance structure.

In regard to ongoing maintenance, fruitful conversations have been had with the Zoo in regards to a commitment to make a contribution to maintenance and security. We have been assured by management that the budget shortfall to complete the project has been secured, and will be part of our local board budget for 2016/17. The Parks portfolio will be receiving more details report on the maintenance budget later in September.

5.3.2 Myers Park Book

8.   

9.    The Board supported the Karangahape Business Association with a Local Board Community Grant to produce the first ever book about the history of Myers Park. A Centennial history of Myers Park 1915-2015 tells the story of Myers Park over the past 100 years, of its evolution to meet the changing needs of a growing and culturally diverse city. 

10.  The book was launched on July 21 at the Quest Hotel on Queen Street, and with a speech from the Chair.

11.  Attached and marked as attachment B are the Chair’s speech notes.

5.3.3 Myers Park Underpass

 

The start of construction of the works is scheduled to commence early September 2016 and forecast to be completed early March 2017.

 

The new concept design for the underpass artwork was presented to the Arts Portfolio on 24 August 2016. The revised proposal by the artist Graham Tipene in conjunction with Warren and Mahoney has been dramatically changed from the original proposal.

The idea of the taniwha has been preserved but the ceiling now features a series of scales (in representation of shark skin) made of aluminium and stainless steel. Some of the scales will be static and some others will be movable.

Lighting will be an important feature of the artwork, not only to make emphasis on the ceiling but also to provide a safe and comfortable walk through the underpass.

 

The new proposal meant that there was a $650,000 budget shortfall, and with the Queen Street entrance and Western stairs to Mayoral Drive that were not funded, and excluded ant an earlier point form the final porject, a total of an additional approximately $1.1m of funding was now required to complete the Myers Park project as originally planned. At its meeting in August 2016 the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board, at which I was present to advocate for this project the Board agreed to endorse the new artwork progressing and to the re-inclusion of the Queen Street Entrance and Western Stairs to Mayoral Drive into the project, and to for the use of the City Centre Targeted Rate fund to pay for the project and further additions. A major vote of confidence by the Advisory Board in this signature Waitemata Local Board project.

 

5.3.4 Victoria Park Entranceway – Fanshawe Street Bus Stops

Construction of this board-negotiated project is nearing completion. Approval of the location and design of the artwork by artist Puhi Thompson, from Ngati Paoa. The following Korero has been provided by Ngati Paoa:

The concepts draw on the mahinga kai theme and oral traditions relating to this area. Te Tō was a headland Pā at Freemans Bay, that was removed to provide fill for the reclamation of Freemans Bay which began in the 1870s and was completed by 1901 (now the ground surface of Victoria Park).  Waikokota (shellfish waters) describes the shallows of Freemans Bay with its abundance of kaimoana. Victoria Park has been scheduled on the basis of this korero. Another significant tradition associated with this area was Ureia, the taniwha who frequented the Waitematā. One of his favourite pastimes was to sunbathe and scratch his barnacles on rocks near Erin Point, hence the name Te Routū ō Ureia (the favoured place of Ureia). The design seeks to capture these connections through an integrated concept. The positioning of the Makawhiti (Yellow eyed mullet) on the adjoining facade seeks to give the impression of a three dimensional water column.

A licence agreement for the occupation of the areas affected of the park will be signed between Auckland Transport and Parks, including conditions such as minimising construction effects (including impact on trees) and prohibiting advertising on the park side of the shelters. The bus shelters are a temporary structure until the whole interchange is revised in approximately two years. The new entrance will be a lasting legacy.

12.  5.3.5 Weona-Westmere Coastal Walkway

13.   

Completion of the construction works is now imminent, with a revised completion date around mid-September.

Three board members attended the Volunteer Planting Day at the Weona entrance on Saturday 13th of August and checked progress on the project.

An opening event will likely take place around end-September (or two weeks after completion).

Stage 2 of the project provides an additional 600m of coastal walkway in an even split of a coastal board walk and on land section.

 

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The way-finding signage project will be delivered separately once the walkway is completed. Parks portfolio holders will be consulted on the signage content along with mana whenua. Following the 12 months maintenance period, additional 4 years of ecological restoration and maintenance will enhance the ecological values of the project site.

 

5.3.6 Symonds St Cemetery

 

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In early July, Parks officers confirmed that they successfully added the headstones in the cemetery in GIS maps. The data is currently being tested. This information will be useful for the purposes of condition assessment and linking historic information. Symonds St is the first cemetery where this data has been made available.

As next steps, Parks will verify the data and allocate a condition rating for each monument to then put together a list for conservation of those that are at most risk. All the information (except for the condition assessment) will be made available to the public.

The remains of the graffiti vandalism from 2012 in the Jewish section have finally been removed or covered up.

As reported by officers by end of July, the path renewals scheduled for the year have been completed.

On 3 August, the Waitematā Local Board chair visited the cemetery with the Mayor, Parks and Heritage officers and the Chair of the Friends of Symonds St Cemetery, Tricia Reade. It was the first time the Mayor had visited the cemetery and was most impressed with the conservation work that the Waitematā Local Board has undertaken to preserve this heritage park.  The depot building has been renewed providing a clean space for volunteers and the conservator to use as a base for activity in the cemetery.

The board funded a ten year programme has effectively been completed ahead of time in just over four years. This project is one I particularly feel proud to have seen through to completion.

5.3.7 Western Springs Pine Removal

This project has proved very challenging. Due to the complexity of the pine removal process, the resource consent and the need to engage with a variety of stakeholders, staff spent the last 10 months re-scoping, investigating and preparing a planning application. The works have now been re-scoped and planning preparation is underway, including a change of methodology to avoid the use of helicopters, reduce damage to current planting, minimise earthworks and ecological damage.

The budget has been successfully carried forward. A timeline was presented to the Parks portfolio in July, which has the physical pine removal being undertaken during the March to May 2017 period.

At the next portfolio meeting, the officers will present the full restoration budgets post removal including non-chemical options for the board to consider.

5.3.8 Playground updates

Cox’s Bay Reserve
An additional $100,000 was approved by the board in August for the project team to go ahead with an enhanced proposal for the playground renewal, in line with community feedback.

Grey Lynn Park playground

The project manager has indicated they are working towards a project completion by mid-November to avoid disruptions for the paddling pool season, which runs is from 1 December to late March.

Western Park playground

Works have started on the playground, with an estimated completion date of end of October.

5.4 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

 

Attached and marked as Attachment C is the August 2016 Progress Update Report.

 

6 Reflections on the 2013-16 Term

The day-to-day business of local boards is decision making on local matters, specifically for local parks, events, arts and recreational services and facilities, community facilities, libraries, and environmental management. In addition local boards have local place making and shaping responsibilities, which necessitate active involvement in wider transport and heritage, urban design and planning issues affecting the local level.

 

The first Waitemata Local Board 2010-2013 oversaw the completion of the Judges Bay upgrade, the refurbishment of the historic Tepid Baths, a new skate park at Victoria Park, the renewal of Point Resolution bridge, new Coxs Bay boardwalk, re-opened Leys Institute Gym and welcomed back Campbell Free Kindergarten as a community asset.

The Board also saw the completion of two all-weather artificial turfs for Seddon Fields and made our playgrounds and sportsfields smokefree. We reopened Newmarket Park following significant remedial works, commenced restoring Symonds Street Cemetery, increased evening opening hours of our suburban libraries, undertook significant ecological restoration of our urban forests and delivered a local Greenways Plan.

We also renewed our commitment to becoming an accessible local board and area, and supported community, arts, sporting groups and local events through grants and partnerships.

We worked hard advocating for our communities, for example regarding greater heritage and character protection, waste minimisation, fair trade and better walking and cycling infrastructure to improve transport choices.

The Super City is now nearly six years old. 21 local boards bring local decision making, and remain the democracy contact point for most residents and ratepayers. Still considered, and often called, community boards, even by many within Council, their potential remains yet to be fully tapped.

Auckland continues to improve daily – we only need to look around our city and try to remember nearly six years ago, before the last Rubgy world cup, Wynyard Quarter existed, or the CRL was a project, to know this is so. Much has also been achieved at Local Board level in six years.

2013–2014 will forever be remembered as ‘the year of plans’.  We seemed to be forever discussing various plans with the community, and thank you.  We are proud though that development plans have been completed for Symonds Street Cemetery, Myers Park, Pt Resolution Taurarua Reserve, Western Park, Grey Lynn Park, Ponsonby Road, K Road and Newmarket’s Laneways.  These now guide short and future longer term development.  Another large project was the refurbishment of Studio One Toi Tū in Ponsonby, providing an accessible community art space for all.

    Making Waitematā a better place to live, work, study, play and visit

2014–2015 was another busy year. We saw Stage 1 of the Myers redevelopment come to fruition with the opening of an award winning children’s playground (top honours Resene Total Colour Awards).  Waitematā was the first local board registered as ‘child friendly’ through the international UNICEF Child Friendly City accreditation process and we celebrated 100 years of Tepid Baths, Parnell Baths and Myers Park.

Our advocacy work helped save the six Great North Road heritage Pohutukawa trees, and the transformation of thinking about cycling in Auckland.  We are part of Auckland Council, but our primary role is as elected representatives of our local communities to speak on their behalf.

2015-2016 saw Weona-Westmere Coastal Walkway, stage two commenced, which included the walkway infrastructure such as boardwalks, final path surfacing, interpretation and planting.  Detailed design of stage 2 of the Myers Park redevelopment was completed and the tender due to go out in the new year, with physical works scheduled to occur in the second half of 2016, allowing the Pop Up Globe Theatre to complete its successful season.

Consultation was completed on the proposed concept designs for the redeveloped Ellen Melville Centre community hub and upgraded Freyberg Place, with construction to commence in August 2016. We had $4.3m available for the Newmarket Laneways streetscape improvements project.  Concept designs were developed for 3 identified areas, Teed Street, Kent Street and York Street, and a decision on which streetscape improvement were to be undertaken within the available budget followed.

We allocated funding to complete the Greenways Route through Grey Lynn Park.  This aligned with a separate Auckland Transport project to connect to Cox’s Bay Reserve. We also undertook consultation on a proposal to improve the pedestrian experience along Ponsonby Road; a priority action identified in the 2014 Ponsonby Road Plan.

Copies of all six annual Waitematā Local Board Achievements Reports can be found on the Council website and links on our Facebook page.

This 2016/17 year is local body election year, and the issues to see our city move forward under the right stewardship remain many and complex.

The main challenges remain prioritising and funding public transport improvements, to get Aucklanders moving and relieve congestion, housing affordability and availability to meet the significant and growing housing shortage in Auckland, meeting the infrastructure costs of the significant growth in our city, city-living affordability, with rates having increased significantly above inflation over recent years, and the health of democracy in our city.

We see the response from some is for the sale of community assets, when we all know that expenditure restraint on Council is what is really required. One that does not mean that unelected CCOs and anonymous Council head office boffins receive generous funding for over budget IT upgrades, economic ambassadors in London, or unnecessary facility upgrades, whilst elected representatives are left to argue with the small change whether library hours should be cut, or how fewer mowings of our parks should be undertaken. This must stop. Being the world’s most liveable city means one that works smarter and prioritises public-facing services and improved service to its community.

We all recognise the need for our city to provide for more people, and enjoy the employment opportunities, and cosmopolitan lifestyle that this brings. Last year, Waitematā Local Board area stood out significantly among Auckland’s local boards, growing by the largest number of people (8,300) and with the highest percentage growth of nearly 10% in a single year.  Almost one fifth (19%) of Auckland’s growth occurred in this local board.

Yet the Unitary Plan and the intensification of our city that this signals remains threatening to many. Yet we all fret that we, or our children will miss out on the housing opportunities that were available to our parents or us.

Yet we can all see our city improve daily around us. Your elected representatives play a significant part in this. They challenge (or should) and battle (if any good) daily with a management and unelected CCO takeover of control of prioritising of our city’s resources. We need to be led by people who love living in this city, and see the glass half-full; positive people who share a vision for a better Auckland.

The city announced it was looking at building a light rail network on the isthmus, as the number of buses in the city centre will soon be too much for the streets to cope with. This could see some original tram routes re-layed down Queen St, Dominion Rd, Sandringham Rd, Mt Eden Rd and Manukau Rd.

With the government’s Urban Cycleway Fund and the interim transport levy investment in cycling in Auckland substantially increased; council spending is up from $14 million to $124 million, meaning $200 million in investment in the region over three years.

We ended last year with the opening of the fantastic Nelson St cycleway and the magenta Te Ara I Whiti – Lightpath, Beach Rd stage 2 in September, and Carlton Gore Rd cycle lanes mid-year. It’s only a year since the fantastic Westhaven Promenade opened. A final decision on Skypath’s future is expected shortly.

Over the past year, the Waitematā Local Board worked hard to deliver the vision and outcomes of our Local Board Plan 2014 and fifth Local Board Agreement.

This 2016/17 year we plan to invest $11m to renew and develop assets in Waitemata and $23 million to maintain and operate these assets. Waitemata Local Board has an annual $1.154m operational expenditure for locally driven initiatives, an Auckland Transport capital projects budget of $470k and a Local Board project capital budget of $507k. We endeavour to leverage off asset renewals budgets as much as possible with our discretionary spend to undertake renewals projects better, and prioritise projects in areas we have undertaken community-approved development plans to guide a coordinated approach to improving our local community.

We all want to pay less rates, and make our Council more accountable and responsive to its residents.  Sounds great, but we all need to ask how, where, and at what cost to local services?

Local Boards are effectively bulk-funded based on residential population by the Governing Body of Council from your hard-earned rates for their discretionary spend to undertake priority local services and improvements. This funding is so for Waitemata, notwithstanding we are host to the region, and have much aging infrastructure, and facilities. Notwithstanding this challenge, your local board is getting on with the job.

We are also continuing our business as usual such as supporting local groups to run their activities through the events and grants programmes, funding arts and community development programmes and delivering local restoration and environmental projects.

This year the Local Board has identified several priorities.

In November 2015, we proudly became the first local board to launch a localised low carbon plan with the publication of ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community’, which contains a series of actions towards transforming Auckland into an energy-resilient low carbon city. We have allocated increased spend on low carbon initiatives, as well as looking at the feasibility of installing a photovoltaics system at Grey Lynn Community Centre to convert solar energy into direct current electricity.

We are keen to leverage from existing renewal programmes in our local parks and open spaces.  Last year we completed a number of park development plans, which has provided us with a very strong framework to identify the priority projects.  Grey Lynn Park southern playground is to be completed this year.

Following public consultation and adoption of the Western Park Development Plan by the local board last August, a number of exciting and long-anticipated park improvements are now occurring for the city’s oldest metropolitan park. Currently a programme of footpath renewals is underway. The new paths have been designed to protect existing tree roots and the overall look is with bluestone edging in line with the development plan.

New lighting will be installed on the western path that connects Ponsonby Road to Beresford Street West and is now completed. The new energy efficient LED lighting is currently planned to be timed to come on at 5am and go off at midnight. This provides a well- lit, commuter route through the park in line with last year’s community wishes. The lighting along the Ponsonby Road frontage of the park is to be retained, and the other old lighting elsewhere in the park decommissioned in due course.

Other projects coming up in the park include a significant new destination playground, including what is believed to be the longest children’s tube slide in Auckland,  which should be completed by the end of September, and renewed fitness stations that will be focussed around the playing field.

January 2016 marked the completion of the first phase of the Weona-Westmere Coastal Walkway, a project that will open up some of Auckland’s finest waterfront, which until now has been largely inaccessible to the public. The re-development of the Ellen Melville Centre into a vibrant community facility in the heart of the city took a step forward this year after the public consultation for the concept design, which will include a permanent public artwork on the O’Connell Street façade.

The POP Programme created sensory garden at Studio One Toi Tu is proposed to have the creation of seating space and an entrance sign.

Other changes that we are proposing include increasing the budget for the now annual Myers Park Medley event, to allow us to deliver an even better community focussed event. The Board is also proposing to deliver a new pathway through the Symonds Street Cemetery to connect K Road to Grafton Cycleway, following the completion of  the installation of new interpretation and wayfinding signage, and to retain a maintenance budget to maintain headstones.

We are investigating the feasibility of installation of a solar heating solution at Parnell Baths.  This could possibly extend the pools opening hours or make the start and end of the season more desirable to users. 

We are also continuing supporting with increased budget community-led development and place making projects such as the work that is currently being undertaken to create an open space design at 254 Ponsonby Road and the construction of a bicycle pump track at Grey Lynn Park.

A key role of the local board is to advocate for initiatives that the local board may not have decision making responsibilities for. Some of the key areas for this area include the continued roll out of the Residential Parking Zone Scheme – with Ponsonby next.

In collaboration with Albert Eden and Puketapapa, we are to see one or more sites in the central area to provide drop-off locations for local residents, for a larger Community Recycling Centre processing site to be located in Maungakiekie-Tamaki.

Construction of Stage I of Auckland Transport’s long awaited Franklin Road Improvements project has commenced. This will see a complete renewal of the street over coming months with services undergrounded, 3.5m wide footpaths, tree pits, on-street parking retained, a slightly raised cycle path on both sides of the road, a new roundabout at Wellington Street, and raised speed tables at all side roads.  It will be fantastic once completed.

The Freemans Bay residential parking zone joins St Mays Bay’s scheme is to become operational this month.

In line with our commitment to place children and young people centre-stage, we continued working towards the ‘Child Friendly Cities’ UNICEF accreditation, including children in the consultation process for the Western Park playground renewal and local area-based plan for Newton and Eden Terrace.

Embracing the community empowerment approach, where individuals, families and communities have the power and ability to influence decisions and take action, we continued supporting a number of initiatives aimed at building capacity, leadership and skills. We also funded and supported events that represent the area’s diversity and local identities, like Parnell Festival of Roses and Myers Park Medley.

Looking forward, there is a lot more planned for delivery in the year ahead. The Annual Budget recently confirmed continues to prioritise the preservation of our character areas, ensure the delivery of high quality developments and advocate for transport improvements.

The following weeks or months will bring some milestones such as the completion of the Weona-Westmere Costal Walkway, the first steps towards the delivery of streetscape improvements in Newmarket with the beginning of our public consultation and the construction stage of the re-developed Ellen Melville Centre.

We are very eager to see the Myers Park upgrade moving forward with the construction of the Mayoral Drive underpass linking the park to Aotea Square. We will continue working with council and Auckland Transport to support the extension of walking and cycling connections with the second stage of the Greenways route connecting Grey Lynn Park with Cox’s Bay Reserve.

We will continue our support for the development of new clubroom facilities for the Richmond Rovers League Club as part of a new multi-use community facility at Grey Lynn Park; a much needed local project.

In line with our commitment to promote connected, accessible and safe transport choices, we will continue to work with Auckland Transport to finalise the roll out of residential parking zones in the inner city suburbs.

We are confident this will be another year of great achievements that will contribute to making Waitematā an even better place to live.

At our inaugural meeting only three years ago I ambitiously sought to see the following outcomes for Auckland at the regional level in this three year term of Council:

·    construction of the City Rail Link commenced;

·    the Parnell railway station, set in its rail heritage precinct opened;

·    SkyPath, the Harbour Bridge walking and cycling pathway opened;

·    The trams returned to the Wynyard Quarter, and light rail to Britomart as a confirmed, planned project;

·    Waterfront Auckland’s Westhaven walking and cycling boardwalk opened;

·    Auckland Transport commit to greater delivery of completion of the Auckland Cycle Network and the on-road component of local boards’ Greenways’ plans;

 

Three have been delivered, and all but light rail are confirmed projects in delivery phase.

At the Local Board level, I wished, amongst many other projects, to see us deliver:

·    The redeveloped Ellen Melville/Pioneer Women’s Hall opened as a vibrant community hub;

·    The significant upgrade of Myers Park completed in time for its centenary in 2015;

·    The Mayoral Drive underpass redeveloped as a safe open space entrance to Myers Park;

·    A multi-board community-led local resource recovery centre opened for business;

·    The 1.4km Weona-Westmere coastal walkway constructed;

·    The Pt Resolution Reserve and headland developed as part of a Taurarua/Pt Resolution Master Plan.

·    A village square or park in Ponsonby Road opened, as part of the Ponsonby Road Master Plan.

·    A Waitemata heritage and character assessment of Grey Lynn and Westmere completed; and

·    A Waitemata Local Area Plan, to build on the Unitary Plan, completed in full consultation with the community.

 

Whilst some may be taking a little longer to deliver than first hoped, all but an area plan post Unitary Plan also seem to be in hand.

When your ballot papers arrive this month, two names who are current members of Waitemata Local board will not be there. City Vision members Christopher Dempsey, a long-time effective public servant, expert planner, community advocate and friend of Parnell since 2010, and community board member from 2004, and Deborah Yates, elected in 2013, and an invaluable social change and environmental advocate, are both standing down. We will miss both, thank them for their considerable respective contributions to their community and wish them well in their future endeavours.

It has been an honour to work alongside my fellow Board members these last three, and six years as Board Chair.

I particularly wish to acknowledge the close working relationship I have had for a second term with Pippa Coom, as Deputy Chair. We have the honour of being the longest standing chair-deputy combination on Auckland Council. Pippa’s support and leadership continue to add considerable strength to this Board and to me as chair.

Vernon Tava, Greg Moyle and Rob Thomas have all contributed much to this Board and the community these last three years, and are again wishing to continue to offer to their communities next term. I thank all members for their support, and for occasionally making the role fun.

I have enjoyed my Portfolios of Arts, Culture and Events and Parks and Open Spaces. I have been actively involved in City Centre and business leadership during the term. I have been a very active participant in the local board chair’s forum, and participated in several all of council working parties. It has been my honour to lead evening Citizenship ceremonies for another 3 years, and I have given many formal addresses and lead community engagement sessions over this term. I have provided regular written chair’s reports updating the Board and the Community on Board and portfolio activities, and have also been a regular columnist in the Hobson, and Ponsonby News.

I wish once again to acknowledge our ward councillor, Clr Mike Lee and his hard work for the community over the last three years. Mike Lee is a strong advocate and often does not leave you unclear as to his views. As chair and as Local Board we have continued to work closely with Mike, especially on transport and Unitary Plan matters that impact on the Waitemata community. The fact that we work closely together as a team in a complementary way, whilst maintaining respectively our regional and local focus, continues to add strength to us as a local board.

I wish to acknowledge and thank our dedicated local board services staff. The Waitemata team continue to provide quality advice, support and assistance. Our relationship managers; Judith Webster, Victoria Villaraza and Kathryn Martin. Our Local Board Senior Advisors: Marion Davies, Trina Thompson, Tara Pradhan, and Simon Tattersfield. Our Local Board Advisors, Tony Chandler, Eman Nasser, Colin Cresswell, Beverley Fletcher and Corina Claps. Our Democracy Advisors:  Maggie Noble, Desiree Tukutama and Sybil Mandow. Our Engagement Officer, Ian Leader, Alice Fauvel and Carlos Rahman. Our fantastic PA Supports; Alana Thurston, Sophie McGhee, Corina Claps, and Tammy Hendricks. We have also been ably supported by Cathy McIntosh as our Communication advisor, Shamila Unka as our Community Empowerment Broker,  Audrey Gan as our Finance Advisor, Mark Miller, Dawn Bardsley and Grant Ockleston as our Parks Advisors, and Priscilla Steele, and Ivan Trethowen as our Auckland Transport Liaison. Thank you all for helping us make this board the effective board it is.

 

Finally, I would like to take this opportunity to thank our engaged and active communities. Without their support the progress made to date could not have happened. There remains much to do, and I wish the incoming Board continued success.

 

Let’s continue to be an effective, progressive, action-focused Local Board.

 

 

7 In the Press Update

Some of the activities since the last report of local Board activities were as follows:

 

7.1 Community Leadership

·    The Hobson, June/July 2016 edition – Chair/Board’s monthly report.

 

Copies are attached and marked as Attachment D

 

·    Ponsonby News, June, July, august and September 2016 editions – “Chair’s Waitemata Local Board Report”. Chair, Board, monthly reports.

 

     Copies are attached and marked as Attachment E and F.

 

 

8 Meetings/Events

In addition to responsibilities in constituency work and community engagement, and any matters noted above, I have undertaken the following Portfolio or Board Chair responsibilities:

 

 

8.1 Community & Civic Leadership:

Attended:

16.           

·    Meeting with St Mary’s Bay Association, 4 May 2016

·    Video Shoot at Symonds St Cemetery, Symonds Street, 10 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Business meeting, Grey Lynn Community Centre, 10 May 2016

·    Led Citizenship Ceremony 2016 –Town Hall, 17 May 2016

·    Local Board Chairs Forum Meeting, 23 May 2016

·    Joint Governing Body and Local Board, Town Hall, 25 May 2016

·    Countdown Ponsonby opening, Ponsonby, 2 June 2016

·    Matariki Festival 2016 opening, Britomart , 9 June 2016

·    Our Auckland photo-shoot, Ponsonby, 9 June 2016

·    Karakia for Victoria Park entrance and pathway from Fanshawe Street, 10 June 2016

·    Tree Planting, One Tree Hill, 11 June 2016

·    Shed Clean-up, Symonds Street Cemetery, 11 June 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Business meeting, Auckland Central, 14 June 2016

·    Auckland Mayoral Debate Breakfast, Grafton, 17 June 2016

·    Meeting with K Road Business Association, K Road, 21 June 2016

·    Ellen Melville Centre & Freyberg Square project update, Pioneer Women’s & Ellen Melville Hall, 22 June 2016

·    Grey Lynn Park Greenways Opening, Grey Lynn, 9 July 2016

·    Speaker at launch of ‘A Centennial History of Myers Park 1915-2015’ Book, 21 July 2016

·    FOSSC monthly meeting, Newmarket, 26 July 2016

·    Meet the Mayoral Candidate, Parnell, 28 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Business Meeting, 9 August 2016

·    Unitary Plan Completion Function, Town Hall, 19 August 2016

·    Pre-meeting to discuss local board involvement in the resource consent review working party, 22 August 2016

·    Local Board involvement in Resource Consents Working Party, 22 August 2016

·    DLC Hearing – Plush, Town Hall, 26 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Extraordinary Meeting for Renaming of Khartoum Place, 30 August 2016

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee, 31 August 2016

17.           

18.         

19.           

·    Speaker at the opening the Club House - West End Lawn Tennis Club , 31 July 2016

20.           

21.          Attached and marked G are the Chairs speech notes.

22.           

·    Site Blessing for the Ellen Melville Centre and Freyberg Place project, 11 August 2016

·    Operanesian On O’Connell, Lorne Street, 11 August 2016

·    Grey Lynn Fire Station Opening, Grey Lynn , 12 August 2016

·    Volunteers Day - Weona Walkway, Westmere, 13 August 2016

·    Franklin Road Community BBQ, Freemans Bay , 14 August 2016

·    Invitation to Holy Trinity Cathedral, 21 August 2016

·    Phil Goff - Official Mayoral Campaign Launch, 28 August 2016

·    Rod Oram's book launch - Three Cities, AUT University, 1 September 2016

23.   

24.                 

8.2 Board Leadership

Attended:

·    Local Board meeting on smoke-free policy and the gambling, 2 May 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 2 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 3 May 2016

·    Media catch-up with Cathy McIntosh, 3 May 2016

·    Local Board members meeting – Budget refresh for annual plan 2016/17, 3 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee, 4 May 2016

·    Parks Portfolio monthly meeting, 5 May 2016

·    Ponsonby Rd pedestrian experience project (Update on the design for MacKelvie Street), 5 May 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 9 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board/F & P Committee annual budget discussions, 9 May 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee, Town Hall,  10 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, Waitemata Local Board , 12 May 2016

·    Photo shoot POP Skip Jump, Auckland Central, 12 May 2016

·    Community Empowerment Approach with Shamila Unka, 16 May 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 16 May 2016

·    Newton and Eden Terrace Draft Plan, Waitemata Local Board, 16 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 17 May 2016

·    Media catch-up with Cathy McIntosh, 17 May 2016

·    Meeting with Tim Coffey, Waitemata Local board, 17 May 2016

·    Events Portfolio monthly meeting, 18 May 2016

·    Friends of Symonds St Cemetery monthly Meeting, 5 April 2016

·    Transport monthly meeting, Waitemata Local Board, 18 May 2016

·    Grey Lynn Park Visit, Grey Lynn, 19 May 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 23 May 2016

·    Briefing on SkyPath, Albert Street, 24 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 24 May 2016

·    Achievements Report meeting, 24 May 2016

·    Finance Committee & LIPs Portfolio Meeting, Waitemata Local Board, 26 May 2016

·    Sports and Recreation monthly meeting, Waitemata Local Board, 26 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, Waitemata Local Board , 30 May 2016

·    Engagement Framework with Carlos, 30 May 2016

·    Arts and Culture monthly meeting, 30 May 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, Waitemata Local Board, 31 May 2016

·    Media catch-up with Cathy McIntosh, 31 May 2016

·    Friends of Symonds St Cemetery monthly meeting, 31 May 2016

·    Parnell Community Committee, Jubilee building, 31 May 2016

·    Parks Portfolio monthly meeting, 2 June 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 7 June 2016

·    Business meeting agenda Run through, Waitemata Local Board 7 June 2016

·    Governance Framework Review interview, 8 June 2016

·    Auckland Domain Committee Agenda run through, Town Hall, 8 June 2016

·    Auckland Domain Committee, Albert Street, 9 June 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 13 June 2016

·    Media catch-up with Cathy McIntosh, 14 June 2016

·    Central Community Recycling Facility Meeting, Albert Eden, 14 June 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee, Albert Street, 15 June 2016

·    Monthly Transport Portfolio, Waitemata Local Board, 15 June 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 16 June 2016

·    Meeting with Barry Potter, Albert Street, 21 June 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 21 June 2016

·    Arts and Culture Monthly portfolio meeting, 21 June 2016

·    Events AC portfolio, 21 June 2016

·    Waitemata Events Funding, 21 June 2016

·    Achievements Report, 22 June 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Grants Committee, 22 June 2016

·    Achievement Reports, 23 June 2016

·    Finance Committee, 23 June 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 4 July 2016

·    Business meeting agenda Run through, Waitemata Local Board 4 July 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee, Town Hall, 4 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 5 July 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee, Town Hall , 6 July 2016

·    Parks Portfolio Monthly meeting, 7 July 2016

·    Newmarket Laneways, 7 July 2016

·    Citizenship 2016 - Round 6 - Shale presiding , 7 July 2016

·    Quay Street Cycleway Opening Event, 8 July 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 11 July 2016

·    Virtual Reality Development in Uptown (AT), 11 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board Business meeting, 12 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 14 July 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 18 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 19 July 2016

·    Local Board involvement in Resource Consents Working Party, Albert Street, 19 July 2016

·    Monthly Transport Portfolio meeting, 20 July 2016

·    Finance and Performance Committee, Town Hall, 21 July 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 25 July 2016

·    Events Portfolio monthly meeting , 25 July 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 26 July 2016

·    Media catch up with Cathy, 26 July 2016

·    Arts and Culture Portfolio meeting, 26 July 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee briefing re UP following receipt of the IHP recommendations, Town Hall, 27 July 2016

·    Auckland Domain Committee run-through, 27 July 2016

·    Auckland Domain Committee , Town Hall 27 July 2016

·    Finance Portfolio meeting, 28 July 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 1 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 2 August 2016

·    Symonds Street Cemetery history and heritage tour with Mayor, 3 August 2016

·    Independent Hearings Panel recommendations: Briefing session for local board members , 4 August 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 8 August 2016

·    Renaming of Khartoum Place, 8 August 2016

·    Parks Portfolio Monthly Meeting, 9 August 2016

·    Community Portfolio additional meeting - Grey Lynn Community Centre portfolio increase, 9 August 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee to consider IHP Unitary Plan recommendations, 10 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 11 August 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee continuation, Town Hall, 12 August 2016

·    Auckland Development Committee continuation, Town Hall, 15 August 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 15 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 16 August 2016

·    Events Portfolio - ATEED meeting, 17 August 2016

·    Events Portfolio - AC - monthly meeting, 17 August 2016

·    Monthly Transport Portfolio Meeting, 17 August 2016

·    CRL update  for Waitemata and Albert Eden Boards Chairs and portfolio holders, 22 August 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 22 August 2016

·    Focus group to provide your views on the changes to local board work programming and quarterly performance reports, Albert Street, 22 August 2016

·    Housing First project walk through opportunity for ACCAB members, 22 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 23 August 2016

·    Media catch up with Cathy, 23 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 23 August 2016

·    Arts and Culture Monthly Portfolio Meeting, 24 August 2016

·    Maori Language Policy, 24 August 2016

·    Local Board Chairs Forum, Town Hall ,26 August 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 29 August 2016

·    Discussion regarding new community facilities maintenance contracts, Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board office, 29 August 2016

·    Waitemata Local Board workshop, 30 August 2016

·    Governance Framework Review - Elected Member Seminar, Town Hall, 31 August 2016

·    Fukuoka Garden Meeting, 31 August 2016

·    Weekly update with Relationship Manager, Waitematā Local Board, 1 September 2016

 

8.3 Events

Attended:

·    2016 New Zealand Listener Gala Night, ASB Theatre, 12 May 2016

·    Winetopia, Queens Wharf, 20 May 2016

25.           

26.         

27.           

·    CRL Ground Breaking, 2 June 2016

·    Italian National Day Concert Invite, 7 June 2016

·    Opening night of that Bloody Woman, SkyCity Theatre, 11 June 2016

·    Newmarket Business Awards 2016, Auckland War Memorial Museum, 17 June 2016

·    Opening Night Gala of the 2016 NZ International Film Festival, 14 July 2016

·    The Walters Prize, Auckland Art Gallery, 15 July 2016

·    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, 23 July 2016

·    Westpac Auckland Business Awards - Central Finalist Function, 4 August 2016

·    Opening of NZ Fashion Week followed by Harman Grubisa, 22 August 2016

·    EMA Unitary Plan discussion with Penny Hulse, Kyber Pass Rd, 29 August 2016

·    Opening night of Royal NZ Ballet Giselle, ASB Theatre, 31 August 2016

·    Auckland's Q Theatre is turning 5! , Q Theatre, 2 September 2016

28.                 

29.    8.4 City Centre Economic Development

(Heart of the City & Auckland City Centre Advisory Board)

 

I sit as local board representative on Auckland City Centre Advisory Board, with representatives of many city centre sector groups such as business and residents, universities, and the private sector, advising Council on all matters affecting the City Centre. The Board primarily oversees the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate collected from city businesses and residents, on top of general rates all other Aucklanders pay, to the tune of an additional $20.8m per annum. The additional rate funds improvements to the city centre, and has been fundamental over many years now in seeing the revival of the city centre as a more pedestrian friendly international city centre, with its shared spaces, and improved public spaces and facilities. The next project is a significant improvement to K Road’s pedestrian environment and a dedicated cycleway. Many think the city centre is getting more than its fair share of your rates, but it is primarily this additional rate that has funded the transformation of our city centre outside the waterfront, and will continue to do so.

 

I am also the board’s representative on the Heart of the City business association executive that represents CBD businesses, and promotes the city centre as a destination. Heart of the City is the largest by some margin of the many Business Improvement Districts throughout Auckland that rate their business membership through a partnership with Council to help build local economies through self-management. HoTC has a BID budget of some $4m per annum so is a significant player in advocacy and business promotion of the city centre. Local board members ensure oversight of the rate collected, and are the liaison with Council. Other members each sit of the Newmarket, K Road, Ponsonby, Parnell and Uptown BIDs, which collectively constitute about 45% of Auckland’s economic activity.

 

·    Heart of the City Board Meeting, HOTC Office,  18 May 2016

·    Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, 25 May 2016

·    Heart of the City Board Meeting, HOTC Office,  22 June 2016

·    Heart of the City Board Meeting, HOTC Office,  27 July  2016

·    Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, 27 July 2016

·    HOTC Board Meeting, 24 August 2016

·    ACCAB Workshop - Karangahape Road cycleway and streetscape project, 24 August 2016

·    Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, 24 August 2016

·    Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, 24 August 2016

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council/ATEED events have consulted on, for events

339

b

Myers Park Book Launch Chair’s Address

347

c

Auckland City Centre September Projects Update Report.

349

d

The Hobson, Chair’s June 2016 Local Board column

357

e

Ponsonby News, “Chair’s Waitemata Local Board Report” – July 2016

359

f

Ponsonby News, “Chair’s Waitemata Local Board Report” – September 2016

361

g

West End Tennis Club Opening Chair’s Address

363

    

Authors

Shale Chambers – Chair,  Waitematā Local Board

 Signatories

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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13 September 2016

 

 

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Deputy Chair’s monthly report

 

File No.: CP2016/13806

 

  

 

Executive summary

This is my final report for the second triennium of Auckland Council.  It includes my reflections on the last three years and covers my Waitematā Local Board activities from 31 July to 6 September 2016 as Deputy Chair, lead for the Community and Transport portfolios, and Chair of the Grants Committee, and with positions on the Ponsonby Business Association Board and Ponsonby Community Centre Committee and Board liaison for the Parnell Community Centre.

 

I have provided a report each month this term. My previous reports are available at www.pippacoom.co.nz.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         receive the deputy chair’s monthly report.

Summary of August highlights

 

Unitary Plan passed

 

The Governing Body of Auckland Council passed the Auckland Unitary Plan (UP) on 15 Auckland following a mammoth five-year process to unify all former regional and district council plans into one.  I sat in on several days of the decision making to hear the debate and support, with reservations, the passing of a unified planning rulebook for Auckland. The Board, particularly through the work and leadership of our Chair, Shale Chambers has been actively involved right from day one. There is a lot to reflect on with the community about the process and final decisions on the Independent Hearings Panel recommendations.

 

It is a significant milestone but there are still big question marks over whether the UP achieves affordable housing, heritage protection, density done well and quality design.  There is a lot of work to be done to now deliver on the promise and potential of a unified plan that responds appropriately to inevitable future growth and delivers on the Auckland Plan. 

 

Renaming lower Khartoum Place

Following consultation on the renaming of lower Khartoum Place with a suitable name associated with women’s suffrage, and in recognition of the Women’s Suffrage Centenary Memorial 1893-1993 ‘Women Achieve the Vote’ the Board voted in July to adopt a bi-lingual name. After receiving further information about the suitability of a bi-lingual name and following a meeting between board representatives, Ngati Whatua and National Council of Women the Board held an extraordinary meeting on 30 August to confirm the new name as Te Hā o Hine Place.

 

I look forward to Suffrage Day on 19 September when we will be celebrating the new name and acknowledging all those who have contributed to the process and the claiming of a small space for women in the city centre.    

 

Auckland Council media release

1 September 2016

 

Te Hā o Hine Place at home in the city centre

 

At a special meeting this week, the Waitematā Local Board voted to change the name of the lower section of Khartoum Place, to acknowledge the location of the Women’s Suffrage Centenary Memorial 1893-1993, ‘Women Achieve the Vote’.

 

On Suffrage Day 2016, September 19, Waitematā Local Board and iwi partners will unveil the new name for the lower section of Khartoum Place; Te Hā o Hine Place, in recognition of the struggle New Zealand Suffragists faced until 1893.

 

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei gifted the name ‘Te Hā o Hine’ which is derived from the whakatauki (proverb) ‘Me aro koe ki te Hā o Hine-ahu-one’ and translates to ‘pay heed to the dignity of women’.  The board felt it was a fitting sentiment as did National Council of Women - Auckland Branch.

 

Carol Beaumont, President of the National Council of Women – Auckland Branch, says they are pleased that the name Khartoum Place is being replaced with Te Hā o Hine Place, as it is more fitting to the Suffrage Memorial.

 

Since opening a refreshed Khartoum Place in September 2014, the Waitematā Local Board began looking more seriously at changing the name of the lower section, an area that was being informally referred to as “Suffrage Place” due to the location next to the Suffrage Memorial and the space being used for annual Women’s Day and Suffrage Day events.

 

In April 2016 the local board consulted  with iwi, the National Council of Women, local businesses, residents and the wider public to ascertain the level of support for a name change and a preference should they support a change.  The majority of submitters supported a name change and for the options for consideration to include; Te Hā o Hine, Suffrage Place and Kate Sheppard Place

 

 

Ellen Melville Centre and Freyberg Place upgrade underway

 

The creation of a community hub for the growing number of city centre residents got closer with the start of the work to renovate and refurbish Ellen Melville Hall.

 

This is one of the Board’s most significant projects that we initiated last term.  Once completed, the new centre will provide a range of facilities including a new kitchen, Wi-Fi, improved amenities, café-style seating and a modern refurbishment.  It will be a much needed community facility for Auckland’s growing city centre residential population.

 

The $10.7m project includes the upgrade of Freyberg Place (funded by the City Centre targeted rate).  The upgrades to Freyberg Place and Ellen Melville Centre are expected to be completed by mid-2017. 

Hakanoa Street footpaths and kerbing

 

Auckland Transport’s renewal of kerbing and footpaths on Hakanoa Street has been an on-going saga.   In August I attended several meetings with residents to resolve the issues related to the removal of bluestone kerbing (replaced in unacceptably large areas with faux concrete kerbing) and poor workmanship including new footpaths on the northern side that led to flooding.  The photo right shows residents inspecting a trial of concrete to mimic bluestone (once complete only the area between the cones will be in concrete)

 

In the latest update to be communicated to all residents Auckland Transport has confirmed that the areas where faux bluestone are to be constructed in concrete are being marked in white paint once each tree site has been investigated to determine the extent where real bluestone kerbs can be installed. AT has committed to re-instating as much bluestone as possible. The northern side footpath/vehicle crossing levels will be remediated to ensure road reserve stormwater is contained.  

 

Auckland Transport’s approach to this renewal has highlighted the need to provide the local board with plans and consult with residents in advance.  I am also following up on the need for a longer term tree management strategy.

 

 

Weona Westmere Walkway community planting day

The project to complete a 1.4km long coastal walkway on council reserve land and the coastal marine area in Westmere got underway last term after years of community campaigning. 

 

It was great to take part in a community planting day to see how far the walkway has progressed around a beautiful but neglected stretch of coastline. Hopefully the walkway will be open by the end of September for everyone to enjoy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portfolios

 

Transport

 

I’ve worked on the transport portfolio with Christopher Dempsey over the last six years.  It has been exciting to see the positive progress being made to improve transport choices in Auckland.  Over the last three years the board has achieved or played a role in achieving for transport: 

·      Start of the City Rail Link (a legacy Mayor Brown can be very proud about)

·      Funded a Parnell Station connection to Nicholls Lane to support opening of the station

·      Progress on the Harbour Bridge pathway SkyPath  

·      Increased funding for cycleways that has led to the completion of the Te ara i whiti /Lightpath, Nelson St cycleway, Quay St cycleway, Westhaven promenade and a central programme of cycleways

·      Progressed the Grey Lynn Greenways route

·      Worked with Auckland Transport on the Ponsonby Road pedestrian experience project

·      Secured the upgrade of Franklin Road with undergrounding of power lines, stormwater separation,  new footpaths, road surfacing, pedestrian crossing and cycle lanes

·      Implementation of the Freemans Bay Residential Parking Zone (now scheduled for 2 October) and parking zones in all central city suburbs

·      Successfully advocated for improved pedestrian safety such as walking improvements at the Grey Lynn shops and in the city centre.

·      Ensured Auckland Transport leveraged maintenance budgets to provide safety improvements for all road users such cycle feeder lanes and stop boxes on Ponsonby Road as part of a resurfacing project

·      Successfully advocated for the removal of parking minimums from the Unitary Plan

·      Advocated for improved local bus services as part of the New Network to be rolled out in 2017

·      Successfully advocated for the inclusion of a new outcome in the City Centre Masterplan:  A walkable and pedestrian- friendly city centre, moving towards zero pedestrian deaths or serious injuries as a result of vehicle collisions.

·      Initiated a street tree planting policy and identified locations for new street trees (including three new tree pits on Williamson Ave as part of the Countdown development)

·      Installed three on street drinking stations

 

We’ve also provided input into a range of Regional transport policies. 

There is still a lot to be done to reduce congestion and carbon emissions, and provide safe, connected, accessible transport choices in Waitematā.  Next term I hope to progress: slower speeds in the city centre and on residential streets, implementation of vision zero, opening up of greenways routes (including opening up the old Parnell Rail tunnel), changes to the give way rule, roll out of improved wayfinding, acceleration of the cycleways programme and residential parking schemes, driver education regarding vulnerable road users, ending dangerous car transporter practicees on Great North Road and further work to improve the walking experience in Waitemata.

 

 

 

Community

 

As portfolio holder with Deborah Yates, we cover community facilities, libraries and initiatives aimed at building community wellbeing capacity, leadership and skills.    Some of what has been achieved for the community over the last three years includes:

 

 

·      Increased community funding to $125,000 per year for grants to community and sports groups  (distributing funds through the Community Grants Committee)

·      Established an accommodation grant fund

·      Funded the Inner City Network and Inner City Neighbours Day event

·      In January 2015 registered the Waitematā Local Board with UNICEF as the first local board to be working toward “child friendly” accreditation.

·      Funded Child Friendly Cities initiatives such as Think Big - the creation of a consultation website for children

·      Supported a Community-led design process for the development 254 Ponsonby Road with open space

·      Provided funding support for Kelmarna Gardens and a community garden coordinator

·      Extended library hours

·      Continued to implement the Accessibility Plan and undertaken a review

·      Agreed funding and work programmes for our three community centres.

·      Provided additional funding to support growing participation at the Grey Lynn Community Centre

·      Provided support to the Waitematā Youth Collective involvement in events, activities, steering groups and projects

One of the areas of ongoing concern has been the increasing numbers of rough sleepers in the city centre.  We have supported the Homelessness Action Plan initiatives currently underway but going into next term a great deal of further work is needed to make an impact.

There is also more to do to develop partnership approaches with mana whenua, improve the health of our communities such as extended smoke free areas, improve safety and increase engagement and participation especially by inner city residents.

I am sad that both of my co-portfolio holders Deborah Yates and Christopher Dempsey have decided to retire from local government.  They have made a huge contribution and I have really appreciated working with them.

In the online version of my report at pippacoom.co.nz I have included photos of Deborah and Christopher in action. (There will of course be a photo of me and Christopher on our bikes – the most enjoyable and fun way to get around Waitematā as a board member!)

 

Waitematā Local Board 2013 - 2016

It has been a privilege to serve on the Waitematā Local Board for two terms as Deputy Chair.  After the hard work in the first term to make the new super city structure work effectively for local decision making, I was grateful to be elected for a second time to continue the many projects underway with an ongoing commitment by the Board to strong community engagement.

There is still a lot to do to ensure Council is listening and responsive to local aspirations and that the governance framework is fit for purpose. There are parts of the organisational structure and culture that still need further refinement to properly support the role of local boards.  The Auckland Transport relationship with local boards is particularly problematic and only a complete overhaul of the leadership is likely to result in any meaningful improvement. 

This term has been immensely rewarding and at times lots of fun too. The Board’s annual achievements reports available on the Council website highlight just how much has happened over the term. We are fortunate to be supported by an outstanding, hardworking local board team. 

The rewards are great for board members able to put the time into the role.  I’ve appreciated the many learning opportunities and the amazing speakers that take part in the Auckland Conversations series.   It has also been an opportunity to meet a wonderfully diverse range of people, to get involved with our many community groups (particularly through our community grant funding) and to take part in the many events on offer in the Waitematā area.

There is still much to do. I hope to be part of a progressive Local Board next term that will continue to deliver for everyone who lives, works, plays and visits Waitematā.

Workshops and meetings

 

From 31 July until 6 September 2016 I attended:

 

·    Local Board Members briefing on greenways identity on 1 August

·    Hakanoa road works meeting with local residents on 1 August

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 2 August

·    Independent Hearings Panel recommendations: Briefing session for local board members

·    Meeting to discuss renaming of Khartoum Place with Ngati Whatua Orakei, National Council for Woman and representatives of the Waitematā Local Board.

·    Community Portfolio additional meeting - Grey Lynn Community Centre funding increase

·    Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 9 August at the Grey Lynn Community Centre

·    Meeting to discuss a proposal for an Inner City Community Garden on Griffith Building Site (temporary site as a result of the CRL works on the corner of Albert Street and Wellesley Street)

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 11 August

·    Attended the Unitary Plan debate at the Governing Body meetings on 11 and 12 August

·    Meeting with GLBA and Auckland Transport to discuss parking impacts of Richmond Road cyclelane project

·    Workshop on 15 August on opportunities for Community-led development support and development with Ākina and Inspiring Communities (at the invitation of Denise Bijoux )

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 16 August

·    Monthly Transport portfolio catch up on 17 August

·    Franklin Road Improvement Project Community Liaison Group Meeting on 17 August

·    Hakanoa St Trial Mimic Kerb Inspection on 22 August (see details above)

·    CRL update  for Waitemata and Albert Eden Boards Chairs and portfolio holders on 22 August

·    Meeting to discuss Greenways branding on 23 August

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 23 August

·    Communications update on 23 August

·    Meeting on 23 August of the community portfolio and inner city residents to discuss action on homelessness and use of the Civic Administration building as a night shelter

·    Meeting to discuss the Board’s feedback on the Maori Language Policy and implementation plan

·    Community portfolio meeting on 24 August

·    Inner City Network meeting and lunch hosted by Splice on 25 August. Presentation: social impact of intensification of housing

·    Ponsonby Community Centre committee meeting on 29 August

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 30 August

·    Waitemata Local Board Extraordinary Meeting for Renaming of Khartoum Place on 30 August

·    Meeting with Hakanoa residents at the Grey  Lynn Community Centre on 31 August to discuss kerb and channel work

·    Meeting on 31 August  of the Elected Member Political Advisory Group to discuss induction planned for new term

·    Waitematā Local Board workshop on 6 September

·    Newmarket Laneways meeting:  feedback from Public Consultation and approval of Final Concept Design

·    Ponsonby Business Association committee meeting on 8 September

 

Events and functions

 

From 31 July until 9 September I attended:

 

·    Opening the Club House - West End Lawn Tennis Club on Sunday 31 July (photo right)

·    Backbenchers Auckland edition at the Britomart Social Club on 3 August

·    First Thursdays on K’rd on 4 August

·    Wynyard Quarter 5th birthday on 6 August

·    Grey Lynn Business Association networking drinks  at  Storage King on 10 August

·    Blessing for the start of works at the Ellen Mellville Centre and Freyberg Square

·    OperaNesia on O’Connell Street on 11 August

·    Opening of the new Grey Lynn Fire Station on Williamson Ave on 12 August

·    Volunteer planting day on the  Weona Walkway, Westmere

·    Franklin Road Community BBQ hosted by Auckland Transport for the start of works on 14 August

·    Venus in Fur at the Herald Theatre at the invitation of the Auckland Theatre Company

·    Dedication and official opening of the Bishop Selwyn Chapel on 21 August (photo right)

·    K’rd presents catwalk show at NZ Fashion Week at the invitation of the K’rd Business Association on 23 August

·    St Columba’s fundraising Potter’s market on 29 August

·    Campaign for Better Transport’s Rail to the Airport public meeting in Onehunga on 30 August

·    Bike Breakfast at Scarecrow on 1 September

·    Random Act of Kindness Day hosted by Splice

·    Rod Oram’s book launch at AUT: Three Cities - Seeking Hope in the Anthropocene

·    Living Wage Assembly at St Matthews for Mayor candidates and Waitematā & Gulf Ward Candidates

·    Q Theatre 5th Birthday celebration at the invitation of Q Theatre on 2 September

·    Merchant Navy remembrance service at the Maritime Museum on 3 September

·    Fukuoka Day at the Town Hall on 3 September 

·    LATE at the Museum from #Slackivism to Activism panel discussion on 5 September

·    Boys will be Boys at Q Theatre on 9 September at the invitation of Silo Theatre

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Pippa coom – Deputy Chair,  Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Report to the Local Board of Member Vernon Tava
August 2016

 

File No.: CP2016/19907

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report covers my Waitematā Local Board Activities during August 2016 as Deputy Chair of the Hearings Committee; Lead of the Parks and Open Spaces portfolio; Heritage, Urban Design and Planning portfolio holder; and Local Board representative on the K’ Road Business Association.

Executive summary

2.       This is my final report to the Local Board for the 2013-2016 term of Council

3.       I sat as a Commissioner on the notified resource consent hearing for 159 Victoria Road, Devonport on 3-5 August

4.       I have included my report-back from the Local Government New Zealand conference in Dunedin and the  LGNZ 2050: Futureproofing Our Communities (ATTACHMENT A to this report

5.       Bonus floor provisions have been tracked for 63 sites in the inner city. This work was initiated by Local Board Chair, Shale Chambers, in his first term: 2010-2013

6.       I keep track of resource consent applications as they are received by Council, requesting further information, plans and Assessments of Environmental Effects for applications of interest. Significant applications are referred to the relevant residents’ associations for their input which I then relay to planners as part of the Local Board’s input. Reporting of resource consent applications, planning portfolio input, hearings and decisions in the Local Board area for this month is detailed in the Heritage, Urban Design and Planning section of this report under the headings ‘Planning’: ‘Resource Consents’

 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Monthly Report of Member Tava

 

 

Comments

Local Government New Zealand Conference 2016, Dunedin

I attended the LGNZ conference from 24-26 July in Dunedin as the Local Board’s representative. The talk of the conference was the Proposed Local Government Amendment Act focusing on the introduction of Auckland-style CCOs throughout the country and preparing smaller councils for amalgamations. This move is widely rejected by the LGNZ as an organisation and as a sum of its members. These conferences are a great opportunity to meet and catch up with other elected members and discuss their similar and different challenges. I always learn a lot and these experiences are valuable in application to my work as an elected member on the Local Board.

 

The highlight of the conference for me was the launch of the LGNZ 2050 discussion paper by the Young Elected Members Network (YEM): LGNZ 2050: Futureproofing Our Communities (ATTACHMENT A to this report). I was elected as the Zone 1 representative on the YEM in 2014 and our main project since then has been to contribute a thinkpiece to the LGNZ for inclusion in their Policy and strategy work. We retained Castalia Strategic Advisors to interview sector experts and academics and write the piece guided by a steering group comprised of YEM Co-Chairs, Cr Aaron Hawkins (Dunedin City Council), Deputy Mayor ‘Ana Coffey (Porirua City Council), Cr Jinty McTavish (Dunedin City Council) and I. 

 

I wrote the terms of reference for this project which took as its starting point the following big questions:

§ What are the big challenges and issues for New Zealand over the next 30-50 years?

§ The four pillars of sustainability: environmental, economic, social, cultural (and demographic)

§ What are the key drivers of change?

§ What are the “enduring questions” for the local government sector?

Another purpose of the project is enhancing youth participation in local government processes; building strong relationships between councils, young people and youth organisations; and, matters of Local Government New Zealand policy, and Central Government policy and legislation, on which young elected members share a view. Our over-arching focus is on intergenerational equity in all its manifestations. We see this as consistent with the core purposes of local government as codified in ss3, 10(2)(c) and 14(h) of the Local Government Act 2002. This future focus is the perspective that will inform YEMs’ contribution to LGNZ policy and programmes, and is consistent with the overall LGNZ goal of ‘promoting and protecting local democracy’.

 

Sustainability is a concept that is embedded in local government legislation (‘sustainable management’ in the Resource Management Act 1991, ‘sustainable development’ in the Local Government Act 2002), policy and thinking. It is not only an environmental consideration, it has economic, social and cultural aspects. Yet, despite its theoretical centrality, it is often lacking in definition at the level of practical implementation. There is a rich body of academic literature, nationally and internationally, and numerous sustainability and low carbon strategies produced by councils throughout the country; but more needs to be done to review this body of knowledge, draw out the major themes and approaches, and assimilate them into a coherent work for discussion and policy development.

 

I attended the ‘Resilient towns, cities and regions – creating places for the future’ masterclass given by Jeb Brugmann, Founder of ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability. This masterclass took a deeper look at how to approach resilience as a new category of placemaking performance and as an investment-worthy proposition. Jeb led us through international case studies to explore the evolution of resilience as an emerging area of planning, regeneration and local economic development practice. He presented a framework and process for incorporating resilience elements in city, district and regional scale plans.

 

Portfolio Report: Parks & Open Spaces

 

Portfolio Responsibilities

Decision-making for and oversight of local parks and public council open spaces, including beaches, coastal walkways, reserves, sports fields, playgrounds, non-road reserve plazas and boat ramps. This includes location and naming of new parks, design and maintenance of park facilities and settings, and supporting community events and planting programmes in parks. Landowner consent delegation in respect of local parks and open spaces. Regulatory and policy oversight of local dog management. Advocacy to achieve local priorities relating to parks network development and input into the management and use of regional parks located within the local area.

 

 

 

Ongoing Projects

Work on the design or construction of the following has continued but there are no openings or substantive report backs for this month. A couple worth highlighting are:

·    Weona-Westmere coastal walkway construction continues

·    Western Park playground upgrade design has continued and will be due for public consultation in October

 

Waitematā Local Board Volunteer Activities August 2016

 

This section is written by Sarah Peters, Local Parks Volunteer and Biodiversity Coordinator as at 1st September 2016.

 

Volunteer Animal Pest Control Programme: trapping rodents and possums

Following a one month break, animal pest control activities re-commenced in August at: Auckland Domain; Newmarket Park; Alberon Reserve; Lemington Reserve; Tirotai Reserve.

 

Auckland Domain: Tree mulching, Sunday 31st July

Around 20 students from St Peter’s College undertook tree mulching at the Auckland Domain. This event had not yet taken place when last month’s report was written.

 

St Peters College students at the Auckland Domain

 

Symonds St Cemetery: Rose pruning, Thursday 11th August

The annual Heritage Rose Society pruning event took place at Symonds St Cemetery with the help of five volunteers.

One of the volunteer rose pruners

 

Portfolio Report: Heritage, Urban Design and Planning

 

Planning

 

Bonus Floor Provisions and Accessways

There are over 60 public access routes through, around or via private buildings throughout the central city. Bonus floor provisions allow developers to increase the floor space of a private development by providing public access or benefit from the change. These usually take the form of pedestrian access ways through buildings, referred to as “through-site access”, and may include widened footpaths. Bonus provisions may also be gained through the provision of public viewing decks, plazas, and privately-owned art works that are accessible to the general public. Council is responsible for monitoring the consent conditions that result in bonus floor provisions and for working with building owners or managers to ensure that public access remains as agreed over time. The Waitematā Local Board has developed a comprehensive list of locations in the city centre where special access is provided via a bonus floor provision. It will be released to the public in September.

 

Resource Consents

The portfolio request information on resource consent applications of interest as a matter of course. The Local Board can have input into the decision on public notification of a resource consent application but not into the substantive matters of the application. The input of the Local Board is not binding on the commissioner making the decision. Nonetheless, on some significant applications we will include substantive comments along with our views on notification.

 

·    R/LUC/2016/3264, 1/10 Edgerley Avenue, Newmarket. Construction of six storey apartment building. The current proposal involves construction of a six storey apartment building with a basement level having a maximum height of 19.45m. The proposed building will contain 44 residential apartment units. A decision on notification input has not yet been made by the planning portfolio of the Local Board as we are still receiving further information on this application.

·    R/LUC/2016/3104, 2 Cremorne Street, Herne Bay.  Council has received a resource consent application for 2 Cremorne Street to remove the Pre-1944 dwelling (built in 1919). It is zoned Residential 2b and no new dwelling is included in the proposal. The house is a hip-roofed bungalow, “English” in style. Most bungalows from this time are Californian in influence so the house is unusual in this respect. The heritage memo obtained as part of this application concludes that the house has intrinsic value as well as being an important part of the intact streetscape of the corner of Argyle and Cremorne Streets. I agree with this assessment and have requested public notification of this consent on the same basis as the heritage assessment.

·    R/VCC/2014/41/1, 7 Park Avenue, Newmarket. Variation of conditions. The main changes are to the built-form of the approved dwellings: Reduction from 4-levels to 3-levels and deletion of roof terraces, proposal for north-facing decks. We did not have input into the notification decision for this application.

·    R/LUC/2016/3273, R/REG/2016/3276, 2-8 Anzac Avenue, Auckland  Central. New retail, continued operation of commuter car park & new LED billboard. The proposal involves the removal of 8 billboards across the site and the establishment of two new LED billboards on the corner of Anzac Avenue and Beach Road. 14 existing parking spaces will be removed from Beach Road and replaced with five new retail/food and beverage tenancies, and the existing carpark (with access off Anzac Avenue) is proposed to be reconfigured. Dispensation is sought for the new billboards as they are free standing and on a street frontage. Consent is sought for the new buildings, non-ancillary parking, discharge of contaminants and earthworks within 50m of a mana whenua site. Overall, consent is required as a discretionary activity. The Local Board requested limited notification of the LED billboard to any nearby residents who will be able to see the new billboard.

·    R/LUC/2016/2954, 160 Symonds Street, Grafton. Alterations to an existing building  including alterations to the existing lift shaft of the Madison apartments. The proposal will result in a volcanic viewshaft infringement. The site is also located within the Upper Symonds Street Character Overlay. The AEE notes “The additional height results in a small area of the amended lift shaft infringing the rolling height plain for Volcanic Cones under the District Plan rules. The area above the plain is triangular shaped with a maximum length of 3.1m, width of 3m and at the highest point is 0.191m (19.1 cm) over the height plain.” The Local Board has a principle of requesting notification of any exceedance of volcanic viewshafts  and would normally request public notification of this consent. However, in this case, the effect of the infringement was deemed less than minor given the lift shaft will be screened by the existing buildings of Meridian and Urba buildings and therefore there will be no change to the views of Mt Eden. 

·    R/VCC/2016/1854/1, 442 Karangahape Road, Auckland. Application to change condition 1 of approved Resource Consent R/LUC/2016/1854 The additional built form will infringe the volcanic view protection shaft by 600mm. Consent is required to accommodate this overrun. There are rules within the District Plan and Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan that preclude the development from being publically or limited notified if it were being assessed as a restricted-discretionary activity.  However, as a discretionary activity by virtue of being a s127 application, there are no rules that preclude notification such that an assessment in this regard is required. The Local Board has a principle of requesting notification of any exceedance of volcanic viewshafts  so we requested public notification of this consent.

·    R/VCC/2014/3820, 5 Rose Road, Ponsonby. The application is a variation to consent conditions to change the following: air conditioning vents on the roof; a revised design of the sign and minor changes to the street facing façade; a new illuminated sign for the premise on the eastern elevation. The subject site is within the Ponsonby Centre Plan Area. The intensity of the activity, in terms of number of persons, number of staff and the parking space infringement has not been proposed to change. As this is an application to change condition 1 of the original resource consent which has permitted this activity, the proposal will be assessed as a discretionary activity.

·    R/LUC/2016/2179/1, 7 Rose Road, Grey Lynn. Demolish the existing building and develop a three level commercial/retail building. We did not have input into this notification decision.

·    R/LUC/2016/3467, 32 Fleet Street, Eden Terrace. Removal of existing dwelling and construction of six-unit apartment building. We did not have input into this notification decision.

·    R/LUC/2016/3407, 7 Arthur Street, Freemans Bay. Removal of a pre-1940 dwelling and construction of new dwelling. The heritage assessment did not support retention of this property as it is a significantly compromised example; as a result, we did not have input into this notification decision.

·    R/LUC/2016/2927, 147 Victoria Street West, Auckland Central. Consent for a new 11 storey mixed use development comprising ground floor and mezzanine office/retail space, 3 levels of hotel accommodation (Ramada Victoria), 6 storeys of 51 residential apartment units and a total of 73 carparking spaces including a basement level while retaining the façade of the existing heritage building at 147 Victoria Street. We did not have input into this notification decision.

·    R/LUC/2016/3598, 47 Marine Parade, Herne Bay. Additions to existing boat shed and construction of a cable car from the shed to the adjacent residential property. We have asked for public access along the waterfront to be maximised so that the passage of members of the public along the shoreline is not unreasonably obstructed by the construction.

·    R/LUC/2016/2923 - 79-83 Beach Road, Auckland Central. Proposed 15 storey mixed use development comprising 77 apartments and 487m2 commercial space at ground level. Includes one basement level with 7 parking spaces, loading and storage at 79-83 Beach Rd, Auckland Central. We recommended limited notification to the properties neighbouring the site due to shading, loss of privacy concerns.

·    R/LUC/2016/3730, 40 Drake Street, Auckland Central. The proposal involves additions and alterations to the existing building, to add three levels of residential floor space for three new residential units, and upgrade the building for earthquake strengthening requirements. Resource consent is required for external additions and alterations, to exceed the permitted height (16m permitted and 18.2m proposed), and to exceed the Maximum Total Floor Area Ratio (3:1 permitted and 3.72:1 proposed).  We did not have input into the notification decision. 

·    R/LUC/2016/3644, 6 Laxon Terrace, Newmarket. Remove the existing dwelling and propose a new three-storey dwelling. Local Board requested limited notification for height in relation to boundary infringements to surrounding properties.

 

Resource consent matters of significance this month

 

252 Great North Road, Grey Lynn: SHA CONSENT

R/LUC/2016/3570. Proposed 5-level apartment building development (plus basement) comprising 37 dwellings, a ground floor retail unit and basement with parking, storage and services. I have discussed this application with the Grey Lynn and Arch Hill Residents’ Associations and they have given detailed feedback that I have passed on to the planners responsible.

 

55-59 Nelson Street, Auckland Central: Four apartment towers

R/REG/2016/3597, R/REG/2016/3602. The application proposes the construction and use of a new mixed-use development and includes all development aspects including earthworks, groundwater diversion and dewatering.  The development is comprised of four distinct apartment towers located over a shared podium floor and four levels of basement car parking and amenities  The development will provide for 237 apartments in a mix of studio, 1, 2, and 3 bedroom typologies. A total of 302 car parking spaces are provided over four basement levels.  Vehicle access will be from Nelson Street where it is proposed to provide for a loading space within the building.  A publicly accessible through site link connects Victoria Street West with Nelson Street.  It will be open to the sky in sections where there is not a building above.  Retail and food & beverage tenancies are located along its length.  A child care centre is proposed and boutique supermarket featured. Consents are required for a range of District Plan, Regional and PAUP reasons including; demolition of existing buildings; traffic related matters (parking,  access and loading) erection of new buildings; modification of height and MTFAR; contamination (NES) and discharges, earthworks and groundwater take & diversion.  Overall consent is required as a non-complying activity. We did not have input into the notification decision on this application.

 

75 Sarsfield Street, Herne Bay: Reconstruction of existing boatshed and the establishment and use of a helicopter landing pad on the replacement building

R/LUC/2016/3508. The application involves the reconstruction of the existing boatshed and the establishment and use of a helicopter landing pad on the replacement building. The applicant has applied for the noise component of this consent as a permitted activity. The Local Board asked that this application should be limited notified to surrounding properties on the basis of noise caused by the helicopter operation. We have also asked for public access along the waterfront to be maximised so that the passage of members of the public along the shoreline is not unreasonably obstructed by the construction.

 

 

No.

Title

Page

a

Castalia Strategic Advisors, ‘The 2050 Challenge: futureproofing our communities’, Local Government New Zealand, 2016.

383

Attachments

     

 

 

Signatories

Authors

Vernon Tava -  Board Member, Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Final Waitemata Local Board Member Report
September 2016 - Deborah Yates


 

File No.: CP2016/19910

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The final Waitemata Local Board report of the 2013 – 2016 term by member Deborah Yates.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         receive the final Waitemata Local Board Member Report September 2016 –             Deborah Yates report.

 

Comments

 

Portfolios:

Natural Environment, including civil defence

Community Development including sub-portfolio of Children and Youth

 

 

Positions:

Grey Lynn Community Centre Committee

Grey Lynn Business Association Board

 

 

Committees:

Community Grants (deputy chair),

Hearings Committee,

Fukuoka Friendship Garden Steering Group,

Weed Management Policy Implementation Political Advisory Group.

P Prescient photo from the late 1960s

 

Winding down

 

Having decided to stand down after only one term in Local Government, I’m experiencing both regrets and relief. It would have been great to do a second term, coming from a position of knowing more about it and recognising more faces (an achievement for a face-blind person), and the chance to achieve much more. It was certainly a baptism by fire for someone utterly new to local government and with very little ready support available. Hopefully this won’t be the same for newcomers next term, with Council now more aware of their role and responsibilities in providing training and support.

 

On the other hand, I’ve struggled with finding myself once more in a bureaucracy – the largest in the country – having sworn off them several times before. Surely, I thought often, I don’t have to spend my retirement years battling with a juggernaut?

 

There have been many positive experiences, observations and learnings, including:

 

·    A huge amount of commitment and hard work from Local Board members and our staff, and a lot learnt from them.

 

·    Attending all sorts of rousing events - and endless meetings.

 

·      Wonderful community including:

o    the Friends of Fukuoka creating an uproar about the dismantling of the Fukuoka Garden at the zoo and leading the charge to have it rebuilt at Western Springs;

o    Freeman’s Bay Residents’ Association standing up for its elderly HNZ tenants; 

o    Arch Hill/Grey Lynn community self-organising over Bunnings and Great North Rd developments; Grey Lynn/Westmere community over Peel St; and Parnell over the Cowie St rail bridge. They may not have won, but then was the playing field ever even?

o    Grey Lynn supporting Kelmarna Gardens in its moment of need;

o    Parnell getting out in droves to tackle the mess that Waipapa Stream was in;

o    Westmere people planting trees on the Weona Walkway;

o    And so many residents making the most of the wide range of activities and services offered by their community centres, libraries and parks.

 

·      Three amazing community centres run with passion by community committees and offering any number of great activities and events, to appreciative residents.

 

·      An outpouring of enthusiasm for things green – trees, gardens, bees and pollinator pathways, stopping the proliferation of toxins, and for active transport.

 

·      Fabulous volunteers and people in the social services getting together in the Inner City Network, activating the Ellen Melville Centre, planting the Feijoa Forest, organising the White Ribbon March, sleeping rough for Lifewise.

 

·      Much increased awareness of the inner city as a residential area housing a diverse range of people from students to young families to retirees and of many different cultures and religions.

 

·      A huge rise in interest in homeless people and attention to their needs from the public – though a pathetic response from government.

 

·      A rise in interest in affordable housing – mine was a lone voice at the start and I was accused of being ‘anti-developer’!

 

·       A successful White Ribbon March, not repeated this year sadly but maybe next.

 

·      Increased interest in young families and children and their voices and needs. Thanks to Claire Stewart from AC, Plunket, and a range of academics.

 

·      Our wonderful Youth Collective and its commitment to match us and be a presence that makes a difference in the city, demonstrated in various events, consultations and their safety map of Auckland City.

 

·    Awareness of the need to respect Mana Whenua, their language and culture culminating in the renaming of Lower Khartoum Place as Te Hā o Hine Place – the essence/dignity of women. The emotional response of our Te Waka Angamua staff member was a reminder of the struggle Maori face in being recognised for their significant contribution to the city, past and present.

 

 

·    A big increase in interest in older adults and getting young people and older adults together to talk and exchange ideas and experiences.

 

 

Cultural event at Studio One Toi Tu with manager, Echo Janman 2016

 

I see the potential of Local Boards to be actively engaged with their communities, rather than an extension of Council. That concept along with community empowerment and community-led projects have infected this Board and changed the way it operates over the past three years. It no longer sees itself as primarily a decision maker on behalf of a predominantly faceless community.

 

I would love to see more and more members of the public waking up to the contribution they can make in influencing their Local Board (or ‘Community Council’?). Standing back, out of disinterest, cynicism or shyness, goes nowhere.

 

Significant happenings in the Environment Portfolio that will hopefully continue to have impact:

 

·    The Board’s ‘Becoming a Low Carbon Community’ Action Plan, its initial projects and the newly established Low Carbon Network.

 

·    The spontaneous Urban Forest Group, who brainstormed the idea of establishing a current picture of our urban forest, now executed, and further ideas for monitoring our trees, spreading the word to the public about the importance of preserving private and public trees and planting many more. This has resulted in a push to do this at a Council-wide level. The Melbourne model has been a great influence.

 

·    Helping rally opposition to the increased use of Glyphosate in public places.

 

·    Working towards a community bush regeneration project at Western Springs that uses no pesticides.

 

·    Rob Thomas and Andrea Reid’s pollinator pathway on the Grey Lynn Greenway.

 

And watch out, I just might continue to push for Auckland to become the world’s first organically-managed low carbon city. Now that would put us on the map – in a very positive way. Converting all commercial kitchen waste into compost for our parks and increasing tree plantings, using zero poisons for pest control, growing organic fruits and vegetables in parks and community gardens and encouraging citizens to do likewise on their properties, running beehives and establishing pollinator pathways. Such practices would benefit everyone in Auckland exponentially and we could proudly proclaim ourselves a liveable city.

 

 

Plant before and 2 days after being sprayed with white vinegar. It died.

 

And in the Community Portfolio:

·    Getting the refurbishment of the Ellen Melville Centre underway – and renaming it.

 

·    Seeing the Grey Lynn, Ponsonby and Parnell Community Centres continue to flourish, reporting back face-to-face to the Board. Grey Lynn grows constantly and has made big progress in sustainable practices (and has accessible doors) and hopefully one day they’ll be an off-grid community hub.

 

·    Fighting to hang onto our library hours and getting more space for the central CAB.

 

·    Helping Kelmarna Gardens conceptualise themselves as an organic educational centre.

 

·    Battling for refurbishment of the little Heards building in Parnell.

 

·    Working alongside the GLBA, a great little Business Association with a social conscience.

 

·    Watching the rebuild of Fukuoka Gardens being prepared, with help from Fukuoka.

 

I am concerned about:

 

·    Confused values. Politicians (and others) need to know what they believe and stand by it, even during an election. It’s about getting enough votes, not all of them!

 

·    The bullish attitude within Council in favour of the use of toxic chemicals in our environment. While this might be put down to ignorance, insensibility or imagined economy, it feels more sinister than that.

 

·    The quality of the housing being built in such a hurry across the city. Although in our area they are generally quality (and hugely unaffordable) apartments built to high specs, so were supposedly the rabbit warren apartments of the 1980s and those built in the 1990s and early 2000s that proved, without exception, to be leaky nightmares. This could well happen again, in one way or another, as we spur developers on, believing the Government’s solution to housing prices and homelessness of quantity rather than quality.

 

·    Ensuring our city is developed with beauty as a goal. Beautiful surroundings in the form of good architecture, natural building materials, natural features, grace and proportion make a difference to people’s wellbeing and matter – a lot.

 

 

 

50 years on: Protesting with the wonderful

John Elliot of the Ponsonby News

 

·    I don’t hold with the view that we have responsibility to support businesses. My understanding is that business either stands or falls on acumen and the market so why need a hand up from government? While the focus locally has been on small businesses (this isn’t so for Council-wide contracting), some of which are owned by local residents, I prefer a focus on looking after them and their interests as residents.

 

·    The HNZ tenants and the homeless in this area. They’re our constituents, too, and deserving of our time and energy. Since neo-liberalism was sprung on us, New Zealand seems to have taken great pleasure in blaming those who, because of illness, disability, abuse, trauma, poor education, political malpractice or just plain bad luck haven’t managed to inherit or amass capital in the form of property in our rampant housing share-market. Without this shock absorber, one is highly vulnerable.

 

I would like to thank all those I have worked, argued, laughed, celebrated and commiserated with over the past three years. I’ve enjoyed knowing you.

 

Deborah Yates

deborahayates@gmail.com

 

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Authors

Deborah Yates  - Board Member,  Waitematā Local Board

 Signatories

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Board Members' verbal reports

File No.: CP2016/13799

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         receive the board members’ verbal reports.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin -  Relationship Advisor, Waitematā Local Board 

 Signatories

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

 

File No.: CP2016/13813

 

  

 

Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.

Purpose

1.       To present to the local board with a governance forward work calendar.

Executive Summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         note the attached governance forward work calendar.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme - September 2016

443

     

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin -  Relationship Advisor, Waitematā Local Board 

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Actions Pending - September 2016

File No.: CP2016/13819

 

  

 

Executive Summary

1.       Providing a list of outstanding actions requested and pending for the Waitemata Local Board for business meetings.

 

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         note the Actions Pending – September 2016 report.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Actions Pending - September 2016

447

    

Signatories

Authors

Sibyl Mandow - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Kathryn Martin -  Relationship Advisor, Waitematā Local Board 

 


Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

13 September 2016

 

 

Waitemata Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2016/19334

 

  

 

Purpose