Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board held in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office, Shop 17B, 93 Bader Drive, Māngere on Wednesday, 23 November 2016 at 5:00pm.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

 

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

 

 

 

Carrol Elliott, JP

 

 

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

 

 

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese, JP

 

 

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

 

 

ABSENT

 

 

Cr Efeso Collins

Cr Alf Filipaina

Emmanuel Guzman

Kerry Harrington

 

 

 

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

23 November 2016

 

 

 

1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

There were no apologies.

 

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

There were no declarations of interest.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution number MO/2016/167

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board confirm the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 26 October 2016 as a true and correct record.

 

CARRIED

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

            There were no leave of absence.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

·         Passing of  Matua Joe Wilson who was strongly supportive of Mahi with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

·         Passing of  Zelda who worked as an Ambassador in the Māngere Town Centre.

·         Stephen Town Acknowledgement - A tragic incident at Moana Nui-a- Kiwa Pool and Leisure Centre where one of our young lifeguards, Deazel Martin, performed CPR on a member of the public  for nearly 15 minutes to try and save her life, before emergency services arrived. Sadly, the woman passed away despite the efforts of Deazel and others in the team. 

·         Anniversary of Jonah Lomu’s death.

·         20th CNZ Arts Pasifika Awards were announced in October. There were 7 winners nationwide, two were from the Māngere Ōtāhuhu area.

o   Special recognition Award – Kolokesa U Mahina-Tuia

o   Emerging Pacific Artist Award – Anonymouz (Matthew Faiumu Salapu)

·         Valerie Adams has been named New Zealand’s first Pacific Sports Ambassador.

·         My Neighbourhood community EP went live earlier this month and reached No 3 on the NZ Heatseeker Albums list.

·         Happy retirement and thanks to Principal Rex Buckley of Kingsford Primary School.

·         Regional Kapahaka Competitions: Te Kura Kaupapa Maori A Rohe o Māngere 3rd and Te Kura Mãori o Ngã Tapuwae 2nd in primary/intermediate group.

 

Secretarial Note: Sports acknowledgments are attached at the back of the minutes.

 

 

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

There were no petitions.

 

8          Deputations

 

There were no deputations.

 

9          Public Forum

 

9.1

Public Forum - Use of Chemicals on the roads and parks

 

The document circulated to the board is attached to the back of the minutes.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/168

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C Elliott:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board thanks Georgina Blackmore for her attendance and presentation.

 

CARRIED

 

 

9.2

Public Forum - Mangere Bridge - development/upgrade of a local playground

 

This item was withdrawn due to no attendance.

 

 

 

9.3

Public Forum - Alcohol licensing, off-licence signage and LOTTO signage.

 

The document circulated to the board is attached to the back of the minutes.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/169

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member N Bakulich:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board thanks Emily Worman and Grant Hewison for their attendance and presentation.

 

CARRIED

 

 

9.4

Public Forum - Bridge Park Tennis Club in Mangere Bridge

 

The document tabled at the meeting is attached to the back of the minutes.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/170

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C Elliott:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board thanks Anna Jacob and Alexander Wilson from the Bridge Park Tennis Club for their attendance and presentation.

 

CARRIED

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

There was no extraordinary business.

 

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

There were no notices of motion.

 

12

Manukau Ward Councillors Update

 

Emmanuel Guzman and Kerry Harrington, Councillor Support Advisors,  introduced themselves to the board and gave a brief update on their roles in supporting the ward councillors.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/171

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C O'Brien:  

That the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins be received and the board thanks Emmanuel Guzman and Kerry Harrington for attending.

 

CARRIED

 

 

13

Replacement of Sugar Sweetened Beverages.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/172

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C Elliott:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         Support in principle the replacement of the sale and supply of Sugar Sweetened Beverages with healthier alternatives in all council community and social facilities (such as leisure centres, libraries and community houses/halls/centres).

b)      Agree in principle to replace the sale and supply of Sugar Sweetened Beverages with healthier alternatives in the following events and locations in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area by December 2018:

Event

Department Responsible

 

Volunteer awards 2016/17

Events

 

Official openings

Events

 

Public meetings

Events

 

Citizenship ceremonies

Events

 

 

Behind the counter Fridges

Number

Department Responsible

Moana Nui a Kiwa Pool & Leisure Centre

1

Leisure

Cafes

Number

 

Mangere Arts Centre

1

Arts

 

 

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu  Local Board, Quarter One, 1 July – 30 September 2016

 

Resolution number MO/2016/173

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Receive the performance report for the financial quarter ending 30 September 2016.

b)      Note that members raised a number of issues that will be investigate and reported back to the board.  

CARRIED

 

Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua left the meeting at 6.28 pm.

Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua returned to the meeting at 6.29 pm.

 

15

Swimming Pool Fencing Exemption Applications

 

Resolution number MO/2016/174

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member N Bakulich:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Agrees to assess swimming pool fencing exemption applications as part of business meetings during the 2016/2019 term as the need arises.

b)      Delegate Member Elliott and Member O’Brien  to form a subgroup to evaluate the swimming pool fencing exemption application,  preform a site visit and report back to the Local Board with their findings at a business meeting.

 

CARRIED

 

 

16

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board urgent decision-making process for the 2016-2019 triennium

 

Resolution number MO/2016/175

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C Elliott:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum.

b)      Delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)      Agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo.

d)      Note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

17

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Meeting Schedule for the 2016-2019 Triennium

 

Resolution number MO/2016/176

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         Note that except for December the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meetings will be held on the third Wednesday of the month commencing at 5pm in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting room, Shop 17, 93 Bader Drive, Mangere.

b)         Adopts its meeting schedule outlined below for the 2016/2019 electoral term:

i)         Wednesday, 14 December 2016

ii)        Wednesday, 15 February 2017

iii)       Wednesday, 15 March 2017

iv)       Wednesday, 19 April 2017

v)        Wednesday, 17 May 2017

vi)       Wednesday, 21 June 2017

vii)      Wednesday, 19 July 2017

viii)     Wednesday, 16 August 2017

ix)       Wednesday, 20 September 2017

x)        Wednesday, 18 October 2017

xi)       Wednesday, 15 November 2017

xii)      Wednesday, 13 December 2017

xiii)     Wednesday, 21 February 2018

xiv)     Wednesday, 21 March 2018

xv)      Wednesday 18 April 2018

xvi)     Wednesday, 16 May 2018

xvii)    Wednesday, 20 June 2018

xviii)   Wednesday, 18 July 2018

xix)     Wednesday, 15 August 2018

xx)      Wednesday, 19 September 2018

xxi)     Wednesday, 17 October 2018

xxii)    Wednesday, 21 November 2018

xxiii)   Wednesday, 12 December 2018

xxiv)   Wednesday, 20 February 2019

xxv)    Wednesday, 20 March 2019

xxvi)   Wednesday, 17 April 2019

xxvii)  Wednesday, 15 May 2019

xxviii) Wednesday, 19 June 2019

xxix)   Wednesday, 17 July 2019

xxx)    Wednesday, 21 August 2019

xxxi)   Wednesday, 18 September 2019

 

c)      Agrees to commence business meetings at 5.00pm. Public forum and deputations will be scheduled in the early part of the business meeting, to enable the democratic process.

 

 

d)      Notes that dates and times for meetings, public engagement and any hearings and deliberations for local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised.

 

CARRIED

 

 

18

Urgent Decision relating to Objection to Renewal of Off-Licence Thirsty Liquor Wickman Way (1-18 Wickman Way, Mangere East)

 

Resolution number MO/2016/177

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member N Bakulich:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board notes the urgent decision relating to Objection to Renewal of Off-Licence Thirsty Liquor Wickman Way (1-18 Wickman Way, Mangere East).

 

CARRIED

 

 

19

For Information: Reports referred to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

Resolution number MO/2016/178

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member N Bakulich:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Note the memorandum from the Programme Specialist, Parks, Recreation and Sports unit on Parks Growth Programme – FY15/16 and FY16/17.

b)      Note the memorandum from the General Manager, Community and Social on the Impact Assessment Region-wide Swimming Pool Pricing Policy 2013-2105.

c)      Note the memorandum from the Team leader Bylaws and Compliance South on the boarding over of windows and colours used in alcohol signage.

 

CARRIED

 

 

20

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

Resolution number MO/2016/179

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

CARRIED

 

 

21

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

 

Resolution number MO/2016/180

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member T Lauese:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshop notes from the workshops held on 7 and 14 September and 12 and 19 October 2016 be received.

 

CARRIED

 

 

22

Chairpersons Announcements

 

Resolution number MO/2016/181

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Deputy Chairperson W Togiamua:  

That the verbal update and written report by the chair be received and notes that reports from members will be included in future agendas under the “Local Board Appointments Report Update by Members”.

CARRIED

  

 

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

There was no consideration of extraordinary items.   

 

 

24

Local Board Appointments - Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board

 

The Airport Noise Community Consultative Group Terms of Reference and letter from the Chair are attached to the back of the minutes.

 

Resolution number MO/2016/182

MOVED by Chairperson L Sosene, seconded by Member C O'Brien:  

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Appoint the following board members to represent the board as follows:

Organisation

 

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum (CIF) for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Bridge BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Town Centre BID

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Makalita Kolo

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Commercial Association BID

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

South Harbour Business Association BID

Carrol Elliott 

Makalita Kolo

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Carrol Elliott

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Christine O’Brien, Makalita Kolo,

Lemauga Lydia Sosene          

 

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group (1 lead, 1 alternate)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ambury Park Centre

Christine O’Brien

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Mountain Education Trust           

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Local Board Leads

Infrastructure and Environmental Services lead

 

Carrol Elliott

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events lead

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Christine O’Brien

Parks, Sport and Recreation lead and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Libraries and Information Services lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Makalita Kolo

 

Local planning and heritage lead – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (Planning)

Carrol Elliott

(Heritage)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Transport lead

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Carrol Elliott/

Makalita Kolo

 

Economic development lead

Christine O’Brien          

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

b)      Delegates to the Youth Connections South Local Governance Group to make all decisions for the youth connections project, including budget and work programme approval.  The local board requests the members to report any major issues or celebrations to the board for information.

c)      Note that the Chair will report back to the board to provide further clarity from the Regional Chair Forum on “Delegates to the relevant Local Board Lead to exercise any residual portfolio power or role conferred in any council document, policy, resolution or work programme”.

CARRIED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese closed meeting in prayer.

 

7.35pm                                               The Chairperson thanked Members for their attendance and attention to business and declared the meeting closed.

 

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board HELD ON

 

 

 

DATE:.........................................................................

 

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:........................................................


Item 6 Acknowledgements

 

De La Salle are the Auckland Secondary School U15 7s Champions after winning the tournament final on Wednesday the 2nd of November

Viscount School are the 2016 Auckland Intermediate School Girls Cricket Champions

 

Mangere Bridge resident Reiko Loane new cap in the All Blacks

 

Mangere Bridge resident Akira Loane named in the Maori All Blacks

 

Siosiua Kaifa of the Manukau Rovers named Auckland Rugby ‘2016 Club Player of the Year’

 

Michael Kaivelata of the Manukau Rovers named Auckland Rugby ‘2016 Club Rookie of the Year’

 

2016 New Zealand Rugb League Awards to Counties Manukau Players

 

  • Women’s Final MVP – Teuila Fotu-Moala
  • Women’s nationals manager of the year – Christine Mirko
  • Women’s nationals trainer of the year – Dan Keepa
  • Women’s Nationals Back MVP – Sarina Fiso
  • Women’s nationals MVP – Kahurangi Peters

2016 Kiwi Ferns

  • Billy-Jean Ale
  • Jocephy Daniels (ARL womans player of the year)
  • Sarina Fiso
  • Teuila Fotu-Moala
  • Amber Kani
  • Lilieta Maumau
  • Kimiora Nati
  • Kahurangi Peters
  • Krystal Rota
  • Atawhai Tupaea
  • Karaiania Wira-Kohu

2016 NZRL Awards – Junior Nationals

  • U15 Tournament MVP – Fangupo-Paea Fotu
  • U15 Manager of the tournament – Tania Harris
  • U15 Coach of the tournament – Mike Cudd
  • U15 Merit Team – Marco Talagi
  •  U15 Merit Team –Talitua Salima
  • U15 Merit Team – Brian Lealiifano
  • U15 Merit Team – Sam Taunga
  • U15 Merit Team – Etuale Lui
  • U15 Merit Team –Kaya Cuthers
  • U15 Merit Team – Aamon Dean
  • U15 Merit Team - Fangupo-Paea Fotu
  • U17 Merit Team – Alfred Smalley
  • U17 Merit Team – Samuiela Lahuinganoa
  • U17 Merit Team – Kayleb Milne
  • U17 Merit Team – Phillip Makatoa
  • U17 Merit Team – Etene Nanai-Seturo

Ruben Wiki Challenge Cup NZ Merit Team

  • U16 Merit Team – Uenuku Malesala
  • U16 Merit Team – Kakoi Togoiu
  • U16 Merit Team – Taylor Fiu
  • U18 Merit Team – Rahiri Witehira
  • U18 Merit Team – Siave Togoiu
  • U18 Merit Team – Kiani Marshall

2016 NZ Secondary Schools

  • Kenese Kenese
  • Samuiela Lahuinganoa
  • Phillip Makatoa
  • Adam Pompey
  • Alfred Smalley
  • Lewis Soosemea
  • Kakoi Togoiu
  • Siave Togoiu
  • Joseph Vuna

2016 NZ Residents

  • Coach Rod Ratu
  • Uila Aiolupo
  • Jethro Friend
  • Roman Hifo
  • Paulos Latu
  • Alan Niulevu
  • Raymond Talimaile

2016 NZ Maori’s

  • Trent Bishop
  • Tony Tuia
  • Carlos Hotene

 

 


Item 9.1

 

Presentation in Open Forum to Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Meeting 23.11.2016 – by Georgina Blackmore

Noting the unanimous resolution passed by Auckland Councillors at the Regional Strategy & Policy Committee meeting of 1 September 2016 to “express its concerns about the use of glyphosate [in public places on streets and parks] to the incoming Council”-– we request the support of Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board to agree to, and communicate to Council, the following two resolutions:

1.    That Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board supports all public places (i.e. streets and parks) in our local board area being free from chemicals for weed and vegetation control - excluding its appropriate and safe use for pest plants. (1)

2.    In order to achieve this, Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board request of Council that the 2017 Annual Plan require and make full regional financial provision this year for the total replacement of glyphosate in all public places across the city by non-chemical methods for weed management and vegetation control - in its own operations and those of Auckland Transport.

 

This would finally implement the key objectives in Auckland Council’s 2013 Weed Management Policy – noting Council’s full support for the implementation of this Policy at the same meeting of 1 September 2016.  

(1)  We confirm and agree with councillors at that meeting that it is the use of glyphosate in public places for vegetation control that is of concern - not its appropriate use for pest plants and problem weeds as directed by Council’s Best Practice Reference Group.

 

 

IN SUPPORT OF THIS REQUEST we note that:

·         The Policy recognises that agrichemicals like glyphosate can be harmful to human health and the environment and prioritises its key objectives to protect people over cost.

·         The Policy states that non-chemical techniques should be used for weed management and vegetation control whenever they are “available and effective.

·         It also recognises that agrichemicals should only be used if non-chemical methods and techniques are not “practical or adequate at achieving the necessary level of control.

·         20 years after its adoption in the legacy Auckland and North Shore Cities, roadside vegetation is still being managed ‘practically’ and ‘adequately’ by nonchemical methods -  including in  rural areas like Waiheke. 

·         These nonchemical methods, are ‘effective’ and ‘available’ for use over the entire Auckland region, with new integrated best practice methodologies  now costing no more than using glyphosate.

 

Glyphosate’s total replacement with non-chemical methods would therefore not only be consistent with Council’s own Policy, but with the growing trend of local authorities and countries around the world stopping its use in public places after the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) released its findings in 2015 that glyphosate was a probable human carcinogen. 

 

Well before this ruling, Aucklanders recognised that all agrichemicals carry risks for human health, and the adoption of non-chemical weed and vegetation control twenty years ago was as a direct response to reported adverse health effects.  

 

As detailed in the latest international monograph on glyphosate by lead author, Auckland’s Dr Meriel Watts, there is a huge body of independent scientific evidence linking glyphosate to adverse effects – not just cancer - on human health and the environment.

 

In this respect Dr Watts notes that some members of the public in Auckland are known to be especially sensitive to the effects of glyphosate, experiencing disabling acute and ongoing chronic effects of being exposed to roadside and park spraying. But every single person in Auckland is vulnerable to the “hidden” effects of glyphosate, because everyone is exposed and no-one can avoid its use in public areas.

 

·         Acute effects of glyphosate exposure include skin problems, headaches, dizziness, severe fatigue, abdominal pain, gastrointestinal problems, acute respiratory infection, conjunctivitis, fever, allergies, and death.

·         Breast cancer: glyphosate at minute levels of exposure causes breast cancer cells to grow, increasing the risk of breast cancer for women.

·         Reproductive: glyphosate causes cell death in human umbilical, embryonic and placental cells, at dilutions far below those used in vegetation control. These effects together with the endocrine disrupting effects can result in pregnancy problems leading to abnormal foetal development, low birth weights, or miscarriages. It also kills testicular Sertoli cells and causes abnormal levels of testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone; and impairs male reproductive development and function including damaging sperm, in laboratory studies.

·         Birth defects: there is evidence from both animal studies and exposed humans of birth defects.

·         Neurological: glyphosate kills nerve cells; it also depletes the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine, and damages the substantia nigra region of the brain, implicating it in Parkinson’s disease.

·         Kidney: glyphosate causes kidney abnormalities, and is thought to be a causative factor in a form of kidney disease that is killing thousands of farmers in some countries.

 

THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS of glyphosate are not insignificant either 

 

·         Glyphosate is considered a widespread environmental contaminant found in soils and sediments, surface water, ground water and even rain.  This is hugely relevant in Auckland with our unique relationship with our marine environment.

·         Glyphosate runoff from hard surfaces is increasingly seen around the world as a source of water pollution, like here in Auckland where glyphosate and its breakdown product AMPA has been found by NIWA in marine sediment in the Waitemata Harbour and Hauraki Gulf, believed to have come largely from roadside spraying.

·         Glyphosate can cause significant effects on species that underpin the entire aquatic food chain. It can alter the composition of natural aquatic communities, tipping the ecological balance, changing clear water to turbid water, giving rise to harmful algal blooms, and reducing species richness. It can have profound impacts on microorganisms, plankton, algae and amphibia at low concentrations.

 

Coupling all this with the adverse effects of glyphosate on soil microorganisms, bees and other beneficial insects, Auckland’s ability to move rapidly, practicably and efficiently to nonchemical weed and vegetation control and protect our health and environment, is a blessing we all recognise.

 

Finally we hope you can take it as read, that you have the support of tens and thousands of people in both your community and the wider city to take this course of action, as evidenced in the submissions, petitions, reports and delegations that have been made over the years. 

 

Our expectation that all the hard work  in bringing the Weed Management Policy to life would be realised, may now be actioned – even if it is three years late.  Thank you all for your support.

 

Submitted by Georgina Blackmore Wednesday 23 November 2016

georginabmore@gmail.com   0220952811


Item 9.3

 

 

 

Deputation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

Wednesday 23 November 2016, 5pm

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for the opportunity of presenting this information through a deputation to you. Our deputation will cover the following issues: Alcohol licensing, off-licence signage and LOTTO signage.

 

Alcohol licensing

 

First, we would like to thank the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board (MOLB) for the support it has given to the community and Respect Our Community Campaign (ROCC) in its ongoing opposition to alcohol licensing.

 

In particular, we understand that in a recent new application for the Phoenix Sports Club, the MOLB has maintained its objection. While this was a new club licence, the combination of 18 pokie machines and previous issues with alcohol and noise at the premises raised serious concerns in our mind about whether this club properly met all the criteria to be granted a licence. Thank you for your objection.

 

I see too, that in your Agenda for this meeting tonight, the MOLB will be noting a decision made to object to the renewal of the off-licence at Wickman Way, mainly because the owner has been caught by the Police selling to a minor in the first probation year. Thank you for your support and ongoing interest in this off-licence.

 

You may also be aware that the application, Super Liquor Great South Road, at the petrol station at 743 Great South Road, Papatoetoe has been granted by the DLC.  Thank you again for your objection. You may no know that Jasmine Kovach has appealed to ARLA.

 

However, there is another objection you may be interested in making tonight. It is for a new liquor store at 26A Salesyard Road, Otahuhu to trade as ‘Bargain Liquor’. Our main concerns are that: the owner is inexperienced; there are already too many liquor outlets in Otahuhu; the proposed premises are close to the Otahuhu Train Station; this area of Otahuhu is Deprivation Index 10; and the Police have identified Otahuhu as a hot spot. We ask that you join us in objecting to this new application tonight. There is a template for an objection in Appendix 1.

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB object to the application for a new Liquor store made for 26A Salesyard Road, Otahuhu to trade as ‘Bargain Liquor’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Off-licence signage

 

As you are aware, ROCC made complaints to Auckland Council that the signage on many liquor stores throughout Māngere and Ōtāhuhu did not comply with the Manukau District Plan and the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw. We met with Council officers Grant Barnes and Max Wilde in March 2016 to explain our concerns. We have been very pleased with the progress made by Council to ensure compliance by liquor stores with the rules. In that light, we believe it would be good to have a follow-up meeting with Grant Barnes and Max Wilde, and have asked them for a date to meet. In the meantime, we suggest it would also be useful for the MOLB to ask these officers to prepare a Memorandum for the Board setting out which liquor stores remain non-compliant. 

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB request a Memorandum from Council officers Grant Barnes and Max Wilde which sets out which liquor stores in the MOLB area are fully complaint with the signage rules of the Manukau District Plan and the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw and which remain non-compliant. 

 

With regard to our concerns about the bright contrasting colours used in liquor store signage (e.g. the orange/black used by Thirsty Liquor, or the yellow/black used by Liquor Spot), we note the Memorandum from Mr Dirk Timp in Item 19 of your Agenda tonight and his view that the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw 2015 does not regulate the colours used in signage. In our view, the bright contrasting colours used in liquor store signage seriously detracts from the amenity of our neighbourhood shops and town centres.  We ask that the MOLB enquire with Council officers whether an amendment could be made to the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw 2015 to prohibit the use of bright contrasting colours on liquor store signage.

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB request a Memorandum from Council officers about whether the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw could be amended to prohibit the use of brightly contrasting colours on liquor store signage.

 

With regard to our concerns regarding the boarding up/covering of window glazing, we are both perplexed and concerned by Mr Timp’s view that there is no regulation regarding this.

 

First, Mr Timp says that under the Signage Bylaw if an owner puts up material (e.g a plastic ‘skin’) against the glazing (that is, for example, just ‘orange’ or ‘black’) and does not specifically advertise the business or a product, they may cover the glazing 100% because that is not a “sign”. We have included an example of this practice, photos from Thirsty Liquor Vine Street in Appendix 2.

 

Well if he is correct (and we have some doubts about that), in our view that is a huge loophole that needs to be immediately closed.

 

It completely undermines the requirements in the Signage Bylaw that ‘window signage’ not cover 100% of the windows (see clause 21 of the Signage Bylaw in Appendix 3).

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB request Council officers prepare an amendment to the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw 2015 so that owners cannot put boards or other material (e.g plastic ‘skins’) against the glazing of liquor store windows that then covers the glazing 100% (or any more than provided for in Clause 21 of the Signage Bylaw).

 

However, Mr Timp goes on to say that boarding up/covering window glazing is not regulated by the Auckland Council District Plan (Manukau Section) or the Proposed Unitary Plan (Decisions Version 19 August 2016).

 

With regard to the Auckland Council District Plan (Manukau Section), I believe that Plan does regulate the boarding over of window glazing for the reasons set out in Appendix 4. Put simply, the boarding over of the glazing is an ‘external alteration’ and requires a controlled activity resource consent.

 

Turning to the Unitary Plan, again, I believe the boarding over of the glazing of retail frontages is regulated and requires a restricted discretionary resource consent. When considering such an application, the Council must look to limit any blank walls, the extent of glazing and the application of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design principles. See Appendix 5.

 

I do not believe Mr Timp’s advice is consisent with these Rules.

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB request Council legal officers review Mr Timp’s advice and provide an opinion whether the boarding up/covering window glazing is regulated (or not) by the Auckland Council District Plan (Manukau Section) or the Proposed Unitary Plan (Decisions Version 19 August 2016).

 

LOTTO signage/gambling

 

In July 2016, a Report was made to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board titled ‘Lotto signage review’ (File No.: CP2016/13203). The Report covered the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area as well and stated that Council compliance staff had individually assessed each premise identified as noncompliant, with breaches of the relevant district plan determined. The Report stated that Council compliance staff were responding and will meet with Lotto New Zealand representatives to advise on compliance issues.

 

At this point, the community has seen little change to LOTTO signage and seem to have heard nothing directly back from the Council compliance staff.

 

We ask that the MOLB seek an update from Council officers on their Report made to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board titled ‘Lotto signage review’ to outline what progress has been made.

 

Recommendation: That the MOLB request Council compliance officers update the MOLB on their Report made to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board titled ‘Lotto signage review’ to outline what progress has been made, and that the MOLB inform the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board that they have made this request.

 

A further concern ROCC members have identified is the new large digital billboard sign that has been put up near the motorway at ‘Tip Top’ corner in Mt Wellington, just as you drive into Otahuhu. See photo in Appendix 6. We find this sign objectionable in that it appears aimed at our community.

 

As you might have seen from the media, LOTTO is by no means a ‘benign’ form of gambling as there are reports from retailers that people put off buying groceries and vegetables when LOTTO jackpots. See the article in Appendix 7.

 

We ask that the MOLB raise our concerns, and perhaps concerns of its own about this sign with LOTTO and the Governing Body and ask for it to be removed. In addition, we ask that the MOLB request Council officers to report on what rules (e.g. in the Auckland City Council Bylaw on Billboards or the Unitary Plan) regulate this sign and how it came to be consented (seemingly without any public consultation)?

 

Recommendation: We ask that the MOLB raise our concerns, and perhaps concerns of its own about the LOTTO Billboard at Tip Top corner with LOTTO and the Governing Body and ask for it to be removed. In addition, we ask that the MOLB request Council officers to report on what rules (e.g. in the Auckland City Council Bylaw on Billboards or the Unitary Plan) regulate this sign and how it came to be consented?

 

A final question we have is about the use of the Metro Hall in Mangere East for housie and/or bingo gambling. Our impression is that the Metro Hall is used regularly for these kinds of gambling activities. We would appreciate the MOLB seeking advice from Council officers as to who is hiring the hall for these kinds of gambling activities and how frequent this is.

 

Recommendation: We ask that the MOLB ask Council officers to undertake an assessment of the gambling (e.g. housie and/or bingo) activities in the Metro Hall, Mangere East.

Emily Worman


 

APPENDIX 1

 

 

Auckland District Licensing Committee

Private Bag 92300, Auckland 1142

 

Email: alcohol_licensing_south@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

OBJECTION TO NEW OFF-LICENCE APPLICATION

Bargain Liquor (26A Salesyard Road, Otahuhu)

 

1.     We object to the Application for a new Off-Licence made by Smart Master Ltd for premises to be situated at: 26A Salesyard Road, Otahuhu to trade as ‘Bargain Liquor’.

 

2.     While we object to the Application on all the grounds under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012, we particularly object as follows:

 

·         Suitability: The sole director and shareholder of the applicant (Smart Master Ltd) is Gui Yang, who appears to have no experience working in or managing an off-licence. Further, there are currently no staff who might have that experience. On that basis, we do not believe Smart Master Ltd or Gui Yang is suitable to hold a licence.

 

·         There is already a proliferation of liquor stores in Otahuhu: Close to the proposed new store are Super Liquor (52 Atkinson Ave), KK Liquor (420 Great South Road), Choice Liquor Mart (91 Mangere Road), the Bottle-O Otahuhu (205-207 Great South Road, Otahuhu), Super Store Liquor (28 Avenue Road, Otahuhu), Super Value Otahuhu (29 Hall Avenue, Otahuhu), Thirsty Liquor (2/28 Bairds Road) and Otahuhu Discount Liquor Centre (626 Great South Road). There are already too many liquor stores in Otahuhu and we do not believe another bottle store licence should be granted.

 

·         Sensitive Sites: The proposed new liquor store is located too close to the Otahuhu Train Station and Transport Hub and the Otahuhu Primary School.

 

·         The target market areas for the store (Otahuhu): The Otahuhu West area is in a Deprivation 10 area and is already negatively affected by the impacts of the existing alcohol licences. It is undesirable for any further alcohol licences to be issued in this area.

 

·         Police Concerns: The Police have said: "There are a number of off-licensed premises currently trading in Otahuhu town centre and the surrounding area, enabling easy access to alcohol ... the area is known for cheap accommodation, housing a lower socio-economic population including beneficiaries and halfway house patrons; the area also has well established street workers, attracting outside patrons to the area. It is believed that these factors, coupled with the easy availability of alcohol, contribute significantly to alcohol issues in this area." (Calls to Police related to alcohol, Auckland, Released 19 September 2013). On this basis, it is undesirable for any further alcohol licences to be issued in this area.

 

 


 

 

APPENDIX 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX 3

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

APPENDIX 4

 

Boards that have replaced the glazing

 

Most liquor stores are located in a Business 1 zone (or a neighbourhood business zone).

 

Rule 14.10.1 of the Manukau District Plan provides for Activities in Business Zones. It states that:

 

(b) All controlled activities in Rule 14.10.2 (Activity Table) shall comply with 14.11 General Development and Performance Standards and Council shall exercise control over those matters specified in 14.12.

 

The Activity Table in Rule 14.10.2 provides for premises in Business Zone 1 and says that: “… any external alterations or additions to any building” is a controlled activity.

 

The boards that have replaced the glazing along the frontages of liquot stores are an external alteration to the building and therefore require a resource consent for a controlled activity.

 

Turning to Rule 14.12.1.2, it provides that when assessing an application for a controlled activity resource consent for external alterations or additions to any building, the Council will have regard to whether the external appearance will maintain the visual amenity values of the Business area. In particular, in the Business 1 zones, whether the design of the groundfloor frontage of the building maintains a sense of variety, including, display windows and creates a continuous street frontage.

 

The boards that have replaced the glazing of the retail frontage are an external alteration and require a controlled activity resource consent. It is likely that no resource consents have been granted for these types of external alterations.

 

Even if an application was made for a controlled activity resource consent to board over the retail frontage glazing, it is doubtful such a consent would be granted as the Council must have regard to whether the external appearance will maintain the visual amenity values of the Business area. In particular, in the Business 1 zones, whether the design of the groundfloor frontage of the building maintains a sense of variety, including, display windows and creates a continuous street frontage. Boarding over the display windows is completely contrary to this.

 

 

 


 

 

APPENDIX 5

 

Turning to the Unitary Plan (Decisions Version 19 August 2016), it appears that the boarding over of the glazing of the retail frontages might be regulated by Rule H12.4.1, in that the boarding over is an addition or alteration to a building not otherwise provided for (A52) and requires a restricted discretionary resource consent.

 

When assessing restricted discretionary activities, Rule H12.8 provides that the Council will consider the following matters when assessing a resource consent application:

 

·         limiting the adverse visual effects of any blank walls along the frontage of the public space (Rule H12.8(3)(iv));

 

·         the extent of glazing provided on walls fronting public streets and the benefits it provides in terms of:

 

o   the attractiveness and pleasantness of the public space and the amenity for people using or passing through that space;

o   the degree of visibility that it provides between the public space and the building interior; and

o   the opportunities for passive surveillance of the street (Rule H12.8(3)(c))

 

·         the application of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design principles to the design and layout of buildings adjoining public spaces (Rule H12.8(3)(e).

 

 

 

 


 

 

APPENDIX 6

 

 

 


 

 

APPENDIX 7

 

 

People tempted by an "elusive dream" may be sacrificing food on the table in order to buy Lotto tickets.

Last week, the biggest jackpot in New Zealand history of $44 million was won by an Auckland couple.

But while the winners celebrated, others may have gone without basic groceries, such as vegetables, to buy tickets, the owners of a supermarket and a vegetable supplier have said.

Both said they noticed a clear drop off in spending every time a large jackpot is on offer.

More than 2.3m tickets were sold in last week's draw.

Lotto NZ says when there are large jackpots, more people than normal buy tickets, but the average value of tickets bought does not change.

Palmerston North's Pioneer New World owner operator Darrin Wong said there was a noticeable dip in food spending.

"I think people don't quite have as much to spend. There is only so much you can spend.

"It is like every other business, you notice the money is not quite there."

Wong said the dip was "across the board", though he could not isolate one area of produce that took a bigger hit than others.

Events like the Melbourne Cup also had an impact.

"You notice the income is not there."

Lotto NZ corporate communications general manager Emilia Mazur said it could not comment on what other retailers observe during this time.

"During a large jackpot draw, the average value of tickets bought doesn't change that much. But what we find is that a lot more people play than normally would.

"Our games are fun to play and it's exciting to be in with a chance to win a big prize.

"At all times, we remind Kiwis to play responsibly, which is all about having fun, being informed, and knowing your limits. "

Ohakune vegetable farmer Bruce Rollinson said he noticed a definite link between his sales and big Lotto jackpots.

"In the past, where the jackpot of anything $25m-plus, it does go quiet.

"It is quite horrendous that people put money on gambling [rather] than food on the table."

Rollinson claimed other growers and wholesalers observed similar corelations.

The Wellington Sevens was another period where sales dropped, he said.

Problem Gambling Foundation NZ marketing and communications director Andree Froude said jackpots enticed people to spend more than they could afford.

"We do know that when we have a really big jackpot there is a change in behaviour of people.

"It is people buying tickets in the hope of winning that elusive dream.

"If someone spends more than they can afford and can't put food on the table, that is harmful."

Jackpots were aggressively advertised, she said.

"It is very 'in your face', especially when there is a big jackpot."

Tickets could be easily bought at supermarkets or online.

"It normalises it. It makes it part of the weekly shop, rather than a discretionary spend.

"You can see that from the queues."

People often did not even consider buying a lotto ticket to be gambling, she said.

A former problem gambler, who did not want to be named, said though Lotto was not his primary addiction, it was too prevalent.

"It might be the lesser of the evils, but it is something that is constantly there.

"It normalises that kind of behaviour, that gambling was OK, even though I had an issue. Going to the supermarket it was right there."

He would still buy tickets even if he could not afford it, being lured in by the hope of a big win to solve his financial problems.

"You don't see the faces of people who lose."


 

 

Item 9.4

 


 

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Item 24