I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 February 2017

9.30am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Community Development and Safety Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

 

Members

Cr Ross Clow

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr Dick Quax

 

Cr Richard Hills

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

IMSB Member Tony Kake

Cr Sir John Walker, KNZM, CBE

 

IMSB Member Dennis Kirkwood

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Mike Lee

Cr John Watson

 

 

 

Ex-officio

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, JP

 

 

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

 

 

(Quorum 7 members)

 

 

 

Sonja Tomovska

Governance Advisor

 

10 February 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 021 615 961

Email: sonja.tomovska@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

TERMS OF REFERENCE

 

 

Responsibilities and key projects

 

The committee is responsible for regional community development and safety, including:

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural organisations

·         arts, culture and heritage

·         alcohol harm reduction strategy (recommendation to Environment and Community Committee)

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

 

Except:

 

(a)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)     where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)     where a matter is the responsibility of another committee

(d)     the approval of expenditure that is not contained within approved budgets

(e)     the approval of expenditure of more than $2 million

(f)      the approval of final policy

(g)     deciding significant matters for which there is high public interest and which are    controversial

(h)     the commissioning of reports on new policy where that policy programme of work has not been approved by the Environment and Community Committee

(i)      the power to establish sub-committees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               9

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    9

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

8          Notices of Motion                                                                                                        10

9          Lifewise,  Auckland City Mission, Vision West, Rainbow Youth and a representative with lived experience of homelessness - Panel Discussion on Rough Sleeping         11

10        Update from the General Manager Arts, Community and Events                         13

11        Update on Housing First and Rough Sleeping                                                        15

12        Regional Community Development Grants Allocation (2016/2017)                      23  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

An apology from Cr J Walker has been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

There are no minutes for confirmation.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Democracy Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

8          Notices of Motion

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for notices of motion had been received.

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 

Lifewise,  Auckland City Mission, Vision West, Rainbow Youth and a representative with lived experience of homelessness - Panel Discussion on Rough Sleeping

 

File No.: CP2017/01042

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To update the Community Development and Safety Committee and be part of a panel discussion on rough sleeping.

Executive summary

2.       The following representatives will be in attendance to update and discuss with the committee issues in relation to rough sleeping:

·        Moira Lawler, Chief Executive, Lifewise

·        Chris Farrelly, Chief Executive, Auckland City Mission

·        Fred Astle, Head of Maori Development, Vision West

·        Maddy Brownlee, Rainbow Housing Support Worker, Rainbow Youth  

·        A representative with “lived” experience of homelessness.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the information from Lifewise, Auckland City Mission, Vision West, Rainbow Youth and the representative with lived experience of homelessness, and thank the representatives for their attendance.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Signatories

Authors

Sonja Tomovska - Advisor - Governance Support

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 

Update from the General Manager Arts, Community and Events

 

File No.: CP2017/01057

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To present to the Community Development and Safety Committee a summary of findings regarding homelessness in Canada from the General Manager Arts, Community and Events.

2.       The presentation will be provided at the meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      receive the presentation from the General Manager Arts, Community and Events on the findings regarding homelessness in Canada.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Sonja Tomovska - Advisor - Governance Support

Authorisers

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 

Update on Housing First and Rough Sleeping

 

File No.: CP2017/00795

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on Council’s activity to address rough sleeping. 

Executive summary

2.       Rough sleeping is a growing problem in Auckland.  Of the estimated 20,296 Aucklanders deemed homeless at the time of the 2013 census, 771 of these were people living without shelter (rough sleeping).  

3.       Staff are undertaking policy work to determine council’s role and position in addressing homelessness, including rough sleeping.  Staff will propose the scope of this work to the Environment and Community Committee in February 2017.

4.       The Mayoral Proposal for the Annual Budget 2017/2018 prioritised $500,000 to address chronic homelessness.

5.       Auckland Council’s activities and investment in reducing and managing homelessness and rough sleeping has increased over the last two years. This includes:

·   $1,000,000 contribution towards the Ministry of Social Development’s ‘Housing First’ initiative in Auckland in 2016/2017;

·   a contribution of $2,000,000 from City Centre Targeted Rate to upgrading the emergency housing provided at James Liston Hostel in 2016/2017;

·   operating expenditure of $830,000 over three years allocated in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 for emergency housing and homelessness initiatives;

·   enhancing inner city public amenities (including storage lockers and showers).      

 

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      note the Update on Housing First and Rough Sleeping report.

 

 

Comments

Rough sleeping in Auckland

6.       Levels of homelessness in Auckland have increased by 26 percent between 2006 and 2013 (not including levels of people living in uninhabitable housing). Homelessness in Auckland is increasingly affecting working households and families.

7.       An estimated 20,296 Aucklanders were deemed homeless at the time of the 2013 census.[1]  Of these, 771 were people living without shelter.  Those living without shelter are described as ‘rough sleepers.’

8.       The 2016 Auckland City Mission Street Count identified 177 rough sleepers in the Central Business District, significantly up from the 68 people identified in the 2013 Street Count.

 

 

Council’s role in addressing homelessness

9.       The Auckland Council Homelessness Action Plan 2012-2015 was an operational delivery plan developed to better coordinate inter-agency activity on homelessness. The Rough Sleeping Steering Group continues to coordinate agencies and activities in the homelessness sector.

10.     Despite the range of ongoing operational activity on homelessness, the council does not have an established policy position or role in addressing homelessness. 

11.     In September 2016 the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee requested that staff undertake further policy work to determine Auckland Council’s role and position in addressing homelessness, including emergency housing (REG/2016/90).

12.     Staff will propose that the policy work include preventing, managing and eliminating all forms of homelessness. This includes people living without shelter, in temporary accommodation, sharing accommodation temporarily and in uninhabitable accommodation.

13.     Staff will seek approval of the policy scope from the Environment and Community Committee at their February meeting. A link to the report can be found here.

14.     If the scope of the policy work is approved, staff will present a report to the Environment and Community Committee in April 2017, which outlines:

·        council’s potential policy position

·        council’s roles in addressing homelessness.

Mayoral proposal for the Annual Budget 2017/2018

15.     The Mayor’s proposal for the 2017/2018 Annual Budget prioritised $500,000 to promote collaboration across council, government agencies, charities, businesses and philanthropic groups to address chronic homelessness (rough sleeping).

16.     The proposed funding will:

·        enable an annual Auckland-wide street count, which the Auckland homelessness sector has identified as a priority (design and implementation)

·        maintain existing budget levels to continue support for Housing First through initiatives such as:

-     outreach services

-     enhanced data management support

-     coordination support for the Emergency Housing sector

-     innovative programme development and

-     evaluation programmes. 

The Auckland Housing First Initiative

Contribution to Auckland Housing First Initiative

17.     In July 2016, the Ministry of Social Development announced investment of $3 million to support implementation of Housing First in Auckland.  Auckland Council invested an additional $1 million.

18.     International evidence suggests the most effective way to address homelessness is via the Housing First model[2]

19.     The approach first moves people into housing and then provides support to address the issues underpinning their homelessness (e.g. addiction, poor mental health).

20.     The approach was first developed in 1992 and was implemented through a programme in the US called Pathways to Housing.  According to the Utah Housing and Community Development Comprehensive Report on Homelessness 2014, the approach has led to a 72 per cent overall drop in chronic homelessness in that state.

21.     Tenancy sustainment rates are the primary indicator for measuring the success of homeless housing policies. Rates are much higher for housing first initiatives than for ‘treatment first’ initiatives.  Evidence demonstrates an 85 per cent tenancy maintenance success rate when the Housing First approach is applied. 

22.     The People’s Project in Hamilton has adopted the Housing First model.  Between August 2014 and May 2016 the People’s Project successfully housed 186 people.  93 per cent have remained housed.

23.     Housing First in Auckland will be delivered by local providers (the Auckland Housing First Collective) as follows:

·   Lifewise and Auckland City Mission - Central Auckland

·   Vision West - West Auckland

·   Affinity – Central and West Auckland (excluding the CBD)

·   LinkPeople - South Auckland.

Taking a ‘collective impact’ approach to applying Housing First in Auckland

24.     The Auckland Housing First Collective wish to take a collective impact approach to enable the model to be applied effectively across the region. The Collective are negotiating with the Ministry of Social Development for additional funding to support a collective approach. This would include support for shared practice, systems, reporting, measurement, and governance.

25.     On 15 February 2017 Auckland Council is hosting a workshop with Mark Cabaj, to explore strategies for implementing a collective impact approach to Housing First in Auckland.  Mark Cabaj is an international expert on collective approaches to tackling complex social issues.  Workshop attendees will include the Auckland Housing First Collective, representatives from the homelessness and health sectors, NGOs and central government (including Ministry for Social Development, Housing NZ, Corrections, NZ Police).

Governance model for the Auckland Housing First Collective

26.     The governance model for the Auckland Housing First Collective is under development, and may include a role for Mayor Phil Goff.

27.     Establishing this governance model may provide an opportunity to refresh other cross-sectoral homelessness and emergency housing coordination groups, such as the Central Auckland Rough Sleeper Steering Group. This could increase collaboration and effective practice across the Auckland region.

Contribution to upgrade of James Liston Hostel Emergency Housing

28.     At their August 2016 meeting, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board recommended allocation of $2 million of City Centre Targeted Rate funding to upgrade and enhance the capacity of James Liston Hostel.  The Finance and Performance Committee approved the $2 million grant at their September 2016 meeting.

29.     James Liston Hostel is Auckland CBD’s only emergency accommodation and has recently aligned its operating model with the Housing First approach.  The proposal for funding for James Liston Hostel was supported by:

·   Auckland City Mission

·   Lifewise

·   the Ministry of Social Development

·   Housing New Zealand and

·   the Homeless Client Committee; a group of people who have lived experience of homelessness.

30.     Funding will enable:

·   renovation of the existing building (including new roof and windows)

·   5 new beds

·   provision of showers and bathrooms on each floor

·   installation of a security system

·   improved layout to enable staff to provide oversight and monitoring

·   specialised rapid intake rooms

·   additional meeting and activity rooms.

31.     Council staff are working with the James Liston Hostel Trust to develop a funding agreement.

Public Amenities Initiative 

32.     While the Housing First initiative aims to end homelessness in Auckland, this will take time. In the meantime, additional support is needed for people who are homeless and/or sleeping rough.

33.     Enhancing the city centre’s public amenities is of particular benefit to the rough sleeping community and has the potential to enhance dignity and wellbeing.

34.     Staff are planning for public amenities (toilets, showers, lockers) to be installed in the Aotea Quarter and the wider City Centre as part of the Aotea Quarter Framework Implementation Plan.

35.     A lack of storage for rough sleepers causes issues for council, rough sleepers and homeless support services, including the following:

·   missed appointments at social services due to lack of mobility

·   loss of possessions and/or identification

·   cost and time to support services of assisting with identification replacement

·   increasing call outs to council bylaws and waste teams.

36.     The Auckland Central Library is planning to pilot storage lockers for rough sleepers.  Key council teams are developing the initiative alongside agencies that work with rough sleepers and the rough sleeping community.  Staff anticipate that the storage lockers will be installed in the last quarter of FY2016/2017.

37.     Staff are working to identify a suitable site for showers in the Aotea Quarter.  Staff expect that a public shower amenity will be installed there in FY2017/2018.

Auckland Council Operating expenditure

38.     Under the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Governing Body approved a funding for emergency housing, homelessness and rough sleeping responses across Auckland as follows:

Budget for homelessness and rough sleeping in the Long-term Plan 2015-2025

Year/s

Amount allocated

Years one and two (2015/2016 and 2016/2017)

$720,000

Year three (2017/2018)

$110,000

Total:

$830,000

 

39.     Since June 2015 a number of initiatives to address homelessness and enhance the provision of emergency housing were funded through this budget. Attachment A provides a full breakdown of funded homelessness and emergency housing initiatives.  These include:

·   support for the outreach service provided by the Auckland City Mission and Salvation Army Waitakere

·   enhancing the provision of public amenities (e.g. storage lockers, showers and toilets) in central Auckland

·   development of the Awhina website by the homeless sector which connects anyone facing homelessness to the people who can help

·   funding for a coordinator to enhance the provision of emergency housing in Auckland

·   supporting the sector and key agencies to deliver a Housing First Model in Auckland to address homelessness.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

40.     The policy work being undertaken will include interviews with key stakeholders.  This will include a range of elected representatives including local board members in areas experiencing high levels of homelessness. 

Māori impact statement

41.     Auckland Council’s $1,000,000 contribution to Housing First in Auckland was prioritised to achieving positive outcomes for vulnerable Māori.  Staff have worked with the Ministry of Social Development to ensure contracts with providers reflect this priority.

42.     Māori are disproportionately affected by homelessness. In 2013, an estimated 32 percent of the homeless population were Māori. Just over four in every ten people on the social housing register are Māori[3].

43.     Māori are less likely than other ethnic groups to own their home and more likely to rent. Rising costs of rents and insecure tenure raise the risk of homelessness.

44.     A number of Māori organisations, most notably Te Puea Marae, have responded to the increasing numbers of homeless Aucklanders by offering short-term emergency housing. 

45.     The policy work being undertaken will specifically address Māori experiences of homelessness and the council’s role and position from a Māori responsiveness perspective.

Implementation

46.     There are no implementation issues arising from this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Emergency Housing and Homelessness Funding

19

     

Signatories

Author

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 


 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 

Regional Community Development Grants Allocation (2016/2017)

 

File No.: CP2017/00270

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       Approve grants to regional community development organisations through the 2016/2017 Regional Community Development Grants scheme.

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Community Development Grants Programme is one of six regional grants programmes included in the Community Grants Policy, adopted on 4 December 2014.

3.       The Long-term Plan 2015-2025 allocated $175,000 annually to the Regional Community Development Grants Programme. 

4.       Forty-six applications were received with a total of $1,327,763 requested.

5.       Staff assessed applications against criteria and have made recommendations.

6.       The Community Development and Safety Committee holds the delegation to approve the allocation of regional community development grants. 

 

Recommendation/s

That the Community Development and Safety Committee:

a)      approve the allocation of funding for regional community development organisations for the amounts and projects outlined below:

Applicant Name

Project name

Recommended Grant

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

The WISE Collective Project

$35,000

Whau ACE Adult and Community Education Incorporated

Karanga - Māori financial literacy

$30,000

Shakti Legal Advocacy and Family Social Services Incorporated

Shakti Ethnic Communities Change Network - Empowering youth and families to live free from violence

$20,000

Rape Crisis Auckland

Sexual violence prevention in the Asian communities

$13,000

Tū Wāhine Trust

Mana Whānau - Upholding the mana of the whanau

$25,000

Zeal Education Trust

Live for Tomorrow Chapters in Schools – empowering young people to build an inclusive school community

$20,000

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Putting the Treaty into Practice in the Community Sector: Enhancing relationships with mana whenua

$15,000

Inspiring Communities

Community-led development capacity building, promotion and support in Auckland region

$17,000

 

 

 

Comments

7.       The Regional Community Development Grants programme is one of six regional grants programmes included in the Community Grants Policy adopted on 4 December 2014 (Resolution number REG/2014/134). This programme is detailed in schedule two of the Community Grants Policy.

8.       The annual budget for the Regional Community Development Grants programme is $175,000.  This was confirmed as part of the final decision-making on the Long-term Plan 2015–2025 (BUD/2015/57).

9.       The Community Grants Policy proposes two regional community development grant types:

·        one-off project grants

·        multi-year strategic relationship grants.

10.     Consistent with the 2015/2016 approach, only one-off project grants are offered this financial year due to the limited budget available.

11.     The 2016/2017 funding round opened on 1 November 2016 and closed on 12 December 2016, with a maximum grant of $40,000. The round received 46 applications, requesting a total of $1,327,763.

12.     The Community Development and Safety Committee holds the delegation to approve allocation of regional community development grants.

Funding Round and Criteria

13.     Applicants were required to demonstrate that projects:

·     have an Auckland-wide or regional focus and/or impact

·     address one or more of the following key focus areas of the empowered communities approach (as outlined in the Empowered communities approach framework included as Attachment A):

increase diverse community participation

build community capacity to do things for themselves

develop and support community-led placemaking initiatives

respond to Māori aspirations in practical and effective ways

·     are a defined project or activity; funding was not available for organisations’ general operating costs.

14.     As outlined in the Community Grants Policy, projects need to demonstrate alignment to one of the following priority areas:

·     focus on the provision of capacity and capability building support

·     facilitate regional collaboration through shared delivery

·     prioritise and actively contribute to the achievement of Māori outcomes

·     promote transformative social change for target populations

·     provide strategic leadership within the community and/or sector

·     seek to develop enabling infrastructure and supportive conditions for the development of social innovation

15.     Applicants were also asked to show their social or community benefits and outcomes.

16.     The following table outlines applications and requested amounts:


 

 

Number of applications

Total funding requested

Total applications

46

$1,326,763

Eligible

-     Aligned

-     Limited alignment

35

-     14

-     21

$1,135,586

-     $453,249

-     $683,337

Ineligible

11

$191,177

 

Assessment

17.     A panel of staff assessed applications against the funding criteria. Applications were assessed as being ‘aligned’, demonstrating ‘limited alignment’ or ‘not aligned’.  An assessment template, showing the assessment criteria, is attached (Attachment B).

18.     35 applications met the funding criteria, however only 14 demonstrated significant alignment to the empowered communities approach and to the community grants policy priority areas. The eight applications that were assessed as best aligned to the empowered communities approach and the community grants policy priority areas are recommended for funding. The table below lists these eight recommended applications.

Applications recommended for funding

Applicant name:

Project name:

ECA score /20

Applied for

Recom-mend

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

The WISE Collective Project

20

$39,815

$35,000

Whau ACE Adult and Community Education Incorporated

Kāranga - Māori financial literacy

19

$40,000

$30,000

Shakti Legal Advocacy and Family Social Services Incorporated

Shakti Ethnic Communities Change Network - Empowering youth and families to live free from violence

16

$30,634

$20,000

Rape Crisis Auckland (Rape Prevention Education)

Sexual violence prevention in the Asian communities

15

$13,000

$13,000

Tū Wāhine Trust

Mana Whānau - Upholding the mana of the whanau

14

$40,000

$25,000

Zeal Education Trust

Live for Tomorrow Chapters in Schools – Empowering young people to build an inclusive school community

13

$35,500

$20,000

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Putting the Treaty into Practice in the Community Sector: Enhancing relationships with mana whenua

12

$39,500

$15,000

Inspiring Communities

Community-led development capacity building, promotion and support in Auckland

10

$40,000

$17,000

Total

$278,449

$175,000

 

19.     Recommended applications represent a wide coverage geographically and across key demographic groups including Māori, migrant, and youth communities.

20.     The table below lists the six other organisations which met the funding criteria and demonstrated alignment to the empowered communities approach but who are not recommended for funding:

Applicant name:

Project name:

Score /20

Applied for

Diabetes Projects Trust - Gardens for Health

Empowering people to grow food in community settings from the ‘Ground UP’

7

$40,000

Auckland North Community and Development Inc. (ANCAD)

Auckland Community Accounting

7

$32,800

Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre

Community Nursery Network - Exploration and feasibility

6

$10,000

 

The Ākina Foundation

Elevate - Contract readiness

6

$38,800

Social Enterprise Auckland

Self-organising social enterprise infrastructure

5

$39,900

Mind Over Manner

Building social pillars within community and resilience for youth

4

$13,300

Total

$174,800

           

21.     Eleven applications were assessed as not meeting the criteria for funding.  Reasons for this assessment includes:

·    local projects with limited evidence they would meet region-wide needs or deliver a regional impact

·    request for operational costs or business as usual activities

·    specific events not aligned to or delivering community empowerment outcomes

·    projects that showed no alignment to the empowered communities approach

·    projects that were not clearly defined or developed, not seen as feasible, or the applicant did not show the capacity to implement the project.

22.     Staff will contact the declined applicants, and advise them of alternative funding opportunities where this is appropriate.

23.     A full schedule of the 46 applications received is attached (Attachment C).

Options

24.     Given the limited funding pool, staff recommend funding fewer project for greater impact.  An alternative option is to allocate smaller grants to a larger number of projects.

 

25.     The following table provides an assessment of the impact if the committee decided to grant funding to all of the 14 applications assessed as meeting the criteria for funding and demonstrating significant alignment to the empowered communities approach:

 

Options to fund either top eight or 14 applications

 

Recommended option (A): Fund top eight applications

Alternative option (B)

Fund top 14 applications

Number of grants made

8

14

Average grant

$21,875

$12,500

Grant as proportion of funding applied for

62.8%

38.6%

Advantages

· greater chance of projects being feasible due to funding amount

· focus on the best projects

· greater staff support available to projects

· as the major funder of the project, council is better able the assess the impact of the grant.

· enables more projects to be funded

· provides a wider spread of project themes.

 

Disadvantages

· a small number of projects are funded – funding ‘reach’ is reduced

· spreads resources thinly (both funding and staff support)

· partially funded projects may struggle to obtain the balance of the funding

· includes projects that have low alignment to the empowered communities approach and the community grants policy priority areas

 

 

26.     Funding recommendations for option B are included below:

Applicant name:

Project name:

ECA Score /20

Applied for

Option 2 Recommendation

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

The WISE Collective Project

20

$39,815

30,000

Whau ACE Adult and Community Education Incorporated

Kāranga - Māori financial literacy

19

$40,000

25,000

Shakti Legal Advocacy and Family Social Services Incorporated

Shakti Ethnic Communities Change Network - Empowering youth and families to live free from violence

16

$30,634

15,000

Rape Crisis Auckland (Rape Prevention Education)

Sexual violence prevention in the Asian communities

15

$13,000

13,000

Tū Wāhine Trust

Mana Whānau - Upholding the mana of the whanau

14

$40,000

20,000

Zeal Education Trust

Live for Tomorrow Chapters in Schools – Empowering young people to build an inclusive school community

13

$35,500

15,000

Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Putting the Treaty into Practice in the Community Sector: Enhancing relationships with mana whenua

12

$39,500

10,000

Inspiring Communities

Community-led development capacity building, promotion and support in Auckland

10

$40,000

17,000

Auckland North Community and Development Inc. (ANCAD)

Auckland Community Accounting

7

$32,800

10,000

Kaipātiki Project Environment Centre

Community Nursery Network - Exploration and feasibility

6

$10,000

 

5,000

Diabetes Projects Trust - Gardens for Health

Empowering people to grow food in community settings from the ‘Ground UP’

6

$40,000

5,000

The Ākina Foundation

Elevate - Contract readiness

6

$38,800

5,000

Social Enterprise Auckland

Self-organising social enterprise infrastructure

5

$39,900

5,000

Mind Over Manner

Building social pillars within community and resilience for youth

4

$13,300

0

Total

$453,249

$175,000

 

27.     Staff would need to work with funded organisation to determine project viability with the limited funding received. 

28.     Advice from the Community Grants Hub is that regional grants need to be allocated strategically to achieve regional outcomes which is not possible for allocations under $10,000.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

29.     Local boards were consulted on, and contributed to, the development of the Community Grants Policy, under which the Regional Community Development Grants programme was established.

Māori impact statement

30.     All applicants were asked to state how their project will meet Māori outcomes.  This was a weak area for many of the applications received, and indicates an opportunity for development and capacity building.

31.     One of the projects recommended for funding is to build community organisations’ application of the Treaty of Waitangi and enhance relationships with mana whenua.

32.     Two of the projects recommended for funding have a focus of responding to Māori aspirations.

Implementation

33.     Following the committee’s decision, staff will notify all applicants of the outcomes and arrange funding agreements and payment. All grants will be subject to accountability requirements, and will be required to demonstrate the outcomes their grant has supported.

34.     Staff will support those that were partially aligned and not aligned to seek other funding sources. To encourage high quality, innovative projects and applications in future, staff will work with key sector organisations to support their capacity to apply.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ECA framework

29

b

Assessment template

31

c

Full schedule of applicants

35

     

Signatories

Authors

Christine Olsen - Community Empowerment Manager

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Ian Maxwell - Director Community Services

 

 



Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 


 


 


Community Development and Safety Committee

16 February 2017

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

    

    



[1] Amore, K (2016). Severe housing deprivation in Aotearoa/New Zealand: 2001-2013. He Kainga Oranga/Housing & Health Research Programme, University of Otago, Wellington

[2] Waegemakers Schiff, Jeannette; Rook, John (2012). Housing first - Where is the Evidence? (Toronto: Homeless Hub).

[3] Ministry of Social Development (2016), Social housing purchasing strategy