I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

4.00pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Chamber
Takapuna Service Centre
Level 3
1 The Strand
Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Dr Grant Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

George Wood, CNZM

 

Members

Mike Cohen, QSM, JP

 

 

Jennifer McKenzie

 

 

Jan O'Connor

 

 

Mike Sheehy

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Karen Durante

Democracy Advisor

 

17 February 2017

 

Contact Telephone: 021 726 065

Email: karen.durante@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Shore Exhibition Centre Trust                                                                           5

8.2     Devonport Environmental Network                                                                   6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                          7

11.1   Notice of Motion - Wastewater discharge into the Waitemata                       7

11.2   Notice of Motion - Off leash dogs in public areas                                            8

11.3   Notice of Motion - Possible relocation of Auckland CBD bus terminal        9

12        Auckland Transport monthly update - February 2017                                            11

13        Monthly Local Board Services report - February 2017                                           25

14        Sunnynook Park stormwater dry pond upgrade                                                     47

15        Takapuna Beach Reserve Holiday Park - update                                                   55`

16        Response to Notice of Motion - Public workshops                                                 67

17        Exchange of parts of Northboro Reserve for other land and vesting of additional open space                                                                                                                             79

18        Milford Centre Plan monitoring report                                                                     91

19        Takapuna Centre Plan -  Monitoring implementation of the Takapuna Strategic Framework                                                                                                                  105

20        ATEED Six monthly report to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board                113

21        Netball North Harbour roof upgrade                                                                       127

22        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         145

23        Board Members' reports                                                                                           147

24        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 163  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

i)              A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

 

ii)             A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 15 December 2016, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 3.20 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Shore Exhibition Centre Trust

Purpose

1.       Gordon Ell , representing the Shore Exhibition Centre Trust, will be in attendance to address the board regarding the history of the building at number 2 The Strand, Takapuna.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Gordon Ell, representing the Shore Exhibition Centre Trust, regarding the history of the building at 2 The Strand, Takapuna and thank him for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          History of 2 The Strand, Takapuna...................................................... 167

 

 

8.2       Devonport Environmental Network

Purpose

1.       Michael Fielding, Sarah Bloomfield and Sid Cuthbertson, representing the Devonport Environment Network (DEN), will be in attendance to address the board regarding assistance required to support ecological restoration within the local board area, specifically Hauraki Corner to Devonport.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Michael Fielding, Sarah Bloomfield and Sid Cuthbertson, representing the Devonport Environment Network regarding assistance required to support ecological restoration within the local board area, and thank them for their presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 


 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


 

11        Notices of Motion

 

11.1     Notice of Motion - Wastewater discharge into the Waitemata

n accordance with Standing Order 3.11.1, the following Notice of Motion has been received from Deputy Chairperson, George Wood, for inclusion on the agenda for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting being held on day, Tuesday, 21 February 2017:

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note with concern the recent media reports that many more than two overflows are occurring from combined storm water/waste water discharge points on the southern side of the Waitemata Harbour between Point Chevalier and St Heliers Bay, which is contrary to the Network Discharge Consent.

b)      request a report advising the impact that these wastewater discharges into the Waitemata Harbour have and what impact this pollution has on the northern side of the Waitemata Harbour (especially in the areas of Shoal Bay, Ngataringa Bay, Stanley Bay and Devonport) and what will be the continuing impact will be if 20 percent of these discharges continue after the Central Interceptor is completed.

 

Background:

1.       The discharge of wastewater overflows from North Shore areas, which form the northern side of the Waitemata Harbour, have been controlled considerably in recent decades.  This is not the situation on the southern side of the harbour where combined waste and storm water outfalls still continue to discharge into the Waitemata Harbour.   Recent articles in the New Zealand Herald have graphically advised that many more overflows are occurring during wet weather events that are permitted in the Network Discharge consent that was granted to Watercare Services in 2014.

2.       The Central Interceptor project was introduced in order to move this combined waste and storm water way from the discharge points into the Waitemata Harbour and move the polluted water to the Mangere Treatment plant.  The NZ Herald article now says that only 80% of this water will be collected and moved to Mangere.  This obviously means that the remaining 20% will still be discharged into the Waitemata Harbour. 

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area is immediately opposite much of the areas from where the polluted overflows discharge into the harbour.   In the past the former North Shore City council had detailed tidal flow patterns done to monitor where the polluted water was taken after it reached the harbour.  It would be helpful to know whether Auckland Council has done this work and what the results show for polluted water moving to the North Shore beaches.


Signed

George Wood,

Deputy Chairperson, Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

 


 

11.2     Notice of Motion - Off leash dogs in public areas

In accordance with Standing Order 3.11.1, the following Notice of Motion has been received from Deputy Chairperson George Wood for inclusion on the agenda for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting being held on day, Tuesday, 21 February 2017:

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)                    note that complaints have been received in recent times relating to the fact that dogs “not under control” are being exercised on Takapuna Beach even during official off leash dog exercising times.

b)        request officers look at what steps can be taken to ensure that dogs remain under the control of their owners at all times and officers report back to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, with particular emphasis on:

i)     ensuring that owners exercising doges in open public areas are made aware that control, in relation to a dog, means that the owner is able to obtain an immediate and desired response from the dog by use of a leash, voice commands, hand signals, whistles or other effective means; and

ii)     steps that can be taken, including improved signage, to publicise the rules that dog owners must follow when taking their doges into public areas especially where dogs are able to be run without a leash.

c)      seek advice on the merits of employing a part-time dog control officer to assist with the education of dog owners in relation to ensuring their dogs remain under control at all times whilst using the official “off leash” areas.

 

Background

1.       In recent weeks, there have been meetings with the owners of dogs of Takapuna and Milford who are concerned about the relatively small number of unruly dogs using Takapuna and Milford beaches during the times dogs can be on these beaches off leash. Dog owners complain that whilst the majority of dogs are controlled, there are dogs that are not under control on the beach. The definition of a dog under control in a public place is clearly set out in the Auckland Council Dog Management Bylaw 2012.

2.       Currently the officers of Auckland Council dog control unit patrol the beaches but the complaining dog owners don’t believe there is sufficient enforcement to ensure that owners comply with the Council’s bylaws.

3.       It is suggested that steps be taken to ensure that all owners who bring their dogs to, in particular, Takapuna and Milford beaches, are aware of their legal requirements of ensuring at all times the dogs remain under control. One idea that would have merit would be to employ a part-time local dog control officer to assist with education and ensuring that dogs remain under control whilst off leash on the beach.

 

 

 

 

11.3     Notice of Motion - Possible relocation of Auckland CBD bus terminal

In accordance with Standing Order 3.11.1, the following Notice of Motion has been received from Member Jennifer McKenzie for inclusion on the agenda for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting being held on day, Tuesday, 21 February 2017:

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note that Auckland Transport is intending to move the Auckland terminal for intercity buses from Sky City in the Auckland city centre to the new Manukau bus station.

b)      Agree that this move is not in the best interests of the residents of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area in that moving the terminal to South Auckland will impose extra costs and hardship for our people.

c)      Direct the chairman to write to the Chairman of Auckland Transport to express this board’s disappointment that this change of location is being considered without consulting with local boards and requesting that the terminal remains in the Auckland city centre.

 

Background

1.       In a letter to the Bus and Coach Association dated 21 November 2016, Mr Mark Lambert, the Chief Auckland Transport metro officer, advised that Auckland Transport proposes to move the long-distance intercity bus services terminal from the Auckland city centre to Manukau. Auckland Transport advises that they propose that this change will occur once the Manukau bus station is completed. A copy of the mentioned letter is attached.

2.       For people living in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area, this proposed change would be most inconvenient. Manukau bus interchange will be over 30 minutes travel time by car from our area and the cost of a taxi fare will be $100.00 plus. Just imagine being dropped off in Manukau at night from a late arriving intercity bus and then having to find a cab to get to the North Shore.

3.       Auckland Transport has never consulted our communities on this decision. It seems knee-jerk reaction to downgrade intercity bus travel and provide an inferior level of service to what is provided currently.

 

Attachments

a          Notice of Motion - Letter from Auckland Transport to Sky City.......... 169

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update - February 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/00215

 

  

 

Purpose

The Auckland Transport Monthly Update Devonport-Takapuna Local Board February 2017 report is attached.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         receives the Auckland Transport February 2017 monthly update report;

b)         allocates $250,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) project in Clarence Street, Devonport, and requests that Auckland Transport proceed with implementation of the project.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport monthly update - February 2017

13

      

Signatories

Authors

Marlyn Nicholls – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport  

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Monthly Local Board Services report - February 2017

 

File No.: CP2017/00214

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide members with an overview of recent Devonport-Takapuna Local Board activity.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Greater Takapuna Reference Group report to the local board.

b)      consider rescinding recommendations (b) (i) and (ii) from resolution number DT/2016/207, which will remove local board member representation on the Greater Takapuna Reference Group for the 2016 – 2019 term.

c)      request that any additional sector voice members for the Greater Takapuna Reference Group be identified by the Greater Takapuna Reference Group itself, and provided to the local board.

d)      allocate $40,000 from its locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital budget to complete the 3 on 3 basketball court at Milford Reserve as per resolution number DT/2015/206 (b).

e)      allocate $80,000 from its LDI capital budget to provide an enhanced playground at Milford Reserve.

f)       endorse the document titled “Devonport-Takapuna Local Board submission on the Point England Development Enabling Bill.”

 

Issues and Activity

 

Greater Takapuna Reference Group Report

 

2.       After eight months of meeting to consider and discuss the desired future of Takapuna, the Greater Takapuna Reference Group (GTRG) gave a briefing to the local board on 6 December 2016 about their collective thinking. The attached report (refer Attachment A) includes the vison statement and recommendations of the GTRG to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board.

3.       The GTRG has agreed on a ‘vision’ statement and success factors for a desirable Takapuna, and has identified seven practical steps that will assist in shaping Takapuna town centre. The GTRG is willing to continue its advisory function in 2017 with particular focus on Panuku’s public consultation planned for March 2017 regarding the Takapuna ‘Unlock’ initiative, and implementation by Auckland Council of the Hurstmere Road streetscape upgrades.

 

Greater Takapuna Reference Group – membership update

 

4.       At the 15 November 2016 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board business meeting, the local board considered whether any political representatives should join the GTRG for the 2016-2019 political term.  Staff recommended that the political membership on the GTRG consist of two local board members and one North Shore ward councillor. 

 

MOVED by Chairperson G Gillon, seconded by Deputy Chairperson G Wood:  

5.       The local board appointed local board members Wood and O’Connor to the GTRG as political representatives[1].

6.       In addition, the local board requested officers to appoint to the GTRG:

·    a representative of the retail sector; and

·    two other representatives from the community, namely residents of the Takapuna area.

 

Role of political representatives on the GTRG

 

7.       Following the recommendations made by the local board, staff and the GTRG facilitator have held discussions about the ongoing role of political representatives on the GTRG.  While having local board and governing body member oversight and input into the GTRG has been beneficial, staff request that the local board reconsider political representation on the GTRG.  This is suggested for the following reasons:

·    The group has reached a critical stage in its formation that could easily be undone through the introduction of new individuals not sharing the same learned values the existing group has. The GTRG are all volunteers who can leave the group at any time. They serve on the group only because they believe they can provide a collective value to the local board and the community through their considered advocacy.

·    The GTRG is a group of people representing a diverse range of opinions and backgrounds. Through this process, they have become a group that listens carefully and respectfully to each other’s views and share their thoughts openly and honestly with one another.

·    The issues considered by the GTRG so far has been the thinking behind the Takapuna ‘Unlock’ project together with the streetscape upgrade of Hurstmere Road. The GTRG briefed the local board on 6 December 2016 about the work they had undertaken and described the common ground they had reached with regard a desired future Takapuna.

8.       This report represents a summary point of what could be described as the first phase of the GTRG. The GTRG and the local board need to then agree the focus of the next phase, which  may include influencing Panuku implementation of the Takapuna ‘Unlock’ project and other issues to do with Greater Takapuna. Consideration of new sector membership as described above could take place at this point.

9.       The GTRG is consistent with, and is an excellent example of, the council’s empowered communities approach in action, where the community are having genuine influence over council’s planning and shaping the town centre. 

10.     The local board would have an important role in providing direction (where necessary) and oversight of the GTRG.  In the event local board representation on the GTRG is rescinded, the local board would still receive progress and accountability reports to ensure the GTRG is meeting the relevant objectives and outcomes set by the local board.

 

Co-opting new members onto the GTRG

 

11.     Subsequent to the November 2016 business meeting, informal discussion was had with the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson about the fact that the GTRG had been set up as a group of individuals representing various sectors, identified initially by the board and then by the GTRG itself.

12.     The Chairperson suggested that there did not appear to be any representation from the environmental advocacy sector or from the heritage advocacy sector, and that staff should seek out Takapuna residents with expertise in those areas.

 

13.     Since November, staff have given consideration to suitable candidates that could be endorsed by the board, but so far have not identified any candidates they could strongly recommend to the board.

14.     Staff advise that the GTRG are best placed to identify missing sectors that should be represented on the group, and that the GTRG have already done so by identifying a lack of representation from the disability sector, the wider community sector (as represented by community coordinators), and the events sector. In each instance, the GTRG has identified individuals best qualified to represent those sectors.

15.     Staff consider that it is important that any new members of the GTRG for the next phase be active in the sector for which they are speaking (i.e. not retired from the sector), and be willing to operate in the collaborative environment of the GTRG.

16.     Should the board decide that the original resolutions must stand, staff strongly recommend that new representatives of the group must not have a publically declared position (e.g. through being candidates for a political party) over any issue related to the development of greater Takapuna. It is suggested that any new member(s) should also be active in the sector they were appointed to represent, as it will ensure current, first-hand working knowledge of the issues of the day within their respective field(s).


Developments at Milford Reserve

 

3 on 3 basketball court

 

17.     Milford Reserve has been identified as the most suitable reserve in the local area for a 3 on 3 basketball court.  As part of the scoping process of the project, all potential options for the location of the court within the reserve were identified with consideration given to the proximity of local residents, trees, car parking, accessibility, passive surveillance, boating club activities and coastal landforms.

18.     The local board allocated $50,000 from its locally driven initiatives (LDI) capex fund towards the project in 2015[2].

19.     Two additional components have arisen during the concept design phase for the basketball court, which has added to the cost of the basketball court.  These include:

·    a proposal to upgrade the basketball court so that its dimensions meet international 3 on 3 basketball specifications; and

·    the addition of an access ramp, retaining wall and path to the existing landform which will provide connections to the basketball court and to ensure accessibility is provided.

20.     The proposal to upgrade the basketball court dimensions is based on input and feedback from both Basketball North Harbour and Basketball New Zealand.  Both organisations noted that the proposed basketball court is in a key location, and upgrading its dimensions to an international standard will increase the capacity and opportunity for active recreation.

21.     The proposed location of the basketball court is on the landward side of the car park between the toilet block and the volley ball courts.  This area is separated from the car park by a sloping grass bank which means an access ramp, retaining wall and path must be added to fit the facility into the existing landform and to ensure accessibility is provided.

22.     To deliver both of these additional components of the project, a further $40,000 is required.  Staff request that this additional budget be sought from the local board’s LDI capital fund.  This will enable the basketball court and amenities to be completed as planned over the coming months.

23.     If the local board was to seek an alternative location within the reserve, or at another reserve, then additional operational funding of $10,000 to $15,000 would be required for the reworking of the design and planning phases of this project.  In addition, it is unlikely this project with be delivered within the 2016 / 2017 financial year.

24.     A map of the proposed location for the basketball court is included as Attachment B to this report.

 

Playground renewal

 

25.     During discussions on the 2016 / 2017 work programme, the local board expressed a preference for the Milford Reserve playground renewal to reference the reserve’s past history, in particular the historical the pirate ship restaurant and dancehall. 

26.     As planning for the renewal has progressed, the location was slightly changed and fencing of the pathways has been incorporated to respond to child safety issues arising from the adjoining car park.  The playground is consented and project construction has been tendered.  Negotiation with the two lowest tenderers is underway.  A number of additional components to enhance the renewal were proposed by the local board in the previous term, these include:

·    the age range of children to be catered to be broadened;

·    ensuring the playground is accessible for all users; and

·    the provision of park furniture, such as bins, sun shades and seating for caregivers.

27.     To deliver all of the above additional components, an additional $80,000 capital funding is required.  Staff request this additional budget be sought from the local board’s LDI capital fund.  This will enable the renewal to commence in late-March 2017 and the project to be completed on schedule.

28.     If the local board does not support the proposed additional investment, the playground will be redesigned to include lower specifications.  This will include the removal of existing equipment that is failing to operate.

29.     The updated developed design for the playground is included as Attachment C to this report.

 

Point England Development Enabling Bill submission

 

30.     In January 2016, the Mayor wrote to all local board chairpersons encouraging local boards to provide views on the Point England Development Enabling Bill, which was seeking public feedback until 31 January 2016. The Bill proposes to enable housing development on 11.69 hectares of land on Point England Recreation Reserve in the Tamaki area.

31.     The proposed development land is Crown-owned, but vested in Auckland Council as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  The Bill would enable housing to be built on this development land by creating a new land parcel from within the reserve with separate title, revoking that parcel’s reserve status, setting it apart for state housing purposes, and re-zoning the land as Residential – Mixed Housing Urban to allow appropriate residential development.  The remaining balance of the reserve (approximately 33 ha) will remain as recreation reserve.

32.     The governing body holds allocated decision-making authority to submit to central government on legislation, including official submissions of Auckland Council incorporating local board views.  In accordance with this, staff prepared draft comment on behalf of the local board and sent it to all members for input and comment. 

33.     In order to meet the necessary timeframes, the board’s views were approved by the Chairperson, and the content was included as part of Auckland Council’s submission on the Bill.  To complete this process, the local board is now requested to formally endorse its views on the Bill proposals (refer Attachment D).

 

Local board views and implications

34.     Local board views and decisions are sought via this report.

Māori impact statement

35.     There are no implications for Maori at this stage.

Implementation

36.     The local board currently has $896,000 in locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital budget available to allocate towards the projects outlined in this report.  If the local board supports both the upgraded basketball court and playground at Milford Reserve, $776,000 in LDI capital funding is still available for allocation to other projects.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Greater Takapuna Reference Group (GTRG) - February report

31

b

Milford Reserve - updated design plan

43

c

Milford Reserve - 3 on 3 Basketball court (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Submission on Point England Development Enabling Bill

45

     

Signatories

Authors

Tristan Coulson – Senior Local Board Advisor

Haley Scovell - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Sunnynook Park stormwater dry pond upgrade

 

File No.: CP2017/00416

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek landowner approval from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to excavate the existing dry pond at Sunnynook Park for additional flood storage and construct overland flow paths in accordance with granted notified resource consent.

Executive summary

2.       This report seeks landowner approval from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to excavate the existing dry pond at Sunnynook Park for additional flood storage and construct overland flow paths in accordance with granted notified resource consent.

3.       Other work includes drainage improvements to the Sunnynook Community Centre, crèche and rugby league club, repairs to and raising an existing floodwall, pedestrian and cycleway access improvements and upgrading of the existing debris and safety screen.

4.       Auckland Council’s stormwater modelling analyses have identified significant flood risk in the Sunnynook area despite the existing dry pond. The park is also susceptible to flooding when the culvert inlet screen at the southern corner of the park becomes blocked. Furthermore, regular surface ponding across the sports fields causes field closures, particularly during winter months.

5.       The proposed works will provide for and improve temporary storage and reduction of stormwater during rainfall events, will enable more effective management of flooding within the Wairau Creek catchment and will enable Sunnynook Park to be better utilised year round.

 

Recommendation

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      grants landowner approval for temporary occupation by the Healthy Waters department and its contractors and agents for upgrade works to the dry pond at Sunnynook Park and associated works, in general accordance with consent numbers LCO-2142694 – Land Use Consent, REG-2142823 – Groundwater Permit, REG-2142696 – Dam Permit and LW-2142699 (s127 application) granted, including conditions relating to the Landscape Plan (Condition 13) which contains the detailed requirements.

Comments

Purpose for the works

6.       Sunnynook Park is currently used for recreational purposes, and also serves an important stormwater function as a dry pond designed to detain flood waters when the capacity of the pipe leaving the park is exceeded due to heavy rain. Floodwater is contained within the park with an embankment at the southern end of the park.

7.       Auckland Council has conducted stormwater modelling analyses which have identified significant flood risk in the Sunnynook area despite the existing dry pond. Modelling has shown that flooding is an ongoing risk for the Sunnynook community, with 14 habitable floors likely to be affected during a 10 year storm event and up to 21 habitable floors predicted to be inundated in the 100 year storm event. Additionally, flooding currently poses a risk to Sunnynook Road and causes field closures during winter months.

8.       Council’s Healthy Waters department has taken steps to mitigate this risk and the proposed remedial works will also benefit the council and other local facilities.

Description of the proposed works

9.       The project proposes to increase the capacity of the flood storage area within Sunnynook Park. This will involve deepening the existing dry-pond (lower pond) and construction of a second smaller dry-pond in the section of park bounded by properties on Heather Place, Tonkin Drive and the end of Trinidad Road (upper pond). The proposed dry-ponds will have a combined storage capacity of approximately 56,000m3 with an average depth of 1.5m.

10.     The works will involve excavation of approximately 39,000m3 of material from Sunnynook Park. A limited amount of the excavated material (approximately 1,200m3) will remain on site at Sunnynook Park to form bunds around the dry-ponds and the platform for the playground near Tonkin Drive. The remaining material (approximately 38,000m3) will be transported to Wairau Intermediate School to level and upgrade the school playing fields.

11.     The proposed additional works in Sunnynook Park include the following components:

Landscaping

12.     A landscaping package has been developed for the southern corner of the lower pond, and includes new access ways, stairs, ramps and seating as well as planting in and around the Sunnynook Community Centre buildings and the main car park and access way.

Stream works

13.     The existing screen at the outlet from the park will be upgraded.

Floodwall

14.     The partially collapsed wall on the boundary of 120 Sycamore Drive and the park will be completely demolished and a new wall will be built.

15.     The existing flood wall between 122 and 134 Sycamore Drive will be raised by 310mm to account for the increase in the height of the bund. The flood wall at 134 Sycamore Drive is cracked and will be repaired.

Overland flow paths

16.     The entrance to the reserve between 30 and 32 Tonkin Drive will be lowered to create a swale to direct overland flows from Tonkin Drive into the upper pond. This work will involve the removal and relocation of the existing playground to the southern side of the carpark off Tonkin Drive.

17.     The park entrance driveway adjacent to 28 Trinidad Road will be raised on the road reserve to divert flows around the property. The kerb at the entrance to Sunnynook Park will also be lowered to create a spill point from the road into the park. Within the park, a two metre wide swale will be created to direct flows into the lower pond.

18.     Overland flows from the southern end of the Sunnynook Road carpark currently flowing into the playground area of the crèche will be diverted onto Sunnynook Road.

Field upgrades

19.     In conjunction with the earthworks on Sunnynook Park the playing field surfaces will be upgraded to ‘sand carpet’. The highly permeable sand layer is designed to allow surface water to drain from the field easily and allow fields to be useable more quickly after a rain event. The sand carpet surfaces will be installed on the four fields and provide for one rugby league field, two cricket ovals, two full size football fields and one three-quarter sized football field.

Other park alterations

20.     One tree in the footprint of the lower pond bund will be removed (a juvenile English Oak) and a further two trees within the earthworks footprint may require removal (juvenile wych elms). In total, 81 trees in Sunnynook Park and the associated overland flow paths will be affected either by works within the root zone or pruning.

21.     A greenway pedestrian and cycle connection through Sunnynook Park will be established. New paths will be provided and existing paths will be upgraded to a walkway/cycleway standard of three metre width. In total, approximately 750 metres of path will be constructed or upgraded, including connections to Sunnynook Road, Trinidad Road and Tonkin Drive.

22.     Three accessible carparks will be created close to the community centre at the southern end of the Sunnynook Park carpark. Two standard carparks will be removed to facilitate this and the plaza and walkway/cycleway path connection in the corner of the park.

23.     New permanent spectator seating linking the Sunnynook Park entrance and existing changing rooms with field one will be provided.

24.     The proposed works within the access way reserve located between 83 and 85 Sunnynook Road involve:

·    construction of a stabilised and sealed access way for truck movements between 83 and 85 Sunnynook Road to Wairau Intermediate School; and

·    re-establishment of the access way reserve once works are completed with a sealed surface to enable pedestrian, cycle and maintenance vehicle access to the school grounds.

Construction impacts

25.     Construction of the proposed works will result in disruptions to the use of Sunnynook Park until April 2019. This disruption will involve the reduced formal and informal recreation opportunities. Walking access will remain open through the park, where practicable. However, during some periods of the construction, limited or no access will be provided due to health and safety requirements. Use of the fields will be closed to the public. The organised sports teams that use Sunnynook Park will be temporarily relocated by the Sports Parks Specialist to other sports fields within the surrounding area.

26.     Our proposed construction programme is as below:

·        first earthworks season: bulk earthworks and drainage, including sand carpet field drainage – October 2017 to May 2018; and

·        Second earthworks season: sand carpet field construction – October 2018 to December 2018. Fields reopen April 2019 (four months to establish grass).

27.     The impact on sport would be as follows:

·        summer season - 25 October to 31 March 2017, affected for two seasons; and

·        winter season - 1 April to 31 August 2018, affected for one season.

28.     Access to the community centre and scout den will remain. Part of the car park will be used for the storage of machinery and for the works office. This area will include the northern half of the carpark from the middle entrance. As the works will close the reserve it is considered that the demand for the carpark will be greatly reduced with only the scout den and community centre in operation during the works.

Consultation

29.     Healthy Waters staff have presented the proposal to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board at workshops on 3 April 2012, 1 April 2014, and 4 May 2015.

30.     Community engagement has been undertaken by the Healthy Waters department with the Sunnynook Community Association, the Sunnynook Community Centre Committee and Sunnynook Residents Association.

31.     In addition to the meetings noted above, an open day to discuss the project was held on 12 May 2016 at the scout’s hall from 4.00pm to 6.30pm, where the project team was available to respond to any queries from community members.

32.     A fully notified consent was lodged and the hearing took place in November 2016. Consent was granted in December 2016.

Conclusion and recommendation

33.     It is recommended that landowner approval be given in general accordance with the consent granted.  Consent conditions relating to the Landscape Plan (Condition 13) contain the detailed requirements.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

34.     This is a long-standing council project to address flooding issues in the Sunnynook area. Consultation has been undertaken with the local board by way of presentations and workshops since 2012.

Māori impact statement

35.     Iwi consultation has been undertaken by the Healthy Waters unit. Consulted iwi have advised that they are generally supportive of the project as it will have a positive impact on human, environmental and cultural health. There are no sites of significance to mana whenua identified in the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan Decisions Version on this park.

Implementation

36.     Sunnynook Park is vested as a recreation reserve and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977. The main purpose of a recreation reserve is the provision of areas for recreation and sporting activities. The proposed works to increase the flood storage capacity to reduce flooding in the surrounding area is secondary to the main purpose of the park. However, the proposal also involves flood protection works to reduce flooding on the park and the installation of a sand carpet surface which will enable more frequent use for recreation and sporting activities. Therefore, the works allow for the park to continue to be used for its purpose as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

37.     The business case has been approved for the preliminary engineers cost estimate of $6.1 million. The project is being funded through the regional flood alleviation budget in the Long-term Plan.

38.     Resource consent has been granted to carry out the works.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Project overview drawing

53

 

Signatories

Authors

Priya Kumar – Senior Healthy Waters Specialist

Authorisers

Craig Mcilroy – General Manager Healthy Waters

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

PDF Creator



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Takapuna Beach Reserve Holiday Park - update

 

File No.: CP2017/01669

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide an update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on options currently under evaluation for the future management and operation of the holiday park within the Northern Activity Zone of Takapuna Beach Reserve. In particular, the operating model for an ‘in-house’ operation needs to be developed further over the next two months before a final decision is made.

Executive summary

2.       The Takapuna Beach Holiday Park has been subject to significant uncertainty regarding its ongoing operations over the past few years. Recent decisions have affirmed the intention to retain the holiday park in its current location, and at a similar scale and nature of operation.

3.       Before any changes can be made to the current lease arrangements, the use of the site as a holiday park needs to be consulted publicly under the Reserves Act 1977, as it is not contemplated by the current Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan.

4.       In December 2016, the possibility of an ‘in-house’ operation by Auckland Council’s newly restructured Community Facilities department was raised as an option to be considered and evaluated, in addition to the two ‘external lease’ options that had already been developed by Panuku.

5.       A decision is now needed by the local board on whether Community Facilities should be given a further two months to continue developing the ‘in-house’ option as the preferred outcome, acknowledging the risks and uncertainties that will arise around funding requirements via the 2018-28 Long-term Plan (LTP) process. The attached flow chart (refer Attachment A) indicates the different flowpaths that would need to be followed for the two options.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the report.

b)      approves Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department to continue developing an ‘in house’ operational model for an agreed campground activity located on Takapuna Beach Reserve, and notes that a further decision will be sought at the April 2017 local board meeting to formally proceed with the ‘in house’ operational model, or else to continue with the ‘external lease’ model.

 

Comments

Background

 

6.       In May 2013, the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan (TBRMP). The TBRMP identifies activity zones within the wider Takapuna Beach Reserve, most notably:

·        unstructured recreation and unimpeded access to public open space;

·        marine related activities, including boat storage, hardstand, launching facilities and any ancillary facilities; and

·        self-contained motorhome accommodation.

7.       In October 2014, the local board resolved to develop a concept plan for the northern activity zone for public consultation (resolution number DT/2014/266). The local board also resolved to establish a working party “to ensure the appropriate accommodation of activities contemplated by the management plan” (resolution number DT/2014/258).

8.       On 21 April 2015, the board endorsed the options developed by the working party, and resolved to undertake consultation with the community on the four potential land use options (resolution number DT/2015/57). The options consulted on were:

·        revert land to use as public open space;

·        retain Takapuna Beach Holiday Park with upgrades;

·        Community Marine Activity Hub as proposed by Harbour Access Trust; and

·        Community Marine Activity Hub, plus upgraded Takapuna Beach Holiday Park activity.

9.       Consultation was undertaken from Monday 11 May to Sunday 7 June 2015. The consultation results were reported back to the 4 August 2015 local board meeting. The council received 7,807 pieces of feedback, with the majority of respondents selecting the option of retaining Takapuna Beach Holiday Park with upgrades as their first preference (80%).

10.     The board resolved at this meeting to request, based on the results of the feedback, a detailed report outlining the process, indicative costs and timelines to retain the holiday park from relevant council staff (resolution number DT/2015/156h).

11.     On 15 December 2015, staff reported on the process required for the council to approve a campground on the reserve, not the process to grant a lease to the current occupier.

12.     The board noted the staff advice provided on 15 December 2015, and resolved (resolution number DT 2015/250) that it confirms its support for an upgraded campground activity within the Northern Activity Zone of Takapuna Beach Reserve. It also requested Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) to proceed to an open expression of interest process to grant a lease on 90% of the current holiday park footprint. The board also provided some direction in this resolution on possible lease parameters and certain priorities to guide the expression of interest process.

13.     Panuku subsequently advised the local board that, to achieve the best possible outcome from an expressions of interest process, more depth and specificity was required about the outcomes that both the local board and the community desire for the holiday park activity.

14.     To assist the board in articulating this vision, a facilitated half-day workshop with the local board and representatives from key identified community groups was held on 1 August 2016. The workshop articulated a clearer vision for the future operations of the holiday park, principally to retain the essence of the current operation’s ‘authentic Kiwi seaside holiday experience’, but with a degree of upgrading of the facilities and infrastructure.

15.     On 6 September 2016, staff reported to the local board on the commercial viability of holiday park operations relating specifically to the proposed lease term. A minimum lease period of 13 years with two further rights of renewal of 10 years was recommended.

16.     On 14 November 2016, the newly-elected local board passed a resolution to re-establish the full (100%) footprint of the holiday park site, thereby rescinding a previous resolution by the outgoing local board to reduce the area to 90% of its current footprint (resolution number DT/2016/201).

Current project status update

17.     Operational maintenance of the existing campground has been undertaken by Panuku, including new power cables to sites and building repairs, to ensure adequate health and safety standards are met on the site.

18.     Panuku has continued to work with key stakeholders and a small number of professional advisors with expert knowledge of holiday park operations to seek feedback on the possible ‘look and feel’ of an upgraded campground activity on Takapuna Beach Reserve. This feedback has included advice to the effect that:

·        The Takapuna beachfront site is arguably one of the best holiday park locations in Auckland and perhaps the country, and is unique in many respects due to its combination of being on the waterfront, within a short drive of Auckland International Airport and the CBD, and with good public transport links which allows motorhome owners to ‘park-up’ for their stay.

·        There is likely to be strong interest from prospective operators, including possibly some larger tourism operators and hospitality organisations.

·        A lease period of 20 years with a further renewal term would be required to attract a good operator with their own funds to invest in accommodation units and other infrastructure. Shorter periods would be less able to attract a suitable level of investment by operators.

·        A ‘reference design’ may not need to be produced for the site prior to seeking expressions of interest. A clear vision statement, operating specification, and known lease term could provide enough direction to prospective bidders. Bidders will have their own ideas for delivering the vision and operating requirements, and these can be evaluated as part of their bids.

·        The existing facilities are approaching the end of their life, and any new facilities may need to be (re)designed specifically to meet the requirements of the Camping Grounds Regulations 1985, which are currently undergoing review.

19.     In December 2016, the possibility of an ‘in-house’ operation by Auckland Council’s newly restructured Community Facilities group was raised as an option to be considered and evaluated, in addition to the two ‘external lease’ options (10-year and 20-year lease term) that had already been developed by Panuku.

20.     Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department has now completed a feasibility assessment of the in-house options, which are outlined below.

External Lease: issues and options

21.     Whilst there are many possible permutations around the leasing options for the site, Panuku has prepared two basic scenario options to assist with decision-making: a shorter-term scenario and a longer-term scenario. These two options are summarised below, and are explored in further detail in the table in Attachment B.

22.     In summary, the shorter-term scenario (Option 1) would be based around an initial 10-year lease, with further renewal at council’s sole discretion. The longer-term scenario (Option 2) would be based around an initial 20-year lease, with a further 10-year renewal possible either at council’s sole discretion, or else subject to satisfactory performance by the operator.

23.     Option 1 would have the advantages of:

·        providing greater flexibility to the local board to change the use of the site in the medium-term, if it wished to retain such flexibility in future; and

·        it would possibly be less likely to generate high levels of opposition or interest in the pubic consultation process.

24.     However, the disadvantages of Option 1 could be quite significant, as:

·        it could require capital investment by council of between $$1 to $2 million to renew the aged infrastructure and facilities, as the shorter lease term would be a barrier to any capital investment by the operator, due to the diminished / uneconomic payback period. Council does not have any funding allocated for this at present;

·        the visitor experience would probably be restricted to a 2-3 star Qualmark rating;

·        provision for any new access off Earnoch Avenue would probably not be feasible; and

·        this option would probably only attract a limited range of interested bidders, i.e. small owner-operators and perhaps some community / social enterprises.

25.     Option 2 would have the advantages of:

·        ‘locking-in’ this part of the reserve to ensure that it is kept as an upgraded campground activity for the foreseeable future;

·        providing a stable platform to establish a long-term viable holiday accommodation business to contribute to the local Takapuna economy;

·        providing a better quality visitor experience, perhaps a 4-5 star Qualmark rating, as the operator’s capital costs could be amortized over 20 years or longer;

·        not requiring much capital investment by council, as the operator’s capital costs could be amortized over 20-30 years;

·        feasibility of providing for a new access off Earnoch Avenue; and

·        possibly attracting a wider range of interested bidders, ranging from small owner-operators through to larger, well-funded tourism operators and hospitality organisations.

26.     The disadvantages of Option 2 would be that:

·        there could be some public resistance to a longer–term lease via the Reserves Act 1977 public consultation process;

·        there would be quite a significant cost to council if it wished to terminate the lease prior to the end of the initial 20-year term;

·        timing and costs to complete the Reserves Act 1977 process might be slightly higher than for Option 1; and

·        a longer-term lease would remove flexibility to change the use of the site to informal recreation if there was a need to meet increasing demand for open space in the wider reserve.

In-house Management: issues and options

27.     Auckland Council has recently established a specialist unit within the new Community Facilities department to manage the holiday accommodation portfolio that is under the direct management of council staff. This includes holiday park operations at Orewa, Whangateau and Martin’s Bay, as well as the Waiheke backpackers hostel and numerous baches, lodges, and tented campgounds located within council’s regional parks.

28.     There is potentially an option for Auckland Council staff to step in and manage the Takapuna Holiday park site if a need ever arises, either for short-term / interim operations management or as a longer-term arrangement. The local board has been provided additional confidential information by way of memo, which should be read in conjunction with this report. 

29.     Given the content of the memo provided, council staff have requested that the memo and the information contained therein be withheld from the public under the following provisions of Section 7(2) of the Local Government Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), as withholding the information is necessary to:

·        (b)(ii) – protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information;

·        (i) – enable any local authority holding the information to carry on, without prejudice or advantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations); and

·        (j) – prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

30.     The advantages of in-house management of the holiday park would be that council would have:

·        direct control over the day-to-day operations of the site;

·        flexibility to make changes to the mix of accommodation and other uses;

·        the opportunity to generate greater income from the expected operating surpluses;

·        the potential to develop off-season (winter) revenue streams, such as hosting small-group on-site conferences / corporate retreats (subject to an assessment against the Reserves Act 1977 and the TBRMP); and

·        greater potential to deliver educational and other community / social outcomes through the facility.

31.     The disadvantages of in-house management of the holiday park would include:

·        council would assume all responsibility for operational risks, including occupancy, profitability, public liability, management risks and reputational risks;

·        council would have to secure the necessary capital funding to re-develop and maintain the building and infrastructure assets via the upcoming LTP process; and

·        the time needed to implement any significant investment to redevelop the campground through an in-house option could be longer than the time required to secure an external lease operator, due to the need to securing funding as part of 2018-28 LTP deliberations.

Reserves Act 1977 process

32.     Previous reports to the local board have discussed the process options to establish a new lease on the site, as the 2013 Takapuna Beach Reserve Management Plan (TBRMP) does not make provision for this activity.

33.     In summary, the options are:

·        lease approach, either:

a.      undertake a publicly notified process, including consultation with mana whenua to enable a lease that is not provided in the TBRMP; or

b.      enter into a lease following the granting of a resource consent which was publicly notified in accordance with the Resource Management Act 1989.

·        TBRMP: Undertake a publicly notified consultation process to review and amend the TBRMP to provide for a holiday park. A lease may then be granted without further consultation.

34.     If an ‘in-house operation’ is chosen as the preferred model, further advice will be provided to the local board on the process for consultation under the Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002. As a holiday park is not envisaged in the TBRMP and would foreclose other uses contemplated in the Northern Activity Zone of the reserve, it is likely that a variation to the TBRMP will be recommended which would require public notification.

 

Social / community enterprise model

35.     The option of giving a local community enterprise an opportunity to bid for the running of the holiday park has also been raised in the past. In principle, there is no reason why the operations could not be carried out by a social enterprise / not-for-profit organisation. In practice, this model may require some financial assistance to become established, as well as needing ongoing financial (rent) subsidy in return for providing other community outcomes, such as providing educational and cultural activities in recognition of the special geological features and Maori cultural history associated with the Takapuna beachfront area.

36.     While there appears to be some support within the community for the concept of a social enterprise to operate the holiday park, it is not clear whether there is an existing organisation that would be suitable to take on this role, or whether a new entity would need to be established.

37.     Unless there is a suitable existing organisation with the capacity to take on this role, there would need to be investment in building the capacity of the social enterprise. This may impact on the suitability of a contestable EOI process to select the preferred operator, with potential disappointment and community concern if the social enterprise was not selected.

38.     The social enterprise approach has not yet been explored beyond a high-level concept, as discussed above. If this option needs to be developed further, it will require more time to consider all options, including risks, entity structure, governance, management, financial implications, community outcomes, iwi consultation and what ancillary community or economic activities can be used to support the social enterprise.

39.     Expressions of interest (EOI) from social enterprise operators could nevertheless still be sought alongside other procurement processes.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

40.     The local board is familiar with the issues within this report, having been engaged by Panuku staff and council officers in discussions and community workshops in recent months.

41.     A decision on pursuing the in-house vs external operational model (either a nominal 10-year or 20-year lease term) is now needed from the local board to enable Panuku and Community Facilities to concentrate their efforts on further developing a preferred outcome model. It is quite important that this decision is made soon, as there is arguably a need to ‘lock in’ the earlier decisions made by the local board and the wider community around the continued use of the site as a holiday park.

42.     It is also proposed that one further community workshop is held in early 2017 to ensure that the community is comfortable with the proposed operational specification, and / or the proposed leasing arrangements if an external operator is to be appointed.

Māori impact statement

43.     Whatungarongaro te tangata, toitū te whenua. The importance of land to Māori is understood.  Panuku has accordingly adopted a collaborative partnership relationship with the 19 Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua groups, and developed robust engagement processes to support its work with them across core business areas. Panuku works closely with local mana whenua to ensure interests are recognised and incorporated into planning activities.

44.     The 13 mana whenua entities with interest in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area includes:

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara;

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua;

·        Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei;

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki;

·        Te Kawerau a Maki;

·        Ngāti Tamaoho;

·        Te Akitai Waiohua;

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua;

·        Ngāti Paoa;

·        Ngāti Maru;

·        Ngāti Whanaunga;

·        Ngāti Tamaterā; and

·        Te Patukirikiri.

45.     Formal consultation with mana whenua will occur as part of any Reserves Act 1977 process.

46.     Separate to the proposed statutory process, 19 mana whenua were invited to participate in the 1 August 2016 visioning workshop.  Te Runanga o Ngāti Whatua was present on the day and contributed positively to the workshops outcomes. The visioning workshop identified the strong desire by the stakeholders and mana whenua partners present on the day to ensure a strong cultural footprint is reflected in the upgraded facility.

47.     Through the mana whenua engagement / partnering process, Panuku can facilitate the expression of a mana whenua cultural narrative to be developed through the design process using the Te Aranga Design Values and Principles matrices. The Te Aranga Māori Design Principles are a set of outcome-based principles founded on intrinsic Māori cultural values and designed to provide practical guidance for enhancing outcomes for the design environment.

48.     The principles have arisen from a widely held desire to enhance mana whenua presence, visibility and participation in the design of the physical realm. They were developed to provide clear guidelines for positive engagement with mana whenua and for shaping our built environment to acknowledge our position as a city in the South Pacific.

Implementation

49.     Once a decision has been reached by the board, Panuku and / or Community Facilities will pursue the agreed course of action leading to the desired operational implementation by 1 January 2018 (in the case of an external lease) or by 1 July 2018 (in the case of an in-house operation). Where possible, Panuku and Community Facilities will work to expedite the timeline to bring forward these implementation dates as far as possible.

50.     It is also proposed that one further community workshop is held in early 2017 to ensure that the community is comfortable with the proposed operational specification, and / or the proposed leasing arrangements if an external operator is to be appointed.

 

Atachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Flowchart: In-house vs. External lease options

63

b

External lease options: 10 / 20 year lease scenarios

65

     

Signatories

Authors

Toni Giacon – Stakeholder and Community Engagement Team Leader, Panuku Devonport Auckland

Mark Cressey – Head of Commercial Leasing and Businesses, Community Facilities, Auckland Council

Matt Ward – Service and Asset Planning Team Leader, Auckland Council

Authorisers

Ian Wheeler – Director Portfolio Management, Panuku Development Auckland

Rod Sheridan – General Manager, Community Facilities, Auckland Council

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Takapuna Holiday Park flowchart: External lease vs in-house options


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Takapuna Holiday Park                                                                                                                        February 2017

High-Level Options/Scenario matrix: External lease options

Parameter / variable

 

Option 1:

A ‘10-year lease’ scenario

Option 2:

A ’20-year lease’ scenario

Lease basis:

10+10yrs. (Second 10yrs at sole discretion of Council). ‘Shorter-term option’.

20+10yrs (could possibly include a ‘buy-back’ option by Council any time after first 10 years). ‘Longer-term option’

Type of bidders likely to be attracted:

Narrower range. Mainly smaller operators, community groups.

Wider range, incl. well funded medium/larger operators.

Likely outcomes:

Business as usual – current state, but with some modest improvements. Still a ‘basic’ visitor experience.

Refreshed/upgraded offering, quality visitor experience with good quality accommodation and facilities. Specifically designed to still provide that ‘authentic’ Kiwi experience.

Likely Qualmark rating

1-3 star range

3-5 star range

Statutory process (under Reserves Act or RMA):

Public notification and consultation, for either:

-     a 10-year lease, or

-     a variation to the Reserve Management Plan, or

-     a resource consent

Less likely to generate high levels of interest or opposition.

Public notification and consultation, for either:

-     a 20-year lease, or

-     a variation to the Reserve Management Plan, or

-     a resource consent

Could generate higher levels of interest and opposition.

Timing of Reserves Act process:

Could do the EOI process first to select a preferred bidder/operator, then followed by Reserves Act process. (Bidders can live with the uncertainty).

Could do the Reserves Act process first, to give more certainty to bidders to invest in their bids, incl their concept plans. Then followed by the EOI process.

Reference design needed

Perhaps (but basic design only). A clear vision statement and operating specification may suffice.

Probably not needed. Bidders to provide concept plans with their bids, based on a clear vision statement and operating specification.

Parameter / variable

 

Option 1:

A ‘10-year lease’ scenario

Option 2:

A ’20-year lease’ scenario

Initial capex required by council

Potentially around $1-2M. Council to fund (and own) most of the facilities and infrastructure. This could result in some delay, as funding would need to be secured (via LTP) before proceeding.

Minimal. Bidders will amortise the costs of new permanent ablutions, kitchen, infrastructure services and manager’s accommodation over 20 years.

Initial capex required by operator

Minimal. (Will need to purchase removeable cabins from current operator or supply new)

$2M+

Annual lease revenue coming back to Council

$100-200k? (Could be modelled?)

Unknown, depends on tenderers ROI. (Could be modelled?)

Risks:

Possibly less risk of opposition to use of site as a holiday park.

More flexibility to change the land use after 10 years, if Council were to decide to do that.

 

Perhaps greater risk of opposition to use of the site as holiday park.

Land use is locked in for the long term (20-30 years). A buyout option could be included, but Council would need to pay for that.

Alternative access from Earnoch Ave

Not likely to be able to include an option for access from Earnoch Ave to be considered as part of the bid process (uneconomic).

Could allow for an alternative access from Earnoch Ave to be considered as part of the bid process.

Time for the statutory process

4-6 months (publicly notify a 10-year lease), or

10-16 months (publicly notify an amendment to the Reserve Management  Plan)

4-6 months (publicly notify a 20-year lease), or

10-16 months (publicly notify an amendment to the Reserve Management  Plan)

Indicative cost of the statutory process

$30k+ for expert evidence

$20k+ for process support/advisory

$20k+ for public consultation process

$50k+ for expert evidence

$20k+ for process support/advisory

$20k+ for public consultation process

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Response to Notice of Motion - Public workshops

 

File No.: CP2017/01236

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board with a response to resolutions passed at its 15 December 2016 business meeting regarding public workshops.

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 15 December 2016, the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board considered a Notice of Motion from the Chairperson seeking advice as to whether or not the board could continue to hold workshops in the public.  In particular, the board requested (resolution number DT2016/225):

·     that officers urgently provide legal and other relevant advice clarifying the position as to whether the board can continue to hold workshops in the open, and that the advice be based on legal opinion regarding relevant legislation and Standing Orders; and

·     that the advice sought be provided prior to the first business meeting of the board in 2017, and prior to the board determining its community forum or workshop / briefing meeting timetables or processes.

3.       In accordance with these resolutions, attached is a memo from the Director, Legal and Risk, and the Governance Director for the board’s information (refer Attachment A).

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the memo dated 7 February 2017 from the Director, Legal and Risk, and the Governance Director entitled ‘Legal requirements and options for workshops and briefings outside of meetings and in closed session.’

b)      note that, in the event the local board decides that workshops and / or briefings are to be held with members of the public, media and stakeholders in attendance, council staff will work through with the local board how it wishes to schedule and operate these forums in the most efficient and effective way possible.

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Response to Notice of Motion - Public workshops

69

     

Signatories

Authors

Eric Perry – Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Exchange of parts of Northboro Reserve for other land and vesting of additional open space

 

File No.: CP2016/24863

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To obtain the local board’s support for the public notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of parts of Northboro Reserve, Belmont, with private land in the Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area.

Executive summary

2.       Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Rawa Limited (Whai Rawa) propose to develop the 8.4ha Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area and build approximately 300 new dwellings.

3.       The land proposed for development is located adjacent to Northboro Reserve, Belmont (refer Attachment A).

4.       To enable efficient use of the site and improve the configuration of Northboro Reserve, Whai Rawa seek to exchange 1,802m² of Northboro Reserve with 3,143m² of the Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area (refer Attachments B and C) under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977. The applicant will bear all costs associated with processing the land exchange.

5.       The proposed land exchange seeks to:

·    relocate and reconfigure three existing narrow accessways into Northboro Reserve

·    exchange an existing 1,370m² steep accessway into Northboro Reserve with 1,370m² of level land adjacent to Hillary Crescent to form a pocket park; and

·    vest an additional 1,341m² of public open space.

6.       The proposed land exchange aims to:

·    improve sightlines and physical access into Northboro Reserve;

·    enhance the recreational opportunities and amenity provided to the community by replacing a sloping accessway with a level park space;

·    provide the community with ‘door step’ access to a small, level, amenity and socialising space; and

·    provide visual relief within a relatively high-density residential development.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board support public notification of the proposed land exchange.

 

Recommendation

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      support the public notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of 1,802m² of Northboro Reserve for 3,143m² of other land within the Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area as shown on Attachments B and C of the agenda report.

 

Comments

Background

8.       Hillary Crescent was declared a Special Housing Area (SHA) in November 2015.

9.       Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Rawa Limited (Whai Rawa) propose to develop the 8.4ha site, commonly known as the Hillary Block, over a five year period commencing in 2018.

10.     There are currently 82 houses on the land and Whai Rawa plans to remove these and develop approximately 300 new dwellings.

11.     The land proposed for development is located adjacent to Northboro Reserve in Belmont (refer Attachment A). 

12.     Northboro Reserve is classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977. It does not have reserve management plan in place.

13.     To make the most efficient use of their land, Whai Rawa are seeking to exchange 1,802m² of Northboro Reserve with 3,143m² of the Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area (SHA) (refer Attachments B and C) using section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

14.     The proposed land exchange comprises the following components:

·    relocation and reconfiguration of three existing narrow accessways into Northboro Reserve to improve sightlines and physical access into the reserve;

·    exchange of an existing 1,370m² steep accessway into Northboro Reserve with 1,370m² of level land adjacent to Hillary Crescent to form a pocket park; and

·    vesting of an additional 1,341m² of public open space.

15.     The proposed land exchange is expected to have positive benefits to the community, including improved access to, and use of, Northboro Reserve.

16.     While the proposed pocket park is located closer to Northboro Reserve than the 100m stipulated in the Open Space Provision Policy the park is expected to:

·    enhance the recreational opportunities and amenity provided to the community by replacing a sloping accessway with a level park space;

·    provide the community with ‘door step’ access to a small, level, amenity and socialising space; and

·    provide visual relief within a relatively high-density residential development.

Reserves Act 1977 land exchange process

17.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act prescribes the process to be followed to undertake a land exchange between reserves and other land. The process comprises the following four key steps:

·    the administering body (in this case the Auckland Council) publicly notifies its intention to undertake the land exchange and calls for objections in writing, allowing a period of at least one month for objections to be received;

·    after a period of at least one month following public notification the administering body considers all received objections to the proposed land exchange;

·    the administering body passes a resolution supporting the land exchange if it considers it appropriate to do so in light of all objections received; and

·    a copy of the resolution supporting the land exchange is forwarded to the Department of Conservation along with all the objections for  authorisation under delegation from the Minister of Conservation.

18.     Relevant mana whenua must be consulted when Auckland Council is performing its functions and duties under the Reserves Act 1977.

Acquisition assessment

19.     Staff have undertaken an initial assessment of the relative merits of the proposed land exchange.

20.     Open space acquisition opportunities, including land exchanges, are assessed against the criteria of the council’s Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy. Staff recommendations for acquisition are based on this assessment.

21.     Proposed acquisitions are prioritised according to the highest rating achieved. A collective summary of the initial assessment for the proposed relocated and reconfigured walkways and new pocket park is provided in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Initial assessment of the open space configuration from the proposed land exchange

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority:

·     the proposed new pocket park could provide ‘door step’ access to a small, level, amenity and socialising space in a relatively high-density residential development

·     the proposed new pocket park could also provide visual relief within the development.

High priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

Not a priority:

·     the proposed land exchange will not connect existing or proposed parks or open spaces.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority:

·     there are no known heritage, cultural or natural values of significance located within the areas included in the proposed land exchange so it adds no value to the parks network with respect to this criterion.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority:

·     the exchange of 1,370m² of sloping accessway into Northboro Reserve with a level area adjacent to Hillary Crescent could enhance the recreational opportunities and amenity provided to the community

·     the relocation and widening of three existing accessways and the formation of a new accessway into Northboro Reserve through the vesting of additional could improve sightlines and physical access into the reserve.

Assessment conclusion

22.     The proposed exchange could be considered a high priority under the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy.

23.     Staff recommend that the local board support the notification of the proposed land exchange.     

Risks

24.     There are no risks to the council if the statutory Reserves Act 1977 land exchange process is followed correctly.

25.     All risks sit with the applicant, as there is no guarantee that the proposed land exchange will be:

·    approved by the governing body for notification;

·    supported by mana whenua through the consultation process;

·    supported by the public through the consultation process;

·    supported by the governing body following public consultation; and

·    authorised by the Minister of Conservation (or their delegate).

Costs

26.     The applicant will bear all costs associated with processing the land exchange.

Next Steps

27.     The proposed land exchange will be reported to the 14 March 2017 meeting of the Environment and Community Committee for their consideration.

28.     The local board’s views will be reported to the committee for their information.

29.     If the Environment and Community Committee approve commencing the land exchange, staff will work with the applicant and begin the section 15, Reserves Act 1977 process as soon as practicable.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

30.     The local board’s views are sought through this report.

Māori impact statement

31.     Consultation with mana whenua will be undertaken as part of the statutory process under the Reserves Act 1977.

32.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces facilitates Māori participation in outdoor recreational activity.

33.     Additional benefits include:

·    demonstrating Auckland Council’s commitment  to the Active Protection (Tautuaku  Ngangahau) Principle of the Treaty of Waitangi; and

·    helping make Auckland a green, resilient and healthy environment consistent with the Māori world view and their role as kaitiaki of the natural environment.

Implementation

34.     There are no implementation issues arising from the recommendations of this report.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

The location of Northboro Reserve and the Hillary Crescent Special Housing Area

85

b

The areas of Northboro Reserve proposed for exchange

87

c

The configuration of open space in the proposed land exchange

89

     

Signatories

Authors

Ezra Barwell - Principal Policy Analyst , Parks and Recreation Policy

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Team Leader, Parks and Recreation Policy

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Team Leader , Parks and Recreation Policy

Kataraina Maki – General Manager, Community and Social Policy

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Milford Centre Plan monitoring report

 

File No.: CP2017/00315

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       This report provides an update on the progress of the actions contained within the Milford Centre Plan.

Executive summary

2.       The Milford Centre Plan (the ‘centre plan’) was adopted by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on 21 April 2015, and is to be formally reviewed in April 2018. The plan’s focus is on public realm projects to support a sustainable community and respect and enhance the centre’s strong local identity. It aims to ‘take Milford into the next 30 years adapting to the future but respecting and honouring the past’.

3.       The centre plan’s vision statement is: “A high quality and accessible centre expressing a strong local identity, with its own story and a friendly, relaxed community heart”.

4.       The plan contains 36 ‘short term’ actions (0-5 years) and 27 ‘medium/long term’ actions (6-30 years).

5.       Of the short term actions, ‘good progress’ has been made on seven, ‘limited’ on 16, with the balance ‘yet to start’. Of the medium to long term actions, six are underway and the balance are yet to be started.

6.       A significant achievement to date is the completion of the pedestrian/cyclist bridge over the Wairau Creek, from Milford Reserve to the intersection of Commodore Parry, Inga and Beach Roads.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the current status of the actions contained within the Milford Centre Plan.

 

Comments

 

Background

 

7.       Milford is a town centre within the Auckland Plan’s ‘network of well connected’ centres. As such, it functions as a ‘local hub providing a wide range of retail and business services and community facilities’ and will see an ‘increase in the density and diversity of housing’ (Chapter 10, Urban Auckland). The Unitary Plan supports this with additional building heights in business zones and extensive areas for medium density residential uses, zoned Mixed Housing Urban.

8.       The Milford Centre Plan addresses the business centre and its environs – refer
Attachment B. The centre plan was adopted by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on 21 April 2015 after a 12 month consultation process, building on ‘visioning’ work completed by the community. The consultation process is summarised below:

·  Visioning report prepared by Milford Vision Forum, dated May 2013

·  Research and analysis, using previous community consultation outputs and taking into account the Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan and Local Board Plan 2014; technical work with key property owners and Auckland Transport and other technical stakeholders – May to June 2014

·  Draft centre plan prepared with a working party of members of the Devonport –Takapuna Local Board and the community; stakeholder and iwi consultation – July to October 2014.

·  Draft centre plan released for engagement; 11 separate events occurred, including the local board hosting a hui with mana whenua addressing Maori aspirations for the Milford area  – November, December 2014.

·  Feedback reviewed (68 formal responses) and centre plan finalised with working party – January to March 2015 (key issues arising were provision for pedestrians and cyclists, and the effects of traffic); and

·  Adoption; implementation commences – April 2015.

 

Key content of the centre plan

 

9.       The centre plan’s vision statement is: “A high quality and accessible centre expressing a strong local identity, with its own story and a friendly, relaxed community heart”. It aims to ‘take Milford into the next 30 years adapting to the future but respecting and honouring the past’.

10.     The plan’s focus is on public realm projects that support a sustainable community and respect and enhance the centre’s strong local identity. The strong local identity is characterised by the marine environment (Milford Beach), the Wairau Creek estuary and Lake Pupuke, and with the commercial centre, forming the highly valued ‘seaside village’ of Milford (page 12, Milford Centre Plan). The beach, the lake, the centre and the estuary form the key elements and destinations of Milford’s ‘walkable loop’, and many of the centre plan’s actions are aimed at enhancing this loop – refer to Attachment B.

11.     The plan has five ‘desired outcomes’ which in turn are guided by six principles, being: natural and cultural heritage; mana whenua as kaitiaki (guardians); character; accessibility; social infrastructure; sustainability. The desired outcomes are (and in brackets the numbers of ‘short term’ and ‘medium/long term’ actions):

·        A strong connection between quality destinations (11 short term; 7 medium/long term);

·        Kitchener Road as a pedestrian friendly ‘main street’ (6; 7);

·        An attractive, vibrant community focal point (5; 4);

·        A healthy, attractive Wairau estuary (6; 6); and

·        Tell the local stories and celebrate our heritage (8; 3).

 

Progress on actions

 

12.     The plan contains 36 ‘short term’ actions (0-5 years), with ‘good progress’ already made on seven, ‘limited’ on 16 with the balance ‘yet to start’. Of the 27 ‘medium/long term’ actions (6-30 years), six are underway and 21 are yet to be started. The most significant achievement to date is the completion of the pedestrian/cyclist bridge over the Wairau Creek, from Milford Reserve to the intersection of Commodore Parry, Inga and Beach Roads. The centre plan does not contain costings of the various implementation actions. Refer to graphic below and Attachment A.

13.     Going forward, some key ‘actions’ for the short term are the gradual transitioning of the central carpark (off Kitchener Road) into a multi-use civic focal point and parking area, and a detailed ‘social infrastructure needs assessment’. The assessment is to ensure the Milford town centre can well support growth and change over the next 30 years, particularly given recent Milford mall consents (for retail, carpark and residential developments) and newly operative Unitary Plan zoning enabling medium intensity residential land uses around the town centre (Mixed Housing Urban).

Consideration

Local board views and implications

14.     This is the first monitoring report on the Milford Centre Plan to inform the local board on the progress to date. Local board staff  were involved in the plan’s formation and have been part of the process of completing the monitoring spreadsheet, at Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

15.     Mana whenua were involved during the formation stages of the development of the centre plan. The local board hosted a hui with mana whenua on 20 October 2014 to address Maori aspirations for the area. A number of confirmed ‘actions’ within the plan will mean ongoing and important engagement with iwi, in consultation with the community and the local board.

16.     The benefits of the centre plan and its implementation for iwi will be significant, and in turn for local, wider Milford, and visitor communities.

Implementation

17.     This report is for information, to be used by the local board for the next Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan, local board agreement, and for the next Auckland Council Long-term Plan (LTP). Additional monitoring reports will be provided in the future. The centre plan has a first formal review date of April 2018 (three years).

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Milford centre plan - monitoring spreadsheet

95

b

Milford Centre Plan - Vision graphic

103

 

Signatories

Authors

Ewen Patience - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Takapuna Centre Plan -  Monitoring implementation of the Takapuna Strategic Framework

 

File No.: CP2017/00334

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide an update on the progress of the actions contained within the Takapuna Centre Plan.

Executive summary

2.       The Takapuna Centre Plan (the centre plan) was adopted in December 2014 and sets out the future growth and development of the Takapuna Centre. The centre plan contains:

·   principles to guide future development within Takapuna;

·   place-shaping factors that are integral to Takapuna’s unique character; and

·   three headline improvement project areas within Takapuna Centre and other actions to support the key principles to achieve Auckland’s vision of becoming the world’s most liveable city.

3.       There are 11 actions within the headline improvement project areas. Good progress has been made on four of those actions, limited progress on four others, and no progress on three. The actions contained within the centre plan are split into different timescales for implementation comprising a short term timescale (0-5 years) and a medium to long term timescale (6 - 30 years).

4.       A copy of the centre plan which includes the actions is provided under separate cover.  Details of the progress made can be found in Attachment A.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the current status of the actions contained within the Takapuna Centre Plan.

 

Comments

Background

5.       Takapuna Centre has a significant role in the Auckland Plan’s strategic directive for focussing growth within a network of high quality centres.  It is a metropolitan centre where council has the opportunity to lead transformation projects through its major landholdings.

6.       The Takapuna Centre Plan: Implementing the Takapuna Strategic Framework’ highlights and provides greater visibility for the transformational projects in Takapuna’s commercial heart.  It is a non-statutory document that reinforces Auckland Council’s vision for Takapuna’s future.

7.       The centre plan was prepared as a continuation of the Takapuna Strategic Framework 2010 (the framework).  Since the adoption of the framework, Auckland Council and the private sector have undertaken various projects to improve the centre.  Examples include the council’s upgrades in Hurstmere Green, the playground on the beachside reserve and private projects such as McKenzies, the Commons and the restaurants fronting The Strand.

8.       The centre plan brings together ongoing planning initiatives (Takapuna Strategic Framework, the Auckland Plan, the Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan and various transformation projects) as they relate to Takapuna Centre.  Features of the centre plan are:

·   principles to guide future development within Takapuna;

·   place-shaping factors which are integral to Takapuna’s unique character;

·   three headline projects and other actions designed to showcase Takapuna’s potential for improvement; and

·   this and other opportunities to enable growth are identified in the Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2015-2025 where ‘Greater Takapuna’ (stretching to Smales Farm and North Shore Hospital) is identified as a Spatial Priority Area. Furthermore, the residential areas immediately west of the centre are defined as a ‘strategic’ Special Housing Area.

9.       Takapuna Centre incorporates three of the precincts identified in the framework which cover the commercial heart of Takapuna; the Northern Hurstmere Precinct, the Central and Beach Front Precinct, and the Central West Precinct, as shown below:.

:

 

Key content of the centre plan

10.     The centre plan sets out principles and place-shaping factors identified by the Framework.  The place-shaping factors, which will anchor any future development within the ‘sense of place’ unique to Takapuna’s beach setting, are:

·   character and landscape;

·   urban form;

·   public open space;

·   activities; amd

·   access and movement

11.     The centre plan focuses on providing more detail on the headline projects earlier proposed by the framework.  They are catalyst projects identified as having the most effect on the long term success of Takapuna’s commercial heart.  The headline projects are:

·   redevelopment of council-owned Anzac Street carpark into a quality open space and mixed-use development including replacement car parking in the heart of Takapuna;

·   upgrading the open space link between Hurstmere Green, The Strand, and Takapuna Beach to open the centre to its stunning coastal setting; and

·   progressive street upgrades beginning with Hurstmere Road to transform the centre’s public spaces.

12.     Other actions are identified to be delivered over the next 30 years.  These focus on projects that, in collaboration with Auckland Transport, council can work on to achieve quality developments on its own properties, streets, and public open space.

Progress on actions

13.     Of the 11 actions contained in the centre plan, good progress has been made on four of these, limited progress has been made on another four, and no progress has been made on three. This spread of progress in the context of a 30 year plan within two years of the plan being adopted is appropriate, especially given that six of the actions are stated to be medium to long term (i.e. within a 6 – 30 year timeframe).

 

14.     Good progress has been made in 3 of the short to medium term timeframes,  and 1 in the medium to long term timeframe.   Good progress has been made on the following actions:

·   redevelopment of the Anzac Street carpark and former Gasometer sites. Panuku Development Auckland has been working on design principles and feasibility options for these sites ahead of community engagement and subsequent release of a draft framework plan early in 2017.

·   Hurstmere Road upgrade,  which has a  $12.3million  budget split over two financial years (FY17- FY19). Stakeholder engagement and concept design underway.

·   Ongoing improvements to Takapuna Beach e.g. completion of children’s playground.

15.     The progress made on the centre plan’s short to medium term actions in the two years since this plan was adopted shows the value of this plan, and the ability to achieve outcomes with stakeholders as a result of the actions contained within it.

16.     The inclusion of actions within this centre plan aids decision-makers and implementers in shaping their own plans, policies, and funding arrangements such as local board plans, local board agreements, and Long-term Plans (LTPs). Together, this allows for progress to be made in an integrated manner toward achieving these actions.

17.     In the remainder of the centre plan, five actions are identified as medium to long term (i.e. 6 - 30 years), which would be a time starting from late 2020.  Details of the progress made on individual centre plan actions can be found in Attachment A.

Consideration

Local board views and implications

18.     This is the first monitoring report on the Takapuna Centre Plan, which was adopted in December 2014, to inform the local board on the progress that has been made to date on the actions contained within this plan. Local board staff have been part of the process of completing the monitoring spreadsheet in Attachment A.

Māori impact statement

19.     Consultation with mana whenua was undertaken on the Takapuna Strategic Framework Discussion Document and the Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan.

20.     As part of the Area Plan preparation process, hui were held in February and July 2014, which included nine mana whenua groups and mataawaka representatives on Maori aspirations for the draft Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan.  As a result of the hui, Maori outcomes were developed and integrated throughout the draft plan.  The Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan was endorsed by the local board in mid-2014.

21.     The key opportunity identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan include partnering with mana whenua on local environment projects and exploring opportunities to develop and use open space to actively highlight their role as kaitiaki.

22.     While no specific engagement with Maori was undertaken as part of the Takapuna Centre Plan, Maori aspirations for Takapuna Centre are given effect by the centre plan through its strategic links with previous planning initiatives and local strategic documents.

23.     The centre plan, specifically sets out the principles that will underpin the projects to take Takapuna forward, the first of which is to “create an environment that tells the story of mana whenua cultural landscapes through Te Aranga Maori Design Principles”. The key objective of the Te Aranga Maori Design Principles is to enhance the protection, reinstatement, development and articulation of mana whenua cultural landscapes enabling all of us (mana whenua, mataawaka, tauiwi and manuhiri) to connect to and deepen a ‘sense of place’.

24.     The Principles seek to foster and guide both culturally appropriate design processes and design responses that enhance appreciation of the  natural, landscape and built environment.

25.     There is no impact on Maori resulting from the content of this monitoring report over and above that for the wider population.

Implementation

26.     This report is for information, which can be used by the local board in the preparation of the next local board plan, and local board agreement, and for the next iteration of the Long-term Plan (LTP). Additional monitoring reports will be provided over time in the future.


 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Takapuna centre plan - monitoring report

111

     

Signatories

Authors

Ewen Patience - Principal Planner, Plans and Places

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager, Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

ATEED Six monthly report to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

File No.: CP2017/01123

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To provide the six-monthly report from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) on its activities with the Devonport –Takapuna Local Board area.

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board with highlights of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) activities in the local board area for the six months from 1 July to 31 December 2016.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the six-monthly report from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) for the period 1 July to 31 December 2016.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ATEED six monthly report July to Dec 2016

115

     

Signatories

Authors

Michael Goudie – Senior Advisor, Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Netball North Harbour roof upgrade

 

File No.: CP2017/00770

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       To seek a decision to grant locally driven initiative (LDI) capital expenditure to Netball North Harbour Incorporated for a roof upgrade.

Executive summary

2.       Netball North Harbour is a regional facility based in the Kaipātiki Local Board area that serves all the northern local board area as well as some central board area.

3.       The roof of the Netball North Harbour facility is in need of major repair to bring it up to standard, make it fit for purpose and to meet current building code. Options to maintain, remodel or renew the roof have been considered. The preferred option is to renew the roof. The estimated cost, including provision for contingencies, is $696,000.

4.       The Local Board Funding Policy 2015 – Handout Nine: LDI Capex Criteria provides for Council to fund up to 49 per cent of project cost.

5.       Based on the renew cost, 49 per cent of the total is $341,040. The Kaipātiki Local Board has resolved (resolution number KT/2016/123) to contribute $175,000 of their locally driven initiative (LDI) capital budget (capex) to the project; this leaves a balance of $166,040 to be funded.

6.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board has been allocated $362,782 per annum of locally driven initiative capital expenditure budget over the first three years of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP).

7.       Netball North Harbour completed a membership survey in 2016 that analysed its membership by local board area with 21 per cent of its membership resides within the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area.

8.       Based on the membership numbers of the three local boards, the balance of $166,040 could be apportioned as follows:

·     Devonport-Takapuna Local Board ($60,118);

·     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board ($65,843);

·     and Upper Harbour Local Board ($40,079).

9.       The Rodney Local Board has not been included in this calculation due to much lower membership numbers. There are 17 netball courts that are owned and maintained by Auckland Council in the Rodney Local Board area.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve in principle a capital grant of $60,118 from its locally driven initiatives – parks response fund budget to Netball North Harbour Incorporated towards costs associated with roof repairs for the Netball North Harbour facility.

b)      note that staff from council’s Parks, Sport and Recreation team will provide an update report to the board once Netball North Harbour has completed its project / feasibility planning for the roof repairs, and have secured full funding for the project.

 

Comments

Background – locally driven initiative (LDI) capital budgets

10.     The Local Board Funding Policy sets out how local boards are funded to meet the costs of providing local activities. As part of the Long-term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP), the governing body established a locally driven initiative (LDI capital budget for each local board to ensure locally important projects were given appropriate priority. The LDI capex budget is the primary source of discretionary budget for funding the local board’s capital projects.

11.     Using LDI capex as a grant to a third party means there is no consequential operational budget (opex) for the project in the future. The benefit, however, is the ability to leverage further third party investment and, therefore provide savings to council.

12.     Community delivered projects funded through a grant must meet the following criteria according to Local Board Funding Policy 2015 – Handout Nine: LDI Capex Criteria (LBF9):

·     a grant can be given to a community group to assist with asset creation where there is a clearly defined “public good” and enduring benefit;

·     any grants allocated must be in accordance with the legislative purpose of local government and be compliant with council’s responsibilities as a public entity dispensing public funds; and

·     all recipients of capital grants must complete an application form that details how the funds will be used and agree to the requirement to keep adequate records and submit an accountability report. The application presented as Attachment A is a Community Facility Development form from 12/13, as this had all the relevant details needed for project.

Community partnerships

13.     A partnership provides an opportunity for council to assist community groups and organisations to develop a range of community facilities and playing surfaces to give greater access to communities, the members of the organisation and the wider public.

14.     According to LBF9 applications for partnership funding must consider the following criteria prior to lodging:

·     meet the strategic objectives of the relevant local board plan, the Auckland Plan and other key Auckland Council strategic documents (see paragraphs 29-31 of this report);

·     address gaps in the network, the community need, how the community will access the asset/facility and the usage component of the asset/facility:

Netball North Harbour is identified in the Auckland Regional Facilities Plan as the netball centre which caters for an area of increased growth, and that will be a central administration and competition base; and

community access is already common practice and will be part of the funding agreement along with usage targets.

·     any partnership proposal requires an externally commissioned project plan/feasibility study outlining the project, including indicative budgets, governance structure and asset renewal programme.

this is currently being worked through with applicant and will be signed off prior to release of funds (indicative budgets are included in the report).

·     identify how community groups and external agencies will monitor and evaluate the contribution the facility makes to meeting community outcomes to ensure the completed facility and the programmes it undertakes remain relevant in their community:.

this will be included in the funding agreement.

 


Background – Netball North Harbour

15.     Netball North Harbour is located on council land at Onewa Domain, 44 Northcote Road, Northcote, in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

16.     Netball North Harbour Incorporated is a registered incorporated society (number 223270, 1952) and holds a community lease for 33 years until 2040, with a right of renewal for a further 33 years.

17.     The centre is a key sub-regional facility with 16,000 members and over 400,000 users annually.

18.     Netball North Harbour completed a membership survey in 2016 that analysed its membership by local board area:

Local board area

Membership %

Number

Hibiscus and Bays

23%

2691

Kaipātiki

22%

2574

Devonport-Takapuna

21%

2457

Upper Harbour

14%

1638

Waitemata

8%

936

Rodney

6%

702

Albert Eden

3%

351

Henderson Massey

1%

117

Other

2%

234

 

19.     Netball North Harbour has a long history of making the facility available to the community and other user groups. They do not lock their courts when not in use by netball, and have actively encouraged other sports (such as tennis) to use the courts by purchasing tennis nets. Other users of the facility include North Harbour Volleyball, Futsal, Grey Power, Floral Art, Aglow and Waitemata Health.

20.     Netball North Harbour has previously received grants from Auckland Council as detailed in the table below. Netball North Harbour currently does not receive any on-going operational funding from Auckland Council.

Year

Amount

Project

Scheme

2016

$78,000

Annual maintenance

Kaipātiki Local Grants and Community Access Grant

2015

$190,000

Building refurbishment

Community Facility Development Fund

2014

$191,243

Upgrade lights and courts

Community Facility Development Fund

21.     The Community Facility Development Fund was a sub-regional fund that supported the development of community-owned facilities. The decisions for the above grants were made by a sub-regional committee made up of the Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipātiki, Upper Harbour and East Coast Bays Subdivision Local Boards.

Current project

22.     The Netball North Harbour building was originally built in 1975 and has not received the required preventative maintenance since opening, due to the priority of funding addressing court and other upgrades directly increasing participation. This has led to the building needing major repair work to bring it up to a standard that meets current building codes.

23.     Since February 2013, Netball North Harbour has engaged professional consultants to prepare a building condition report and obtain quotes for the required work. Three options have been considered: maintain, remodel or renew their roof and replace windows to ensure the building is fit for purpose for the future. The three options including a provision for contingency are:

Project

Cost

Impact

Maintenance

$58,850

Roof will be held together for further 3-5 years

Roof re-model

$655,200

Current roof will be brought up to current building code

Roof renew

$696,000

Current roof will be replaced

24.     A roof renew is the preferred option, due to the fact that it will result in the lowest impact on the activities at the centre. A roof renewal will also allow the replacement roof to be constructed off-site and transported onto the building in three separate one-week windows. Conversely, a roof re-model would require the building to be closed for approximately 17 weeks.

25.     LBF9 allows council to fund up to 49 per cent of project budget whereby the asset is community group owned on council land, and the group is responsible for operating costs and maintenance.

26.     Based on the renew cost, 49 per cent of the total is $341,040. The Kaipātiki Local Board has resolved (resolution number KT/2016/123) to contribute $175,000 of its LDI capex to the project, leaving a shortfall of $166,040 to be funded.

27.     Based on the numbers from the membership survey, splitting the remainder of $166,040 between Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays and Upper Harbour Local Boards could be achieved as follows:

Devonport-Takapuna

$60,118

Hibiscus and Bays

$65,843

Upper Harbour

$40,079

28.     The Rodney Local Board has not been included in this calculation due to much lower membership numbers. There are also 17 council-owned netball courts already maintained in the Rodney Local Board area.

Strategic alignment

29.     Investment into this project aligns with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan outcome: “We have infrastructure that enables and encourages healthy lifestyles.”

30.     Investment into this project aligns with Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan initiative 8.2: “Promote and prioritise investment into partnerships to provide multisport and multi-use recreation and sport facilities.”

31.     Investment into this project aligns with Auckland Plan, Chapter Five, Priority 2: “Prioritise and Optimise Our Recreation and Sports Facilities, Public Open Space Use and the Capability of Recreation and Sport Organisations.”

Consideration

Local board views and implications

32.     In 2014-15, the sub-regional committee for the Community Facility Development Fund made comprised of representatives from the Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipātiki, Upper Harbour and Hibiscus and Bays (East Coast Bays subdivision) Local Boards supported Netball North Harbour projects.

33.     Netball North Harbour completed a membership survey in 2016 that analysed their membership by local board, showing 21 per cent of their memberships residing within the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area.

Māori impact statement

34.     The upgrade of this facility will be of great benefit to the Maori population of Devonport-Takapuna. which is 5.3 per cent or 2,847 according to the 2013 Census.

Implementation

35.     There is existing budget available within the local board’s locally driven initiative (LDI) capital expenditure budget should the board wish to support the recommendation.

36.     The Sport and Recreation team will support the partnership by creating a funding agreement between Netball North Harbour and Auckland Council. The agreement will identify clear community access, asset management, maintenance and reporting criteria, as well as a requirement that the remaining funding be secured before the grant is released.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Group Funding Application Form 12/13

133

     

Signatories

Authors

Mathew Walsh - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Sharon Rimmer - Manager Sport and Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

 

File No.: CP2017/00217

 

  

 

Purpose

1.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Cr Chris Darby and Cr Richard Hills, to update the board on the activities of the governing body.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      thank Cr Chris Darby for his verbal update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the governing body.

b)      thank Cr Richard Hills for his verbal update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the governing body.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Karen Durante - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Board Members' reports

File No.: CP2017/00218

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for members to update the board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from Deputy Chairperson George Wood.

b)      receive the written report from Member  Mike Cohen.

c)      receive the written report from Member Jennifer McKenzie.

d)      receive the written report from Member Mike Sheehy.

e)      receive any verbal reports of members.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chairperson's report - George Wood

149

b

Member's report - Mike Cohen

151

c

Member's report - Jennifer McKenzie

159

d

Member's report - Mike Sheehy

161

    

Signatories

Authors

Karen Durante - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2017/00219

 

  

 

Executive Summary

An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson to update the board on the projects and issues he has been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s verbal report.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatories

Authors

Karen Durante - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

  


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    History of 2 The Strand, Takapuna               Page 167

Item 11.3    Attachment a    Notice of Motion - Letter from Auckland Transport to Sky City                                                                 Page 169


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 February 2017

 

 


 

 



[1] 15 November 2016 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting resolution number: DT/2016/207

[2] 15 September 2015 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting resolution number DT/2015/206